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1.
Br J Community Nurs ; 26(6): 266-270, 2021 Jun 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1262691

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 provided significant challenges for community services and care homes. Residential and nursing care patients are considered highly vulnerable to the coronavirus due to their physical needs and environmental factors. Significant concern was raised with personal protective equipment (PPE) availability and appropriate training and support in local care homes. Members of the district nursing team and community services formed a team to deliver face to face training and support to care home workers to improve PPE adherence and reduce risks of transmission. Visits were offered to all 46 care homes in the locality and over 55 visits for teaching were performed in the first month. Challenges were faced with managing and prioritising frontline clinical duties. Feedback was overwhelmingly positive and care staff benefited from face-to-face delivery of education to support best practice.


Subject(s)
Allied Health Personnel/education , COVID-19/prevention & control , Community Health Nursing/education , Infection Control/methods , Nursing Homes , Personal Protective Equipment , Humans , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Program Evaluation , SARS-CoV-2 , United Kingdom
3.
J Prim Care Community Health ; 12: 21501327211004285, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1150376

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Medical assistants (MAs) were once limited to obtaining vital signs and office work. Now, MAs are foundational to team-based care, interacting with patients, systems, and teams in many ways. The transition to Virtual Health during the COVID-19 pandemic resulted in a further rapid and unique shift of MA roles and responsibilities. We sought to understand the impact of this shift and to place their new roles in the context of national professional competency standards. METHODS: In this qualitative, grounded theory study we conducted semi-structured interviews with 24 MAs at 10 primary care sites at a major academic medical center on their experiences during the shift from in-person to virtual care. MAs were selected by convenience sample. Coding was done in Dedoose version 8.335. Consensus-based inductive and deductive approaches were used for interview analysis. Identified MA roles were compared to national MA, Institute of Medicine, physician, and nursing professional competency domains. RESULTS: Three main themes emerged: Role Apprehension, Role Expansion, and Adaptability/Professionalism. Nine key roles emerged in the context of virtual visits: direct patient care (pre-visit and physical care), panel management, health systems ambassador, care coordination, patient flow coordination, scribing, quality improvement, and technology support. While some prior MA roles were limited by the virtual care shift, the majority translated directly or expanded in virtual care. Identified roles aligned better with Institute of Medicine, physician, and nursing professional competencies, than current national MA curricula. CONCLUSIONS: The transition to Virtual Health decreased MA's direct clinical work and expanded other roles within interprofessional care, notably quality improvement and technology support. Comparison of the current MA roles with national training program competencies identified new leadership and teamwork competencies which could be expanded during MA training to better support MA roles on inter-professional teams.


Subject(s)
Allied Health Personnel , COVID-19 , Health Occupations , Pandemics , Professional Competence , Professional Role , Telemedicine , Academic Medical Centers , Allied Health Personnel/education , Continuity of Patient Care , Curriculum , Humans , Interprofessional Relations , Leadership , Medical Informatics , Patient Care Team , Patient-Centered Care , Primary Health Care , Professional Competence/standards , Qualitative Research , Quality Improvement , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Antimicrob Resist Infect Control ; 9(1): 185, 2020 11 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1067275

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Prehospital professionals such as emergency physicians or paramedics must be able to choose and adequately don and doff personal protective equipment (PPE) in order to avoid COVID-19 infection. Our aim was to evaluate the impact of a gamified e-learning module on adequacy of PPE in student paramedics. METHODS: This was a web-based, randomized 1:1, parallel-group, triple-blind controlled trial. Student paramedics from three Swiss schools were invited to participate. They were informed they would be presented with both an e-learning module and an abridged version of the current regional prehospital COVID-19 guidelines, albeit not in which order. After a set of 22 questions designed to assess baseline knowledge, the control group was shown the guidelines before answering a set of 14 post-intervention questions. The e-learning group was shown the gamified e-learning module right after the guidelines, and before answering post-intervention questions. The primary outcome was the difference in the percentage of adequate choices of PPE before and after the intervention. RESULTS: The participation rate was of 71% (98/138). A total of 90 answer sets was analyzed. Adequate choice of PPE increased significantly both in the control (50% [33;83] vs 25% [25;50], P = .013) and in the e-learning group (67% [50;83] vs 25% [25;50], P = .001) following the intervention. Though the median of the difference was higher in the e-learning group, there was no statistically significant superiority over the control (33% [0;58] vs 17% [- 17;42], P = .087). The e-learning module was of greatest benefit in the subgroup of student paramedics who were actively working in an ambulance company (42% [8;58] vs 25% [- 17;42], P = 0.021). There was no significant effect in student paramedics who were not actively working in an ambulance service (0% [- 25;33] vs 17% [- 8;50], P = .584). CONCLUSIONS: The use of a gamified e-learning module increases the rate of adequate choice of PPE only among student paramedics actively working in an ambulance service. In this subgroup, combining this teaching modality with other interventions might help spare PPE and efficiently protect against COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/physiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Health Personnel/education , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personal Protective Equipment , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Adult , Allied Health Personnel/education , Allied Health Personnel/standards , Betacoronavirus/genetics , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Education, Distance/statistics & numerical data , Europe , Female , Health Personnel/standards , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional , Internet , Knowledge , Learning , Male , Personal Protective Equipment/standards , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Students/psychology , Young Adult
6.
J Intellect Disabil ; 25(3): 415-426, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-894975

ABSTRACT

The Center for Disease Control (CDC) recommended that direct support professionals (DSPs) take additional steps to protect people with disabilities during COVID-19 and receive training on the use of personal protective equipment and infection prevention. The Golisano Institute for Developmental Disability Nursing identified this as an unmet need and created an online asynchronous course for DSPs on infection prevention and use of personal protective equipment to reduce transmission of COVID-19 among individuals with disabilities and DSPs. Constructivism, experiential learning theory, and active learning theory guided content development. The course used games to break-up dense information into more manageable chunks as a means to increase learner engagement and motivation. The course was delivered on a dynamic Learning Management System to allow for a variety of content authoring tools to be utilized. After evaluation, the course was disseminated to DSPs. Future directions include a broader infection protection course for DSPs, without a direct focus on COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Allied Health Personnel/education , COVID-19/prevention & control , Developmental Disabilities/nursing , Education, Distance , Adult , Curriculum , Humans , Personal Protective Equipment
7.
Anaesthesist ; 70(1): 13-22, 2021 01.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-840972

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic necessitated a time-critical expansion of medical staff in intensive care units (ICU) and emergency rooms (ER). OBJECTIVE: This article describes the development, performance and first results of an interprofessional blended learning concept called hospital paramedics, qualifying paramedics and additional medical personnel to support ICUs and ERs. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The Protestant Hospital of the Bethel Foundation (EvKB), University Hospital OWL, University of Bielefeld in cooperation with the Study Institute Westfalen-Lippe, developed a 2-stage blended learning concept (stage 1 e­learning with online tutorials, stage 2 practical deployment) comprising 3 modules: ICU, ER and in-hospital emergency medicine. At the beginning, the participants were asked about their sociodemographic data (age, gender, type of medical qualifications) and subjective feeling of confidence. At the end, a final discussion with the participant, the practice instructor and the supervising physician took place and an evaluation of the deployment by the head of the practice and the hospital paramedic was carried out using questionnaires. RESULTS: Within 6 weeks 58 (63%) of the 92 participants completed the online course and 17 (29%) additionally completed their traineeship. In the ICU they assisted with preparing catheter systems, medication and nursing, performed Manchester triage and initial care in the ER. After completion hospital paramedics were significantly more confident when working in a hospital, catheterization and tracheostoma care (p < 0.05). Of the supervisors 94% deemed the deployment as useful and 100% of the participants were prepared to be available at short notice in their areas as compensation for the COVID-19-pandemic in the event of a staff shortage. Through the provision of additional intensive care ventilators and monitoring units in the period from March to the beginning of May 2020 and the personnel management that was carried out, the EvKB was in a position to increase the number of previously provided ventilator beds by potentially >40 ventilation places. CONCLUSION: Blended learning concepts, such as hospital paramedics, can quickly qualify medical personnel for use in system-relevant settings, relieve nursing staff and thus create an expansion of intensive care capacities. Existing or pending pandemic and contingency plans should be complemented by such blended learning training so that they are immediately available in case of a second pandemic wave, future pandemics or other crisis situations.


Subject(s)
Allied Health Personnel/education , COVID-19/therapy , Emergency Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Health Personnel/education , Intensive Care Units/organization & administration , Interprofessional Education/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/nursing , Critical Care/methods , Emergency Medical Technicians/education , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Ventilators, Mechanical , Volunteers/education
9.
J Med Imaging Radiat Sci ; 51(4): 512-517, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-739921

ABSTRACT

Clinical placement experience is an important component of medical radiation science (MRS) education, equipping students to safely transition into complex healthcare environments. This commentary draws on evidence from the literature that reports challenges allied health students face in clinical environments. As several factors are implicated that could result in a higher prevalence of psychological distress and mental ill-health in MRS students, there is a need to re-emphasize the importance of developing strategies to support students in clinical education. A key recommendation is to identify associated risk factors early as they can impact on the quality of education and in severe cases be detrimental to students' psychological well-being. This requires an understanding of the full extent and nature of the challenges through partnered approaches between professional organisations, clinical departments, academics and students. Developing evidence-based strategies for improving students' well-being in clinical environments is also essential.


Subject(s)
Allied Health Occupations/education , Allied Health Personnel/education , Allied Health Personnel/psychology , Radiography/psychology , Radiotherapy/psychology , Students, Medical/psychology , Humans , Radiography/methods , Radiotherapy/methods
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