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2.
Monaldi Arch Chest Dis ; 90(3)2020 Jul 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-649882

ABSTRACT

Italy is currently experiencing an epidemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19). Aim of our study is to identify the best predictors of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) admission in patients with Covid-19. We examined 28 patients admitted to the Emergency Department (ED) and subsequently confirmed as cases of Covid-19. Patients received, at the admission to the ED, a diagnostic work-up including: patient history, clinical examination, an arterial blood gas analysis (whenever possible performed on room air), laboratory blood tests, including serum concentrations of interleukin-6 (IL-6), lung ultrasound examination and a computed tomography (CT) scan of the thorax. For each patient, as gas exchange index through the alveolocapillary membrane, we determined the alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient (AaDO⁠2) and the alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient augmentation (AaDO⁠2 augmentation). For each patient, as measurement of hypoxemia, we determined oxygen saturation (SpO2), partial pressure of oxygen in arterial blood (PaO⁠2), PaO⁠2 deficit and the ratio between arterial partial pressure of oxygen by blood gas analysis and fraction of inspired oxygen (P/F). Patients were assigned to ICU Group or to Non-ICU Group basing on the decision to intubate. Areas under the curve (AUC) and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve were used to compare the performance of each test in relation to prediction of ICU admission. Comparing patients of ICU Group (10 patients) with patients of Non-ICU Group (18 patients), we found that the first were older, they had more frequently a medical history of malignancy and they were more frequently admitted to ED for dyspnea. Patients of ICU Group had lower oxygen saturation, PaO⁠2, P/F and higher heart rate, respiratory rate, AaDO⁠2, AaDO⁠2 augmentation and lactate than patients of Non-ICU Group. ROC curves demonstrate that age, heart rate, respiratory rate, dyspnea, lactate, AaDO2, AaDO2 augmentation, white blood cell count, neutrophil count and percentage, fibrinogen, C-reactive protein, lactate dehydrogenase, glucose level, international normalized ratio (INR), blood urea and IL-6 are useful predictors of ICU admission. We identified several predictors of ICU admission in patients with Covid-19. They can act as fast tools for the early identification and timely treatment of critical cases since their arrival in the ED.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Critical Care , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Blood Gas Analysis , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Emergency Service, Hospital , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Italy , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Predictive Value of Tests , ROC Curve , Risk Factors
3.
JAMA Netw Open ; 3(7): e2013880, 2020 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-621959

ABSTRACT

Importance: During the ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, case reports have suggested that the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may lead to adverse outcomes. Objective: To study the association of NSAID use with adverse outcomes in patients hospitalized with influenza or influenza pneumonia. Design, Setting, and Participants: This cohort study used propensity score matching among 7747 individuals aged 40 years or older who were hospitalized with influenza, confirmed by polymerase chain reaction or antigen testing, between 2010 and 2018. Data were collected using Danish nationwide registers. All analyses reported were performed on May 29, 2020. Exposures: Prescription fill of an NSAID within 60 days before admission. Main Outcomes and Measures: Risk ratio (RR) and risk difference (RD) with 95% CIs for intensive care unit admission and death within 30 days of admission. Results: A total of 7747 patients (median [interquartile range] age, 71 [59-80] years, 3980 [51.4%] men) with confirmed influenza were identified. Of these, 520 (6.7%) were exposed to NSAIDs. In the unmatched cohorts, 104 of 520 patients (20.0%) who used NSAIDs and 958 of 7227 patients (13.3%) who did not use NSAIDs were admitted to the intensive care unit. For death within 30 days of admission, we observed 37 events (7.1%) among those who used NSAIDs compared with 563 events (7.8%) among those who did not. Current NSAID use was associated with intensive care unit admission (RR, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.26 to 1.81; RD, 6.7%; 95% CI, 3.2% to 10.3%), while NSAID use was not associated with death (RR, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.66 to 1.26; RD, -0.7%; 95% CI, -3.0% to 1.6%). In the matched cohorts, risks were unchanged for patients who used NSAIDs, while 83 ICU admissions (16.0%) and 36 deaths (6.9%) were observed among matched individuals who did not use NSAIDs. Matched (ie, adjusted) analyses yielded attenuated risk estimates for intensive care unit admission (RR, 1.25; 95% CI, 0.95 to 1.63; RD, 4.0%; 95% CI, -0.6% to 8.7%) and death (RR, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.66 to 1.60; RD, 0.2%; 95% CI, -2.9% to 3.3%). Associations were more pronounced among patients who used NSAIDs for a longer period (eg, for intensive care unit admission: RR, 1.90; 95% CI, 1.19 to 3.06; RD, 13.4%; 95% CI, 4.0% to 22.8%). Conclusions and Relevance: In this cohort study of adult patients hospitalized with influenza, the use of NSAIDs was not associated with 30-day intensive care unit admission or death in adjusted analyses. There was an association between long-term use of NSAIDs and intensive care unit admission.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/pharmacology , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Hospitalization , Intensive Care Units , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/adverse effects , Betacoronavirus , Cohort Studies , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Denmark/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Influenza, Human , Male , Middle Aged , Odds Ratio , Pandemics , Pneumonia , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/virology
4.
J Clin Microbiol ; 58(9)2020 08 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-636249

ABSTRACT

The clinical performances of six molecular diagnostic tests and a rapid antigen test for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) were clinically evaluated for the diagnosis of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in self-collected saliva. Saliva samples from 103 patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 (15 asymptomatic and 88 symptomatic) were collected on the day of hospital admission. SARS-CoV-2 RNA in saliva was detected using a quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (RT-qPCR) laboratory-developed test (LDT), a cobas SARS-CoV-2 high-throughput system, three direct RT-qPCR kits, and reverse transcription-loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP). The viral antigen was detected by a rapid antigen immunochromatographic assay. Of the 103 samples, viral RNA was detected in 50.5 to 81.6% of the specimens by molecular diagnostic tests, and an antigen was detected in 11.7% of the specimens by the rapid antigen test. Viral RNA was detected at significantly higher percentages (65.6 to 93.4%) in specimens collected within 9 days of symptom onset than in specimens collected after at least 10 days of symptoms (22.2 to 66.7%) and in specimens collected from asymptomatic patients (40.0 to 66.7%). Self-collected saliva is an alternative specimen option for diagnosing COVID-19. The RT-qPCR LDT, a cobas SARS-CoV-2 high-throughput system, direct RT-qPCR kits (except for one commercial kit), and RT-LAMP showed sufficient sensitivities in clinical use to be selectively used in clinical settings and facilities. The rapid antigen test alone is not recommended for an initial COVID-19 diagnosis because of its low sensitivity.


Subject(s)
Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Immunoassay , Nucleic Acid Amplification Techniques , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Saliva/virology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antigens, Viral/analysis , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/methods , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/standards , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Immunoassay/methods , Immunoassay/standards , Immunoassay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Nucleic Acid Amplification Techniques/methods , Nucleic Acid Amplification Techniques/standards , Nucleic Acid Amplification Techniques/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , RNA, Viral/analysis , RNA, Viral/genetics , Sensitivity and Specificity , Specimen Handling , Young Adult
5.
Epidemiol Health ; 42: e2020047, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-646722

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To estimate time-variant reproductive number (Rt) of coronavirus disease 19 based on either number of daily confirmed cases or their onset date to monitor effectiveness of quarantine policies. METHODS: Using number of daily confirmed cases from January 23, 2020 to March 22, 2020 and their symptom onset date from the official website of the Seoul Metropolitan Government and the district office, we calculated Rt using program R's package "EpiEstim". For asymptomatic cases, their symptom onset date was considered as -2, -1, 0, +1, and +2 days of confirmed date. RESULTS: Based on the information of 313 confirmed cases, the epidemic curve was shaped like 'propagated epidemic curve'. The daily Rt based on Rt_c peaked to 2.6 on February 20, 2020, then showed decreased trend and became <1.0 from March 3, 2020. Comparing both Rt from Rt_c and from the number of daily onset cases, we found that the pattern of changes was similar, although the variation of Rt was greater when using Rt_c. When we changed assumed onset date for asymptotic cases (-2 days to +2 days of the confirmed date), the results were comparable. CONCLUSIONS: Rt can be estimated based on Rt_c which is available from daily report of the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Estimation of Rt would be useful to continuously monitor the effectiveness of the quarantine policy at the city and province levels.


Subject(s)
Basic Reproduction Number/statistics & numerical data , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Epidemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Child , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Public Policy , Quarantine , Seoul/epidemiology , Time Factors , Young Adult
6.
Psychiatry Res ; 291: 113294, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-640985

ABSTRACT

To cope with Covid-19 and limits its spread among residents, retirement homes have prohibited physical contact between residents and families and friend and, in some cases, even between residents or between residents and caregivers. We investigated the effects of measures against Covid-19 on the mental health of participants with Alzheimer's disease (AD) who live in retirement homes in France. We instructed on-site caregivers to assess depression and anxiety in participants with mild AD who live in retirement homes. Fifty-eight participants consented to participate in the study. The participants rated their depression and anxiety during and before the Covid-19 crisis. Participants reported higher depression (p = .005) and anxiety (p = .004) during than before the Covid-19 crisis. These increases can be attributed to the isolation of the residents and/or to the drastic changes in their daily life and care they receive. While, in their effort to prevent infections, retirement homes are forced to physically separate residents from the outside world and to drastically reduce residents' activities, these decisions are likely to come at a cost to residents with AD and their mental health.


Subject(s)
Alzheimer Disease/complications , Anxiety/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections , Depression/diagnosis , Homes for the Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Alzheimer Disease/psychology , Anxiety/complications , Anxiety/psychology , Betacoronavirus , Caregivers , Depression/complications , Depression/psychology , Female , France , Humans , Male , Nursing Homes , Severity of Illness Index
7.
J Clin Microbiol ; 58(9)2020 08 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-751568

ABSTRACT

The clinical performances of six molecular diagnostic tests and a rapid antigen test for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) were clinically evaluated for the diagnosis of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in self-collected saliva. Saliva samples from 103 patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 (15 asymptomatic and 88 symptomatic) were collected on the day of hospital admission. SARS-CoV-2 RNA in saliva was detected using a quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (RT-qPCR) laboratory-developed test (LDT), a cobas SARS-CoV-2 high-throughput system, three direct RT-qPCR kits, and reverse transcription-loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP). The viral antigen was detected by a rapid antigen immunochromatographic assay. Of the 103 samples, viral RNA was detected in 50.5 to 81.6% of the specimens by molecular diagnostic tests, and an antigen was detected in 11.7% of the specimens by the rapid antigen test. Viral RNA was detected at significantly higher percentages (65.6 to 93.4%) in specimens collected within 9 days of symptom onset than in specimens collected after at least 10 days of symptoms (22.2 to 66.7%) and in specimens collected from asymptomatic patients (40.0 to 66.7%). Self-collected saliva is an alternative specimen option for diagnosing COVID-19. The RT-qPCR LDT, a cobas SARS-CoV-2 high-throughput system, direct RT-qPCR kits (except for one commercial kit), and RT-LAMP showed sufficient sensitivities in clinical use to be selectively used in clinical settings and facilities. The rapid antigen test alone is not recommended for an initial COVID-19 diagnosis because of its low sensitivity.


Subject(s)
Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Immunoassay , Nucleic Acid Amplification Techniques , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Saliva/virology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antigens, Viral/analysis , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/methods , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/standards , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Immunoassay/methods , Immunoassay/standards , Immunoassay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Nucleic Acid Amplification Techniques/methods , Nucleic Acid Amplification Techniques/standards , Nucleic Acid Amplification Techniques/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , RNA, Viral/analysis , RNA, Viral/genetics , Sensitivity and Specificity , Specimen Handling , Young Adult
8.
BMC Public Health ; 20(1): 1384, 2020 Sep 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-751220

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In light of the COVID-19 pandemic, many have flagged racial and ethnic differences in health outcomes in western countries as an urgent global public health priority. Kuwait has a unique demographic profile with two-thirds of the population consisting of non-nationals, most of which are migrant workers. We aimed to explore whether there is a significant difference in health outcomes between non-Kuwaiti and Kuwaiti patients diagnosed with COVID-19. METHODS: We used a prospective COVID-19 registry of all patients (symptomatic and asymptomatic) in Kuwait who tested positive from February 24th to April 20th, 2020, collected from Jaber Al-Ahmad Al-Sabah Hospital, the officially-designated COVID-19 healthcare facility in the country. We ran separate logistic regression models comparing non-Kuwaitis to Kuwaitis for death, intensive care unit (ICU) admission, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and pneumonia. RESULTS: The first 1123 COVID-19 positive patients in Kuwait were all recruited in the study. About 26% were Kuwaitis and 73% were non-Kuwaiti. With adjustments made to age, gender, smoking and selected co-morbidities, non-Kuwaitis had two-fold increase in the odds of death or being admitted to the intensive care unit compared to Kuwaitis (OR: 2.14, 95% CI 1.12-4.32). Non-Kuwaitis had also higher odds of ARDS (OR:2.44, 95% CI 1.23-5.09) and pneumonia (OR: 2.24, 95% CI 1.27-4.12). CONCLUSION: This is the first study to report on COVID-19 outcomes between Kuwaiti and non-Kuwaiti patients. The current pandemic may have amplified the differences of health outcomes among marginalized subpopulations. A number of socioeconomic and environmental factors could explain this health disparity. More research is needed to advance the understanding of policymakers in Kuwait in order to make urgent public health interventions.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/ethnology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Ethnic Groups/statistics & numerical data , Health Status Disparities , Pneumonia, Viral/ethnology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Infant , Kuwait/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , Registries , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
9.
BMC Med ; 18(1): 274, 2020 09 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-751215

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has been a pandemic worldwide. Old age and underlying illnesses are associated with poor prognosis among COVID-19 patients. However, whether frailty, a common geriatric syndrome of reduced reserve to stressors, is associated with poor prognosis among older COVID-19 patients is unknown. The aim of our study is to investigate the association between frailty and severe disease among COVID-19 patients aged ≥ 60 years. METHODS: A prospective cohort study of 114 hospitalized older patients (≥ 60 years) with confirmed COVID-19 pneumonia was conducted between 7 February 2020 and 6 April 2020. Epidemiological, demographic, clinical, laboratory, and outcome data on admission were extracted from electronic medical records. All patients were assessed for frailty on admission using the FRAIL scale, in which five components are included: fatigue, resistance, ambulation, illnesses, and loss of weight. The outcome was the development of the severe disease within 60 days. We used the Cox proportional hazards models to identify the unadjusted and adjusted associations between frailty and severe illness. The significant variables in univariable analysis were included in the adjusted model. RESULTS: Of 114 patients, (median age, 67 years; interquartile range = 64-75 years; 57 [50%] men), 39 (34.2%), 39 (34.2%), and 36 (31.6%) were non-frail, pre-frail, and frail, respectively. During the 60 days of follow-up, 43 severe diseases occurred including eight deaths. Four of 39 (10.3%) non-frail patients, 15 of 39 (38.5%) pre-frail patients, and 24 of 36 (66.7%) frail patients progressed to severe disease. After adjustment of age, sex, body mass index, haemoglobin, white blood count, lymphocyte count, albumin, CD8+ count, D-dimer, and C-reactive protein, frailty (HR = 7.47, 95% CI 1.73-32.34, P = 0.007) and pre-frailty (HR = 5.01, 95% CI 1.16-21.61, P = 0.03) were associated with a higher hazard of severe disease than the non-frail. CONCLUSIONS: Frailty, assessed by the FRAIL scale, was associated with a higher risk of developing severe disease among older COVID-19 patients. Our findings suggested that the use of a clinician friendly assessment of frailty could help in early warning of older patients at high-risk with severe COVID-19 pneumonia.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Frail Elderly , Frailty/diagnosis , Frailty/virology , Geriatric Assessment/methods , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus , China , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Proportional Hazards Models , Prospective Studies
10.
Nan Fang Yi Ke Da Xue Xue Bao ; 40(6): 778-785, 2020 Jun 30.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-749262

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To explore the clinical characteristics and outcomes of adult critically ill patients with COVID-19 and identify the risk factors correlated with in-hospital deaths. METHODS: This study was conducted among 20 confirmed adult cases of COVID-19 in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of Honghu People's Hospital in Jingzhou City, Hubei Province. According to the final outcome, the patients were divided into survivor group and death group with 10 patients each. The demographic data, clinical manifestations and signs, laboratory findings, treatment measures and clinical outcomes were obtained from electronic medical records to compare the clinical characteristics and outcomes between the two groups. Univariate logistic analysis was used to analyze the risk factors associated with in-hospital death. RESULTS: The mean age of patients with confirmed COVID-19 was 70 ± 12 years, and 40% of them were male. The patients were admitted to ICU 11 ± 9 days after symptom onset. The most common symptoms on admission were cough (19 cases), fatigue or myalgia (18 cases), fever (17 cases) and dyspnea (16 cases). Eleven (55%) of the patients had underlying diseases, among which hypertension was the most common (11 cases), followed by cardiovascular disease (4 cases) and diabetes (3 cases). Six (30%) of the patients received invasive mechanical ventilation and continued renal replacement therapy but eventually died. Acute cardiac injury was the most common complication (19 cases). Half of the patients died between the 2nd and 19th day after ICU admission. Compared with dead patients, the surviving patients had a lower average body weight (61.70±2.36 vs 68.60±7.15 kg, P=0.01) and a higher Glasgow Coma Index (14.69 ± 0.70 vs 12.70 ± 2.45, P=0.03), and were less likely to develop shock (2 vs 10, P=0.001) or acute respiratory distress syndrome (2 vs 10, P=0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Critically ill patients with COVID-19 are generally older. A higher body weight and a lower lymphocyte count are potentially associated with a greater likeliness of fatality in ICU patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Critical Illness , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies
11.
BMC Med ; 18(1): 274, 2020 09 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-745683

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has been a pandemic worldwide. Old age and underlying illnesses are associated with poor prognosis among COVID-19 patients. However, whether frailty, a common geriatric syndrome of reduced reserve to stressors, is associated with poor prognosis among older COVID-19 patients is unknown. The aim of our study is to investigate the association between frailty and severe disease among COVID-19 patients aged ≥ 60 years. METHODS: A prospective cohort study of 114 hospitalized older patients (≥ 60 years) with confirmed COVID-19 pneumonia was conducted between 7 February 2020 and 6 April 2020. Epidemiological, demographic, clinical, laboratory, and outcome data on admission were extracted from electronic medical records. All patients were assessed for frailty on admission using the FRAIL scale, in which five components are included: fatigue, resistance, ambulation, illnesses, and loss of weight. The outcome was the development of the severe disease within 60 days. We used the Cox proportional hazards models to identify the unadjusted and adjusted associations between frailty and severe illness. The significant variables in univariable analysis were included in the adjusted model. RESULTS: Of 114 patients, (median age, 67 years; interquartile range = 64-75 years; 57 [50%] men), 39 (34.2%), 39 (34.2%), and 36 (31.6%) were non-frail, pre-frail, and frail, respectively. During the 60 days of follow-up, 43 severe diseases occurred including eight deaths. Four of 39 (10.3%) non-frail patients, 15 of 39 (38.5%) pre-frail patients, and 24 of 36 (66.7%) frail patients progressed to severe disease. After adjustment of age, sex, body mass index, haemoglobin, white blood count, lymphocyte count, albumin, CD8+ count, D-dimer, and C-reactive protein, frailty (HR = 7.47, 95% CI 1.73-32.34, P = 0.007) and pre-frailty (HR = 5.01, 95% CI 1.16-21.61, P = 0.03) were associated with a higher hazard of severe disease than the non-frail. CONCLUSIONS: Frailty, assessed by the FRAIL scale, was associated with a higher risk of developing severe disease among older COVID-19 patients. Our findings suggested that the use of a clinician friendly assessment of frailty could help in early warning of older patients at high-risk with severe COVID-19 pneumonia.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Frail Elderly , Frailty/diagnosis , Frailty/virology , Geriatric Assessment/methods , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus , China , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Proportional Hazards Models , Prospective Studies
12.
Trials ; 21(1): 766, 2020 Sep 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-745676

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To investigate the potential efficacy of Acacia Senegal extract Gum Arabic (GA) supplementation as immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory dietary intervention among newly diagnosed COVID 19 Sudanese patients. To study the effect of GA on the level of cytokines, TNFα, IL8, IL6 IL10, CRP and the viral load. Secondary outcomes will be the effect of GA oral intake on mortality rate and days of hospital admission. TRIAL DESIGN: Quadruple blind, randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial Phase II & III. Prospective, two-arm, parallel-group, randomised (1:1 allocation ratio) superiority trial of oral GA among seropositive COVID-19 patients. PARTICIPANTS: Inclusion criteria: COVID-19 infected (newly diagnosed) as proved by real-time PCR within 72 hours of PCR. Age 8-90 years Both genders Exclusion criteria: Intubated patients on parenteral treatment Allergy to Gum Arabic The study will be conducted in COVID Isolation Centres and Soba University Hospital Khartoum State Sudan. INTERVENTION AND COMPARATOR: Experimental: Intervention Group This arm will receive 100% natural Gum Arabic provided in a powder form in 30-grams-dose once daily for four weeks Placebo Comparator: Control group: This group will be provided with pectin powder provided as one-gram-dose once daily for four weeks Both GA and placebo will be in addition to standard care treatment based on local clinical guidelines. MAIN OUTCOMES: Mean change from baseline score of Immune Response to end of the trial. Changes of the level of Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNFα), interleukin IL8, IL6, and IL10 from the baseline values (Four weeks from the start of randomization). Mortality rate: The percentage of deaths among COVID 19 patients received Gum Arabic compared to placebo (Four weeks from the start of randomization]). RANDOMISATION: Randomization (1:1 allocation ratio) and will be conducted using a sequence of computer-generated random numbers by an independent individual. Each participating centre will be assigned a special code generated by the computer. The randomization will be kept by the PI and a research assistant. BLINDING (MASKING): Quadruple (Participant, Care Provider, Investigator, Outcomes Assessor) NUMBERS TO BE RANDOMISED (SAMPLE SIZE): 110 eligible patients will be randomly assigned to either GA (n=55) or placebo (n=55) groups. TRIAL STATUS: Protocol Version no 2, 30th June 2020. Recruitment will start on 15th September 2020. The intended completion date is 15th January 2021. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04381871 . Date of trial registration: 11 May 2020. FULL PROTOCOL: The full protocol is attached as an additional file, accessible from the Trials website (Additional file 1). In the interest in expediting dissemination of this material, the familiar formatting has been eliminated; this Letter serves as a summary of the key elements of the full protocol.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Gum Arabic/therapeutic use , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Child , Clinical Trials, Phase II as Topic , Clinical Trials, Phase III as Topic , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Gum Arabic/adverse effects , Host Microbial Interactions , Humans , Immunologic Factors/adverse effects , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Prospective Studies , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
13.
Zhong Nan Da Xue Xue Bao Yi Xue Ban ; 45(5): 536-541, 2020 May 28.
Article in English, Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-745337

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Since the outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), it has spread rapidly in China and many other countries. The rapid increase in the number of cases has caused widespread panic among people and has become the main public health problem in the world. Severe patients often have difficult breathing and/or hypoxemia after 1 week of onset. A few critically ill patients may not only rapidly develop into acute respiratory distress syndrome, but also may cause coagulopathy, as well as multiple organs failure (such as heart, liver and kidney) or even death. This article is to analyze the predictive role of clinical features in patients with COVID-19 for severe disease, so as to help doctor monitor the severity-related features, restrain the disease progress, and provide a reference for improvement of medical treatment. METHODS: The clinical data of 208 patients with COVID-19 who were isolated and treated in Changsha Public Health Treatment Center from January 17, 2020 to March 14, 2020 were collected. All patients were the mild and ordinary adult patients on admission, including 105 males and 103 females from 19 to 84 (median age 44) years old. According to the "Program for the diagnosis and treatment of novel coronavirus (COVID-19) infected pneumonia (Trial version 7)" issued by the General Office of National Health Committee and Office of State Administration of Traditional Chinese Medicine as the diagnostic and typing criteria. According to progression from mild to severe disease during hospitalization, the patients were divided into a mild group (n=183) and a severe transformation group (n=25). The clinical features such as age, underlying disease, blood routine, coagulation function, blood biochemistry, oxygenation index, and so on were analyzed. Among them, laboratory tests included white blood cell (WBC), lymphocytes (LYM), neutrophil (NEU), hemoglobin (Hb), platelet (PLT), prothrombin time (PT), plasma fibrinogen (Fib), activated partial prothrombin time (APTT), thrombin time (TT), D-dimer, total bilirubin (TBIL), albumin (ALB), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), serum creatinine (Cr), creatine kinase (CK), creatine kinase isoenzyme-MB (CK-MB), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), C-reactive protein (CRP), and oxygen partial pressure in arterial blood. Partial pressure of oxygen in arterial blood/fractional concentration of inspiratory oxygen (PaO2/FiO2) was calculated. The variables with statistical significance were analyzed by logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: Patients in the severe transformation group had more combined underlying diseases than those in the mild group (P<0.05). From the perspective of disease distribution, patients in the severe transformation group had more combined hypertension (P<0.05). In the severe transformation group, PT was significantly longer, the levels of Fib, ALT, AST, CK, LDH, and CRP were significantly higher than those in the mild group (P<0.05 or P<0.001), while LYM, ALB, and PaO2/FiO2 were significantly lower than those in the mild group (P<0.05 or P<0.001). Logistic regression analysis was performed on clinical features with statistically significant differences. Combined with hypertension, LYM, PT, Fib, ALB, ALT, AST, CK, LDH, and CRP as independent variables, and having severe disease or not was the dependent variable. The results show that combined hypertension, decreased LYM, longer PT, and increased CK level were independent risk factors that affected the severity of COVID-19 (P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The patients with mild COVID-19 who are apt to develop severe diseases may be related to combined hypertension, decreased LYM, and longer PT, and increased CK level. For the mild patients with these clinical features, early intervention may effectively prevent the progression to severe diseases.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus , China , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Disease Progression , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Retrospective Studies , Young Adult
14.
Zhong Nan Da Xue Xue Bao Yi Xue Ban ; 45(7): 790-796, 2020 Jul 28.
Article in English, Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-745313

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To analyze the clinical characteristics of 71 patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). METHODS: The general data, epidemiological data, laboratory tests, imaging examinations, and treatment of 71 patients with COVID-19 admitted to the Sixth People's Hospital of Zhengzhou from January 19, 2020 to March 3, 2020 were retrospectively analyzed. RESULTS: Of the 71 COVID-19 patients, the ages were 4-84 (41.29±15.21) years, 38 (53.5%) patients were male, 33 (46.5%) were female, and 52 (73.2%) were in 22 clusters. The main clinical manifestations were fever (78.9%), cough (64.8%), and sputum (38.0%). The fever was mainly low and moderate, with 49 patients (69.0%) at 37.3-39.0 ℃. Most of the leukocytes, neutrophils, and lymphocytes were normal, accounting for 47 (66.2%), 51 (71.8%), and 51 (71.8%) patients, respectively; a few of them were decreased, accounting for 21 (29.6%), 16 (22.5%), and 20 (28.2%) patients, respectively. There were 38 (53.5%) and 31 (43.7%) patients with the decreased CD4+ and CD8+ T cell counts, respectively. There were 41 (57.7%), 38 (53.5%), 32 (45.1%), 26(36.6%), 22 (31.0%), 20 (28.2%), 14 (19.7%), 14 (19.7%), and 9 (12.7%) patients with the increased levels of C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, procalcitonin, fibrinogen,interleukin 6, lactate dehydrogenase,D-dimer,alanine aminotransferase, and aspartate aminotransferase, respectively. Of the 71 patients, the lung was involved in 60 (84.5%) patients, the double lung was involved in 47 (66.2%) patients, and the single lung was involved in 13 (18.3%) patients. The course of the disease was long, and the time from symptom onset to the second severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) nucleic acid negative transformation was (17.22±6.34) days.There were no significant differences in the incubation period (t=-0.453, P>0.05), the complicates (χ2=0.042, P>0.05), and the time from symptom onset to diagnosis (t=-1.330, P>0.05) in patients between the non-severe group and the severe group. The onset age, gender, SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid negative time, lymphocyte count, D-dimer, C-reactive protein, total bilirubin, direct bilirubin, lactate dehydrogenase, calcium ion, CD4+ T cell count, CD8+ T cell count, calcitonin, procalcitonin, and troponin were significantly different between the severe group and the non-severe group (all P<0.05). Among the 71 patients, 4 (5.6%) patients were mild, 59 (83.1%) were normal, and 8 (11.3%) were severe or critical. CONCLUSIONS: The aggregation phenomenon of COVID-19 is obvious. Fever and cough are the main clinical manifestations. White blood cells, neutrophils, and lymphocytes in the most patients in the early onset are normal. Most COVID-19 patients are light and ordinary type, with good prognosis.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus , Child , Child, Preschool , China , Cough/virology , Female , Fever/virology , Humans , Leukocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Young Adult
15.
World J Gastroenterol ; 26(31): 4694-4702, 2020 Aug 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-745192

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has become a worldwide pandemic. We investigated the clinical characteristics and risk factors for liver injury in COVID-19 patients in Wuhan by retrospectively analyzing the epidemiological, clinical, and laboratory data for 218 COVID-19 patients and identifying the risk factors for liver injury by multivariate analysis. AIM: To investigate the clinical characteristics and risk factors for liver injury in COVID-19 patients in Wuhan. METHODS: The 218 patients included 94 males (43.1%), aged 22 to 94 (50.1 ± 18.4) years. Elevated aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) were present in 42 (53.2%) and 36 (45.6%) cases, respectively, and 79 (36.2%) patients had abnormally elevated transaminase levels at admission. Patients with liver injury were older than those with normal liver function by a median of 12 years, with a significantly higher frequency of males (68.4% vs 28.8%, P < 0.001) and more coexisting illnesses (48.1% vs 27.3%, P = 0.002). Significantly more patients had fever and shortness of breath (87.3% vs 69.8% and 29.1% vs 14.4%, respectively) in the liver injury group. Only 12 (15.2%) patients had elevated total bilirubin. ALT and AST levels were mildly elevated [1-3 × upper limit of normal (ULN)] in 86.1% and 92.9% of cases, respectively. Only two (2.5%) patients had an ALT or AST level > 5 × ULN. Elevated γ-glutamyl transpeptidase was present in 45 (57.0%) patients, and 86.7% of these had a γ-glutamyl-transpeptidase level < 135 U/L (3 × ULN). Serum alkaline phosphatase levels were almost normal in all patients. Patients with severe liver injury had a significantly higher frequency of abnormal transaminases than non-severe patients, but only one case had very high levels of aminotransferases. RESULTS: Multivariate analysis revealed that male sex, high D-dimer level, and high neutrophil percentage were linked to a higher risk of liver injury. The early stage of COVID-19 may be associated with mildly elevated aminotransferase levels in patients in Wuhan. Male sex and high D-dimer level and neutrophil percentage may be important predictors of liver injury in patients with COVID-19. CONCLUSION: Male sex and high D-dimer level and neutrophil percentage may be important predictors of liver injury in patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Liver Diseases/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Female , Humans , Liver Diseases/diagnosis , Liver Diseases/epidemiology , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Multivariate Analysis , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors
16.
Biomed Res Int ; 2020: 2721381, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-744899

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Emergency department (ED) triage regarding infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) is challenging. During the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak in Germany, the diagnostic outcomes of critically ill patients admitted to the resuscitation room in the ED of our academic 754-bed hospital should be analyzed. Methods: All resuscitation room patients between March 1st and April 15th 2020 were included in this retrospective study. Every patient with suspicion of SARS-CoV-2 infection received a pharyngeal swab for real-time polymerase chain reaction (rt-PCR), divided in the clinical subgroups of "highly suspicious for COVID-19" and "COVID-19 as differential diagnosis." All respiratory and infectious symptoms were included as at least "differential diagnosis" as an expanded suspicion strategy. Results: Ninety-five patients were included (trauma n = 14, critically ill n = 81). Of 3 highly suspicious patients, 2 had rt-PCR positive pharyngeal swabs. In 39 patients, COVID-19 was defined as differential diagnosis, and 3 were positive for SARS-CoV-2. Of them, pharyngeal swabs were positive in 1 case, while in 2 cases, only tracheal fluid was rt-PCR positive while the pharyngeal swabs were negative. In one of these 2 cases, chest computed tomography (CT) was also negative for ground-glass opacities but showed a pulmonary abscess and pulmonary embolism. Conclusion: We recommend an expanded suspicion strategy for COVID-19 due to unexpected diagnostic outcomes. Personal protective equipment should be used in every resuscitation room operation due to unexpected cases and initial knowledge gaps. Furthermore, tracheal fluid should be tested for SARS-CoV-2 in every intubated patient due to cases with negative pharyngeal swabs and negative chest CT.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/methods , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Critical Illness , Diagnosis, Differential , Disease Outbreaks , Emergency Service, Hospital , False Negative Reactions , Female , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , RNA, Viral/genetics , RNA, Viral/isolation & purification , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Resuscitation , Retrospective Studies , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Triage
17.
Commun Dis Intell (2018) ; 442020 Aug 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-743198

ABSTRACT

Cumulatively to 16 August there have been 23,696 case notifications and 428 deaths. The number of new cases reported nationally this fortnight (3-16 August 2020) was 3,767, a 37% decrease from the previous fortnight (5,944). On average this represented 269 cases diagnosed each day over the reporting period, a decrease from 425 cases per day over the previous reporting period. 3,628 (96%) of all cases were reported in Victoria, with a smaller number of cases reported from NSW (125), Qld (2), WA (5), SA (6) and Tas (1). In Victoria, the majority of cases (3,284; 90%) were locally acquired, with a further 344 (10%) under investigation at the time of analysis, but likely also to be locally acquired. Of the remaining 139 cases reported, 26 (19%) were overseas acquired; 110 (80%) were locally acquired, predominantly in NSW, and 3 (2%) were reported as under investigation. The decrease in new cases observed this fortnight in Victoria is likely associated with the enhanced public health measures that are currently in place in Victoria. A total of 54 deaths were reported, all from Victoria: 52 (96%) were aged 70 years and over, and 2 (4%) were aged 30 to 69 years. Testing rates remain high across all jurisdictions, with an overall positivity rate for the reporting period of 0.6%. Victoria reported a positivity rate of 1.7% for this reporting period; in all other jurisdictions the positivity rate was 0.05% or lower.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Australia/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , Cluster Analysis , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Disease Notification , Female , Humans , Infant , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Population Surveillance , Young Adult
18.
AJNR Am J Neuroradiol ; 41(7): 1165-1169, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-742697

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Chest CT may be used as a tool for rapid coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) detection. Our aim was to investigate the value of additional chest CT for detection of coronavirus 19 (COVID-19) in patients who undergo head CT for suspected stroke or head trauma in a COVID-19-endemic region. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Our study included 27 patients (mean age, 74 years; range, 54-90 years; 20 men) who underwent head CT for suspected stroke (n = 21) or head trauma (n = 6), additional chest CT for COVID-19 detection, and real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction testing in a COVID-19-endemic region. Sensitivity, specificity, and negative and positive predictive values of chest CT in detecting COVID-19 were calculated. RESULTS: Final neurologic diagnoses were ischemic stroke (n = 11), brain contusion (n = 5), nontraumatic intracranial hemorrhage (n = 2), brain metastasis (n = 1), and no primary neurologic disorder (n = 8). Symptoms of possible COVID-19 infection (ie, fever, cough, and/or shortness of breath) were present in 20 of 27 (74%) patients. Seven of 27 patients (26%) had real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction confirmed-COVID-19 infection. Chest CT results were 6 true-positives, 15 true-negatives, 5 false-positives, and 1 false-negative. Diagnostic performance values of chest CT were a sensitivity of 85.7%, specificity of 75.0%, negative predictive value of 93.8%, and positive predictive value of 54.6%. CONCLUSIONS: The sensitivity of additional chest CT is fairly high. However, a negative result does not exclude COVID-19. The positive predictive value is poor. Correlation of chest CT results with epidemiologic history and clinical presentation, along with real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, is needed for confirmation.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Craniocerebral Trauma/diagnostic imaging , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Stroke/diagnostic imaging , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Craniocerebral Trauma/etiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Stroke/etiology , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods
19.
PLoS One ; 15(8): e0237629, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-742528

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic, general practitioners worldwide re-organise care in very different ways because of the lack of evidence-based protocols. OBJECTIVE: This paper describes the organisation and the characteristics of consultations in Belgian out-of-hours primary care during five weekends at the peak of a COVID-19 outbreak and compares it to a similar period in 2019. METHODS: Real-time observational study using pseudonymised routine clinical data extracted out of reports from home visits, telephone- and physical consultations (iCAREdata). Nine general practice cooperatives (GPCs) participated covering a population of 1 513 523. RESULTS: All GPCs rapidly re-organised care in order to handle the outbreak and provide a safe working environment. The average consultation rate was 222 per 100 000 citizens per weekend. These consultations were handled by telephone alone in 40% (N = 6293). A diagnosis at risk of COVID-19 was registered in 6692 (43%) consultations,. Out of 5311 physical consultations, 1460 were at risk of COVID-19 of which 443 (30%) did not receive prior telephone consultation to estimate this risk. Compared to 2019, the workload initially increased due to telephone consultations but afterwards declined drastically. The physical consultation rate declined by 45% with a marked decline in diagnoses unrelated to COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: General practitioners can rapidly re-organise out-of-hours care to handle patient flows during a COVID-19 outbreak. Forty percent of the out-of-hours primary care contacts are handled by telephone consultations alone. We recommend to give a telephone consultation to all patients and not to rely on call takers to differentiate between infectious and regular care. The demand for physical consultations declined drastically provoking questions about patient's safety for care unrelated to COVID-19.


Subject(s)
After-Hours Care/organization & administration , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , General Practice/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Primary Health Care/organization & administration , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Belgium/epidemiology , Child , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , General Practitioners , House Calls , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Patient Safety , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Remote Consultation/methods , Workload , Young Adult
20.
BMJ Case Rep ; 13(8)2020 Aug 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-742208

ABSTRACT

The current COVID-19 crisis has significantly impacted healthcare systems worldwide. There has been a palpable increase in public avoidance of hospitals, which has interfered in timely care of critical cardiovascular conditions. Complications from late presentation of myocardial infarction, which had become a rarity, resurfaced during the pandemic. We present two such encounters that occurred due to delay in seeking medical care following myocardial infarction due to the fear of contracting COVID-19 in the hospital. Moreover, a comprehensive review of literature is performed to illustrate the potential factors delaying and decreasing timely presentations and interventions for time-dependent medical emergencies like ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). We emphasise that clinicians should remain vigilant of encountering rare and catastrophic complications of STEMI during this current era of COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Emergency Service, Hospital , Fear , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , Time-to-Treatment , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Pandemics , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/complications , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/therapy
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