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1.
Arch Pharm Res ; 45(9): 631-643, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2035372

ABSTRACT

(±)-Decumicorine A (1) and (±)-epi-decumicorine A (2), two pairs of enantiomeric isoquinoline alkaloids featuring a novel phenylpropanoid-conjugated protoberberine skeleton, were isolated and purified from the rhizomes of Corydalis decumbens. The separation of (±)-1 and (±)-2 was achieved by chiral HPLC to produce four optically pure enantiomers. The structures and absolute configurations of compounds (-)-1, (+)-1, (-)-2, and (+)-2 were elucidated by spectroscopic analysis, ECD calculations, and X-ray crystallographic analyses. The two racemates were generated from a Diels-Alder [4 + 2] cycloaddition between jatrorrhizine and ferulic acid in the proposed biosynthetic pathways, which were fully verified by a biomimetic synthesis. Moreover, compound (+)-1 exhibited an antiviral entry effect on SARS-CoV-2 pseudovirus by blocking spike binding to the ACE2 receptor on HEK-293T-ACE2h host cells.


Subject(s)
Alkaloids , COVID-19 , Corydalis , Alkaloids/chemistry , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Berberine Alkaloids , Biomimetics , COVID-19/drug therapy , Corydalis/chemistry , Humans , Isoquinolines , Molecular Structure , Rhizome , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Phytother Res ; 36(7): 2686-2709, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1941309

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is caused by Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which has a high mortality rate and transmissibility. In this context, medicinal plants have attracted attention due to the wide availability and variety of therapeutic compounds, such as alkaloids, a vast class with several proven pharmacological effects, like the antiviral and anti-inflammatory activities. Therefore, this scoping review aimed to summarize the current knowledge of the potential applicability of alkaloids for treating COVID-19. A systematic search was performed on PubMed and Scopus, from database inception to August 2021. Among the 63 eligible studies, 65.07% were in silico model, 20.63% in vitro and 14.28% clinical trials and observational studies. According to the in silico assessments, the alkaloids 10-hydroxyusambarensine, cryptospirolepine, crambescidin 826, deoxynortryptoquivaline, ergotamine, michellamine B, nigellidine, norboldine and quinadoline B showed higher binding energy with more than two target proteins. The remaining studies showed potential use of berberine, cephaeline, emetine, homoharringtonine, lycorine, narciclasine, quinine, papaverine and colchicine. The possible ability of alkaloids to inhibit protein targets and to reduce inflammatory markers show the potential for development of new treatment strategies against COVID-19. However, more high quality analyses/reviews in this field are necessary to firmly establish the effectiveness/safety of the alkaloids here described.


Subject(s)
Alkaloids , COVID-19 , Alkaloids/chemistry , Alkaloids/pharmacology , Alkaloids/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Molecules ; 27(9)2022 Apr 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1820341

ABSTRACT

Piper nigrum, or black pepper, produces piperine, an alkaloid that has diverse pharmacological activities. In this study, N-aryl amide piperine analogs were prepared by semi-synthesis involving the saponification of piperine (1) to yield piperic acid (2) followed by esterification to obtain compounds 3, 4, and 5. The compounds were examined for their antitrypanosomal, antimalarial, and anti-SARS-CoV-2 main protease activities. The new 2,5-dimethoxy-substituted phenyl piperamide 5 exhibited the most robust biological activities with no cytotoxicity against mammalian cell lines, Vero and Vero E6, as compared to the other compounds in this series. Its half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) for antitrypanosomal activity against Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense was 15.46 ± 3.09 µM, and its antimalarial activity against the 3D7 strain of Plasmodium falciparum was 24.55 ± 1.91 µM, which were fourfold and fivefold more potent, respectively, than the activities of piperine. Interestingly, compound 5 inhibited the activity of 3C-like main protease (3CLPro) toward anti-SARS-CoV-2 activity at the IC50 of 106.9 ± 1.2 µM, which was threefold more potent than the activity of rutin. Docking and molecular dynamic simulation indicated that the potential binding of 5 in the 3CLpro active site had the improved binding interaction and stability. Therefore, new aryl amide analogs of piperine 5 should be investigated further as a promising anti-infective agent against human African trypanosomiasis, malaria, and COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Alkaloids , Antimalarials , COVID-19 , Piper nigrum , Alkaloids/chemistry , Alkaloids/pharmacology , Animals , Antimalarials/pharmacology , Benzodioxoles , Humans , Mammals , Molecular Docking Simulation , Piper nigrum/chemistry , Piperidines , Polyunsaturated Alkamides/chemistry , Polyunsaturated Alkamides/pharmacology
4.
Mar Drugs ; 20(3)2022 Feb 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1725847

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic and its continuing emerging variants emphasize the need to discover appropriate treatment, where vaccines alone have failed to show complete protection against the new variants of the virus. Therefore, treatment of the infected cases is critical. This paper discusses the bio-guided isolation of three indole diketopiperazine alkaloids, neoechinulin A (1), echinulin (2), and eurocristatine (3), from the Red Sea-derived Aspergillus fumigatus MR2012. Neoechinulin A (1) exhibited a potent inhibitory effect against SARS-CoV-2 Mpro with IC50 value of 0.47 µM, which is comparable to the reference standard GC376. Despite the structural similarity between the three compounds, only 1 showed a promising effect. The mechanism of inhibition is discussed in light of a series of extensive molecular docking, classical and steered molecular dynamics simulation experiments. This paper sheds light on indole diketopiperazine alkaloids as a potential structural motif against SARS-CoV-2 Mpro. Additionally, it highlights the potential of different molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation approaches in the discrimination between active and inactive structurally related Mpro inhibitors.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/antagonists & inhibitors , Cysteine Proteinase Inhibitors/chemistry , Indole Alkaloids/chemistry , Piperazines/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Alkaloids/chemistry , Alkaloids/isolation & purification , Antiviral Agents/isolation & purification , Aspergillus fumigatus/chemistry , Cysteine Proteinase Inhibitors/isolation & purification , Indole Alkaloids/isolation & purification , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Piperazines/isolation & purification
5.
Molecules ; 27(4)2022 Feb 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1715567

ABSTRACT

Alkaloids are nitrogen-containing compounds, biosynthesized by both marine and terrestrial organisms, often with strong biological properties [...].


Subject(s)
Alkaloids/chemistry , Alkaloids/pharmacology , Drug Discovery , Alkaloids/isolation & purification , Aquatic Organisms/chemistry , Biological Products , Drug Discovery/methods , Plant Extracts
6.
Molecules ; 27(3)2022 Jan 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1686898

ABSTRACT

Cancer is the second most fatal disease worldwide, with colon cancer being the third most prevalent and fatal form of cancer in several Western countries. The risk of acquisition of resistance to chemotherapy remains a significant hurdle in the management of various types of cancer, especially colon cancer. Therefore, it is essential to develop alternative treatment modalities. Naturally occurring alkaloids have been shown to regulate various mechanistic pathways linked to cell proliferation, cell cycle, and metastasis. This review aims to shed light on the potential of alkaloids as anti-colon-cancer chemotherapy agents that can modulate or arrest the cell cycle. Preclinical investigated alkaloids have shown anti-colon cancer activities and inhibition of cancer cell proliferation via cell cycle arrest at different stages, suggesting that alkaloids may have the potential to act as anticancer molecules.


Subject(s)
Alkaloids/chemistry , Alkaloids/pharmacology , Antineoplastic Agents/chemistry , Antineoplastic Agents/pharmacology , Cell Cycle Checkpoints/drug effects , Colonic Neoplasms/drug therapy , Alkaloids/therapeutic use , Animals , Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use , Apoptosis/drug effects , Cell Proliferation/drug effects , Colonic Neoplasms/metabolism , Colonic Neoplasms/pathology , Drug Discovery , Humans
7.
Molecules ; 27(3)2022 Jan 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1686897

ABSTRACT

Viral infections and outbreaks have become a major concern and are one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The development of successful antiviral therapeutics and vaccines remains a daunting challenge. The discovery of novel antiviral agents is a public health emergency, and extraordinary efforts are underway globally to identify safe and effective treatments for different viral diseases. Alkaloids are natural phytochemicals known for their biological activities, many of which have been intensively studied for their broad-spectrum of antiviral activities against different DNA and RNA viruses. The purpose of this review was to summarize the evidence supporting the efficacy of the antiviral activity of plant alkaloids at half-maximum effective concentration (EC50) or half-maximum inhibitory concentration (IC50) below 10 µM and describe the molecular sites most often targeted by natural alkaloids acting against different virus families. This review highlights that considering the devastating effects of virus pandemics on humans, plants, and animals, the development of high efficiency and low-toxicity antiviral drugs targeting these viruses need to be developed. Furthermore, it summarizes the current research status of alkaloids as the source of antiviral drug development, their structural characteristics, and antiviral targets. Overall, the influence of alkaloids at the molecular level suggests a high degree of specificity which means they could serve as potent and safe antiviral agents waiting for evaluation and exploitation.


Subject(s)
Alkaloids/chemistry , Alkaloids/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Virus Diseases/drug therapy , Viruses/drug effects , Alkaloids/therapeutic use , Animals , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Drug Development , Drug Discovery , Humans , Virus Replication/drug effects
8.
Med Sci Monit ; 28: e934102, 2022 Jan 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1651076

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND Heat-clearing and detoxifying herbs (HDHs) play an important role in the prevention and treatment of coronavirus infection. However, their mechanism of action needs further study. This study aimed to explore the anti-coronavirus basis and mechanism of HDHs. MATERIAL AND METHODS Database mining was performed on 7 HDHs. Core ingredients and targets were screened according to ADME rules combined with Neighborhood, Co-occurrence, Co-expression, and other algorithms. GO enrichment and KEGG pathway analyses were performed using the R language. Finally, high-throughput molecular docking was used for verification. RESULTS HDHs mainly acts on NOS3, EGFR, IL-6, MAPK8, PTGS2, MAPK14, NFKB1, and CASP3 through quercetin, luteolin, wogonin, indirubin alkaloids, ß-sitosterol, and isolariciresinol. These targets are mainly involved in the regulation of biological processes such as inflammation, activation of MAPK activity, and positive regulation of NF-kappaB transcription factor activity. Pathway analysis further revealed that the pathways regulated by these targets mainly include: signaling pathways related to viral and bacterial infections such as tuberculosis, influenza A, Ras signaling pathways; inflammation-related pathways such as the TLR, TNF, MAPK, and HIF-1 signaling pathways; and immune-related pathways such as NOD receptor signaling pathways. These pathways play a synergistic role in inhibiting lung inflammation and regulating immunity and antiviral activity. CONCLUSIONS HDHs play a role in the treatment of coronavirus infection by regulating the body's immunity, fighting inflammation, and antiviral activities, suggesting a molecular basis and new strategies for the treatment of COVID-19 and a foundation for the screening of new antiviral drugs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Coronavirus/drug effects , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Alkaloids/chemistry , Alkaloids/pharmacology , Caspase 3/drug effects , Caspase 3/genetics , Coronavirus/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Cyclooxygenase 2/drug effects , Cyclooxygenase 2/genetics , Databases, Pharmaceutical , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/chemistry , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/therapeutic use , Flavanones/chemistry , Flavanones/pharmacology , Humans , Indoles/chemistry , Indoles/pharmacology , Interleukin-6/genetics , Lignin/chemistry , Lignin/pharmacology , Luteolin/chemistry , Luteolin/pharmacology , Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 14/drug effects , Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 14/genetics , Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 8/drug effects , Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 8/genetics , Molecular Docking Simulation , NF-kappa B p50 Subunit/drug effects , NF-kappa B p50 Subunit/genetics , Naphthols/chemistry , Naphthols/pharmacology , Nitric Oxide Synthase Type III/drug effects , Nitric Oxide Synthase Type III/genetics , Protein Interaction Maps , Quercetin/chemistry , Quercetin/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Signal Transduction , Sitosterols/chemistry , Sitosterols/pharmacology , Transcriptome/drug effects , Transcriptome/genetics
9.
Chem Biodivers ; 18(11): e2100674, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1615945

ABSTRACT

Chemical investigation on a Streptomyces sp. strain MS180069 isolated from a sediment sample collected from the South China Sea, yielded the new benzo[f]isoindole-dione alkaloid, bhimamycin J (1). The structure was determined by extensive spectroscopic analysis, including HRMS, 1D, 2D NMR, and X-ray diffraction techniques. A molecular docking study revealed 1 as a new molecular motif that binds with human angiotensin converting enzyme2 (ACE2), recently described as the cell surface receptor responsible for uptake of 2019-CoV-2. Using enzyme assays we confirm that 1 inhibits human ACE2 79.7 % at 25 µg/mL.


Subject(s)
Alkaloids/chemistry , Geologic Sediments/microbiology , Isoindoles/chemistry , Streptomyces/chemistry , Alkaloids/metabolism , Alkaloids/pharmacology , Alkaloids/therapeutic use , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/antagonists & inhibitors , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Binding Sites , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Fungi/drug effects , Gram-Negative Bacteria/drug effects , Gram-Positive Bacteria/drug effects , Humans , Isoindoles/isolation & purification , Isoindoles/metabolism , Isoindoles/pharmacology , Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy , Molecular Conformation , Molecular Docking Simulation , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Streptomyces/isolation & purification , Streptomyces/metabolism
10.
Chem Biodivers ; 19(1): e202100668, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1611203

ABSTRACT

Forsyqinlingines C (1) and D (2), two C9 -monoterpenoid alkaloids bearing a rare skeleton, were isolated from the ripe fruits of Forsythia suspensa. Their structures, including absolute configurations, were fully elucidated by extensive spectroscopic data and ECD experiments. The plausible biogenetic pathway for compounds 1 and 2 was also proposed. In vitro, two C9 -monoterpenoid alkaloids showed anti-inflammatory activity performed by the inhibitory effect on the release of ß-glucuronidase in rat polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs), as well as antiviral activity against influenza A (H1N1) virus and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV).


Subject(s)
Alkaloids/chemistry , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Forsythia/chemistry , Monoterpenes/chemistry , Alkaloids/isolation & purification , Alkaloids/pharmacology , Animals , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/isolation & purification , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/isolation & purification , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Forsythia/metabolism , Fruit/chemistry , Fruit/metabolism , Glucuronidase/metabolism , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/drug effects , Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy , Molecular Conformation , Neutrophils/cytology , Neutrophils/drug effects , Neutrophils/metabolism , Platelet Activating Factor/pharmacology , Rats , Respiratory Syncytial Viruses/drug effects
11.
J Nat Prod ; 85(1): 284-291, 2022 01 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1596477

ABSTRACT

We have previously reported that neoechinulin B (1a), a prenylated indole diketopiperazine alkaloid, shows antiviral activities against hepatitis C virus (HCV) via the inactivation of the liver X receptors (LXRs) and the resultant disruption of double-membrane vesicles. In this study, a two-step synthesis of the diketopiperazine scaffold of 1a was achieved by the base-induced coupling of 1,4-diacetyl-3-{[(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)oxy]methyl}piperazine-2,5-dione with aldehydes, followed by the treatment of the resultant coupling products with tetra-n-butylammonium fluoride. Compound 1a and its 16 derivatives 1b-q were prepared using this method. Furthermore, variecolorin H, a related alkaloid, was obtained by the acid treatment of 1a in MeOH. The antiviral evaluation of 1a and its derivatives revealed that 1a, 1c, 1d, 1h, 1j, 1l, and 1o exhibited both anti-HCV and anti-severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) activities. The results of this study indicate that the exomethylene moiety on the diketopiperazine ring is important for the antiviral activities. The antiviral compounds can inhibit the production of HCV and SARS-CoV-2 by inactivating LXRs.


Subject(s)
Alkaloids/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Hepacivirus/drug effects , Piperazines/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Alkaloids/chemical synthesis , Alkaloids/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/chemical synthesis , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Cell Line, Tumor , Diketopiperazines/chemistry , Diketopiperazines/pharmacology , Humans , Liver X Receptors/antagonists & inhibitors , Molecular Structure , Piperazines/chemical synthesis , Piperazines/chemistry , Structure-Activity Relationship , Transcription, Genetic/drug effects
12.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(23)2021 Nov 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1538409

ABSTRACT

Several coronaviruses (CoVs) have been associated with serious health hazards in recent decades, resulting in the deaths of thousands around the globe. The recent coronavirus pandemic has emphasized the importance of discovering novel and effective antiviral medicines as quickly as possible to prevent more loss of human lives. Positive-sense RNA viruses with group spikes protruding from their surfaces and an abnormally large RNA genome enclose CoVs. CoVs have already been related to a range of respiratory infectious diseases possibly fatal to humans, such as MERS, SARS, and the current COVID-19 outbreak. As a result, effective prevention, treatment, and medications against human coronavirus (HCoV) is urgently needed. In recent years, many natural substances have been discovered with a variety of biological significance, including antiviral properties. Throughout this work, we reviewed a wide range of natural substances that interrupt the life cycles for MERS and SARS, as well as their potential application in the treatment of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/therapy , Alkaloids/chemistry , Alkaloids/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , COVID-19/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Flavonoids/chemistry , Flavonoids/therapeutic use , Humans , Mutation , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Terpenes/chemistry , Terpenes/therapeutic use
13.
Molecules ; 26(20)2021 Oct 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526851

ABSTRACT

There have been more than 150 million confirmed cases of SARS-CoV-2 since the beginning of the pandemic in 2019. By June 2021, the mortality from such infections approached 3.9 million people. Despite the availability of a number of vaccines which provide protection against this virus, the evolution of new viral variants, inconsistent availability of the vaccine around the world, and vaccine hesitancy, in some countries, makes it unreasonable to rely on mass vaccination alone to combat this pandemic. Consequently, much effort is directed to identifying potential antiviral treatments. Marine brominated tyrosine alkaloids are recognized to have antiviral potential. We test here the antiviral capacity of fourteen marine brominated tyrosine alkaloids against five different target proteins from SARS-CoV-2, including main protease (Mpro) (PDB ID: 6lu7), spike glycoprotein (PDB ID: 6VYB), nucleocapsid phosphoprotein (PDB ID: 6VYO), membrane glycoprotein (PDB ID: 6M17), and non-structural protein 10 (nsp10) (PDB ID: 6W4H). These marine alkaloids, particularly the hexabrominated compound, fistularin-3, shows promising docking interactions with predicted binding affinities (S-score = -7.78, -7.65, -6.39, -6.28, -8.84 Kcal/mol) for the main protease (Mpro) (PDB ID: 6lu7), spike glycoprotein (PDB ID: 6VYB), nucleocapsid phosphoprotein (PDB ID: 6VYO), membrane glycoprotein (PDB ID: 6M17), and non-structural protein 10 (nsp10) (PDB ID: 6W4H), respectively, where it forms better interactions with the protein pockets than the native interaction. It also shows promising molecular dynamics, pharmacokinetics, and toxicity profiles. As such, further exploration of the antiviral properties of fistularin-3 against SARS-CoV-2 is merited.


Subject(s)
Alkaloids/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Alkaloids/isolation & purification , Alkaloids/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Binding Sites , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/chemistry , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/metabolism , Halogenation , Humans , Isoxazoles/chemistry , Isoxazoles/metabolism , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Structure-Activity Relationship , Tyrosine/analogs & derivatives , Tyrosine/chemistry , Tyrosine/metabolism
15.
J Gen Virol ; 102(8)2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1368372

ABSTRACT

Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) is an economically important coronavirus, causing damaging losses to the poultry industry worldwide as the causative agent of infectious bronchitis. The coronavirus spike (S) glycoprotein is a large type I membrane protein protruding from the surface of the virion, which facilitates attachment and entry into host cells. The IBV S protein is cleaved into two subunits, S1 and S2, the latter of which has been identified as a determinant of cellular tropism. Recent studies expressing coronavirus S proteins in mammalian and insect cells have identified a high level of glycosylation on the protein's surface. Here we used IBV propagated in embryonated hens' eggs to explore the glycan profile of viruses derived from infection in cells of the natural host, chickens. We identified multiple glycan types on the surface of the protein and found a strain-specific dependence on complex glycans for recognition of the S2 subunit by a monoclonal antibody in vitro, with no effect on viral replication following the chemical inhibition of complex glycosylation. Virus neutralization by monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies was not affected. Following analysis of predicted glycosylation sites for the S protein of four IBV strains, we confirmed glycosylation at 18 sites by mass spectrometry for the pathogenic laboratory strain M41-CK. Further characterization revealed heterogeneity among the glycans present at six of these sites, indicating a difference in the glycan profile of individual S proteins on the IBV virion. These results demonstrate a non-specific role for complex glycans in IBV replication, with an indication of an involvement in antibody recognition but not neutralisation.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus/physiology , Polysaccharides/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Alkaloids/chemistry , Alkaloids/pharmacology , Amino Acid Sequence , Animals , Binding Sites , Cells, Cultured , Chromatography, Liquid , Computational Biology/methods , Coronavirus/drug effects , Coronavirus Infections/veterinary , Gene Expression Regulation, Viral , Glycosylation/drug effects , Infectious bronchitis virus/physiology , Models, Molecular , Molecular Conformation , Molecular Weight , Neutralization Tests , Oligosaccharides/chemistry , Oligosaccharides/metabolism , Polysaccharides/chemistry , Poultry Diseases/virology , Protein Transport , Spectrometry, Mass, Electrospray Ionization , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Structure-Activity Relationship , Virus Replication/drug effects
16.
Molecules ; 26(16)2021 Aug 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1362396

ABSTRACT

The specificity of inhibition by 6,6'-dihydroxythiobinupharidine (DTBN) on cysteine proteases was demonstrated in this work. There were differences in the extent of inhibition, reflecting active site structural-steric and biochemical differences. Cathepsin S (IC50 = 3.2 µM) was most sensitive to inhibition by DTBN compared to Cathepsin B, L and papain (IC50 = 1359.4, 13.2 and 70.4 µM respectively). DTBN is inactive for the inhibition of Mpro of SARS-CoV-2. Docking simulations suggested a mechanism of interaction that was further supported by the biochemical results. In the docking results, it was shown that the cysteine sulphur of Cathepsin S, L and B was in close proximity to the DTBN thiaspirane ring, potentially forming the necessary conditions for a nucleophilic attack to form a disulfide bond. Covalent docking and molecular dynamic simulations were performed to validate disulfide bond formation and to determine the stability of Cathepsins-DTBN complexes, respectively. The lack of reactivity of DTBN against SARS-CoV-2 Mpro was attributed to a mismatch of the binding conformation of DTBN to the catalytic binding site of Mpro. Thus, gradations in reactivity among the tested Cathepsins may be conducive for a mechanism-based search for derivatives of nupharidine against COVID-19. This could be an alternative strategy to the large-scale screening of electrophilic inhibitors.


Subject(s)
Alkaloids/pharmacology , Cysteine Proteases/metabolism , Alkaloids/chemistry , Animals , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Binding Sites , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/metabolism , Catalytic Domain , Cathepsins/pharmacology , Cell Line, Tumor , Cysteine Proteases/chemistry , Cysteine Proteinase Inhibitors/chemistry , Cysteine Proteinase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Humans , Mice , Molecular Docking Simulation/methods , Nuphar/chemistry , Papain/pharmacology , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , Protein Binding , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects
17.
Chem Biol Interact ; 341: 109449, 2021 May 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1157165

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19, a severe global pandemic caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) has emerged as one of the most threatening transmissible disease. As a great threat to global public health, the development of treatment options has become vital, and a rush to find a cure has mobilized researchers globally from all areas. SCOPE AND APPROACH: This review focuses on deciphering the potential of different secondary metabolites from medicinal plants as therapeutic options either as inhibitors of therapeutic targets of SARS-CoV-2 or as blockers of viral particles entry through host cell receptors. The use of medicinal plants containing specific phytomoieties could be seen in providing a safer and long-term solution for the population with lesser side effects. Key Findings and Conclusions: Considering the high cost and time-consuming drug discovery process, therapeutic repositioning of existing drugs was explored as treatment option in COVID-19, however several molecules have been retracted as therapeutics either due to no positive outcomes or the severe side effects. These effects call for exploring the alternate treatment options which are therapeutically effective as well as safe. Keeping this in mind, phytopharmaceuticals derived from medicinal plants could be explored as important resources in the development of COVID-19 treatment, as their role in the past for treatment of viral diseases like HIV, MERS-CoV, and influenza has been well reported. Considering this fact, different phytoconstituents such as flavonoids, alkaloids, tannins and glycosides etc. Possessing antiviral properties against coronaviruses and possessing potential against SARS-CoV-2 have been reviewed in the present work.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Phytochemicals/pharmacology , Alkaloids/chemistry , Alkaloids/pharmacology , Anthraquinones/chemistry , Anthraquinones/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Flavonoids/chemistry , Flavonoids/pharmacology , Humans , Oils, Volatile/chemistry , Oils, Volatile/pharmacology , Phytochemicals/chemistry , Plants, Medicinal/chemistry , Plants, Medicinal/metabolism , Saponins/chemistry , Saponins/pharmacology , Secondary Metabolism
18.
Biomolecules ; 11(3)2021 03 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1148287

ABSTRACT

The huge global expansion of the COVID-19 pandemic caused by the novel SARS-corona virus-2 is an extraordinary public health emergency. The unavailability of specific treatment against SARS-CoV-2 infection necessitates the focus of all scientists in this direction. The reported antiviral activities of guanidine alkaloids encouraged us to run a comprehensive in silico binding affinity of fifteen guanidine alkaloids against five different proteins of SARS-CoV-2, which we investigated. The investigated proteins are COVID-19 main protease (Mpro) (PDB ID: 6lu7), spike glycoprotein (PDB ID: 6VYB), nucleocapsid phosphoprotein (PDB ID: 6VYO), membrane glycoprotein (PDB ID: 6M17), and a non-structural protein (nsp10) (PDB ID: 6W4H). The binding energies for all tested compounds indicated promising binding affinities. A noticeable superiority for the pentacyclic alkaloids particularly, crambescidin 786 (5) and crambescidin 826 (13) has been observed. Compound 5 exhibited very good binding affinities against Mpro (ΔG = -8.05 kcal/mol), nucleocapsid phosphoprotein (ΔG = -6.49 kcal/mol), and nsp10 (ΔG = -9.06 kcal/mol). Compound 13 showed promising binding affinities against Mpro (ΔG = -7.99 kcal/mol), spike glycoproteins (ΔG = -6.95 kcal/mol), and nucleocapsid phosphoprotein (ΔG = -8.01 kcal/mol). Such promising activities might be attributed to the long ω-fatty acid chain, which may play a vital role in binding within the active sites. The correlation of c Log P with free binding energies has been calculated. Furthermore, the SAR of the active compounds has been clarified. The Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism, Excretion, and Toxicity (ADMET) studies were carried out in silico for the 15 compounds; most examined compounds showed optimal to good range levels of ADMET aqueous solubility, intestinal absorption and being unable to pass blood brain barrier (BBB), non-inhibitors of CYP2D6, non-hepatotoxic, and bind plasma protein with a percentage less than 90%. The toxicity of the tested compounds was screened in silico against five models (FDA rodent carcinogenicity, carcinogenic potency TD50, rat maximum tolerated dose, rat oral LD50, and rat chronic lowest observed adverse effect level (LOAEL)). All compounds showed expected low toxicity against the tested models. Molecular dynamic (MD) simulations were also carried out to confirm the stable binding interactions of the most promising compounds, 5 and 13, with their targets. In conclusion, the examined 15 alkaloids specially 5 and 13 showed promising docking, ADMET, toxicity and MD results which open the door for further investigations for them against SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Alkaloids/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/chemistry , Porifera/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Animals , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/toxicity , Blood-Brain Barrier , Crystallography, X-Ray , Ligands , Membrane Glycoproteins/chemistry , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Phosphoproteins/chemistry , Protease Inhibitors/chemistry , Rats , Software , Viral Proteases/chemistry
19.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(4)2021 Feb 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1085073

ABSTRACT

Genus Aspergillus represents a widely spread genus of fungi that is highly popular for possessing potent medicinal potential comprising mainly antimicrobial, cytotoxic and antioxidant properties. They are highly attributed to its richness by alkaloids, terpenes, steroids and polyketons. This review aimed to comprehensively explore the diverse alkaloids isolated and identified from different species of genus Aspergillus that were found to be associated with different marine organisms regarding their chemistry and biology. Around 174 alkaloid metabolites were reported, 66 of which showed important biological activities with respect to the tested biological activities mainly comprising antiviral, antibacterial, antifungal, cytotoxic, antioxidant and antifouling activities. Besides, in silico studies on different microbial proteins comprising DNA-gyrase, topoisomerase IV, dihydrofolate reductase, transcriptional regulator TcaR (protein), and aminoglycoside nucleotidyl transferase were done for sixteen alkaloids that showed anti-infective potential for better mechanistic interpretation of their probable mode of action. The inhibitory potential of compounds vs. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 (ACE2) as an important therapeutic target combating COVID-19 infection and its complication was also examined using molecular docking. Fumigatoside E showed the best fitting within the active sites of all the examined proteins. Thus, Aspergillus species isolated from marine organisms could afford bioactive entities combating infectious diseases.


Subject(s)
Alkaloids/chemistry , Alkaloids/pharmacology , Anti-Infective Agents/chemistry , Anti-Infective Agents/pharmacology , Aspergillus/chemistry , COVID-19/drug therapy , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/metabolism , Drug Discovery , Humans , Molecular Docking Simulation , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
20.
Pharm Nanotechnol ; 8(6): 437-451, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1067531

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus has become a life-threatening disease and it is caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). This new strain of coronavirus is not completely understood and to date, there is no treatment for coronavirus. Traditional ayurvedic medicines, mainly essential oils and Chinese herbs, have always played a vital role in the prevention and treatment of several epidemics and pandemics. In the meantime, guidelines of the ministry of AYUSH (Ayurveda, yoga, unani, siddha and homoepathy) include a traditional medicinal treatment for flu and fever and also recommended to boost immunity to prevent the spread of coronavirus. It is not possible to find which essential oil will offer the best level of protection. However, it is likely to assume that some essential oils are likely to offer a measurable level of defense in the same way they do with many other known viruses. METHODS: Literature relevant to various essential oils having antiviral activity has been collected and compiled. Various nanocarriers of essential oils have also been stated. The database was collected using various search engines such as J-Gate, Google Scholar, Sci-Hub, PubMed, ScienceDirect, etc. Results: Essential oils contain active constituents such as phenolic compounds, terpenoids, alkaloids, phenyl propanoids, etc., which are responsible for their biological properties such as antiviral, antibacterial, antimicrobial, antioxidant activities and many more. However, the use of essential oils has always been limited due to poor solubility, solvent toxicity, volatility and low solubility. Many nanotechnology based carriers especially, liposomes, dendrimers, nanoparticles, nanoemulsion and microemulsion, etc. have been evidenced to overcome limitations associated with essential oils. CONCLUSION: Several essential oils possess potent antiviral activity and are characterized by fewer side effects and are safe for human use. The nanocarrier systems of these oils have proved the potential to treat viral and bacterial infections. Lay Summary: Current COVID-19 era demands traditional treatment for immunity boost up as support therapy. Traditional ayurvedic medicines, mainly essential oils and Chinese herbs, have always played a vital role in the prevention and treatment of several epidemics and pandemics. Therefore, authors have summarized various essential oils having antiviral activity in current manuscript. Various nanocarriers of essential oils have been reported. Essential oils contain active constituents such as phenolic compounds, terpenoids, alkaloids, phenyl propanoids, etc., which are responsible for their biological properties such as antiviral, antibacterial, antimicrobial, antioxidant activity. However, the use of essential oils has always been limited due to poor solubility, solvent toxicity, volatility and low solubility. Many nanotechnology based carriers especially, liposomes, dendrimers, nanoparticles, nanoemulsion and microemulsion, etc. have been evidenced to overcome limitations associated with essential oils. The nanocarrier systems of these oils have proved the potential to treat viral and bacterial infections.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/chemistry , COVID-19/prevention & control , Delayed-Action Preparations/chemistry , Nanocapsules/chemistry , Oils, Volatile/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Alkaloids/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , Databases, Pharmaceutical , Drug Compounding , Herbal Medicine , Humans , Oils, Volatile/administration & dosage , Oils, Volatile/adverse effects , Terpenes/chemistry
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