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1.
Front Immunol ; 12: 744090, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1379961
2.
Immunology ; 163(4): 431-435, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1273103

ABSTRACT

The pandemic has brought challenges to teaching lab and research skills. Here Nigel Francis and colleagues explore the diverse approaches taken to replace lab-based immunology teaching, explain how networks of educators have driven this innovation and discuss the importance of retaining best practice into the future.


Subject(s)
Allergy and Immunology/education , Biomedical Research/education , COVID-19 , Computer-Assisted Instruction , Education, Distance , Laboratories , Students , Teaching , Curriculum , Humans
3.
Trends Immunol ; 41(12): 1051-1053, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-907150

ABSTRACT

An exemplar outcome of an immunology-based intervention is vaccine development; the current COVID-19 pandemic is a case in point. Can we build an immunology research ecosystem in Africa that nurtures discovery and enables translation? We see African immunologists as key agents of change and discuss obstacles and opportunities.


Subject(s)
Allergy and Immunology , Developing Countries , Africa , Allergy and Immunology/education , Allergy and Immunology/organization & administration , Allergy and Immunology/trends , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Biochem Mol Biol Educ ; 48(6): 678-684, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-897739

ABSTRACT

Over the last few decades, there has been a shift in the classroom from lecture-based to active learning settings with the argument that students retain more information when they are involved in the learning process. This correlation is even stronger when the active learning setting incorporates a real-world or personal connection. Using active learning activities that develop students' ability to comprehend primary scientific literature is particularly important in the field of immunology, due to the rapid expansion of information in the field, which has been further accelerated due to the COVID-19 pandemic. By nature, immunology is interdisciplinary, requiring an integrated knowledge of concepts from several scientific disciplines to understand complex immune processes. Engaging undergraduate students through the use of primary literature can improve scientific literacy, develop critical thinking, and enhance understanding of complex topics. To explore this, we utilized a group learning activity in an introductory immunology course that incorporated both a coronavirus-related review and COVID-19 clinical research article. We found that this learning activity significantly enhanced student confidence in key scientific literacy skills: reading scientific literature, clearly explaining relevant points, and describing conclusions generated from the data. Moreover, all students reported that they enjoyed the activity and that it helped them understand more about the current COVID-19 pandemic in the context of the immune response.


Subject(s)
Allergy and Immunology/education , COVID-19 , Education, Distance/methods , Literacy , Pandemics , Problem-Based Learning/methods , Self Concept , Students/psychology , Alabama , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Self-Assessment , Universities/organization & administration , Young Adult
5.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract ; 9(1): 1-6.e1, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-899065

ABSTRACT

As a result of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) global pandemic, medical trainees have faced unique challenges and uncertainties. To capture the experiences of allergy and immunology fellows throughout the United States and Canada during this time, a 17-item electronic questionnaire was distributed to 380 fellow-in-training (FIT) members of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology enrolled in US and Canadian allergy/immunology fellowship programs. Voluntary and anonymous responses were collected from April 15 to May 15, 2020. In addition to summary statistics, categorical data were compared using χ2 tests (Fisher's exact). Responses were obtained from FITs across all years of training and primary specialties (Internal Medicine, Pediatrics, and Medicine-Pediatrics) with a response rate of 32.6% (124 of 380). Reassignment to COVID-19 clinical responsibilities was reported by 12% (15 of 124) of FITs, with the largest proportion in the US northeast region. A majority of FITs used telehealth (95%) and virtual learning (82%) during the pandemic. Overall, 21% (25 of 120) of FITs expressed concern about potentially lacking clinical experience for independently practicing allergy and immunology. However, FITs using telehealth reported lower concern compared with those who did not (18.4% [21 of 114] vs 66.7% [4 of 6]; P = .01). The survey shows that allergy and immunology trainee experiences have varied considerably since the COVID-19 outbreak. Notably, the adoption of telehealth and virtual learning was commonly reported, and optimization of these virtual experiences will be helpful. Even outside of pandemics, training on the use of telemedicine may be a sound strategy in preparation for future health care delivery and unexpected events.


Subject(s)
Allergy and Immunology/education , Allergy and Immunology/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/prevention & control , Fellowships and Scholarships/methods , Canada , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , United States
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