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1.
Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc ; 28(6): 1705-1711, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1826407

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Due to the lack of evidence, it was the aim of the study to investigate current possible cutbacks in orthopaedic healthcare due to the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic (COVID-19). METHODS: An online survey was performed of orthopaedic surgeons in the German-speaking Arthroscopy Society (Gesellschaft für Arthroskopie und Gelenkchirurgie, AGA). The survey consisted of 20 questions concerning four topics: four questions addressed the origin and surgical experience of the participant, 12 questions dealt with potential cutbacks in orthopaedic healthcare and 4 questions addressed the influence of the pandemic on the particular surgeon. RESULTS: Of 4234 contacted orthopaedic surgeons, 1399 responded. Regarding arthroscopic procedures between 10 and 30% of the participants stated that these were still being performed-with actual percentages depending on the specific joint and procedure. Only 6.2% of the participants stated that elective total joint arthroplasty was still being performed at their centre. In addition, physical rehabilitation and surgeons' postoperative follow-ups were severely affected. CONCLUSION: Orthopaedic healthcare services in Austria, Germany, and Switzerland are suffering a drastic cutback due to COVID-19. A drastic reduction in arthroscopic procedures like rotator cuff repair and cruciate ligament reconstruction and an almost total shutdown of elective total joint arthroplasty were reported. Long-term consequences cannot be predicted yet. The described disruption in orthopaedic healthcare services has to be viewed as historic. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: V.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Orthopedic Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Orthopedics/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Aftercare/statistics & numerical data , Arthroplasty/statistics & numerical data , Arthroscopy/statistics & numerical data , Austria/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Germany/epidemiology , Health Care Surveys , Humans , Internet , Male , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Rehabilitation/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Switzerland/epidemiology
3.
Minerva Surg ; 77(1): 50-56, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1485663

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The aim of this systematic review was to report and to analyze if there is and what is the impact of telemedicine in the surgical practice during COVID-19 pandemic. Many authors have posited that the pandemic urged a high implementation of the telemedicine service even in surgical specialties, however, the impact of this change of the clinical practice has been variably reported and its utilization in general surgery is uncertain. EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: All articles from any country written in English, Italian, Spanish, or French, about the use of telemedicine for indication to surgical treatment or for 30-day postoperative follow-up in general surgery during the COVID 19 outbreak, from the March 1, 2020, to December 1, 2020, were included. EVIDENCE SYNTHESIS: Two hundred nine articles were fully analyzed, and 207 further articles were excluded. Finally, 2 articles, both published in October 2020, were included in the present systematic review. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, the rapid spread of SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has forced to review the traditional methods to deliver surgical assistance and urged surgeons to find alternative methods to continue their practice. The literature about this topic is yet scarce and many questions regarding its efficacy in improving patients' health, cost-effectiveness and user satisfaction remain unsolved.


Subject(s)
Aftercare , COVID-19 , General Surgery , Telemedicine , Aftercare/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , General Surgery/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Pandemics , Postoperative Care/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data
5.
Chest ; 160(1): 187-198, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1290546

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: More than 20% of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 demonstrate ARDS requiring ICU admission. The long-term respiratory sequelae in such patients remain unclear. RESEARCH QUESTION: What are the major long-term pulmonary sequelae in critical patients who survive COVID-19? STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Consecutive patients with COVID-19 requiring ICU admission were recruited and evaluated 3 months after hospitalization discharge. The follow-up comprised symptom and quality of life, anxiety and depression questionnaires, pulmonary function tests, exercise test (6-min walking test [6MWT]), and chest CT imaging. RESULTS: One hundred twenty-five patients admitted to the ICU with ARDS secondary to COVID-19 were recruited between March and June 2020. At the 3-month follow-up, 62 patients were available for pulmonary evaluation. The most frequent symptoms were dyspnea (46.7%) and cough (34.4%). Eighty-two percent of patients showed a lung diffusing capacity of less than 80%. The median distance in the 6MWT was 400 m (interquartile range, 362-440 m). CT scans showed abnormal results in 70.2% of patients, demonstrating reticular lesions in 49.1% and fibrotic patterns in 21.1%. Patients with more severe alterations on chest CT scan showed worse pulmonary function and presented more degrees of desaturation in the 6MWT. Factors associated with the severity of lung damage on chest CT scan were age and length of invasive mechanical ventilation during the ICU stay. INTERPRETATION: Three months after hospital discharge, pulmonary structural abnormalities and functional impairment are highly prevalent in patients with ARDS secondary to COVID-19 who required an ICU stay. Pulmonary evaluation should be considered for all critical COVID-19 survivors 3 months after discharge.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Long Term Adverse Effects , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Quality of Life , Respiratory Function Tests/methods , Survivors , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods , Aftercare/methods , Aftercare/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Long Term Adverse Effects/diagnosis , Long Term Adverse Effects/epidemiology , Long Term Adverse Effects/etiology , Long Term Adverse Effects/psychology , Lung/physiopathology , Male , Middle Aged , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Patient Discharge/statistics & numerical data , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2 , Spain/epidemiology , Survivors/psychology , Survivors/statistics & numerical data , Walk Test/methods , Walk Test/statistics & numerical data
6.
Ann R Coll Surg Engl ; 103(7): 520-523, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1288675

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: In light of the COVID-19 recommendations from the Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland, we aimed to study patient and clinician satisfaction with a newly established telephone (TP) colorectal clinic service in lieu of traditional face-to-face (FTF) appointments. Comparative outcomes included patient versus clinician satisfaction; patient versus clinician desire to continue TP clinics postpandemic; and views of Specialty Trainee 3+ (ST3+)/Specialty Associate Specialist (SAS) doctors versus consultants on TP compared with FTF appointments. METHODS: We conducted a prospective service evaluation of patient and clinician satisfaction with colorectal surgery TP clinics between 1 June 2020 and 30 June 2020 in a British District General Hospital. RESULTS: Patients had higher satisfaction than clinicians with TP clinics: 91.5% versus 66.6% reported above-average experience [odds ratio (OR) = 5.35, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.53 to 18.75, p = 0.01]. Clinicians had lower demand to continue TP clinics post-COVID-19 versus patients, with a trend towards significance (60% versus 82.9%, OR = 0.31, 95% CI 0.10 to 0.97, p = 0.08). ST3+/SAS doctors were more likely than consultants to find TP clinics inferior to FTF consultation for patient assessment (48.3% versus 23.7%, OR = 3.00, 95% CI 1.17 to 7.71, p = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: While clinicians may be concerned that patient assessment suffers, patient satisfaction with TP clinics is high. There should be a place for TP clinics post-COVID-19 but there must be a robust process for patient selection as well as adequate training for current and future generations of clinicians.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Colorectal Neoplasms/diagnosis , Medical Oncology/methods , Remote Consultation/methods , Telephone , Aftercare/methods , Aftercare/standards , Aftercare/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Colorectal Neoplasms/therapy , Humans , Infection Control/standards , Job Satisfaction , Medical Oncology/standards , Medical Oncology/statistics & numerical data , Patient Satisfaction/statistics & numerical data , Prospective Studies , Remote Consultation/standards , Remote Consultation/statistics & numerical data , Surgeons/psychology , Surgeons/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , United Kingdom/epidemiology
7.
J Am Geriatr Soc ; 69(10): 2722-2731, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1268124

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess the association between SARS-CoV-2 infection and decreased hand grip strength (HGS). DESIGN: Longitudinal population-based study. SETTING: Community-dwelling older adults (aged ≥60 years) living in a rural Ecuadorian village struck by the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. PARTICIPANTS: Of 282 enrolled individuals, 254 (90%) finished the study. MEASUREMENTS: HGS was measured 3 months before (January 2020) and 9 months after the introduction of the virus into the population (January 2021). SARS-CoV-2 antibody testing was performed in two rounds: in May-June (early) and September-November (late), 2020. An independent association between SARS-CoV-2 infection and HGS decline was assessed by fitting linear mixed models for longitudinal data. Changes in HGS scores in SARS-CoV-2 seropositive subjects, according to the time elapsed since seroconversion, were compared with those who remained seronegative. RESULTS: Overall, 149 (59%) individuals became seropositive for SARS-CoV-2. The mean HGS (in kg) was 25.3 ± 8.3 at baseline and 23.7 ± 8.1 at follow-up (p = 0.028), with 140 individuals having >5% HGS decline between both measurements. The follow-up HGS measurement decreased by 1.72 kg in seropositive individuals, and by 0.57 kg in their seronegative counterparts (p < 0.001). SARS-CoV-2 seropositive individuals were 2.27 times more likely (95% CI: 1.33-3.87) to have a lower HGS measurement at the time of follow-up than those who remained seronegative. When compared with seronegative subjects, seropositive patients with early seroconversion were 3.41 times (95% CI: 1.73-6.74) more likely to have >5% HGS decline at the time of the follow-up than those with later, i.e., more recent, infections. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows an independent deleterious impact of SARS-CoV-2 on HGS that is more marked among individuals with infections that occurred more than 8 months before follow-up HGS. Results suggest the possibility of chronic damage to skeletal muscles by SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Geriatric Assessment , Hand Strength , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Aftercare/methods , Aftercare/statistics & numerical data , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19 Serological Testing/methods , Ecuador/epidemiology , Female , Geriatric Assessment/methods , Geriatric Assessment/statistics & numerical data , Health Services for the Aged/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Independent Living/statistics & numerical data , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Rural Population
8.
Int J Med Sci ; 18(12): 2545-2550, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1248381

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The epidemiological and clinical characteristics of patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) have been researched. However, the prevalence of repositivity by real-time PCR for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) remains unclear. Methods: A retrospective study was conducted involving 599 discharged patients with COVID-19 in a single medical centre. The clinical features of patients during their hospitalization and 14-day post-discharge quarantine were collected. Results: A total of 122 patients (20.4%) out of 599 patients retested positive after discharge. Specifically, 94 (15.7%) retested positive within 24 h of discharge, and another 28 patients (4.7%) were repositive on day 7 after discharge, although none showed any clinical symptomatic recurrence. Both repositives and non­repositives have similar patterns of IgG and IgM. Notably, the length of hospitalization of non-repositive patients was longer than that of 24-h repositive patients and 7-day repositive patients. In addition, the length of hospitalization of 24-h repositive patients was shorter than that of 7-day repositive patients, indicating that the length of hospitalization was also a determinant of viral shedding. Conclusion: Our study provides further information for improving the management of recovered and discharged patients, and further studies should be performed to elucidate the infectiveness of individuals with prolonged or RNA repositivity.


Subject(s)
Aftercare/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Adolescent , Adult , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Immunoglobulin M/blood , Immunoglobulin M/immunology , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Discharge , RNA, Viral/isolation & purification , Retrospective Studies , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Severity of Illness Index , Virus Shedding/immunology , Young Adult
9.
Headache ; 61(5): 734-739, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1238428

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We sought to investigate the patient experience of telemedicine for headache care during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. BACKGROUND: The use of telemedicine has rapidly expanded and evolved since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. Telemedicine eliminates the physical and geographic barriers to health care, preserves personal protective equipment, and prevents the spread of COVID-19 by allowing encounters to happen in a socially distanced way. However, few studies have assessed the patient perspective of telemedicine for headache care. METHODS: The American Migraine Foundation (AMF) designed a standardized electronic questionnaire to assess the patient experience of telemedicine for headache care between March and September 2020 to help inform future quality improvement as part of its patient advocacy initiative. The date parameters were identified as the emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 disease and the declaration of a national emergency in the United States. The questionnaire was distributed electronically to more than 100,000 members of the AMF community through social media platforms and the AMF email database. RESULTS: A total of 1172 patients responded to our electronic questionnaire, with 1098 complete responses. The majority, 1081/1153 (93.8%) patients, had a previous headache diagnosis prior to the telemedicine encounter. A total of 648/1127 (57.5%) patients reported that they had used telemedicine for headache care during the study period. Among those who participated in telehealth visits, 553/647 (85.5%) patients used it for follow-up visits; 94/647 (14.5%) patients used it for new patient visits. During the telemedicine encounters, 282/645 (43.7%) patients were evaluated by headache specialists, 222/645 (34.4%) patients by general neurologists, 198/645 (30.7%) patients by primary care providers, 73/645 (11.3%) patients by headache nurse practitioners, and 21/645 (3.2%) patients by headache nurses. Only 47/633 (7.4%) patients received a new headache diagnosis from telemedicine evaluation, whereas the other 586/633 (92.6%) patients did not have a change in their diagnoses. During these visits, a new treatment was prescribed for 358/636 (52.3%) patients, whereas 278/636 (43.7%) patients did not have changes made to their treatment plan. The number (%) of patients who rated the telemedicine headache care experience as "very good," "good," "fair," "poor," and "other" were 396/638 (62.1%), 132/638 (20.7%), 67/638 (10.5%), 23/638 (3.6%), and 20/638 (3.1%), respectively. Detailed reasons for "other" are listed in the manuscript. Most patients, 573/638 (89.8%), indicated that they would prefer to continue to use telemedicine for their headache care, 45/638 (7.1%) patients would not, and 20/638 (3.1%) patients were unsure. CONCLUSIONS: Our study evaluating the patient perspective demonstrated that telemedicine facilitated headache care for many patients during the COVID-19 pandemic, resulting in high patient satisfaction rates, and a desire to continue to use telemedicine for future headache care among those who completed the online survey.


Subject(s)
Aftercare/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 , Headache Disorders/therapy , Patient Satisfaction/statistics & numerical data , Process Assessment, Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Foundations , Headache Disorders/diagnosis , Health Care Surveys , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Young Adult
10.
Rev Esp Cir Ortop Traumatol (Engl Ed) ; 65(3): 167-171, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1188971

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIM: The current COVID-19 pandemic scenario has driven surgical departments to a transformation.The worldwide spread of the disease has led to a public health quarantine where health care professionals are at high risk of infection. In this context, telemedicine has been promoted and scaled up to reduce the risk of transmission. This study aims to demonstrate that a combined framework based on telematics and in-person clinical encounter not only ensures medical care but the safety of healthcare professionals and patients. MATERIAL AND METHOD: Descriptive observational study on the follow-up of patients during the COVID19 Pandemic, combining telephone and traditional. RESULTS: A total of 5031 telephone calls were made, differentiating between medical referrals, specialised primary care visits, and outpatient consultation.They were classified as successful, required an in-person visit, or no successful telephone contact. Furthermore, we divided them into 2 groups: resolved and unresolved.53% of all telematic visits were successful. CONCLUSIONS: Telematic medical systems are a feasible option in a orthopedics department and an interesting resource to preserve once the pandemic is resolved. Future lines of research should be opened to improve system success, analyze its cost-effectiveness ratio, and correct any legal conflicts that may exist.


ANTECEDENTES Y OBJETIVO: Durante la pandemia COVID-19 la actividad de los servicios quirúrgicos se ha visto obligada a adaptarse y transformarse. La telemedicina se está implantando como nunca antes en esta nueva situación en la que los pacientes están confinados y los profesionales sanitarios presentan riesgo de infectarseEl objetivo es mostrar que una reestructuración combinada telemática y presencial de las visitas permite asegurar la asistencia médica, garantizando la protección del personal sanitario y de los pacientes. MATERIAL Y MÉTODO: Estudio descriptivo observacional sobre el seguimiento de pacientes durante la Pandemia COVID combinando la consulta telefónica con la presencial. RESULTADOS: Se realizaron un total de 5031 llamadas telefónicas diferenciando entre Derivaciones, Visitas de atención primaria especializada y Consulta externa hospitalaria.Se registraron como efectivas, tributarias de visita presencial y no se logra contacto telefónico. Y las dividimos en 2 grupos resueltas y no resueltas.Del total de visitas no presenciales telefónicas fueron efectivas un 53%. CONCLUSIONES: La medicina telemática es una opción factible en un servicio de traumatología y de manera adecuada será una opción interesante de mantener tras la pandemia.Futuras líneas de investigación deberían ser abiertas para mejorar la capacidad de resolución de este sistema, analizar su relación coste-efectividad y subsanar los conflictos legales que pudieran existir.


Subject(s)
Aftercare/methods , COVID-19/prevention & control , Infection Control/methods , Orthopedics/methods , Postoperative Care/methods , Remote Consultation/methods , Telephone , Aftercare/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Feasibility Studies , Health Policy , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Orthopedics/statistics & numerical data , Outcome and Process Assessment, Health Care , Pandemics , Physical Distancing , Postoperative Care/statistics & numerical data , Remote Consultation/statistics & numerical data , Spain/epidemiology
11.
J Laryngol Otol ; 135(4): 344-347, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1146477

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This prospective study aimed to evaluate possible diagnostic delays in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma recurrences due to the changed follow-up protocol during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. METHODS: The follow-up appointments of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients treated more than one year prior to the pandemic were changed to telephone appointments in order to reduce physical visits to the hospital. All contacts, reasons for contact and recurrent cancers were recorded. RESULTS: There were 17 recurrences during a seven-month study period among 178 patients treated in the previous year (10 per cent); 14 of these recurrences occurred in patients whose treatment had ended less than one year previously and 3 occurred more than one year after treatment had ended. There was no delay in diagnoses of recurrent tumours or treatment despite reduced visits because of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. CONCLUSION: According to our analyses, no delay was caused in the diagnoses of recurrent diseases. Follow up by telephone or telemedicine can be considered as part of the follow-up protocol one year after the treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma when necessary.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/diagnosis , Delayed Diagnosis/statistics & numerical data , Head and Neck Neoplasms/diagnosis , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/diagnosis , Aftercare/statistics & numerical data , Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/epidemiology , Finland/epidemiology , Head and Neck Neoplasms/epidemiology , Humans , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/epidemiology , Prospective Studies
13.
Intern Emerg Med ; 16(6): 1673-1682, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1098981

ABSTRACT

To evaluate the effectiveness of an integrated emergency department (ED)/hospital at home (HH) medical care model in mild COVID-19 pneumonia and evaluate baseline predictors of major outcomes and potential savings. Retrospective cohort study with patients evaluated for COVID-19 pneumonia in the ED, from March 3 to April 30, 2020. All of them were discharged home and controlled by HH. The main outcomes were ED revisit and the need for deferred hospital admission (protocol failure). Outcome predictors were analyzed by simple logistic regression model (OR; 95% CI). Potential savings of this medical care model were estimated. Of the 377 patients attended in the ED, 109 were identified as having mild pneumonia and were included in the ED/HH medical care model. Median age was 50.0 years, 52.3% were males and 57.8% had Charlson index ≥ 1. The median HH stay was 8 (IQR 3.7-11) days. COVID-19-related ED revisit was 19.2% (n = 21) within 6 days (IQR 3-12.5) after discharge from ED. Overall protocol failure (deferred hospital admission) was 6.4% (n = 7), without ICU admission. The ED/HH model provided potential cost savings of 77% compared to traditional stay, due to the costs of home care entails 23% of the expenses generated by a conventional hospital stay. 789 days of hospital stay were avoided by HH, rather than hospital admission. An innovative ED/HH model for selected patients with mild COVID-19 pneumonia is feasible, safe and effective. Less than 6.5% of patients requiring deferred hospital admission and potential savings were generated due to hospitalization.


Subject(s)
Aftercare/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/therapy , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Patient Discharge/statistics & numerical data , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Feasibility Studies , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Patient Readmission/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , Time Factors
14.
Lung ; 199(2): 113-119, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1077586

ABSTRACT

The enduring impact of COVID-19 on patients has been examined in recent studies, leading to the description of Long-COVID. We report the lasting symptom burden of COVID-19 patients from the first wave of the pandemic. All patients with COVID-19 pneumonia discharged from a large teaching hospital trust were offered follow-up. We assessed symptom burden at follow-up using a standardised data collection technique during virtual outpatient clinic appointments. Eighty-six percent of patients reported at least one residual symptom at follow-up. No patients had persistent radiographic abnormalities. The presence of symptoms at follow-up was not associated with the severity of the acute COVID-19 illness. Females were significantly more likely to report residual symptoms including anxiety (p = 0.001), fatigue (p = 0.004), and myalgia (p = 0.022). The presence of long-lasting symptoms is common in COVID-19 patients. We suggest that the phenomenon of Long-COVID may not be directly attributable to the effect of SARS-CoV-2, and believe the biopsychosocial effects of COVID-19 may play a greater role in its aetiology.


Subject(s)
Aftercare , Anxiety , COVID-19/complications , Cost of Illness , Fatigue , Aftercare/methods , Aftercare/statistics & numerical data , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/therapy , Fatigue/diagnosis , Fatigue/etiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Models, Biopsychosocial , Myalgia/diagnosis , Myalgia/etiology , Patient Discharge , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Sex Factors , Symptom Assessment/methods , Symptom Assessment/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/methods , United Kingdom/epidemiology
15.
Am J Obstet Gynecol MFM ; 2(4): 100226, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1064756

ABSTRACT

Background: The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 has challenged obstetrical care providers. Universal testing on labor and delivery units has been implemented by many hospitals to ensure patient and staff safety. Asymptomatic carrier rates are expected to vary based on geographic differences in disease prevalence, although differences within the same city have not been reported previously. In addition, clinical follow-up of women who had a negative result for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 during obstetrical hospitalization has not been included in any previous reports. Objective: This study aimed to describe the prevalence of positive severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 test results among asymptomatic pregnant women at 2 Philadelphia obstetrical hospitals, characterize the clinical course of those who had a positive result, and report symptom development among all women tested in the 2 weeks after hospitalization. Study Design: This is an observational study of asymptomatic pregnant women who underwent severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 testing at 2 academic health centers (Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and Pennsylvania Hospital) in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, between April 13, 2020, and April 26, 2020. All women tested were contacted via telephone for symptom follow-up at 1 and 2 weeks after discharge. Asymptomatic positive test rates are reported for the overall population and by hospital. The hospital and 2-week posthospital course are described for women who had a positive result for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. Posthospital symptom development among women who had a negative result for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 is also described. Results: A total of 318 asymptomatic women underwent severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 testing during this 2-week period; 8 women had a positive result. The overall asymptomatic test positive rate was 2.5%. The rate at Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania was 3.8% compared with 1.3% at Pennsylvania Hospital (P=.283). Of note, 3 women (37.5%) who were initially asymptomatic developed mild symptoms in the 2 weeks after a positive test result. Repeat severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 testing was performed in 14 of the 310 women (4.5%) who initially had a negative result; 2 women (0.6%) had a positive result on repeat testing. Moreover, 242 (78.1%) and 213 (68.7%) of the 310 women who had a negative result for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 at the time of the initial hospitalization were followed up via telephone at 1 and 2 weeks after admission, respectively. Viral symptoms, including fevers, chills, shortness of breath, or cough, were self-reported in 4.5% and 4.2% of these women at 1 and 2 weeks after discharge, respectively. Conclusion: The asymptomatic positive severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 test rate among an obstetrical population in Philadelphia differed between 2 hospitals and was lower than that described in other geographic regions. This supports the importance of institution-specific testing protocols. The development of symptomatic severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection after hospitalization among women with initial negative test results is uncommon.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Carrier State , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Adult , Aftercare/methods , Aftercare/organization & administration , Aftercare/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19 Testing/methods , Carrier State/diagnosis , Carrier State/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Philadelphia/epidemiology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/physiopathology , Prevalence , Symptom Assessment/statistics & numerical data
16.
J Gen Intern Med ; 36(3): 738-745, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1059633

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Little is known about long-term recovery from severe COVID-19 disease. Here, we characterize overall health, physical health, and mental health of patients 1 month after discharge for severe COVID-19. METHODS: This was a prospective single health system observational cohort study of patients ≥ 18 years hospitalized with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 disease who required at least 6 l of oxygen during admission, had intact baseline cognitive and functional status, and were discharged alive. Participants were enrolled between 30 and 40 days after discharge. Outcomes were elicited through validated survey instruments: the PROMIS® Dyspnea Characteristics and PROMIS® Global Health-10. RESULTS: A total of 161 patients (40.6% of eligible) were enrolled; 152 (38.3%) completed the survey. Median age was 62 years (interquartile range [IQR], 50-67); 57 (37%) were female. Overall, 113/152 (74%) participants reported shortness of breath within the prior week (median score 3 out of 10 [IQR 0-5]), vs 47/152 (31%) pre-COVID-19 infection (0, IQR 0-1), p < 0.001. Participants also rated their physical health and mental health as worse in their post-COVID state (43.8, standard deviation 9.3; mental health 47.3, SD 9.3) compared to their pre-COVID state, (54.3, SD 9.3; 54.3, SD 7.8, respectively), both p < 0.001. Physical and mental health means in the general US population are 50 (SD 10). A total of 52/148 (35.1%) patients without pre-COVID oxygen requirements needed home oxygen after hospital discharge; 20/148 (13.5%) reported still using oxygen at time of survey. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with severe COVID-19 disease typically experience sequelae affecting their respiratory status, physical health, and mental health for at least several weeks after hospital discharge.


Subject(s)
Aftercare/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/rehabilitation , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Patient Discharge/statistics & numerical data , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Aftercare/psychology , Aged , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19 Testing/statistics & numerical data , Cohort Studies , Disease Progression , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Respiration, Artificial/psychology
17.
BMC Med ; 18(1): 408, 2020 12 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-979824

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has placed significant pressure on health and social care. Survivors of COVID-19 may be left with substantial functional deficits requiring ongoing care. We aimed to determine whether pre-admission frailty was associated with increased care needs at discharge for patients admitted to hospital with COVID-19. METHODS: Patients were included if aged over 18 years old and admitted to hospital with COVID-19 between 27 February and 10 June 2020. The Clinical Frailty Scale (CFS) was used to assess pre-admission frailty status. Admission and discharge care levels were recorded. Data were analysed using a mixed-effects logistic regression adjusted for age, sex, smoking status, comorbidities, and admission CRP as a marker of severity of disease. RESULTS: Thirteen hospitals included patients: 1671 patients were screened, and 840 were excluded including, 521 patients who died before discharge (31.1%). Of the 831 patients who were discharged, the median age was 71 years (IQR, 58-81 years) and 369 (44.4%) were women. The median length of hospital stay was 12 days (IQR 6-24). Using the CFS, 438 (47.0%) were living with frailty (≥ CFS 5), and 193 (23.2%) required an increase in the level of care provided. Multivariable analysis showed that frailty was associated with an increase in care needs compared to patients without frailty (CFS 1-3). The adjusted odds ratios (aOR) were as follows: CFS 4, 1.99 (0.97-4.11); CFS 5, 3.77 (1.94-7.32); CFS 6, 4.04 (2.09-7.82); CFS 7, 2.16 (1.12-4.20); and CFS 8, 3.19 (1.06-9.56). CONCLUSIONS: Around a quarter of patients admitted with COVID-19 had increased care needs at discharge. Pre-admission frailty was strongly associated with the need for an increased level of care at discharge. Our results have implications for service planning and public health policy as well as a person's functional outcome, suggesting that frailty screening should be utilised for predictive modelling and early individualised discharge planning.


Subject(s)
Aftercare/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 , Frailty/complications , Quality of Life , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/rehabilitation , Cohort Studies , Comorbidity , Female , Frailty/rehabilitation , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Discharge , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis ; 40(3): 657-661, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-942543

ABSTRACT

The incidence of re-positive virus detection in patients who recovered from COVID-19 during quarantine was 6.2% in two designated locations, in Wuhan, indicating that suggestions for patients after discharge to be quarantined before leaving for home might be necessary. This experience might be referred to by other countries with epidemic outbreak.


Subject(s)
Aftercare/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/diagnosis , Quarantine/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , China/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged
19.
PLoS One ; 15(10): e0239570, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-868653

ABSTRACT

Data on residual clinical damage after Coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) are lacking. The aims of this study were to investigate whether COVID-19 leaves behind residual dysfunction, and identify patients who might benefit from post-discharge monitoring. All patients aged ≥18 years admitted to the Emergency Department (ED) for COVID-19, and evaluated at post-discharge follow-up between 7 April and 7 May, 2020, were enrolled. Primary outcome was need of follow-up, defined as the presence at follow-up of at least one among: respiratory rate (RR) >20 breaths/min, uncontrolled blood pressure (BP) requiring therapeutic change, moderate to very severe dyspnoea, malnutrition, or new-onset cognitive impairment, according to validated scores. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) served as secondary outcome. 185 patients were included. Median [interquartile range] time from hospital discharge to follow-up was 23 [20-29] days. 109 (58.9%) patients needed follow-up. At follow-up evaluation, 58 (31.3%) patients were dyspnoeic, 41 (22.2%) tachypnoeic, 10 (5.4%) malnourished, 106 (57.3%) at risk for malnutrition. Forty (21.6%) patients had uncontrolled BP requiring therapeutic change, and 47 (25.4%) new-onset cognitive impairment. PTSD was observed in 41 (22.2%) patients. At regression tree analysis, the ratio of arterial oxygen partial pressure to fractional inspired oxygen (PaO2/FiO2) and body mass index (BMI) at ED presentation, and age emerged as independent predictors of the need of follow-up. Patients with PaO2/FiO2 <324 and BMI ≥33 Kg/m2 had the highest odds to require follow-up. Among hospitalised patients, age ≥63 years, or age <63 plus non-invasive ventilation or diabetes identified those with the highest probability to need follow-up. PTSD was independently predicted by female gender and hospitalisation, the latter being protective (odds ratio, OR, 4.03, 95% confidence interval, CI, 1.76 to 9.47, p 0.0011; OR 0.37, 95% CI 0.14 to 0.92, p 0.033, respectively). COVID-19 leaves behind physical and psychological dysfunctions. Follow-up programmes should be implemented for selected patients.


Subject(s)
Cognitive Dysfunction/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Dyspnea/epidemiology , Malnutrition/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Aftercare/statistics & numerical data , Aged , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/rehabilitation , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/rehabilitation
20.
Ann Am Thorac Soc ; 17(10): 1231-1237, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-858611

ABSTRACT

Rationale: Many clinical studies have focused on the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of inpatients with coronavirus disease (COVID-19). However, there are few reports about the clinical follow-up of discharged patients.Objectives: To describe the follow-up of patients with COVID-19 in Wenzhou City, Zhejiang, China.Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 4-week follow-ups in patients with COVID-19, including computed tomographic (CT) chest scanning, blood testing, and oropharyngeal-swab testing for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) ribonucleic acid. The chest CT scans and blood tests were performed on the last day before discharge and 2 weeks and 4 weeks after discharge. The oropharyngeal-swab tests were performed at both 1 week and 2 weeks after discharge. Fifty-one patients with common COVID-19 were enrolled in the study. All the CT and clinical data were collected between January 23 and March 28, 2020.Results: Compared with the abnormalities found on the the last CT scans before discharge, the abnormalities in the lungs at the first and second follow-ups after discharge had been gradually absorbed. The cases with focal ground-glass opacity were reduced from 17.7% to 9.8% of cases. The cases with multiple ground-glass opacities decreased from 80.4% to 23.5%. The cases with consolidation were reduced from 49.0% to 2.0%. The cases with interlobular septal thickening were reduced from 80.4% to 35.3%. The cases with subpleural lines were reduced from 29.4% to 7.8%. The cases with irregular lines were reduced from 41.2% to 15.7%. The lung lesions of 25.5% patients were shown to be fully absorbed on the first CT scans after discharge, and the rate of lung recovery increased to 64.7% after the second follow-up. Nucleic-acid test results became recurrently positive in 17.6% of discharged patients, of whom only 33.3% complained of clinical symptoms. There were no differences in the characteristics of the last CT scans before discharge between the patients with recurrently positive test results and the patients with negative test results. The lung damage was fully absorbed in 55.6% of discharged patients with recurrence of positive test results for SARS-CoV-2 ribonucleic acid.Conclusions: The lung damage due to COVID-19 could be reversible for patients with common COVID-19. A few cases showed recurring positive results of nucleic-acid tests after discharge.


Subject(s)
Aftercare , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Pandemics , Patient Discharge/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods , Aftercare/methods , Aftercare/statistics & numerical data , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , China/epidemiology , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/methods , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/statistics & numerical data , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
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