Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 121
Filter
1.
BMJ Glob Health ; 7(5)2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1879128

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: There are concerns about the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the continuation of essential health services in sub-Saharan Africa. Through the Countdown to 2030 for Women's, Children's and Adolescents' Health country collaborations, analysts from country and global public health institutions and ministries of health assessed the trends in selected services for maternal, newborn and child health, general service utilisation. METHODS: Monthly routine health facility data by district for the period 2017-2020 were compiled by 12 country teams and adjusted after extensive quality assessments. Mixed effects linear regressions were used to estimate the size of any change in service utilisation for each month from March to December 2020 and for the whole COVID-19 period in 2020. RESULTS: The completeness of reporting of health facilities was high in 2020 (median of 12 countries, 96% national and 91% of districts ≥90%), higher than in the preceding years and extreme outliers were few. The country median reduction in utilisation of nine health services for the whole period March-December 2020 was 3.9% (range: -8.2 to 2.4). The greatest reductions were observed for inpatient admissions (median=-17.0%) and outpatient admissions (median=-7.1%), while antenatal, delivery care and immunisation services generally had smaller reductions (median from -2% to -6%). Eastern African countries had greater reductions than those in West Africa, and rural districts were slightly more affected than urban districts. The greatest drop in services was observed for March-June 2020 for general services, when the response was strongest as measured by a stringency index. CONCLUSION: The district health facility reports provide a solid basis for trend assessment after extensive data quality assessment and adjustment. Even the modest negative impact on service utilisation observed in most countries will require major efforts, supported by the international partners, to maintain progress towards the SDG health targets by 2030.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Child Health Services , Adolescent , Africa South of the Sahara/epidemiology , Child , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Pandemics , Pregnancy , Prenatal Care
4.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 1073, 2022 May 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1869074

ABSTRACT

Emerging infectious diseases are a growing threat in sub-Saharan African countries, but the human and technical capacity to quickly respond to outbreaks remains limited. Here, we describe the experience and lessons learned from a joint project with the WHO Regional Office for Africa (WHO AFRO) to support the sub-Saharan African COVID-19 response.In June 2020, WHO AFRO contracted a number of consultants to reinforce the COVID-19 response in member states by providing actionable epidemiological analysis. Given the urgency of the situation and the magnitude of work required, we recruited a worldwide network of field experts, academics and students in the areas of public health, data science and social science to support the effort. Most analyses were performed on a merged line list of COVID-19 cases using a reverse engineering model (line listing built using data extracted from national situation reports shared by countries with the Regional Office for Africa as per the IHR (2005) obligations). The data analysis platform The Renku Project ( https://renkulab.io ) provided secure data storage and permitted collaborative coding.Over a period of 6 months, 63 contributors from 32 nations (including 17 African countries) participated in the project. A total of 45 in-depth country-specific epidemiological reports and data quality reports were prepared for 28 countries. Spatial transmission and mortality risk indices were developed for 23 countries. Text and video-based training modules were developed to integrate and mentor new members. The team also began to develop EpiGraph Hub, a web application that automates the generation of reports similar to those we created, and includes more advanced data analyses features (e.g. mathematical models, geospatial analyses) to deliver real-time, actionable results to decision-makers.Within a short period, we implemented a global collaborative approach to health data management and analyses to advance national responses to health emergencies and outbreaks. The interdisciplinary team, the hands-on training and mentoring, and the participation of local researchers were key to the success of this initiative.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Africa South of the Sahara/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Humans , Public Health , Workforce
5.
BMJ Open ; 12(5): e055895, 2022 05 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1854344

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) is faced with the dual epidemics of HIV/AIDS and non-communicable diseases (NCDs). Cardiovascular diseases, cancers, chronic respiratory diseases, diabetes and mental illnesses are the five major NCDs, causing death globally with low-income and middle-income countries, contributing 78% of all NCD deaths and 85% of premature deaths. There has been increased interest in the integration of HIV and NCDs care, especially in SSA that accounts for 55% of people living with HIV (PLHIV) globally. This systematic review and meta-analysis will estimate the overall prevalence or incidence of NCDs (or its risk factors) among adults living with HIV in SSA. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines will be used. Two authors will independently screen the title and abstracts of the articles identified from the search. Study participants will be any adult (≥18 years old) living with HIV in SSA. Exposure of interest will be HIV (with or without ART). Outcomes of interest are prevalence or incidence of any NCD/NCD risk factors. A random-effects meta-analysis will be used to estimate pooled prevalence or incidence of the five major NCDs among PLHIV, using Stata software. χ2 test and I2 statistic will be used to measure statistical heterogeneity between studies. If there is significant heterogeneity, subgroup analysis will be used to investigate potential sources. Publication bias will be assessed using funnel plots and the Stata 'metabias' command. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethical review will not be required because it is a systematic review. Data will be kept in the institutional data repository. Study findings will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42021258769.


Subject(s)
Cardiovascular Diseases , Diabetes Mellitus , HIV Infections , Noncommunicable Diseases , Adolescent , Adult , Africa South of the Sahara/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Noncommunicable Diseases/epidemiology , Prevalence , Systematic Reviews as Topic
7.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(8)2022 04 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1785671

ABSTRACT

The World Health Organisation declared the ongoing COVID-19 global health challenge a pandemic in March 2020. Since then, countries across the globe have implemented different public health control strategies-including global vaccination programs-in attempts to mitigate the further transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. However, to date, the virus has continued to spread rapidly despite these interventions. Countries across sub-Saharan Africa have implemented variable control strategies to combat the pandemic; however, despite the continent being among the least affected in terms of direct case burden, morbidity, and mortality, it has experienced marked socioeconomic disruption. Therefore, economic resuscitation is an urgent priority. The continent is vastly underrepresented in the body of scientific evidence due to limited research resources, testing capacity and genomic surveillance leading to empirical responses or responses guided by evidence from elsewhere. To inform the ongoing pandemic, and to prepare for the future, this Special Issue calls for manuscripts on global COVID-19 responses, and encourages researchers and stakeholders from resource-limited settings, particularly from sub-Saharan Africa, to share their COVID-19 public health responses. Areas to be covered include, but are not limited to, surveillance, case management, infection prevention and control, risk communication and community engagement, logistics, laboratory, ports of entry, and co-ordination. Manuscripts including primary research, viewpoints/perspectives, and comprehensive literature reviews are all welcome.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Africa South of the Sahara/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Public Health , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Pan Afr Med J ; 41: 70, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776673

ABSTRACT

Child health services remain one of the most cost-effective strategies in reducing child mortality which is still disturbingly high in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Efforts by governments and other stakeholders in response to the COVID-19 pandemic have inadvertently disrupted the provision of other essential health services including those focusing on children. This comes at the backdrop of the World Health Organization´s guidelines for countries to sustain priority services while fighting the COVID-19 pandemic. Underpinned by the Socio-Ecological Model (SEM), we propose population-based interventions which could help in sustaining child health services in the midst of COVID-19 in SSA. At the intrapersonal and interpersonal levels, educating mothers during routine community outreach services, during child welfare clinics, and in church/mosques could be useful. Education and sensitization of male partners could also be an important intervention. At the institutional and community levels, we recommend the allocation of more funds to other essential health services including child health services. The training and deployment of more general nurses, community health nurses/officers, and public health officers is imperative. The provision and adherence to COVID-19 preventive protocols at health facilities are also recommended at these levels. At the public policy level, insurance and tax relief packages for frontline professionals providing child health services and micro-credit facilities at reduced interest rates for women could be implemented towards sustaining the utilisation of child health services.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Child Health Services , Africa South of the Sahara/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Child Mortality , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics/prevention & control
10.
Hypertension ; 79(5): 898-905, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1741745

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) has the highest age-adjusted burden of hypertension and cardiovascular disease (CVD). SSA also experiences many viral infections due to unique environmental and societal factors. The purpose of this narrative review is to examine evidence around how hypertension, CVD, and emerging viral infections interact in SSA. METHODS: In September 2021, we conducted a search in MEDLINE, Embase, and Scopus, limited to English language studies published since 1990, and found a total of 1169 articles. Forty-seven original studies were included, with 32 on COVID-19 and 15 on other emerging viruses. RESULTS: Seven articles, including those with the largest sample size and most robust study design, found an association between preexisting hypertension or CVD and COVID-19 severity or death. Ten smaller studies found no association, and 17 did not calculate statistics to compare groups. Two studies assessed the impact of COVID-19 on incident CVD, with one finding an increase in stroke admissions. For other emerging viruses, 3 studies did not find an association between preexisting hypertension or CVD on West Nile and Lassa fever mortality. Twelve studies examined other emerging viral infections and incident CVD, with 4 finding no association and 8 not calculating statistics. CONCLUSIONS: Growing evidence from COVID-19 suggests viruses, hypertension, and CVD interact on multiple levels in SSA, but research gaps remain especially for other emerging viral infections. SSA can and must play a leading role in the study and control of emerging viral infections, with expansion of research and public health infrastructure to address these interactions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases , Hypertension , Africa South of the Sahara/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Humans , Hypertension/epidemiology , Risk Factors
11.
BMC Infect Dis ; 22(1): 130, 2022 Feb 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736348

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Women of reproductive age in sub-Saharan African (SSA) share the greatest burden of the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Comprehensive knowledge about HIV is seen as pivotal in combating the epidemic. Therefore, this study aimed to assess comprehensive knowledge about HIV/AIDS and associated factors among women of reproductive age in sub-Saharan Africa. OBJECTIVE: To examine comprehensive knowledge about HIV/AIDS and associated factors among women of reproductive age in sub-Saharan Africa. METHODS: We used the most recent SSA countries Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) data. To assess comprehensive knowledge, a composite score of six separate questions (can get HIV by witchcraft or supernatural means, can reduce risk of getting HIV by using condoms during sex, reduce the risk of getting HIV by having one sex partner only, can get HIV from mosquito bites, can get HIV by sharing food with a person who has HIV/AIDS, and a healthy-looking person can have HIV) was used. Those who answered all six questions correctly were considered to have comprehensive knowledge. To assess the factors associated with comprehensive knowledge of HIV/AIDS, we used a multilevel binary logistic regression model since the data had hierarchical nature. RESULTS: In this study, the comprehensive knowledge about HIV/AIDS was 38.56% (95% CI: 38.32, 38.75). Both individual and community-level factors were associated with comprehensive knowledge about HIV/AIDS. Among individual-level factors, older age, having primary and above educational level, being from wealthy households, contraceptive use, listening to the radio, and reading newspaper were associated with higher odds of comprehensive knowledge about HIV/AIDS. Being from urban areas and the Eastern African region were the community-level factors that were associated with higher odds of comprehensive knowledge about HIV/AIDS. CONCLUSION: The study found that comprehensive knowledge of HIV/AIDS is low. Individual and community-level factors were associated with comprehensive knowledge of HIV/AIDS. Therefore, giving special attention to those young women, women who had no formal education, those from poor socioeconomic status, and those who are from remote areas could decrease the epidemics of HIV/AIDS by increasing the comprehensive knowledge about HIV/AIDS. Besides, it is better to strengthen media campaigns regarding HIV/AIDS to increase comprehensive knowledge about HIV/AIDS.


Subject(s)
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome , Africa South of the Sahara/epidemiology , Aged , Demography , Female , Health Surveys , Humans , Multilevel Analysis
13.
JAMA Pediatr ; 176(3): e216436, 2022 Mar 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1635814

ABSTRACT

IMPORTANCE: Little is known about COVID-19 outcomes among children and adolescents in sub-Saharan Africa, where preexisting comorbidities are prevalent. OBJECTIVE: To assess the clinical outcomes and factors associated with outcomes among children and adolescents hospitalized with COVID-19 in 6 countries in sub-Saharan Africa. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: This cohort study was a retrospective record review of data from 25 hospitals in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria, South Africa, and Uganda from March 1 to December 31, 2020, and included 469 hospitalized patients aged 0 to 19 years with SARS-CoV-2 infection. EXPOSURES: Age, sex, preexisting comorbidities, and region of residence. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: An ordinal primary outcome scale was used comprising 5 categories: (1) hospitalization without oxygen supplementation, (2) hospitalization with oxygen supplementation, (3) ICU admission, (4) invasive mechanical ventilation, and (5) death. The secondary outcome was length of hospital stay. RESULTS: Among 469 hospitalized children and adolescents, the median age was 5.9 years (IQR, 1.6-11.1 years); 245 patients (52.4%) were male, and 115 (24.5%) had comorbidities. A total of 39 patients (8.3%) were from central Africa, 172 (36.7%) from eastern Africa, 208 (44.3%) from southern Africa, and 50 (10.7%) from western Africa. Eighteen patients had suspected (n = 6) or confirmed (n = 12) multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children. Thirty-nine patients (8.3%) died, including 22 of 69 patients (31.9%) who required intensive care unit admission and 4 of 18 patients (22.2%) with suspected or confirmed multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children. Among 468 patients, 418 (89.3%) were discharged, and 16 (3.4%) remained hospitalized. The likelihood of outcomes with higher vs lower severity among children younger than 1 year expressed as adjusted odds ratio (aOR) was 4.89 (95% CI, 1.44-16.61) times higher than that of adolescents aged 15 to 19 years. The presence of hypertension (aOR, 5.91; 95% CI, 1.89-18.50), chronic lung disease (aOR, 2.97; 95% CI, 1.65-5.37), or a hematological disorder (aOR, 3.10; 95% CI, 1.04-9.24) was associated with severe outcomes. Age younger than 1 year (adjusted subdistribution hazard ratio [asHR], 0.48; 95% CI, 0.27-0.87), the presence of 1 comorbidity (asHR, 0.54; 95% CI, 0.40-0.72), and the presence of 2 or more comorbidities (asHR, 0.26; 95% CI, 0.18-0.38) were associated with reduced rates of hospital discharge. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: In this cohort study of children and adolescents hospitalized with COVID-19 in sub-Saharan Africa, high rates of morbidity and mortality were observed among infants and patients with noncommunicable disease comorbidities, suggesting that COVID-19 vaccination and therapeutic interventions are needed for young populations in this region.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Child, Hospitalized , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Adolescent , Africa South of the Sahara/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/mortality , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Infant , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Respiration, Artificial , SARS-CoV-2
14.
PLoS Negl Trop Dis ; 16(1): e0010047, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1632368

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In the 20th century, epidemics of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) ravaged communities in a number of African countries. The latest surge in disease transmission was recorded in the late 1990s, with more than 35,000 cases reported annually in 1997 and 1998. In 2013, after more than a decade of sustained control efforts and steady progress, the World Health Assembly resolved to target the elimination of HAT as a public health problem by 2020. We report here on recent progress towards this goal. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: With 992 and 663 cases reported in 2019 and 2020 respectively, the first global target was amply achieved (i.e. fewer than 2,000 HAT cases/year). Areas at moderate or higher risk of HAT, where more than 1 case/10,000 people/year are reported, shrunk to 120,000 km2 for the five-year period 2016-2020. This reduction of 83% from the 2000-2004 baseline (i.e. 709,000 km2) is slightly below the target (i.e. 90% reduction). As a result, the second global target for HAT elimination as a public health problem cannot be considered fully achieved yet. The number of health facilities able to diagnose and treat HAT expanded (+9.6% compared to a 2019 survey), thus reinforcing the capacity for passive detection and improving epidemiological knowledge of the disease. Active surveillance for gambiense HAT was sustained. In particular, 2.8 million people were actively screened in 2019 and 1.6 million in 2020, the decrease in 2020 being mainly caused by COVID-19-related restrictions. Togo and Côte d'Ivoire were the first countries to be validated for achieving elimination of HAT as a public health problem at the national level; applications from three additional countries are under review by the World Health Organization (WHO). CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The steady progress towards the elimination of HAT is a testament to the power of multi-stakeholder commitment and coordination. At the end of 2020, the World Health Assembly endorsed a new road map for 2021-2030 that set new bold targets for neglected tropical diseases. While rhodesiense HAT remains among the diseases targeted for elimination as a public health problem, gambiense HAT is targeted for elimination of transmission. The goal for gambiense HAT is expected to be particularly arduous, as it might be hindered by cryptic reservoirs and a number of other challenges (e.g. further integration of HAT surveillance and control into national health systems, availability of skilled health care workers, development of more effective and adapted tools, and funding for and coordination of elimination efforts).


Subject(s)
Trypanosoma brucei brucei/pathogenicity , Trypanosoma brucei gambiense/pathogenicity , Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense/pathogenicity , Trypanosomiasis, African/prevention & control , Africa South of the Sahara/epidemiology , Animals , Endemic Diseases , Humans , Insect Control , Insect Vectors/parasitology , Trypanosomiasis, African/epidemiology , Tsetse Flies/parasitology , World Health Organization
15.
Int J Infect Dis ; 113 Suppl 1: S16-S21, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575135

ABSTRACT

In this perspective, we discuss the impact of COVID-19 on tuberculosis (TB)/HIV health services and approaches to mitigating the growing burden of these three colliding epidemics in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). SSA countries bear significantly high proportions of TB and HIV cases reported worldwide, compared to countries in the West. Whilst COVID-19 epidemiology appears to vary across Africa, most countries in this region have reported relatively lower-case counts compared to the West. Nevertheless, the COVID-19 pandemic has added an additional burden to already overstretched health systems in SSA, which, among other things, have been focused on the longstanding dual epidemics of TB and HIV. As with these dual epidemics, inadequate resources and poor case identification and reporting may be contributing to underestimations of the COVID-19 case burden in SSA. Modelling studies predict that the pandemic-related disruptions in TB and HIV services will result in significant increases in associated morbidity and mortality over the next five years. Furthermore, limited empirical evidence suggests that SARS-CoV-2 coinfections with TB and HIV are associated with increased mortality risk in SSA. However, predictive models require a better evidence-base to accurately define the impact of COVID-19, not only on communicable diseases such as TB and HIV, but on non-communicable disease comorbidities. Further research is needed to assess morbidity and mortality data among both adults and children across the African continent, paying attention to geographic disparities, as well as the clinical and socio-economic determinants of COVID-19 in the setting of TB and/or HIV.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , HIV Infections , Tuberculosis , Africa South of the Sahara/epidemiology , Child , HIV Infections/complications , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Health Services , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Tuberculosis/epidemiology
16.
Front Immunol ; 12: 565625, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574690

ABSTRACT

Sub-Saharan Africa has generally experienced few cases and deaths of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). In addition to other potential explanations for the few cases and deaths of COVID-19 such as the population socio-demographics, early lockdown measures and the possibility of under reporting, we hypothesize in this mini review that individuals with a recent history of malaria infection may be protected against infection or severe form of COVID-19. Given that both the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum) merozoites bind to the cluster of differentiation 147 (CD147) immunoglobulin, we hypothesize that the immunological memory against P. falciparum merozoites primes SARS-CoV-2 infected cells for early phagocytosis, hence protecting individuals with a recent P. falciparum infection against COVID-19 infection or severity. This mini review therefore discusses the potential biological link between P. falciparum infection and COVID-19 infection or severity and further highlights the importance of CD147 immunoglobulin as an entry point for both SARS-CoV-2 and P. falciparum into host cells.


Subject(s)
Basigin/immunology , COVID-19 , Immunologic Memory , Malaria, Falciparum , Plasmodium falciparum/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Africa South of the Sahara/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , Humans , Malaria, Falciparum/epidemiology , Malaria, Falciparum/immunology , Merozoites/immunology , Severity of Illness Index
19.
BMJ Glob Health ; 6(11)2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1533036

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Since sex-based biological and gender factors influence COVID-19 mortality, we wanted to investigate the difference in mortality rates between women and men in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). METHOD: We included 69 580 cases of COVID-19, stratified by sex (men: n=43 071; women: n=26 509) and age (0-39 years: n=41 682; 40-59 years: n=20 757; 60+ years: n=7141), from 20 member nations of the WHO African region until 1 September 2020. We computed the SSA-specific and country-specific case fatality rates (CFRs) and sex-specific CFR differences across various age groups, using a Bayesian approach. RESULTS: A total of 1656 deaths (2.4% of total cases reported) were reported, with men accounting for 70.5% of total deaths. In SSA, women had a lower CFR than men (mean [Formula: see text] = -0.9%; 95% credible intervals (CIs) -1.1% to -0.6%). The mean CFR estimates increased with age, with the sex-specific CFR differences being significant among those aged 40 years or more (40-59 age group: mean [Formula: see text] = -0.7%; 95% CI -1.1% to -0.2%; 60+ years age group: mean [Formula: see text] = -3.9%; 95% CI -5.3% to -2.4%). At the country level, 7 of the 20 SSA countries reported significantly lower CFRs among women than men overall. Moreover, corresponding to the age-specific datasets, significantly lower CFRs in women than men were observed in the 60+ years age group in seven countries and 40-59 years age group in one country. CONCLUSIONS: Sex and age are important predictors of COVID-19 mortality globally. Countries should prioritise the collection and use of sex-disaggregated data so as to design public health interventions and ensure that policies promote a gender-sensitive public health response.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , Adult , Africa South of the Sahara/epidemiology , Bayes Theorem , Child , Child, Preschool , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
20.
Clin Infect Dis ; 73(10): 1913-1919, 2021 11 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1522140

ABSTRACT

Globally, there are prevailing knowledge gaps in the epidemiology, clinical manifestations, and outcomes of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection among children and adolescents; and these gaps are especially wide in African countries. The availability of robust age-disaggregated data is a critical first step in improving knowledge on disease burden and manifestations of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) among children. Furthermore, it is essential to improve understanding of SARS-CoV-2 interactions with comorbidities and coinfections such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), tuberculosis, malaria, sickle cell disease, and malnutrition, which are highly prevalent among children in sub-Saharan Africa. The African Forum for Research and Education in Health (AFREhealth) COVID-19 Research Collaboration on Children and Adolescents is conducting studies across Western, Central, Eastern, and Southern Africa to address existing knowledge gaps. This consortium is expected to generate key evidence to inform clinical practice and public health policy-making for COVID-19 while concurrently addressing other major diseases affecting children in African countries.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coinfection , Tuberculosis , Adolescent , Africa South of the Sahara/epidemiology , Child , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL