Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 120
Filter
1.
J Laryngol Otol ; 135(9): 755-758, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1747302

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There are significant drug-drug interactions between human immunodeficiency virus antiretroviral therapy and intranasal steroids, leading to high serum concentrations of iatrogenic steroids and subsequently Cushing's syndrome. METHOD: All articles in the literature on cases of intranasal steroid and antiretroviral therapy interactions were reviewed. Full-length manuscripts were analysed and the relevant data were extracted. RESULTS: A literature search and further cross-referencing yielded a total of seven reports on drug-drug interactions of intranasal corticosteroids and human immunodeficiency virus protease inhibitors, published between 1999 and 2019. CONCLUSION: The use of potent steroids metabolised via CYP3A4, such as fluticasone and budesonide, are not recommended for patients taking ritonavir or cobicistat. Mometasone should be used cautiously with ritonavir because of pharmacokinetic similarities to fluticasone. There was a delayed onset of symptoms in many cases, most likely due to the relatively lower systemic bioavailability of intranasal fluticasone.


Subject(s)
Adrenal Cortex Hormones/adverse effects , Cushing Syndrome/chemically induced , HIV Infections/drug therapy , HIV Protease Inhibitors/adverse effects , HIV , Administration, Intranasal , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/administration & dosage , Adult , Cobicistat/administration & dosage , Cobicistat/adverse effects , Drug Interactions , Fluticasone/administration & dosage , Fluticasone/adverse effects , HIV Protease Inhibitors/administration & dosage , Humans , Male , Ritonavir/administration & dosage , Ritonavir/adverse effects
2.
J Med Virol ; 94(4): 1540-1549, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1718400

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection in elderly patients is more aggressive and treatments have shown limited efficacy. Our objective is to describe the clinical course and to analyze the prognostic factors associated with a higher risk of mortality of a cohort of patients older than 80 years. In addition, we assess the efficacy of immunosuppressive treatments in this population. We analyzed the data from 163 patients older than 80 years admitted to our institution for COVID-19, during March and April 2020. A Lasso regression model and subsequent multivariate Cox regression were performed to select variables predictive of death. We evaluated the efficacy of immunomodulatory therapy in three cohorts using adjusted survival analysis. The mortality rate was 43%. The mean age was 85.2 years. The disease was considered severe in 76.1% of the cases. Lasso regression and multivariate Cox regression indicated that factors correlated with hospital mortality were: age (hazard ratio [HR] 1.12, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.03-1.22), alcohol consumption (HR 3.15, 95% CI: 1.27-7.84), CRP > 10 mg/dL (HR 2.67, 95% CI: 1.36-5.24), and oxygen support with Venturi Mask (HR 6.37, 95% CI: 2.18-18.62) or reservoir (HR 7.87, 95% CI: 3.37-18.38). Previous treatment with antiplatelets was the only protective factor (HR 0.47, 95% CI: 0.23-0.96). In the adjusted treatment efficacy analysis, we found benefit in the combined use of tocilizumab (TCZ) and corticosteroids (CS) (HR 0.09, 95% CI: 0.01-0.74) compared to standard treatment, with no benefit of CS alone (HR 0.95, 95% CI: 0.53-1.71). Hospitalized elderly patients suffer from a severe and often fatal form of COVID-19 disease. In this regard, several parameters might identify high-risk patients upon admission. Combined use of TCZ and CS could improve survival.


Subject(s)
Adrenal Cortex Hormones/administration & dosage , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/administration & dosage , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/mortality , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/virology , Comorbidity , Drug Therapy, Combination , Female , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Spain/epidemiology , Survival Analysis
3.
Aging (Albany NY) ; 14(1): 54-72, 2022 01 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1622954

ABSTRACT

Corticosteroid has been proved to be one of the few effective treatments for COVID-19 patients. However, not all the patients were suitable for corticosteroid therapy. In this study, we aimed to propose a machine learning model to forecast the response to corticosteroid therapy in COVID-19 patients. We retrospectively collected the clinical data about 666 COVID-19 patients receiving corticosteroid therapy between January 27, 2020, and March 30, 2020, from two hospitals in China. The response to corticosteroid therapy was evaluated by hospitalization time, oxygen supply duration, and the outcomes of patients. Least Absolute Shrinkage and Selection Operator (LASSO) was applied for feature selection. Five prediction models were applied in the training cohort and assessed in an internal and an external validation dataset, respectively. Finally, two (C reactive protein, lymphocyte percent) of 36 candidate immune/inflammatory features were finally used for model development. All five models displayed promising predictive performance. Notably, the ensemble model, PRCTC (prediction of response to corticosteroid therapy in COVID-19 patients), derived from three prediction models including Gradient Boosted Decision Tree (GBDT), Neural Network (NN), and logistic regression (LR), achieved the best performance with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.810 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.760-0.861) in internal validation cohort and 0.845 (95% CI 0.779-0.911) in external validation cohort to predict patients' response to corticosteroid therapy. In conclusion, PRCTC proposed with universality and scalability is hopeful to provide tangible and prompt clinical decision support in management of COVID-19 patients and potentially extends to other medication predictions.


Subject(s)
Adrenal Cortex Hormones/administration & dosage , COVID-19/drug therapy , Machine Learning , Aged , Algorithms , COVID-19/virology , China , Female , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Neural Networks, Computer , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Treatment Outcome
5.
J Clin Invest ; 132(3)2022 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1555937

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUNDSevere coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is associated with a dysregulated immune response, which can result in cytokine-release syndrome and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Patients with COVID-19-associated ARDS have elevated free serum levels of the cytokine lymphotoxin-like inducible protein that competes with glycoprotein D for herpesvirus entry on T cells (LIGHT; also known as TNFSF14). Such patients may benefit from LIGHT-neutralization therapy.METHODSThis randomized, double-blind, multicenter, proof-of-concept trial enrolled adults hospitalized with COVID-19-associated pneumonia and mild to moderate ARDS. Patients received standard of care plus a single dose of a human LIGHT-neutralizing antibody (CERC-002) or placebo. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients receiving CERC-002 who remained alive and free of respiratory failure through day 28. Safety was assessed via adverse event monitoring.RESULTSFor most of the 83 enrolled patients, standard of care included systemic corticosteroids (88.0%) or remdesivir (57.8%). A higher proportion of patients remained alive and free of respiratory failure through day 28 after receiving CERC-002 (83.9%) versus placebo (64.5%; P = 0.044), including in patients 60 years of age or older (76.5% vs. 47.1%, respectively; P = 0.042). Mortality rates were 7.7% (CERC-002) and 14.3% (placebo) on day 28 and 10.8% and 22.5%, respectively, on day 60. Treatment-emergent adverse events were less frequent with CERC-002 than placebo.CONCLUSIONFor patients with COVID-19-associated ARDS, adding CERC-002 to standard-of-care treatment reduces LIGHT levels and might reduce the risk of respiratory failure and death.TRIAL REGISTRATIONClinicalTrials.gov NCT04412057.FUNDINGAvalo Therapeutics.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal/administration & dosage , COVID-19/drug therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/drug therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Tumor Necrosis Factor Ligand Superfamily Member 14/antagonists & inhibitors , Adenosine Monophosphate/administration & dosage , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/administration & dosage , Adult , Alanine/administration & dosage , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/mortality , Cytokine Release Syndrome/blood , Cytokine Release Syndrome/mortality , Disease-Free Survival , Double-Blind Method , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/blood , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/mortality , Survival Rate , Tumor Necrosis Factor Ligand Superfamily Member 14/blood
6.
Drug Discov Ther ; 15(5): 273-277, 2021 Nov 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1542926

ABSTRACT

Use of systemic corticosteroids is well-established in COVID-19 patients with hypoxia; however, there is scant data on its role in patients with mild disease and prolonged symptoms as a measure to prevent disease progression. The aim of this study is to evaluate the role of systemic corticosteroids in preventing hypoxia (SpO2 ≤ 93% on room-air) among mild COVID-19 patients. An observational study was conducted among symptomatic COVID-19 patients taking oral corticosteroids and attending institute teleconsultation facility between 10th-30th June 2021. Patients who were already on corticosteroids for other indication or required oxygen supplementation before or within 24-hours of initiation of corticosteroids were excluded. A total of 140 consecutive symptomatic COVID-19 patients were included. Higher baseline C-reactive protein (OR: 1.03, 95% CI: 1.02-1.06, p < 0.001) and early systemic corticosteroid (within 7 days) initiation (OR: 6.5, 95% CI: 2.1-20.1, p = 0.001) were independent risk factors for developing hypoxia (SpO2 ≤ 93%). Progression to hypoxia was significantly higher in patients who received corticosteroids before day 7 of illness (36.7%, 95% CI, 23.4-51.7%) compared to ≥ 7 of illness (14.3%, 95% CI, 7.8-23.2%) for persistent fever. Systemic corticosteroids within 7 days from symptom-onset were harmful and increased the risk of progression to hypoxia, whereas it may decrease the risk of progression when administered on or beyond 7 days in patients with mild COVID-19 and persistent symptoms. A well-designed randomised controlled trial is required to validate the findings.


Subject(s)
Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Hypoxia/prevention & control , Administration, Oral , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/administration & dosage , Adult , COVID-19/complications , Disease Progression , Female , Humans , Hypoxia/drug therapy , Hypoxia/etiology , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Male , Middle Aged , Treatment Outcome
7.
J Med Virol ; 94(4): 1540-1549, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1540142

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection in elderly patients is more aggressive and treatments have shown limited efficacy. Our objective is to describe the clinical course and to analyze the prognostic factors associated with a higher risk of mortality of a cohort of patients older than 80 years. In addition, we assess the efficacy of immunosuppressive treatments in this population. We analyzed the data from 163 patients older than 80 years admitted to our institution for COVID-19, during March and April 2020. A Lasso regression model and subsequent multivariate Cox regression were performed to select variables predictive of death. We evaluated the efficacy of immunomodulatory therapy in three cohorts using adjusted survival analysis. The mortality rate was 43%. The mean age was 85.2 years. The disease was considered severe in 76.1% of the cases. Lasso regression and multivariate Cox regression indicated that factors correlated with hospital mortality were: age (hazard ratio [HR] 1.12, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.03-1.22), alcohol consumption (HR 3.15, 95% CI: 1.27-7.84), CRP > 10 mg/dL (HR 2.67, 95% CI: 1.36-5.24), and oxygen support with Venturi Mask (HR 6.37, 95% CI: 2.18-18.62) or reservoir (HR 7.87, 95% CI: 3.37-18.38). Previous treatment with antiplatelets was the only protective factor (HR 0.47, 95% CI: 0.23-0.96). In the adjusted treatment efficacy analysis, we found benefit in the combined use of tocilizumab (TCZ) and corticosteroids (CS) (HR 0.09, 95% CI: 0.01-0.74) compared to standard treatment, with no benefit of CS alone (HR 0.95, 95% CI: 0.53-1.71). Hospitalized elderly patients suffer from a severe and often fatal form of COVID-19 disease. In this regard, several parameters might identify high-risk patients upon admission. Combined use of TCZ and CS could improve survival.


Subject(s)
Adrenal Cortex Hormones/administration & dosage , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/administration & dosage , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/mortality , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/virology , Comorbidity , Drug Therapy, Combination , Female , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Spain/epidemiology , Survival Analysis
8.
Respir Physiol Neurobiol ; 297: 103813, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1521498

ABSTRACT

This study was aimed to explore the precise dose of corticosteroid therapy in critical COVID-19. A total of forty-five critical COVID-19 patients were enrolled. The process of critical COVID-19 was divided into alveolitis and fibrosis stages. Most nonsurvivors died in fibrosis phase. Nonsurvivors had more dyspnea symptoms, fewer days of hospitalization, shorter duration of alveolitis and fibrosis. High-dose daily corticosteroid therapy (≥150 mg/d) was associated with shorter survival time and lower lymphocyte count in fibrosis phase. Moreover, a high cumulative dose (≥604 mg) was tied to longer duration of virus shedding, lower oxygenation index (OI), higher incidence of tracheal intubation, fewer lymphocytes and higher levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). In alveolitis phase, the low-to-moderate-dose daily corticosteroid therapy and a small cumulative dose reduced lymphocytes. In conclusion, low-to-moderate dose corticosteroids may be beneficial in the fibrosis phase. High-dose corticosteroid therapy in the fibrosis phase aggravates the severity of critical COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Glucocorticoids/administration & dosage , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/administration & dosage , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , Aged , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/physiopathology , Critical Illness , Female , Fibrosis , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Humans , L-Lactate Dehydrogenase/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Lung/physiopathology , Lymphocyte Count , Male , Methylprednisolone/administration & dosage , Methylprednisolone/therapeutic use , Middle Aged , Prednisolone/administration & dosage , Prednisolone/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Survival Rate , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Virus Shedding
9.
BMJ ; 375: e068060, 2021 11 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1495140

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To determine if inhaled and intranasal ciclesonide are superior to placebo at decreasing respiratory symptoms in adult outpatients with covid-19. DESIGN: Randomised, double blind, placebo controlled trial. SETTING: Three Canadian provinces (Quebec, Ontario, and British Columbia). PARTICIPANTS: 203 adults aged 18 years and older with polymerase chain reaction confirmed covid-19, presenting with fever, cough, or dyspnoea. INTERVENTION: Participants were randomised to receive either inhaled ciclesonide (600 µg twice daily) and intranasal ciclesonide (200 µg daily) or metered dose inhaler and nasal saline placebos for 14 days. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome was symptom resolution at day 7. Analyses were conducted on the modified intention-to-treat population (participants who took at least one dose of study drug and completed one follow-up survey) and adjusted for stratified randomisation by sex. RESULTS: The modified intention-to-treat population included 203 participants: 105 were randomly assigned to ciclesonide (excluding two dropouts and one loss to follow-up) and 98 to placebo (excluding three dropouts and six losses to follow-up). The median age was 35 years (interquartile range 27-47 years) and 54% were women. The proportion of participants with resolution of symptoms by day 7 did not differ significantly between the intervention group (42/105, 40%) and control group (34/98, 35%); absolute adjusted risk difference 5.5% (95% confidence interval -7.8% to 18.8%). Results might be limited to the population studied, which mainly included younger adults without comorbidities. The trial was stopped early, therefore could have been underpowered. CONCLUSION: Compared with placebo, the combination of inhaled and intranasal ciclesonide did not show a statistically significant increase in resolution of symptoms among healthier young adults with covid-19 presenting with prominent respiratory symptoms. As evidence is insufficient to determine the benefit of inhaled and intranasal corticosteroids in the treatment of covid-19, further research is needed. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT04435795.


Subject(s)
Adrenal Cortex Hormones/administration & dosage , Ambulatory Care/methods , COVID-19/drug therapy , Pregnenediones/administration & dosage , Administration, Inhalation , Adolescent , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Double-Blind Method , Drug Administration Schedule , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Intention to Treat Analysis , Male , Middle Aged , Pregnenediones/therapeutic use , Self Report , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
10.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 20964, 2021 10 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1483147

ABSTRACT

Multicentre, retrospective cohort study with multivariable Cox proportional-hazards modelling and survival-time inverse-probability-weighting, evaluating the impact of different treatments on survival of proven COVID-19 patients admitted to two Hospitals in the province of Piacenza, Italy. Use of tocilizumab and of high doses of low molecular weight heparin, but not of antivirals (either alone or in combination), azithromycin, and any corticosteroid, was independently associated with lower mortality. Our results support further clinical evaluation of high doses of low molecular weight heparin and tocilizumab as COVID-19 therapeutics.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/administration & dosage , Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Heparin/administration & dosage , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/administration & dosage , Aged , Azithromycin/administration & dosage , Female , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Admission , Probability , Proportional Hazards Models , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
11.
Am J Respir Crit Care Med ; 205(1): 36-45, 2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1476911

ABSTRACT

Rationale: Studies have suggested some patients with asthma are at risk of severe coronavirus disease (COVID-19), but they have had limited data on asthma phenotype and have not considered if risks are specific to COVID-19. Objectives: To determine the effect of asthma phenotype on three levels of COVID-19 outcomes. Compare hospitalization rates with influenza and pneumonia. Methods: Electronic medical records were used to identify patients with asthma and match them to the general population. Patient-level data were linked to Public Health England severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) test data, hospital, and mortality data. Asthma was phenotyped by medication, exacerbation history, and type 2 inflammation. The risk of each outcome, adjusted for major risk factors, was measured using Cox regression. Measurements and Main Results: A total of 434,348 patients with asthma and 748,327 matched patients were included. All patients with asthma had a significantly increased risk of a General Practice diagnosis of COVID-19. Asthma with regular inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) use (hazard ratio [HR], 1.27; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01-1.61), intermittent ICS plus add-on asthma medication use (HR, 2.00; 95% CI, 1.43-2.79), regular ICS plus add-on use (HR, 1.63; 95% CI, 1.37-1.94), or with frequent exacerbations (HR, 1.82; 95% CI, 1.34-2.47) was significantly associated with hospitalization. These phenotypes were significantly associated with influenza and pneumonia hospitalizations. Only patients with regular ICS plus add-on asthma therapy (HR, 1.70; 95% CI, 1.27-2.26) or frequent exacerbations (HR, 1.66; 95% CI, 1.03-2.68) had a significantly higher risk of ICU admission or death. Atopy and blood eosinophil count were not associated with severe COVID-19 outcomes. Conclusions: More severe asthma was associated with more severe COVID-19 outcomes, but type 2 inflammation was not. The risk of COVID-19 hospitalization appeared to be similar to the risk with influenza or pneumonia.


Subject(s)
Asthma/complications , COVID-19/complications , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Phenotype , SARS-CoV-2 , Administration, Inhalation , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/administration & dosage , Adult , Asthma/drug therapy , Critical Care/statistics & numerical data , Death , England/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Influenza, Human/complications , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Acuity , Pneumonia/complications , Proportional Hazards Models
12.
Respir Res ; 22(1): 200, 2021 Jul 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1450712

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The first step in SARS-CoV-2 infection is binding of the virus to angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) on the airway epithelium. Asthma affects over 300 million people world-wide, many of whom may encounter SARS-CoV-2. Epidemiologic data suggests that asthmatics who get infected may be at increased risk of more severe disease. Our objective was to assess whether maintenance inhaled corticosteroids (ICS), a major treatment for asthma, is associated with airway ACE2 expression in asthmatics. METHODS: Large airway epithelium (LAE) of asthmatics treated with maintenance ICS (ICS+), asthmatics not treated with ICS (ICS-), and healthy controls (controls) was analyzed for expression of ACE2 and other coronavirus infection-related genes using microarrays. RESULTS: As a group, there was no difference in LAE ACE2 expression in all asthmatics vs controls. In contrast, subgroup analysis demonstrated that LAE ACE2 expression was higher in asthmatics ICS+ compared to ICS‾ and ACE2 expression was higher in male ICS+ compared to female ICS+ and ICS‾ of either sex. ACE2 expression did not correlate with serum IgE, absolute eosinophil level, or change in FEV1 in response to bronchodilators in either ICS- or ICS+. CONCLUSION: Airway ACE2 expression is increased in asthmatics on long-term treatment with ICS, an observation that should be taken into consideration when assessing the use of inhaled corticosteroids during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Adrenal Cortex Hormones/administration & dosage , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Asthma/drug therapy , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , Respiratory Mucosa/drug effects , Administration, Inhalation , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/adverse effects , Adult , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Asthma/diagnosis , Asthma/enzymology , Asthma/genetics , COVID-19/enzymology , COVID-19/virology , Case-Control Studies , Female , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Receptors, Virus/genetics , Respiratory Mucosa/enzymology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Time Factors , Up-Regulation , Virus Internalization , Young Adult
13.
Postgrad Med ; 133(8): 994-1000, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1450321

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) is a rare but severe condition resulting in excessive response of the immune system after SARS-CoV-2 infection. We report a single-center cohort of children with MIS-C, describing the spectrum of presentation, therapies, clinical course, and short-term outcomes. METHODS: This is a prospective observational study from to a tertiary pediatric rheumatology center including patients (aged 1 month to 21 years) diagnosed with MIS-C between April 2020-April 2021. Demographic, clinical, laboratory results and follow-up data were collected through the electronic patient record system and analyzed. RESULTS: A total of 67 patients with MIS-C were included in the study. Fever was detected in all patients; gastrointestinal system symptoms were found in 67.2% of the patients, rash in 38.8%, conjunctivitis in 31.3%, hypotension in 26.9% myocarditis, and/or pericarditis in 22.4%, respectively. Respiratory symptoms were only in five patients (7.5%). Kawasaki Disease like presentation was found 37.3% of the patients. The mean duration of hospitalization was 11.8 7.07 days. Fifty-seven patients (85%) received intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), 45 (67%) received corticosteroids, 17 (25.3%) received anakinra, and one (1.5%) received tocilizumab. Seven of the patients (10.4%) underwent therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE). In 21 (31.3%) patients, a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) was required in a median of 2 days. The first finding to improve was fever, while the first parameter to decrease was ferritin (median 6.5 days (IQR, 4-11.2 days)). Sixty-five patients were discharged home with a median duration of hospital stay of 10 days (IQR, 7-15 days). CONCLUSION: Patients with MIS-C may have severe cardiac findings and intensive care requirements in admission and hospital follow-up. The vast majority of these findings improve with effective treatment without any sequelae until discharge and in a short time in follow-up. Although the pathogenesis and treatment plan of the disease are partially elucidated, follow-up studies are needed in terms of long-term prognosis and relapse probabilities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Intensive Care Units, Pediatric/statistics & numerical data , Rheumatology/statistics & numerical data , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/drug therapy , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/etiology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/physiopathology , Administration, Intravesical , Adolescent , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/administration & dosage , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , Child , Child, Preschool , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulins/administration & dosage , Immunoglobulins/therapeutic use , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein/administration & dosage , Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein/therapeutic use , Male , Oxytocin/administration & dosage , Oxytocin/analogs & derivatives , Oxytocin/therapeutic use , Plasma Exchange , Prospective Studies
14.
J Med Virol ; 94(1): 372-379, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1437057

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is characterized by dysregulated hyperimmune response and steroids have been shown to decrease mortality. However, whether higher dosing of steroids results in better outcomes has been debated. This was a retrospective observation of COVID-19 admissions between March 1, 2020, and March 10, 2021. Adult patients (≥18 years) who received more than 10 mg daily methylprednisolone equivalent dosing (MED) within the first 14 days were included. We excluded patients who were discharged or died within 7 days of admission. We compared the standard dose of steroids (<40 mg MED) versus the high dose of steroids (>40 mg MED). Inverse probability weighted regression adjustment (IPWRA) was used to examine whether higher dose steroids resulted in improved outcomes. The outcomes studied were in-hospital mortality, rate of acute kidney injury (AKI) requiring hemodialysis, invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV), hospital-associated infections (HAI), and readmissions. Of the 1379 patients meeting study criteria, 506 received less than 40 mg of MED (median dose 30 mg MED) and 873 received more than or equal to 40 mg of MED (median dose 78 mg MED). Unadjusted in-hospital mortality was higher in patients who received high-dose corticosteroids (40.7% vs. 18.6%, p < 0.001). On IPWRA, the use of high-dose corticosteroids was associated with higher odds of death (odds ratio [OR] 2.14; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.45-3.14, p < 0.001) but not with the development of HAI, readmissions, or requirement of IMV. High-dose corticosteroids were associated with lower rates of AKI requiring hemodialysis (OR 0.33; 95% CI 0.18-0.63). In COVID-19, corticosteroids more than or equal to 40 mg MED were associated with higher in-hospital mortality.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/mortality , Methylprednisolone/therapeutic use , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/administration & dosage , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Cross Infection/epidemiology , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Male , Methylprednisolone/administration & dosage , Middle Aged , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects
15.
Transfusion ; 61(11): 3267-3271, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1434847

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Large clinical trials have demonstrated the overall safety of vaccines for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). However, reports have emerged of autoimmune phenomena, including vaccine-associated myocarditis, immune thrombocytopenia, and immune thrombotic thrombocytopenia. CASE PRESENTATION: Here we present a novel case of a young woman who developed life-threatening autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) after her first dose of a SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccine. Notably, initial direct antiglobulin testing was negative using standard anti-IgG reagents, which are "blind" to certain immunoglobulin (IgG) isotypes. Further testing using an antiglobulin reagent that detects all IgG isotypes was strongly positive and confirmed the diagnosis of AIHA. The patient required transfusion with 13 units of red blood cells, as well as treatment with corticosteroids, rituximab, mycophenolate mofetil, and immune globulin. CONCLUSION: As efforts to administer SARS-CoV-2 vaccines continue globally, clinicians must be aware of potential autoimmune sequelae of these therapies.


Subject(s)
Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune/chemically induced , Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune/therapy , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/administration & dosage , Adult , Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune/blood , Autoantibodies/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Erythrocyte Transfusion , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulins/administration & dosage , Mycophenolic Acid/administration & dosage , Rituximab/administration & dosage
16.
J Med Virol ; 94(1): 349-356, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1427138

ABSTRACT

Corticosteroid dosing in the range of 0.5-2 mg/kg/day of methylprednisolone equivalents has become a standard part of the management of intensive care unit (ICU) patients with COVID-19 pneumonia based on positive results of randomized trials and a meta-analysis. Alongside such conventional dosing, administration of 1 gm of methylprednisolone daily (pulse dosing) has also been reported in the literature with claims of favorable outcomes. Comparisons between such disparate approaches to corticosteroids for Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pneumonia are lacking. In this retrospective study of patients admitted to the ICU with COVID-19 pneumonia, we compared patients treated with 0.5-2 mg/kg/day in methylprednisolone equivalents (high-dose corticosteroids) and patients treated with 1 gm of methylprednisolone (pulse-dose corticosteroids) to those who did not receive any corticosteroids. The endpoints of interest were hospital mortality, ICU-free days at Day 28, and complications potentially attributable to corticosteroids. Pulse-dose corticosteroid therapy was associated with a significant increase in ICU-free days at Day 28 compared to no receipt: adjusted relative risk (aRR): 1.45 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05-2.02; p = 0.03) and compared with high-dose corticosteroid administration (p = 0.003). Nonetheless, receipt of high-dose corticosteroids-but not of pulse-dose corticosteroids-significantly reduced the odds of hospital mortality compared to no receipt: adjusted Odds ratio (aOR) 0.31 (95% CI: 0.12-0.77; p = 0.01). High-dose corticosteroids reduced mortality compared to pulse-dose corticosteroids (p = 0.04). Pulse-dose corticosteroids-but not high-dose corticosteroids-significantly increased the odds of acute kidney injury requiring renal replacement therapy compared to no receipt: aOR 3.53 (95% CI: 1.27-9.82; p = 0.02). The odds of this complication were also significantly higher in the pulse-dose group when compared to the high-dose group (p = 0.05 for the comparison). In this single-center study, pulse-dose corticosteroid therapy for COVID-19 pneumonia in the ICU was associated with an increase in ICU-free days but failed to impact hospital mortality, perhaps because of its association with development of severe renal failure. In line with existing trial data, the effect of high-dose corticosteroids on mortality was favorable.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/chemically induced , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/mortality , Methylprednisolone/therapeutic use , Pulse Therapy, Drug/adverse effects , Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/administration & dosage , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/adverse effects , Critical Care/methods , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Methylprednisolone/administration & dosage , Methylprednisolone/adverse effects , Pulse Therapy, Drug/methods , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects
17.
Lancet Respir Med ; 9(8): 909-923, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1411740

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Previous studies suggested that the prevalence of chronic respiratory disease in patients hospitalised with COVID-19 was lower than its prevalence in the general population. The aim of this study was to assess whether chronic lung disease or use of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) affects the risk of contracting severe COVID-19. METHODS: In this population cohort study, records from 1205 general practices in England that contribute to the QResearch database were linked to Public Health England's database of SARS-CoV-2 testing and English hospital admissions, intensive care unit (ICU) admissions, and deaths for COVID-19. All patients aged 20 years and older who were registered with one of the 1205 general practices on Jan 24, 2020, were included in this study. With Cox regression, we examined the risks of COVID-19-related hospitalisation, admission to ICU, and death in relation to respiratory disease and use of ICS, adjusting for demographic and socioeconomic status and comorbidities associated with severe COVID-19. FINDINGS: Between Jan 24 and April 30, 2020, 8 256 161 people were included in the cohort and observed, of whom 14 479 (0·2%) were admitted to hospital with COVID-19, 1542 (<0·1%) were admitted to ICU, and 5956 (0·1%) died. People with some respiratory diseases were at an increased risk of hospitalisation (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD] hazard ratio [HR] 1·54 [95% CI 1·45-1·63], asthma 1·18 [1·13-1·24], severe asthma 1·29 [1·22-1·37; people on three or more current asthma medications], bronchiectasis 1·34 [1·20-1·50], sarcoidosis 1·36 [1·10-1·68], extrinsic allergic alveolitis 1·35 [0·82-2·21], idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis 1·59 [1·30-1·95], other interstitial lung disease 1·66 [1·30-2·12], and lung cancer 2·24 [1·89-2·65]) and death (COPD 1·54 [1·42-1·67], asthma 0·99 [0·91-1·07], severe asthma 1·08 [0·98-1·19], bronchiectasis 1·12 [0·94-1·33], sarcoidosis 1·41 [0·99-1·99), extrinsic allergic alveolitis 1·56 [0·78-3·13], idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis 1·47 [1·12-1·92], other interstitial lung disease 2·05 [1·49-2·81], and lung cancer 1·77 [1·37-2·29]) due to COVID-19 compared with those without these diseases. Admission to ICU was rare, but the HR for people with asthma was 1·08 (0·93-1·25) and severe asthma was 1·30 (1·08-1·58). In a post-hoc analysis, relative risks of severe COVID-19 in people with respiratory disease were similar before and after shielding was introduced on March 23, 2020. In another post-hoc analysis, people with two or more prescriptions for ICS in the 150 days before study start were at a slightly higher risk of severe COVID-19 compared with all other individuals (ie, no or one ICS prescription): HR 1·13 (1·03-1·23) for hospitalisation, 1·63 (1·18-2·24) for ICU admission, and 1·15 (1·01-1·31) for death. INTERPRETATION: The risk of severe COVID-19 in people with asthma is relatively small. People with COPD and interstitial lung disease appear to have a modestly increased risk of severe disease, but their risk of death from COVID-19 at the height of the epidemic was mostly far lower than the ordinary risk of death from any cause. Use of inhaled steroids might be associated with a modestly increased risk of severe COVID-19. FUNDING: National Institute for Health Research Oxford Biomedical Research Centre and the Wellcome Trust.


Subject(s)
Adrenal Cortex Hormones , COVID-19 , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive , Administration, Inhalation , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/administration & dosage , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/adverse effects , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19 Testing , Comorbidity , England/epidemiology , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Mortality , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/diagnosis , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/drug therapy , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/epidemiology , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Social Class
18.
Br J Radiol ; 94(1126): 20210327, 2021 Oct 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1406741

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To describe the restructuring of services by British radiologists in response to evolving national guidelines and highlight the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the treatment of musculoskeletal (MSK) conditions. METHODS: An online anonymised survey was distributed via the British Society of Skeletal Radiology (BSSR) members forum in November 2020. Responses were collated using a standardised Google form including 21 questions. RESULTS: 135 members of the BSSR completed the survey. 85% of respondents stopped performing corticosteroid injections (CSI) during the initial lockdown of the pandemic. This was primarily influenced by national guidelines. The majority of respondents initially abstained from offered CSI procedures, then by November 2020, 69% of respondents were providing CSI for high and low risk patients, 23% were only providing CSI for low-risk patients with 8% still not performing any CSI. 40% of respondents reported routinely obtaining specific written consent regarding the risk of COVID-19. Approximately, 11,000 CSI were performed by respondents between March and November 2020 with no reported significant COVID-19-related complications. Over 80% of BSSR members reported that the number of CSI procedures that they performed dropped by more than 80% compared to usual. 73% of respondents reported an increased backlog of patients awaiting treatment. The average waiting time for routine outpatient CSI treatment was > 12 weeks in 53% of responses, compared to 34% the previous year. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic has had a significant impact on the clinical practices of MSK radiologists in the UK. Our survey highlights the rapid response of BSSR members as national guidelines evolved. Currently, the majority of respondents are performing CSI for musculoskeletal conditions when clinically indicated, with enhanced consent. However, the pandemic has resulted in increased waiting times - delaying the treatment of patients who may be suffering with significant pain and disability. Further research is warranted to provide guidance around both service recovery and provision of CSI around COVID-19 vaccination schedules. ADVANCES IN KNOWLEDGE: BSSR members responded rapidly to changing guidelines during the COVID-19 pandemic. The majority of respondents are currently performing CSI when clinically indicated. The pandemic has resulted in a significant increase in waiting times which will have a significant impact on UK musculoskeletal services.


Subject(s)
Adrenal Cortex Hormones/administration & dosage , COVID-19/epidemiology , Musculoskeletal Diseases/drug therapy , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/statistics & numerical data , Radiologists , England/epidemiology , Guideline Adherence , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
19.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0257376, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1403324

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of Tocilizumab (with or without corticosteroids) in a real-life context among moderate-to-severe COVID-19 patients hospitalized at the Infectious Diseases ward of two hospitals in Lazio region, Italy, during the first wave of SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. METHOD: We conducted a retrospective cohort study among moderate-to-severe COVID-19 pneumonia to assess the influence of tocilizumab (with or without corticosteroids) on: 1) primary composite outcome: risk for death/invasive mechanical ventilation/ICU-transfer at 14 days from hospital admission; 2) secondary outcome: COVID-related death only. Both outcomes were also assessed at 28 days and restricted to baseline more severe cases. We also evaluated the safety of tocilizumab. RESULTS: Overall, 412 patients were recruited, being affected by mild (6.8%), moderate (66.3%) or severe (26.9%) COVID-19 at baseline. The median participant' age was 63 years, 56.5% were men, the sum of comorbidities was 1.34 (±1.44), and the median time from symptom onset to hospital admission was 7 [3-10] days. Patients were subdivided in 4 treatment groups: standard of care (SoC) only (n = 172), SoC plus corticosteroid (n = 65), SoC plus tocilizumab (n = 50), SoC plus tocilizumab and corticosteroid (n = 125). Twenty-six (6.3%) patients underwent intubation, and 37 (9%) COVID-related deaths were recorded. After adjusting for several factors, multivariate analysis showed that tocilizumab (with or without corticosteroids) was associated to improved primary and secondary outcomes at 14 days, and at 28-days only when tocilizumab administered without corticosteroid. Among more severe cases the protective effect of tocilizumab (± corticosteroids) was observed at both time-points. No safety concerns were recorded. CONCLUSION: Although contrasting results from randomized clinical trials to date, in our experience tocilizumab was a safe and efficacious therapeutic option for patients with moderate-to-severe COVID-19 pneumonia. Its efficacy was improved by the concomitant administration of corticosteroids in patients affected by severe-COVID-19 pneumonia at baseline.


Subject(s)
Adrenal Cortex Hormones/administration & dosage , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/administration & dosage , COVID-19/drug therapy , Pandemics , Adult , Aged , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome
20.
Best Pract Res Clin Anaesthesiol ; 35(3): 269-292, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1401261

ABSTRACT

Coronaviruses belong to the family Coronaviridae order Nidovirales and are known causes of respiratory and intestinal disease in various mammalian and avian species. Species of coronaviruses known to infect humans are referred to as human coronaviruses (HCoVs). While traditionally, HCoVs have been a significant cause of the common cold, more recently, emergent viruses, including severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) has caused a global pandemic. Here, we discuss coronavirus disease (COVID-19) biology, pathology, epidemiology, signs and symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and recent clinical trials involving promising treatments.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Adenosine Monophosphate/administration & dosage , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/administration & dosage , Alanine/administration & dosage , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Animals , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/immunology , Coronavirus/drug effects , Coronavirus/immunology , Cough/epidemiology , Cough/therapy , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/therapy , Fatigue/epidemiology , Fatigue/therapy , Fever , Heart Diseases/epidemiology , Heart Diseases/therapy , Humans , Positive-Pressure Respiration/methods , Prognosis , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/epidemiology , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/therapy , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Treatment Outcome
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL