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1.
Skinmed ; 21(2): 118-121, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2320749

ABSTRACT

A 30-year-old woman visited the dermatology and venereology clinic with red rashes on her cheeks with spreading wounds to the ears present for 6 months. Similar ailments were also found on the chest and upper arms accompanying black spots on both palms. Initially, red rashes appeared intermittently, observed around the eyes and cheeks, especially at sun exposure. Tenderness or pruritus was not present; however, the patient had joints ache, sore fingers, hair loss as well as frequent fever.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lupus Erythematosus, Cutaneous , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic , Female , Humans , Adult , Pandemics , COVID-19/complications , Alopecia/complications , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/complications
2.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 22413, 2022 12 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2186010

ABSTRACT

Long-term sequelae of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) constitute Long COVID. Although Long COVID has been reported globally, its risk factors and effects on quality of life (QOL) remain unclear. We conducted a cross-sectional study using questionnaires and electronic medical records of COVID-19 patients who were diagnosed or hospitalized at five facilities in Japan. Responses were obtained from 285 out of 1,150 patients. More than half of the participants reported Long COVID symptoms of varying severity 1 year after COVID-19. Common sequelae included fatigue, dyspnea, alopecia, concentration problems, memory problems, sleeplessness, and joint pain, which often significantly reduced their QOL. COVID-19 severity was strongly associated with sputum production, chest pain, dyspnea, sore throat, and diarrhea, but not with fatigue, dysgeusia, anosmia, alopecia, and sleeplessness. Fatigue, dysgeusia, anosmia, alopecia, and sleeplessness affected the QOL among participants with asymptomatic or mild COVID-19 during the acute phase. Moreover, these sequelae persisted for prolonged periods.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , Cross-Sectional Studies , Post-Acute COVID-19 Syndrome , Quality of Life , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/complications , Anosmia , Dysgeusia , Prevalence , Risk Factors , Chest Pain , Dyspnea/epidemiology , Fatigue/epidemiology , Fatigue/complications , Alopecia/complications
3.
Front Immunol ; 13: 919958, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2039675

ABSTRACT

Background: Androgen sensitivity, which was established as the leading etiology of androgenetic alopecia (AGA) and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), plays an important role in SARS-CoV-2 infection. Vaccination is essential for AGA and BPH patients in view of the high risk from SARS-CoV-2 infection. Purpose: We aimed to investigate the associated factors for SARS-CoV-2 vaccination and its side effects in populations with AGA and BPH. Method: We collected the data on SARS-CoV-2 vaccination and adverse reactions of male AGA and BPH patients visited the outpatient of Xiangya hospital by telephone and web-based questionnaires. Vaccination rate and adverse reactions were compared by different vaccine types and use of anti-androgen therapy. Result: A total of 457 AGA patients and 397 BPH patients were recruited in this study. Among which, 92.8% AGA patients and 61.0% BPH patients had at least the first dose of SARS-CoV-2 vaccination (p < 0.001). Having comorbidities and use of anti-androgen therapy increased the risk of un-vaccination among AGA by 2.875 and 3.729 times, respectively (p < 0.001). Around 31.1% AGA patients and 9.5% BPH patients presented adverse reactions, which were mostly mild. Anti-androgen therapy increased the inclination of injection site pain after vaccination (18.7% vs 11.9%; OR: 1.708, 95% CI: 1.088-2.683, p = 0.019). Conclusion: Co-existence of other systemic diseases and anti-androgen therapy were the limiting factors for SARS-CoV-2 unvaccination, especially in AGA patients. The importance of SARS-CoV-2 vaccines should be strengthened and popularized in androgen sensitive phenotypes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions , Prostatic Hyperplasia , Vaccines , Alopecia/complications , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions/complications , Humans , Hyperplasia , Male , Phenotype , Prostate , Prostatic Hyperplasia/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination/adverse effects
4.
J Cosmet Dermatol ; 21(9): 3655-3662, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1922985

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: While there are literature reporting increased incidence of hair loss in COVID-19 patients, insufficient evidence exists on the topic to date. This review aims to identify the existing evidence and clinical characteristics of hair loss with COVID-19 infection. METHODS: Following the PRISMA Extension for Scoping Reviews, MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched for all peer-reviewed articles with relevant keywords including "Alopecia," "Telogen Effluvium (TE)," and "COVID-19" from their inception to November 20, 2021. RESULTS: A total of 26 articles, with 9 observational studies and 17 case reports or series (a total of 58 cases), were included. Most studies dealt with TE. There were no clear trends between COVID-19 severity and the extent of hair loss. Analysis of the 58 cases also found similar results with most of the cases being female (82.8%), the median onset of hair loss of 2.0 months, and the median time to recovery of hair loss of 5.0 months with a resolution rate of 95%. CONCLUSION: While this systematic review revealed uncertainty and a lack of strong evidence regarding the association of COVID-19 and hair loss, hair loss in COVID-19 may mainly include TE and be reversible in nature. Future studies are warranted to determine the detailed pathophysiology and risk factors of hair loss in COVID-19, including possible roles of estrogen, progesterone, and pro-inflammatory cytokines.


Subject(s)
Alopecia Areata , COVID-19 , Alopecia/complications , Alopecia/etiology , Alopecia Areata/etiology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cytokines , Estrogens , Female , Humans , Male , Progesterone
5.
Dermatol Ther ; 35(6): e15433, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1735906

ABSTRACT

The prevalence of hair loss has increased during COVID-19. In this study, we review the current literature on incidence and characteristics of various types of COVID-19-related and COVID-19-vaccine- related hair loss including telogen effluvium, alopecia areata, friction alopecia and anagen effluvium. Regarding most of them, the more severe the infection, the more profound and prolonged the course of alopecia. However, the most important issue is reassuring the patients of the non-serious nature of this complication, since psychological support is the most important factor in the earlier resolution of the condition.


Subject(s)
Alopecia Areata , COVID-19 , Vaccines , Alopecia/complications , Alopecia Areata/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
6.
J Cosmet Dermatol ; 21(4): 1339-1346, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1625816

ABSTRACT

Emerging literature evidence shows that the manifestations of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), which is the disease caused by SARS-CoV-2, encompass alterations of the pulmonary, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and neurological system. Moreover, hematologic and dermatologic manifestations have been documented. The aim of this review is to summarize the dermatologic manifestations of COVID-19 involving the hair and nails in a narrative way. A total of 1136 patients have been reported to have de novo hair loss following COVID-19. Notably, 958 patients experienced telogen effluvium (TE) (female/male ratio = 3,86:1), two female patients experienced anagen effluvium, and 176 people had alopecia areata (female/male ratio of 19:3). Ten patients were reported to have ungual changes following the infection with the novel coronavirus: The individuals affected were 6 women and 4 men. COVID-19 can be associated with hair and ungual manifestations. This review summarizes the evidence regarding the hair and ungual manifestations of COVID-19, which could be harnessed to better understand the clinical implications and pathophysiology of this disease that has been burdening society globally since December 2019.


Subject(s)
Alopecia Areata , COVID-19 , Alopecia/complications , Alopecia Areata/epidemiology , Alopecia Areata/etiology , COVID-19/complications , Female , Hair , Humans , Male , Nails , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 16144, 2021 08 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1349688

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 can involve persistence, sequelae, and other medical complications that last weeks to months after initial recovery. This systematic review and meta-analysis aims to identify studies assessing the long-term effects of COVID-19. LitCOVID and Embase were searched to identify articles with original data published before the 1st of January 2021, with a minimum of 100 patients. For effects reported in two or more studies, meta-analyses using a random-effects model were performed using the MetaXL software to estimate the pooled prevalence with 95% CI. PRISMA guidelines were followed. A total of 18,251 publications were identified, of which 15 met the inclusion criteria. The prevalence of 55 long-term effects was estimated, 21 meta-analyses were performed, and 47,910 patients were included (age 17-87 years). The included studies defined long-COVID as ranging from 14 to 110 days post-viral infection. It was estimated that 80% of the infected patients with SARS-CoV-2 developed one or more long-term symptoms. The five most common symptoms were fatigue (58%), headache (44%), attention disorder (27%), hair loss (25%), and dyspnea (24%). Multi-disciplinary teams are crucial to developing preventive measures, rehabilitation techniques, and clinical management strategies with whole-patient perspectives designed to address long COVID-19 care.


Subject(s)
Alopecia/diagnosis , Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity/diagnosis , COVID-19/complications , Dyspnea/diagnosis , Fatigue/diagnosis , Headache/diagnosis , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Alopecia/complications , Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity/complications , COVID-19/virology , Dyspnea/complications , Fatigue/complications , Headache/complications , Humans , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Young Adult
11.
Clin Microbiol Infect ; 27(1): 89-95, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-803353

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To describe the prevalence, nature and risk factors for the main clinical sequelae in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) survivors who have been discharged from the hospital for more than 3 months. METHODS: This longitudinal study was based on a telephone follow-up survey of COVID-19 patients hospitalized and discharged from Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, China before 1 March 2020. Demographic and clinical characteristics and self-reported clinical sequelae of the survivors were described and analysed. A cohort of volunteers who were free of COVID-19 and lived in the urban area of Wuhan during the outbreak were also selected as the comparison group. RESULTS: Among 538 survivors (293, 54.5% female), the median (interquartile range) age was 52.0 (41.0-62.0) years, and the time from discharge from hospital to first follow-up was 97.0 (95.0-102.0) days. Clinical sequelae were common, including general symptoms (n = 267, 49.6%), respiratory symptoms (n = 210, 39%), cardiovascular-related symptoms (n = 70, 13%), psychosocial symptoms (n = 122, 22.7%) and alopecia (n = 154, 28.6%). We found that physical decline/fatigue (p < 0.01), postactivity polypnoea (p= 0.04) and alopecia (p < 0.01) were more common in female than in male subjects. Dyspnoea during hospitalization was associated with subsequent physical decline/fatigue, postactivity polypnoea and resting heart rate increases but not specifically with alopecia. A history of asthma during hospitalization was associated with subsequent postactivity polypnoea sequela. A history of pulse ≥90 bpm during hospitalization was associated with resting heart rate increase in convalescence. The duration of virus shedding after COVID-19 onset and hospital length of stay were longer in survivors with physical decline/fatigue or postactivity polypnoea than in those without. CONCLUSIONS: Clinical sequelae during early COVID-19 convalescence were common; some of these sequelae might be related to gender, age and clinical characteristics during hospitalization.


Subject(s)
Alopecia/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Dyspnea/epidemiology , Fatigue/epidemiology , Survivors , Tachycardia/epidemiology , Adult , Alopecia/complications , Alopecia/physiopathology , Alopecia/therapy , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/therapy , China/epidemiology , Convalescence , Dyspnea/complications , Dyspnea/physiopathology , Dyspnea/therapy , Fatigue/complications , Fatigue/physiopathology , Fatigue/therapy , Female , Humans , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Discharge , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Severity of Illness Index , Tachycardia/complications , Tachycardia/physiopathology , Tachycardia/therapy
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