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4.
Glob Health Res Policy ; 6(1): 36, 2021 09 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440961

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The highly contagious nature of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) places physicians in South Asia at high risk of contracting the infection. Accordingly, we conducted this study to provide an updated account of physician deaths in South Asia during the COVID-19 pandemic and to analyze and compare the different characteristics associated with physician mortality amongst the countries of the region. METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional study by using published news reports on the websites of news agencies from 9 selected countries in South Asia. Our study included only those physicians and doctors who died after contracting COVID-19 from their respective workplaces. All available data about the country of origin, type of, sex, age, medical or surgical specialty, and date of death were included. RESULTS: The total number of physician deaths reported due to COVID-19 in our study was 170, with half (87/170, 51%) of the deaths reported from Iran. Male physician deaths were reported to be 145 (145/170 = 85%). Internal Medicine (58.43%) was the most severely affected sub-specialty. The highest physician mortality rate in the general population recorded in Afghanistan (27/1000 deaths). General physicians from India [OR = 11.00(95% CI = 1.06-114.08), p = 0.045] and public sector medical practitioners from Pakistan [aOR = 4.52 (95% CI = 1.18-17.33), p = 0.028] were showing significant mortality when compared with other regions in multivariate logistic regression. CONCLUSION: An increased number of physician deaths, owing to COVID-19, has been shown in South Asia. This could be due to decreased personal protective equipment and the poor health care management systems of the countries in the region to combat the pandemic. Future studies should provide detailed information of characteristics associated with physician mortalities along with the main complications arising due to the virus.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Mortality , Occupational Diseases/mortality , Occupational Exposure/statistics & numerical data , Occupational Health/statistics & numerical data , Physicians/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Afghanistan/epidemiology , Aged , Bangladesh/epidemiology , Bhutan/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Global Health/statistics & numerical data , Humans , India/epidemiology , Indian Ocean Islands/epidemiology , Iran/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Nepal/epidemiology , Occupational Diseases/virology , Pakistan/epidemiology , Sri Lanka/epidemiology
8.
Viruses ; 13(7)2021 07 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1314760

ABSTRACT

More than a year after the first identification of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) as the causative agent of the 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in China, the emergence and spread of genomic variants of this virus through travel raise concerns regarding the introduction of lineages in previously unaffected regions, requiring adequate containment strategies. Concomitantly, such introductions fuel worries about a possible increase in transmissibility and disease severity, as well as a possible decrease in vaccine efficacy. Military personnel are frequently deployed on missions around the world. As part of a COVID-19 risk mitigation strategy, Belgian Armed Forces that engaged in missions and operations abroad were screened (7683 RT-qPCR tests), pre- and post-mission, for the presence of SARS-CoV-2, including the identification of viral lineages. Nine distinct viral genotypes were identified in soldiers returning from operations in Niger, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Afghanistan, and Mali. The SARS-CoV-2 variants belonged to major clades 19B, 20A, and 20B (Nextstrain nomenclature), and included "variant of interest" B.1.525, "variant under monitoring" A.27, as well as lineages B.1.214, B.1, B.1.1.254, and A (pangolin nomenclature), some of which are internationally monitored due to the specific mutations they harbor. Through contact tracing and phylogenetic analysis, we show that isolation and testing policies implemented by the Belgian military command appear to have been successful in containing the influx and transmission of these distinct SARS-CoV-2 variants into military and civilian populations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Military Personnel , SARS-CoV-2/classification , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Afghanistan/epidemiology , Belgium , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Democratic Republic of the Congo/epidemiology , Genome, Viral , Genomics , Humans , Mali/epidemiology , Molecular Epidemiology , Mutation , Niger/epidemiology , Phylogeny , Travel , Whole Genome Sequencing
14.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 25(6): 2726-2729, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1173123

ABSTRACT

This short communication described the actions taken in ophthalmic practice in Kabul, Afghanistan during the COVID-19 pandemic to effectively protect both patients and staff. By following World Health Organisation (WHO), international and local guidelines it has been possible to continue treating ophthalmic outpatients with minimum risk to both patients and staff. The changes which have been implemented may allow better overall infection control in the hospital which will continue to have benefits post-pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Eye Diseases/therapy , Infection Control/methods , Ophthalmology/methods , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Afghanistan/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , Eye Diseases/virology , Humans , Infection Control/statistics & numerical data , Ophthalmology/standards , Practice Guidelines as Topic , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
16.
Bull World Health Organ ; 99(1): 6-7, 2021 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1033409

ABSTRACT

Pandemic-related school closures are impacting the sexual and reproductive health and rights of adolescent girls. Lynn Eaton reports.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Pregnancy in Adolescence , Schools/organization & administration , Adolescent , Afghanistan/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2
17.
East Mediterr Health J ; 26(12): 1442-1445, 2020 Dec 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-995098
18.
Lancet ; 396(10264): 1716-1717, 2020 11 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-943701
20.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 69(40): 1464-1468, 2020 Oct 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-842550

ABSTRACT

Wild poliovirus type 1 (WPV1) transmission is ongoing only in Afghanistan and Pakistan (1). Following a decline in case numbers during 2013-2016, the number of cases in Afghanistan has increased each year during 2017-2020. This report describes polio eradication activities and progress toward polio eradication in Afghanistan during January 2019-July 2020 and updates previous reports (2,3). Since April 2018, insurgent groups have imposed bans on house-to-house vaccination. In September 2019, vaccination campaigns in areas under insurgency control were restarted only at health facilities. In addition, during March-June 2020, all campaigns were paused because of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. The number of WPV1 cases reported in Afghanistan increased from 21 in 2018 to 29 in 2019. During January-July 2020, 41 WPV1 cases were reported as of August 29, 2020 (compared with 15 during January-July 2019); in addition, 69 cases of circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus type 2 (cVDPV2), and one case of ambiguous vaccine-derived poliovirus type 2 (aVDPV2) (isolates with no evidence of person-to-person transmission or from persons with no known immunodeficiency) were detected. Dialogue with insurgency leaders through nongovernmental and international organizations is ongoing in an effort to recommence house-to-house campaigns, which are essential to stopping WPV1 transmission in Afghanistan. To increase community demand for polio vaccination, additional community health needs should be addressed, and polio vaccination should be integrated with humanitarian services.


Subject(s)
Disease Eradication , Poliomyelitis/prevention & control , Population Surveillance , Adolescent , Afghanistan/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , Humans , Immunization Programs , Immunization Schedule , Infant , Poliomyelitis/epidemiology , Poliovirus/isolation & purification , Poliovirus Vaccine, Oral/administration & dosage , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data
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