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9.
Enferm Clin (Engl Ed) ; 31: S12-S17, 2021 Feb.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1172424

ABSTRACT

At the international level, the enormous demand to manage the COVID-19 pandemic has posed a challenge both in the provision of personnel and in supplies and sanitary material. There is no precedent or publication related to the management and leadership of nursing services in Spain within the emergency plan for the COVID-19 pandemic. This article describes the experience of the Hospital Clinico de Barcelona in the current extraordinary circumstances that undoubtedly constitute a nursing management of enormous magnitude and unprecedented due to the high number of people affected and the extraordinary risk of healthcare personnel. Following national and international guidelines to alleviate the pandemic, protect health and prevent the spread of the outbreak. The ability to work as a team, emotional management and respect for organizational decisions have made it possible to face the challenges that the pandemic has put in place and that the Nursing Department can lead in a calm and orderly manner the different actions to perform. Lastly, it will be necessary to continue with an in-depth analysis of the situation and of the actions carried out in order to identify the areas for improvement as well as to evaluate the overall nature of the process.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospital Administration , Leadership , Nursing Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Advisory Committees/organization & administration , Bed Conversion , COVID-19/therapy , Checklist , Clinical Protocols , Emergencies/epidemiology , Health Personnel/education , Home Care Services/organization & administration , Humans , Nurse's Role , Personal Protective Equipment , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling/organization & administration , Spain/epidemiology , Triage/organization & administration
10.
Biomed Res Int ; 2021: 8871287, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1159878

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Facility-based death review committee (DRC) of neonatal deaths and stillbirths can encourage stakeholders to enhance the quality of care during the antenatal period and labour to improve birth outcomes. To understand the benefits and impact of the DRCs, this study was aimed at exploring the DRC members' perception about the role and benefits of the newly developed facility-based DRCs in five pilot hospitals in Jordan, to assess women empowerment, decision-making process, power dynamics, culture and genderism as contributing factors for deaths, and impact of COVID-19 lockdown on births. METHODS: A descriptive study of a qualitative design-using focus group discussions-was conducted after one year of establishing DRCs in 5 pilot large hospitals. The number of participants in each focus group ranged from 8 to10, and the total number of participants was 45 HCPs (nurses and doctors). Questions were consecutively asked in each focus group. The moderator asked the main questions from the guide and then used probing as needed. A second researcher observed the conversation and took field notes. RESULTS: Overall, there was an agreement among the majority of DRC members across all hospitals that the DRC was successful in identifying the exact cause of neonatal deaths and stillbirths as well as associated modifiable factors. There was also a consensus that the DRC contributed to an improvement in health services provided for pregnant women and newborns as well as protecting human rights and enabling women to be more interdependent in taking decisions related to family planning. Moreover, the DRC agreed that a proportion of the neonatal deaths and stillbirths occurring in the hospitals could have been prevented if adequate antenatal care was provided and some traditional harmful practices were avoided. CONCLUSIONS: Facility-based neonatal death review audit is practical and can be used to identify exact causes of maternal and neonatal deaths and is a valuable tool for hospital quality indicators. It can also change the perception and practice of health care providers, which may be reflected in improving the quality of provided healthcare services.


Subject(s)
Advisory Committees , Attitude to Health , COVID-19 , Perinatal Death , Stillbirth , Advisory Committees/organization & administration , Decision Making , Female , Focus Groups , Health Personnel , Hospitals , Human Rights , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Infection Control/methods , Intensive Care Units, Neonatal , Jordan , Perinatal Death/prevention & control , Pregnancy , Pregnant Women , Prenatal Care
12.
Surg Innov ; 27(6): 564-569, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1067152

ABSTRACT

Background. The COVID-19 epidemic has resulted in a massive surge in the need for intensive care unit (ICU) care. To avoid being overwhelmed, hospitals had to adapt and support the ICU teams in structured ICU care including involving surgical teams. This work aims at describing the collaborative efforts between the ICU care team and the Surgical Task Force (STF) during a surge of ICU activity in a University Hospital in a French high-density COVID-19 cluster. Study Design. This retrospective single center study analyzed the STF workflow and the ICU population. The study included 55 patients hospitalized in our ICU, ICU-converted step-down units, and post-anesthesia care units. The primary measure was the global daily STF activity. The secondary measure was the daily activity for each of the 5 tasks accomplished by the STF. Results. The STF attempted 415 phone calls for 55 patients' families, 237 mobilizations of patients requiring prone positions, follow-up of 20 patients requiring medevac, and contribution to ethical discussion for 2 patients. The mean (SD) daily number of successful phones calls, ethical discussions, mobilizations of patients requiring prone positions and medevac follow-up were 18 (7), .1 (.4), 10 (7), and 2 (3), respectively. No actions for discharge summaries writing were required. The maximum number of daily mobilizations for patients requiring prone positions was 25. The maximum number of daily attempted phone calls and successful phone calls were 37 and 26, respectively. Conclusion. Surgeons' technical and nontechnical skills represented an effective support for ICU teams during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Advisory Committees/organization & administration , COVID-19/therapy , Critical Care/organization & administration , Surgery Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Feasibility Studies , Female , France , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies
15.
Lancet Respir Med ; 9(4): 430-434, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1033502

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic strained health-care systems throughout the world. For some, available medical resources could not meet the increased demand and rationing was ultimately required. Hospitals and governments often sought to establish triage committees to assist with allocation decisions. However, for institutions operating under crisis standards of care (during times when standards of care must be substantially lowered in the setting of crisis), relying on these committees for rationing decisions was impractical-circumstances were changing too rapidly, occurring in too many diverse locations within hospitals, and the available information for decision making was notably scarce. Furthermore, a utilitarian approach to decision making based on an analysis of outcomes is problematic due to uncertainty regarding outcomes of different therapeutic options. We propose that triage committees could be involved in providing policies and guidance for clinicians to help ensure equity in the application of rationing under crisis standards of care. An approach guided by egalitarian principles, integrated with utilitarian principles, can support physicians at the bedside when they must ration scarce resources.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Critical Care/organization & administration , Health Care Rationing/organization & administration , Pandemics/prevention & control , Triage/organization & administration , Advisory Committees/organization & administration , Advisory Committees/standards , COVID-19/epidemiology , Critical Care/economics , Critical Care/standards , Critical Care/statistics & numerical data , Decision Making, Organizational , Global Health/economics , Global Health/standards , Health Care Rationing/economics , Health Care Rationing/standards , Health Policy , Humans , Intersectoral Collaboration , Pandemics/economics , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Standard of Care/economics , Triage/standards
19.
Eur Respir Rev ; 29(157)2020 Sep 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-835811

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus-2. Consensus suggestions can standardise care, thereby improving outcomes and facilitating future research. METHODS: An International Task Force was composed and agreement regarding courses of action was measured using the Convergence of Opinion on Recommendations and Evidence (CORE) process. 70% agreement was necessary to make a consensus suggestion. RESULTS: The Task Force made consensus suggestions to treat patients with acute COVID-19 pneumonia with remdesivir and dexamethasone but suggested against hydroxychloroquine except in the context of a clinical trial; these are revisions of prior suggestions resulting from the interim publication of several randomised trials. It also suggested that COVID-19 patients with a venous thromboembolic event be treated with therapeutic anticoagulant therapy for 3 months. The Task Force was unable to reach sufficient agreement to yield consensus suggestions for the post-hospital care of COVID-19 survivors. The Task Force fell one vote shy of suggesting routine screening for depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder. CONCLUSIONS: The Task Force addressed questions related to pharmacotherapy in patients with COVID-19 and the post-hospital care of survivors, yielding several consensus suggestions. Management options for which there is insufficient agreement to formulate a suggestion represent research priorities.


Subject(s)
Advisory Committees/organization & administration , Betacoronavirus , Consensus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , International Cooperation , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pulmonary Medicine/standards , Societies, Medical , COVID-19 , Europe , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
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