Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 16 de 16
Filter
1.
BMC Emerg Med ; 21(1): 110, 2021 10 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477263

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Ambulance care professionals are regularly confronted with critical incidents that increase risks for mental health disorders. To minimize these risks, it is important that ambulance care professionals adequately cope with critical incidents. Especially from the perspective of starting ambulance care professionals it is unknown which coping styles they use when experiencing a critical incident and how they are trained to cope with critical incidents. The aim of this study was to gain insight in (a) what starting ambulance care professionals describe as critical incidents, (b) how they experience these critical incidents and their consequences, (c) how they cope with these incidents, and (d) how they are trained and guided to cope with these incidents. METHODS: A qualitative design with individual, semi-structured interviews was used. The data was analyzed by using inductive thematic analysis. RESULTS: Twenty-two starting ambulance care professionals were interviewed of which, 11 were male. The age ranged from 23 to 31 years, with 11 participants being 27 years or younger. Three key-themes emerged that make an incident critical: (1) emotional connection versus emotional detachment, (2) feeling loss of control, and (3) incomprehension. All participants experienced several short to middle term physical, psychological and social consequences after encountering a critical incident. Starting ambulance care professionals applied different coping strategies during different phases of the ambulance care process: a mix of depersonification, focus on the medical task, support from colleagues and their own network, seeking confirmation, and distraction. Most starting ambulance care professionals don't actively remember they received education about coping with critical incidents during their initial educational program. During and after traineeships, the workplace preceptor has a crucial role for starting ambulance care professionals to learn them how to cope with critical incidents. CONCLUSIONS: Three key-themes interact to make an incident more critical for starting ambulance care professionals. To cope with these critical incidents, starting ambulance care professionals use a variety of coping strategies. These results can be used to develop training and coaching for starting ambulance care professionals so they can adequately cope with critical incidents.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , Allied Health Personnel/psychology , Ambulances , Adult , Emotions , Female , Humans , Male , Qualitative Research , Workplace , Young Adult
2.
Aust J Rural Health ; 29(5): 753-767, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1443220

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the impact of COVID-19 on the mental health and well-being of rural paramedics, police, community nursing and child protection staff. METHOD: An online survey was distributed to investigate the sources of stress and support across individual, task and organisational domains. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: The survey was completed by 1542 paramedics, police, community nurses and child protection workers from all states and territories of Australia. This study describes the data for the 632 rural participants. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The main measures of well-being were the Public Health Questionnaire (PHQ9), the Generalised Anxiety Disorder (GAD7), the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), workplace engagement, intention to quit and COVID-19-related stress. RESULTS: The mean depression and anxiety scores were 8.2 (PHQ9) and 6.8 (GAD7). This is 2-3 times that found in the general community. Over half (56.1%) of respondents showed high emotional exhaustion (burnout). The emotional exhaustion, depersonalisation and personal accomplishment mean scores were 28.5, 9.3 and 34.2, respectively. The strongest associations with burnout and psychological distress were workload, provision of practical support, training and organisational communication. A significant proportion of respondents were seriously considering quitting (27.4%) or looking for a new job with a different employer (28.5%) in the next 12 months. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 has increased the workload and stress on rural front-line community staff. The major sources of stress were related to organisations' responses to COVID-19 and not COVID-19 per se. The data suggest the most effective mental health interventions are practical and preventive, such as firstly ensuring fair and reasonable workloads.


Subject(s)
Allied Health Personnel/psychology , Burnout, Professional , COVID-19/psychology , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Nurses/psychology , Police/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workload
3.
Psychiatr Rehabil J ; 44(3): 201-203, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1404880

ABSTRACT

The well-being of the psychiatric rehabilitation workforce is a growing concern, particularly as a result of the stresses of the COVID-19 pandemic on demand for mental health services. Research focusing on this aspect of psychiatric rehabilitation services remains limited but is important in supporting a resilient mental health workforce. This special section presents four papers that focus on aspects of worker well-being and burnout, including drivers of well-being and other outcomes, as well as exploring potential action steps and contexts that organizations could consider in their efforts to bolster well-being. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
Allied Health Personnel/psychology , Mental Health Services , Psychiatric Rehabilitation , Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Health Personnel , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
4.
J Am Geriatr Soc ; 70(1): 8-18, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1373834

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Limited COVID-19 vaccination acceptance among healthcare assistants (HCAs) may adversely impact older adults, who are at increased risk for severe COVID-19 infections. Our study objective was to evaluate the perceptions of COVID-19 vaccine safety and efficacy in a sample of frontline HCAs, overall and by race and ethnicity. METHODS: An online survey was conducted from December 2020 to January 2021 through national e-mail listserv and private Facebook page for the National Association of Health Care Assistants. Responses from 155 HCAs, including certified nursing assistants, home health aides, certified medical assistants, and certified medication technicians, were included. A 27-item survey asked questions about experiences and perceptions of COVID-19 vaccines, including how confident they were that COVID-19 vaccines are safe, effective, and adequately tested in people of color. Multivariable regression was used to identify associations with confidence in COVID-19 vaccines. RESULTS: We analyzed data from 155 completed responses. Among respondents, 23.9% were black and 8.4% Latino/a. Most respondents worked in the nursing home setting (53.5%), followed by hospitals (12.9%), assisted living (11.6%), and home care (10.3%). Respondents expressed low levels of confidence in COVID-19 vaccines, with fewer than 40% expressing at least moderate confidence in safety (38.1%), effectiveness (31.0%), or adequate testing in people of color (27.1%). Non-white respondents reported lower levels of confidence in adequate testing of vaccines compared to white respondents. In bivariate and adjusted models, respondents who gave more favorable scores of organizational leadership at their workplace expressed greater confidence in COVID-19 vaccines. CONCLUSION: Frontline HCAs reported low confidence in COVID-19 vaccines. Stronger organizational leadership in the workplace appears to be an important factor in influencing HCA's willingness to be vaccinated. Action is needed to enhance COVID-19 vaccine uptake in this important population with employers playing an important role to build vaccine confidence and trust among employees.


Subject(s)
Allied Health Personnel/psychology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Perception , /statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Assisted Living Facilities/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/prevention & control , Female , Hospitals/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Internet , Male , Middle Aged , Nursing Homes/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data
5.
Int J Lang Commun Disord ; 56(3): 567-582, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1142848

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is an increasing number of technological resources available to speech and language therapists (SLTs) for use in clinical practice, but the factors that influence SLTs' selection and use of such resources are not well understood. In related fields, technology acceptance models have been employed to explain users' adoption of technology and to inform the advancement of empirically supported technological resources. AIMS: To determine the factors that influence SLTs' use of technology for clinical practice by testing a model of their technology acceptance and use. METHODS & PROCEDURES: We surveyed 209 practising SLTs in the United States representative of the speech and language membership of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA). Participants completed a 38-item electronic survey representing four categories: (1) technology use, (2) technology attitudes and factors influencing technology use, (3) employment information and (4) demographics. Items measuring technology attitudes served as indicators of the research model, which mapped the primary relationships of a technology acceptance model. Survey data were collected before the Covid-19 pandemic. OUTCOMES & RESULTS: The research model accounted for 66% of the variance in SLTs' behavioural intention to use technology, which significantly and positively predicted the amount of time they reportedly spent using technology in the workplace. Subjective norms and attitudes towards technology use directly predicted the intention to use technology. Perceived usefulness and ease of use indirectly predicted intention to use technology. Survey respondents reported using technology during 48% (SD = 24%) of their overall weekly work hours on average, with a large majority reporting using technology at least once per week for planning (89% of respondents), assessment (66% of respondents) or intervention (90% of respondents). CONCLUSIONS & IMPLICATIONS: These findings statistically explain the relationships between SLTs' attitudes and their intention to use technology for clinical practice, contributing to our understanding of why SLTs adopt certain technologies. We also detail the nature and frequency of technology use in the clinical practice of SLTs. Future directions for this work include further exploring use categories, employing direct measurements of technology use and exploring the impact of recent changes in SLT service delivery due to the Covid-19 pandemic on SLTs' technology attitudes. What this paper adds What is already known on the subject Existing research about the adoption and use of technological resources by SLTs indicates that they select tools based on convenience, cost and recommendations by others. What this paper adds to existing knowledge This study is the first to develop and test a research model of SLTs' technology attitudes. The findings from model testing demonstrate the significant predictors of SLTs' behavioural intention to use technology for clinical purposes. Intent of use is related to how much SLTs use technology in the workplace. What are the potential or actual clinical implications of this work? The present findings can inform interventions targeting the design and adoption of electronic SLT resources that are empirically supported.


Subject(s)
Allied Health Personnel/psychology , Language Therapy/methods , Speech Therapy/methods , Technology/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States
6.
Work ; 68(2): 305-315, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1045527

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has shown a catastrophic effect on mankind. The allied healthcare professionals (AHPs) play a pivotal role against COVID-19. OBJECTIVES: To appraise the knowledge and attitude about COVID-19 of AHPs working across Saudi Arabia. METHODS: This cross-sectional study was conducted using Qualtrics software to gather data from all five regions of Saudi Arabia during the nationwide lockdown in April 2020. Complete responses of 195 AHPs were considered for analysis. The questionnaire consisted of 15 and 14 questions on knowledge and attitude, respectively. The overall scores of each domain were calculated and modified Bloom's criterion was applied to categorize them into a three-point ordinal scale. Statistical analysis was performed using Chi-square test along with multivariate logistic regression for significant parameters. RESULTS: The AHPs displayed a moderate level of knowledge (58.2%) and a good level of attitude (80%). The AHPs were found to have a non-significant (P > 0.05) difference in the level of knowledge within age, gender, region, occupation, educational level, organizational setup and years of experience. The attitude of AHPs working in a private setup has shown a 2.8 times (P = 0.020) higher risk for having moderate/poor attitude compared to the AHPs working in a government organization. CONCLUSIONS: AHPs displayed a moderate level of knowledge and good attitude towards COVID-19. Emphasis should be given to continuous professional development in order to enhance their knowledge. Furthermore, strategies should be developed in the private sector to positively reinforce the attitude of AHPs.


Subject(s)
Allied Health Personnel/psychology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Pandemics/prevention & control , Adult , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Services Research , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
7.
Disaster Med Public Health Prep ; 14(3): 406-412, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1027830

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Previous research has identified a lack of clarification regarding paramedic professional obligation to work. Understanding community expectations of paramedics will provide some clarity around this issue. The objective of this research was to explore the expectations of a sample of Australian community members regarding the professional obligation of paramedics to respond during pandemics. METHODS: The authors used qualitative methods to gather Australian community member perspectives immediately before the onset of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Focus groups were used for data collection, and a thematic analysis was conducted. RESULTS: The findings revealed 9 key themes: context of obligation (normal operations versus crisis situation), hierarchy of obligation (individual versus organizational obligation), risk acceptability, acceptable occupational risk (it's part of the job), access to personal protective equipment, legal and ethical guidelines, education and training, safety, and acceptable limitations to obligation. The factors identified as being acceptable limitations to professional obligation are presented as further sub-themes: physical health, mental health, and competing personal obligations. CONCLUSIONS: The issue of professional obligation must be addressed by ambulance services as a matter of urgency, especially in light of the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic. Further research is recommended to understand how community member expectations evolve during and after the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic.


Subject(s)
Allied Health Personnel/ethics , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Social Responsibility , Allied Health Personnel/psychology , Allied Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 , Focus Groups/methods , Humans , Motivation , Pandemics/ethics , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Professional Role , Qualitative Research
8.
Gen Hosp Psychiatry ; 69: 20-26, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1014490

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to understand the physical and psychological impact of high stress clinical environments and contributory factors of burnout in multidisciplinary healthcare workforce during the initial outbreak of COVID-19. METHOD: In-person qualitative interviews informed by an adaptation of Karasek's Job Demand-control model were conducted with a convenience sample of healthcare workforce from March to April 2020. RESULTS: Themes emerging from interviews coalesced around three main areas: fear of uncertainty, physical and psychological manifestations of stress, and resilience building. Shifting information, a lack of PPE, and fear of infecting others prompted worry for those working with Covid-infected patients. Participants reported that stress manifested more psychologically than physically. Individualized stress mitigation efforts, social media and organizational transparency were reported by healthcare workers to be effective against rising stressors. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 has presented healthcare workforce with unprecedented challenges in their work environment. With attention to understanding stressors and supporting clinicians during healthcare emergencies, more research is necessary in order to effectively promote healthcare workforce well-being.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/therapy , Health Personnel/psychology , Occupational Stress/psychology , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Resilience, Psychological , Adult , Allied Health Personnel/psychology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Fear , Female , Humans , Male , Nurses/psychology , Organizational Policy , Pharmacists/psychology , Physicians/psychology , Qualitative Research , Respiratory Therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Media , Uncertainty , United States
11.
PLoS One ; 15(10): e0241328, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-895072

ABSTRACT

The purpose of the current study was to examine the impact of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2 or COVID-19) on allied health professionals work environment, access to personal protective equipment (PPE) and COVID-19 testing, and mental health. A 34-question survey was developed and distributed electronically to allied health professionals through listservs of professional organizations and social media groups. A total of 921 responses from allied health professionals in a variety of work settings were analyzed. The majority of allied health professionals had access to medical-grade PPE and agreed with their clinics decisions to stay open or closed. Private practices appeared to be the most negatively impacted with regards to employment in the form of pay reductions, furloughs, lay-offs, or the requirement of using paid time off. Importantly, 86% of all respondents, irrespective of employment status, reported feeling stressed with regards to changes in their work environment and transmission of the virus. However, levels of stress were dependent upon access to PPE and mental health resources. Specifically, those with access to mental health support reported lower stress levels than those without such access. These results highlight the need for continuous monitoring of mental health for allied health professionals in order to inform clinic and hospital policies for PPE and the development of brief interventions to mitigate adverse long-term mental health outcomes.


Subject(s)
Allied Health Personnel/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Personal Protective Equipment/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19 Testing , Female , Health Occupations , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States/epidemiology
12.
J Med Imaging Radiat Sci ; 51(4): 512-517, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-739921

ABSTRACT

Clinical placement experience is an important component of medical radiation science (MRS) education, equipping students to safely transition into complex healthcare environments. This commentary draws on evidence from the literature that reports challenges allied health students face in clinical environments. As several factors are implicated that could result in a higher prevalence of psychological distress and mental ill-health in MRS students, there is a need to re-emphasize the importance of developing strategies to support students in clinical education. A key recommendation is to identify associated risk factors early as they can impact on the quality of education and in severe cases be detrimental to students' psychological well-being. This requires an understanding of the full extent and nature of the challenges through partnered approaches between professional organisations, clinical departments, academics and students. Developing evidence-based strategies for improving students' well-being in clinical environments is also essential.


Subject(s)
Allied Health Occupations/education , Allied Health Personnel/education , Allied Health Personnel/psychology , Radiography/psychology , Radiotherapy/psychology , Students, Medical/psychology , Humans , Radiography/methods , Radiotherapy/methods
13.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 17(14)2020 07 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-653519

ABSTRACT

Historically, infectious diseases have been the leading cause of human psychosomatic strain and death tolls. This research investigated the recent threat of COVID-19 contagion, especially its impact among frontline paramedics treating patients with COVID-19, and their perception of self-infection, which ultimately increases their agonistic behaviour. Based on the stressor-strain-outcome paradigm, a research model was proposed and investigated using survey-based data through a structured questionnaire. The results found that the perceived threat of COVID-19 contagion (emotional and cognitive threat) was positively correlated with physiological anxiety, depression, and emotional exhaustion, which led toward agonistic behaviour. Further, perceived social support was a key moderator that negatively affected the relationships between agonistic behaviour and physiological anxiety, depression, and emotional exhaustion. These findings significantly contributed to the current literature concerning COVID-19 and pandemic-related effects on human behaviour. This study also theorized the concept of human agonistic behaviour, which has key implications for future researchers.


Subject(s)
Agonistic Behavior , Allied Health Personnel/psychology , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Adult , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
16.
Brain Behav Immun ; 88: 559-565, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-100653

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Since the declaration of the coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak as pandemic, there are reports on the increased prevalence of physical symptoms observed in the general population. We investigated the association between psychological outcomes and physical symptoms among healthcare workers. METHODS: Healthcare workers from 5 major hospitals, involved in the care for COVID-19 patients, in Singapore and India were invited to participate in a study by performing a self-administered questionnaire within the period of February 19 to April 17, 2020. Healthcare workers included doctors, nurses, allied healthcare workers, administrators, clerical staff and maintenance workers. This questionnaire collected information on demographics, medical history, symptom prevalence in the past month, Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS-21) and the Impact of Events Scale-Revised (IES-R) instrument. The prevalence of physical symptoms displayed by healthcare workers and the associations between physical symptoms and psychological outcomes of depression, anxiety, stress, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) were evaluated. RESULTS: Out of the 906 healthcare workers who participated in the survey, 48 (5.3%) screened positive for moderate to very-severe depression, 79 (8.7%) for moderate to extremely-severe anxiety, 20 (2.2%) for moderate to extremely-severe stress, and 34 (3.8%) for moderate to severe levels of psychological distress. The commonest reported symptom was headache (32.3%), with a large number of participants (33.4%) reporting more than four symptoms. Participants who had experienced symptoms in the preceding month were more likely to be older, have pre-existing comorbidities and a positive screen for depression, anxiety, stress, and PTSD. After adjusting for age, gender and comorbidities, it was found that depression (OR 2.79, 95% CI 1.54-5.07, p = 0.001), anxiety (OR 2.18, 95% CI 1.36-3.48, p = 0.001), stress (OR 3.06, 95% CI 1.27-7.41, p = 0.13), and PTSD (OR 2.20, 95% CI 1.12-4.35, p = 0.023) remained significantly associated with the presence of physical symptoms experienced in the preceding month. Linear regression revealed that the presence of physical symptoms was associated with higher mean scores in the IES-R, DASS Anxiety, Stress and Depression subscales. CONCLUSIONS: Our study demonstrates a significant association between the prevalence of physical symptoms and psychological outcomes among healthcare workers during the COVID-19 outbreak. We postulate that this association may be bi-directional, and that timely psychological interventions for healthcare workers with physical symptoms should be considered once an infection has been excluded.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections , Depression/epidemiology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Adult , Allied Health Personnel/psychology , Allied Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Female , Headache/epidemiology , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , India/epidemiology , Internationality , Lethargy/epidemiology , Male , Nurses/psychology , Nurses/statistics & numerical data , Pharyngitis/epidemiology , Physicians/psychology , Physicians/statistics & numerical data , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2 , Singapore/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL