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1.
Viruses ; 14(2)2022 02 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1674829

ABSTRACT

Coronaviruses (CoV) are divided into the genera α-CoVs, ß-CoVs, γ-CoVs and δ-CoVs. Of these, α-CoVs and ß-CoVs are solely capable of causing infections in humans, resulting in mild to severe respiratory symptoms. Bats have been identified as natural reservoir hosts for CoVs belonging to these two genera. Consequently, research on bat populations, CoV prevalence in bats and genetic characterization of bat CoVs is of special interest to investigate the potential transmission risks. We present the genome sequence of a novel α-CoV strain detected in rectal swab samples of Miniopterus fuliginosus bats from a colony in the Wavul Galge cave (Koslanda, Sri Lanka). The novel strain is highly similar to Miniopterus bat coronavirus 1, an α-CoV located in the subgenus of Minunacoviruses. Phylogenetic reconstruction revealed a high identity of the novel strain to other α-CoVs derived from Miniopterus bats, while human-pathogenic α-CoV strains like HCoV-229E and HCoV-NL63 were more distantly related. Comparison with selected bat-related and human-pathogenic strains of the ß-CoV genus showed low identities of ~40%. Analyses of the different genes on nucleotide and amino acid level revealed that the non-structural ORF1a/1b are more conserved among α-CoVs and ß-CoVs, while there are higher variations in the structural proteins known to be important for host specificity. The novel strain was named batCoV/MinFul/2018/SriLanka and had a prevalence of 50% (66/130) in rectal swab samples and 58% (61/104) in feces samples that were collected from Miniopterus bats in Wavul Galge cave. Based on the differences between strain batCoV/MinFul/2018/SriLanka and human-pathogenic α-CoVs and ß-CoVs, we conclude that there is a rather low transmission risk to humans. Further studies in the Wavul Galge cave and at other locations in Sri Lanka will give more detailed information about the prevalence of this virus.


Subject(s)
Alphacoronavirus/genetics , Alphacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Chiroptera/virology , Coronavirus Infections/veterinary , Disease Reservoirs/veterinary , Disease Reservoirs/virology , Genome, Viral , Alphacoronavirus/classification , Animals , Caves/virology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Evolution, Molecular , Female , Male , Phylogeny , Sequence Analysis, DNA , Sri Lanka
2.
Viruses ; 14(2)2022 01 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1625724

ABSTRACT

Bats are a reservoir for coronaviruses (CoVs) that periodically spill over to humans, as evidenced by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and SARS-CoV-2. A collection of 174 bat samples originating from South Dakota, Minnesota, Iowa, and Nebraska submitted for rabies virus testing due to human exposure were analyzed using a pan-coronavirus PCR. A previously partially characterized CoV, Eptesicus bat CoV, was identified in 12 (6.9%) samples by nested RT-PCR. Six near-complete genomes were determined. Genetic analysis found a high similarity between all CoV-positive samples, Rocky Mountain bat CoV 65 and alphacoronavirus HCQD-2020 recently identified in South Korea. Phylogenetic analysis of genome sequences showed EbCoV is closely related to bat CoV HKU2 and swine acute diarrhea syndrome CoV; however, topological incongruences were noted for the spike gene that was more closely related to porcine epidemic diarrhea virus. Similar to some alphaCoVs, a novel gene, ORF7, was discovered downstream of the nucleocapsid, whose protein lacked similarity to known proteins. The widespread circulation of EbCoV with similarities to bat viruses that have spilled over to swine warrants further surveillance.


Subject(s)
Alphacoronavirus/classification , Alphacoronavirus/genetics , Chiroptera/virology , Disease Reservoirs/veterinary , Disease Reservoirs/virology , Phylogeny , Alphacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Animals , Genome, Viral , Iowa , Midwestern United States , Minnesota , Republic of Korea , Sequence Analysis, DNA , South Dakota , Viral Zoonoses/transmission
3.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 24145, 2021 12 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1585802

ABSTRACT

Recent studies suggest that coronaviruses circulate widely in Southeast Asian bat species and that the progenitors of the SARS-Cov-2 virus could have originated in rhinolophid bats in the region. Our objective was to assess the diversity and circulation patterns of coronavirus in several bat species in Southeast Asia. We undertook monthly live-capture sessions and sampling in Cambodia over 17 months to cover all phases of the annual reproduction cycle of bats and test specifically the association between their age and CoV infection status. We additionally examined current information on the reproductive phenology of Rhinolophus and other bat species presently known to occur in mainland southeast China, Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia. Results from our longitudinal monitoring (573 bats belonging to 8 species) showed an overall proportion of positive PCR tests for CoV of 4.2% (24/573) in cave-dwelling bats from Kampot and 4.75% (22/463) in flying-foxes from Kandal. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the PCR amplicon sequences of CoVs (n = 46) obtained clustered in Alphacoronavirus and Betacoronavirus. Interestingly, Hipposideros larvatus sensu lato harbored viruses from both genera. Our results suggest an association between positive detections of coronaviruses and juvenile and immature bats in Cambodia (OR = 3.24 [1.46-7.76], p = 0.005). Since the limited data presently available from literature review indicates that reproduction is largely synchronized among rhinolophid and hipposiderid bats in our study region, particularly in its more seasonal portions (above 16° N), this may lead to seasonal patterns in CoV circulation. Overall, our study suggests that surveillance of CoV in insectivorous bat species in Southeast Asia, including SARS-CoV-related coronaviruses in rhinolophid bats, could be targeted from June to October for species exhibiting high proportions of juveniles and immatures during these months. It also highlights the need to develop long-term longitudinal surveys of bats and improve our understanding of their ecology in the region, for both biodiversity conservation and public health reasons.


Subject(s)
Alphacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/genetics , COVID-19/transmission , Chiroptera/growth & development , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Alphacoronavirus/classification , Animals , Asia, Southeastern/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus/classification , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Cambodia/epidemiology , Chiroptera/classification , Chiroptera/virology , Epidemics/prevention & control , Evolution, Molecular , Genome, Viral/genetics , Geography , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Phylogeny , SARS-CoV-2/classification , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Species Specificity
4.
Viruses ; 13(10)2021 10 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463837

ABSTRACT

In summer 2020, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) was detected on mink farms in Utah. An interagency One Health response was initiated to assess the extent of the outbreak and included sampling animals from on or near affected mink farms and testing them for SARS-CoV-2 and non-SARS coronaviruses. Among the 365 animals sampled, including domestic cats, mink, rodents, raccoons, and skunks, 261 (72%) of the animals harbored at least one coronavirus. Among the samples that could be further characterized, 127 alphacoronaviruses and 88 betacoronaviruses (including 74 detections of SARS-CoV-2 in mink) were identified. Moreover, at least 10% (n = 27) of the coronavirus-positive animals were found to be co-infected with more than one coronavirus. Our findings indicate an unexpectedly high prevalence of coronavirus among the domestic and wild free-roaming animals tested on mink farms. These results raise the possibility that mink farms could be potential hot spots for future trans-species viral spillover and the emergence of new pandemic coronaviruses.


Subject(s)
Alphacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/veterinary , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Alphacoronavirus/classification , Alphacoronavirus/genetics , Animals , Animals, Domestic/virology , Animals, Wild/virology , Cats , Disease Hotspot , Female , Male , Mephitidae/virology , Mice , Mink/virology , Raccoons/virology , SARS-CoV-2/classification , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Utah/epidemiology
5.
Viruses ; 13(10)2021 10 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1460086

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus, an important zoonotic disease, raises concerns of future pandemics. The bat is considered a source of noticeable viruses resulting in human and livestock infections, especially the coronavirus. Therefore, surveillance and genetic analysis of coronaviruses in bats are essential in order to prevent the risk of future diseases. In this study, the genome of HCQD-2020, a novel alphacoronavirus detected in a bat (Eptesicus serotinus), was assembled and described using next-generation sequencing and bioinformatics analysis. The comparison of the whole-genome sequence and the conserved amino acid sequence of replicated proteins revealed that the new strain was distantly related with other known species in the Alphacoronavirus genus. Phylogenetic construction indicated that this strain formed a separated branch with other species, suggesting a new species of Alphacoronavirus. Additionally, in silico prediction also revealed the risk of cross-species infection of this strain, especially in the order Artiodactyla. In summary, this study provided the genetic characteristics of a possible new species belonging to Alphacoronavirus.


Subject(s)
Alphacoronavirus/classification , Alphacoronavirus/genetics , Chiroptera/virology , Coronavirus Infections/veterinary , Genome, Viral/genetics , Alphacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Amino Acid Sequence/genetics , Animals , Artiodactyla/virology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Phylogeny , Republic of Korea , Sequence Alignment , Whole Genome Sequencing
6.
Viruses ; 13(10)2021 10 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1460085

ABSTRACT

According to various estimates, only a small percentage of existing viruses have been discovered, naturally much less being represented in the genomic databases. High-throughput sequencing technologies develop rapidly, empowering large-scale screening of various biological samples for the presence of pathogen-associated nucleotide sequences, but many organisms are yet to be attributed specific loci for identification. This problem particularly impedes viral screening, due to vast heterogeneity in viral genomes. In this paper, we present a new bioinformatic pipeline, VirIdAl, for detecting and identifying viral pathogens in sequencing data. We also demonstrate the utility of the new software by applying it to viral screening of the feces of bats collected in the Moscow region, which revealed a significant variety of viruses associated with bats, insects, plants, and protozoa. The presence of alpha and beta coronavirus reads, including the MERS-like bat virus, deserves a special mention, as it once again indicates that bats are indeed reservoirs for many viral pathogens. In addition, it was shown that alignment-based methods were unable to identify the taxon for a large proportion of reads, and we additionally applied other approaches, showing that they can further reveal the presence of viral agents in sequencing data. However, the incompleteness of viral databases remains a significant problem in the studies of viral diversity, and therefore necessitates the use of combined approaches, including those based on machine learning methods.


Subject(s)
Alphacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Chiroptera/virology , Genome, Viral/genetics , Metagenome/genetics , Alphacoronavirus/classification , Alphacoronavirus/genetics , Animals , Betacoronavirus/classification , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Chiroptera/genetics , Computational Biology/methods , Feces/virology , High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing , Metagenomics/methods , Moscow , Phycodnaviridae/classification , Phycodnaviridae/genetics , Phycodnaviridae/isolation & purification , Sequence Analysis, DNA
7.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 10(1): 1660-1668, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1343597

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic is a major challenge worldwide. However, the epidemic potential of common human coronaviruses (HCoVs) remains unclear. This study aimed to determine the epidemiological and co-infection characteristics of common HCoVs in individuals with influenza-like illness (ILI) and severe acute respiratory infection (SARI). This retrospective, observational, multicentre study used data collected from patients admitted to nine sentinel hospitals with ILI and SARI from January 2015 through December 2020 in Shanghai, China. We prospectively tested patients for a total of 22 respiratory pathogens using multi-real-time polymerase chain reaction. Of the 4541 patients tested, 40.37% (1833/4541) tested positive for respiratory pathogens and 3.59% (163/4541) tested positive for common HCoVs. HCoV infection was more common in the non-endemic season for respiratory pathogens (odds ratio: 2.33, 95% confidence interval: 1.64-3.31). HCoV-OC43 (41.72%, 68/163) was the most common type of HCoV detected. The co-infection rate was 31.29% (51/163) among 163 HCoV-positive cases, with HCoV-229E (53.13%, 17/32), the HCoV type that was most frequently associated with co-infection. Respiratory pathogens responsible for co-infections with HCoVs included parainfluenza virus, rhinovirus/enterovirus, influenza A virus, and adenovirus. Furthermore, we identified one patient co-infected with HCoV-OC43 and HCoV-NL63/HKU1. The prevalence of common HCoVs remains low in ILI/SARI cases, in Shanghai. However, the seasonal pattern of HCoVs may be opposite to that of other respiratory pathogens. Moreover, HCoVs are likely to co-exist with specific respiratory pathogens. The potential role of co-infections with HCoVs and other pathogenic microorganisms in infection and pathogenesis of ILI and SARI warrants further study.


Subject(s)
Alphacoronavirus , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Coinfection/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Alphacoronavirus/classification , Alphacoronavirus/genetics , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/history , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/history , Female , History, 21st Century , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Public Health Surveillance , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/classification , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Seasons
8.
Viruses ; 13(6)2021 06 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1282637

ABSTRACT

Bat species worldwide are receiving increased attention for the discovery of emerging viruses, cross-species transmission, and zoonoses, as well as for characterizing virus infections specific to bats. In a previous study, we investigated the presence of coronaviruses in faecal samples from bats at different locations in Denmark, and made phylogenies based on short, partial ORF1b sequences. In this study, selected samples containing bat coronaviruses from three different bat species were analysed, using a non-targeted approach of next-generation sequencing. From the resulting metagenomics data, we assembled full-genome sequences of seven distinct alphacoronaviruses, three astroviruses, and a polyomavirus, as well as partial genome sequences of rotavirus H and caliciviruses, from the different bat species. Comparisons to published sequences indicate that the bat alphacoronaviruses belong to three different subgenera-i.e., Pedacovirus, Nyctacovirus, and Myotacovirus-that the astroviruses may be new species in the genus Mamastrovirus, and that the polyomavirus could also be a new species, but unassigned to a genus. Furthermore, several viruses of invertebrates-including two Rhopalosiphum padi (aphid) viruses and a Kadipiro virus-present in the faecal material were assembled. Interestingly, this is the first detection in Europe of a Kadipiro virus.


Subject(s)
Alphacoronavirus/genetics , Astroviridae/genetics , Chiroptera/virology , Genome, Viral , Whole Genome Sequencing , Alphacoronavirus/classification , Alphacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Animals , Astroviridae/classification , Astroviridae/isolation & purification , Denmark , Feces/virology , Genomics/methods , Open Reading Frames , Phylogeny
9.
PLoS One ; 16(1): e0244006, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1074162

ABSTRACT

In this study, we examined the role of the eastern bent-winged bat (Miniopterus fuliginosus) in the dispersion of bat adenovirus and bat alphacoronavirus in east Asia, considering their gene flows and divergence times (based on deep-sequencing data), using bat fecal guano samples. Bats in China moved to Jeju Island and/or Taiwan in the last 20,000 years via the Korean Peninsula and/or Japan. The phylogenies of host mitochondrial D-loop DNA was not significantly congruent with those of bat adenovirus (m2XY = 0.07, p = 0.08), and bat alphacoronavirus (m2XY = 0.48, p = 0.20). We estimate that the first divergence time of bats carrying bat adenovirus in five caves studied (designated as K1, K2, JJ, N2, and F3) occurred approximately 3.17 million years ago. In contrast, the first divergence time of bat adenovirus among bats in the 5 caves was estimated to be approximately 224.32 years ago. The first divergence time of bats in caves CH, JJ, WY, N2, F1, F2, and F3 harboring bat alphacoronavirus was estimated to be 1.59 million years ago. The first divergence time of bat alphacoronavirus among the 7 caves was estimated to be approximately 2,596.92 years ago. The origin of bat adenovirus remains unclear, whereas our findings suggest that bat alphacoronavirus originated in Japan. Surprisingly, bat adenovirus and bat alphacoronavirus appeared to diverge substantially over the last 100 years, even though our gene-flow data indicate that the eastern bent-winged bat serves as an important natural reservoir of both viruses.


Subject(s)
Alphacoronavirus/genetics , Chiroptera/genetics , Alphacoronavirus/classification , Alphacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Animals , Caves , Chiroptera/classification , Chiroptera/virology , DNA, Mitochondrial/chemistry , DNA, Mitochondrial/metabolism , DNA, Viral/chemistry , DNA, Viral/metabolism , Far East , Feces/virology , Gene Flow , Genetic Variation , High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing , Monte Carlo Method , Phylogeny
10.
Transbound Emerg Dis ; 68(3): 987-992, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-722280

ABSTRACT

The novel SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus has attracted attention due to the high number of human cases around the world. It has been proposed that this virus originated in bats, possibly transmitted to humans by an intermediate host, making bats a group of great interest during this outbreak. Almost 10% of the world's bat species inhabit Mexico, and 14 previous novel CoVs have been recorded in Mexican bats. However, the phylogenetic relationships between these viruses and the novel coronavirus are unknown. The aim of this communication was therefore to describe the phylogenetic relationships between Mexican bat-CoVs and SARS-CoV-2. We showed that Mexican bat-CoVs sequences are grouped into two genera, Alphacoronavirus and Betacoronavirus, and the new coronavirus is an independent clade within Betacoronavirus. Due to the diversity of CoVs in Mexican bats, the propensity of CoVs to shift hosts, the invasion mechanisms described for this new virus, and previous reports of animals infected by SARS-CoV-2, the risk of possible infection from humans to Mexican bats should not be discarded and warrants further analyses. To avoid future zoonotic infectious diseases and to limit persecution of bats, we urge researchers and the general population to take extreme precautions and avoid manipulation of bats during the current and future similar outbreaks.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Chiroptera/virology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Alphacoronavirus/classification , Alphacoronavirus/genetics , Animals , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Diseases, Emerging/virology , Coronaviridae/classification , Coronaviridae/genetics , Evolution, Molecular , Genome, Viral , Humans , Mexico/epidemiology , Phylogeny , SARS-CoV-2/classification , Zoonoses/epidemiology
11.
Mol Biol Evol ; 37(9): 2706-2710, 2020 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-641314

ABSTRACT

Due to the scope and impact of the COVID-19 pandemic there exists a strong desire to understand where the SARS-CoV-2 virus came from and how it jumped species boundaries to humans. Molecular evolutionary analyses can trace viral origins by establishing relatedness and divergence times of viruses and identifying past selective pressures. However, we must uphold rigorous standards of inference and interpretation on this topic because of the ramifications of being wrong. Here, we dispute the conclusions of Xia (2020. Extreme genomic CpG deficiency in SARS-CoV-2 and evasion of host antiviral defense. Mol Biol Evol. doi:10.1093/molbev/masa095) that dogs are a likely intermediate host of a SARS-CoV-2 ancestor. We highlight major flaws in Xia's inference process and his analysis of CpG deficiencies, and conclude that there is no direct evidence for the role of dogs as intermediate hosts. Bats and pangolins currently have the greatest support as ancestral hosts of SARS-CoV-2, with the strong caveat that sampling of wildlife species for coronaviruses has been limited.


Subject(s)
Alphacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Genome, Viral , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Reassortant Viruses/genetics , Alphacoronavirus/classification , Alphacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Animals , Betacoronavirus/classification , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Biological Evolution , COVID-19 , Chiroptera/virology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/virology , CpG Islands , Dogs , Eutheria/virology , Humans , Immune Evasion/genetics , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Protein Binding , RNA, Viral/genetics , RNA, Viral/metabolism , RNA-Binding Proteins/genetics , RNA-Binding Proteins/immunology , RNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism , Reassortant Viruses/classification , Reassortant Viruses/pathogenicity , SARS-CoV-2 , Virus Replication
12.
Infect Genet Evol ; 84: 104440, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-621792

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2, a new coronavirus strain responsible for COVID-19, has emerged in Wuhan City, China, and continuing its global pandemic nature. The availability of the complete gene sequences of the virus helps to know about the origin and molecular characteristics of this virus. In the present study, we performed bioinformatic analysis of the available gene sequence data of SARS-CoV-2 for the understanding of evolution and molecular characteristics and immunogenic resemblance of the circulating viruses. Phylogenetic analysis was performed for four types of representative viral proteins (spike, membrane, envelope and nucleoprotein) of SARS-CoV-2, HCoV-229E, HCoV-OC43, SARS-CoV, HCoV-NL63, HKU1, MERS-CoV, HKU4, HKU5 and BufCoV-HKU26. The findings demonstrated that SARS-CoV-2 exhibited convergent evolutionary relation with previously reported SARS-CoV. It was also depicted that SARS-CoV-2 proteins were highly similar and identical to SARS-CoV proteins, though proteins from other coronaviruses showed a lower level of resemblance. The cross-checked conservancy analysis of SARS-CoV-2 antigenic epitopes showed significant conservancy with antigenic epitopes derived from SARS-CoV. Descriptive epidemiological analysis on several epidemiological indices was performed on available epidemiological outbreak information from several open databases on COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-2). Satellite-derived imaging data have been employed to understand the role of temperature in the environmental persistence of the virus. Findings of the descriptive analysis were used to describe the global impact of newly emerged SARS-CoV-2, and the risk of an epidemic in Bangladesh.


Subject(s)
Antigens, Viral/genetics , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Genome, Viral , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , SARS Virus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Alphacoronavirus/classification , Alphacoronavirus/genetics , Alphacoronavirus/metabolism , Amino Acid Sequence , Animals , Antigens, Viral/chemistry , Antigens, Viral/metabolism , Bangladesh/epidemiology , Base Sequence , Betacoronavirus/classification , Betacoronavirus/metabolism , Binding Sites , COVID-19 , Chiroptera/virology , Computational Biology , Coronavirus 229E, Human/classification , Coronavirus 229E, Human/genetics , Coronavirus 229E, Human/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Coronavirus NL63, Human/classification , Coronavirus NL63, Human/genetics , Coronavirus NL63, Human/metabolism , Coronavirus OC43, Human/classification , Coronavirus OC43, Human/genetics , Coronavirus OC43, Human/metabolism , Humans , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/classification , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/genetics , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/metabolism , Models, Molecular , Mutation , Nucleoproteins/chemistry , Nucleoproteins/genetics , Nucleoproteins/metabolism , Phylogeny , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Protein Binding , Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs , SARS Virus/classification , SARS Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Sequence Alignment , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Viral Envelope Proteins/chemistry , Viral Envelope Proteins/genetics , Viral Envelope Proteins/metabolism
13.
Infect Genet Evol ; 84: 104389, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-459162

ABSTRACT

The newly identified SARS-CoV-2 has now been reported from around 185 countries with more than a million confirmed human cases including more than 120,000 deaths. The genomes of SARS-COV-2 strains isolated from different parts of the world are now available and the unique features of constituent genes and proteins need to be explored to understand the biology of the virus. Spike glycoprotein is one of the major targets to be explored because of its role during the entry of coronaviruses into host cells. We analyzed 320 whole-genome sequences and 320 spike protein sequences of SARS-CoV-2 using multiple sequence alignment. In this study, 483 unique variations have been identified among the genomes of SARS-CoV-2 including 25 nonsynonymous mutations and one deletion in the spike (S) protein. Among the 26 variations detected in S, 12 variations were located at the N-terminal domain (NTD) and 6 variations at the receptor-binding domain (RBD) which might alter the interaction of S protein with the host receptor angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). Besides, 22 amino acid insertions were identified in the spike protein of SARS-CoV-2 in comparison with that of SARS-CoV. Phylogenetic analyses of spike protein revealed that Bat coronavirus have a close evolutionary relationship with circulating SARS-CoV-2. The genetic variation analysis data presented in this study can help a better understanding of SARS-CoV-2 pathogenesis. Based on results reported herein, potential inhibitors against S protein can be designed by considering these variations and their impact on protein structure.


Subject(s)
Alphacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Genome, Viral , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/chemistry , SARS Virus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Alphacoronavirus/classification , Alphacoronavirus/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Animals , Base Sequence , Betacoronavirus/classification , Betacoronavirus/metabolism , Binding Sites , Chiroptera/virology , Gene Expression , Humans , Models, Molecular , Mutation , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/genetics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Protein Binding , Protein Conformation, alpha-Helical , Protein Conformation, beta-Strand , Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs , SARS Virus/classification , SARS Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Sequence Alignment , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Structural Homology, Protein , Virus Attachment
14.
Biomed Res Int ; 2020: 4389089, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-618728

ABSTRACT

The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a new viral infection caused by the severe acute respiratory coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Genomic analyses have revealed that SARS-CoV-2 is related to Pangolin and Bat coronaviruses. In this report, a structural comparison between the Sars-CoV-2 Envelope and Membrane proteins from different human isolates with homologous proteins from closely related viruses is described. The analyses here reported show the high structural similarity of Envelope and Membrane proteins to the counterparts from Pangolin and Bat coronavirus isolates. However, the comparisons have also highlighted structural differences specific of Sars-CoV-2 proteins which may be correlated to the cross-species transmission and/or to the properties of the virus. Structural modelling has been applied to map the variant sites onto the predicted three-dimensional structure of the Envelope and Membrane proteins.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/chemistry , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Viral Envelope Proteins/chemistry , Viral Matrix Proteins/chemistry , Alphacoronavirus/chemistry , Alphacoronavirus/classification , Alphacoronavirus/genetics , Amino Acid Sequence , Animals , Betacoronavirus/classification , Betacoronavirus/genetics , COVID-19 , Chiroptera/virology , Coronaviridae/chemistry , Coronaviridae/classification , Coronaviridae/genetics , Coronavirus Envelope Proteins , Eutheria/virology , Humans , Models, Molecular , Pandemics , Protein Conformation , SARS-CoV-2 , Sequence Homology, Amino Acid , Species Specificity , Structural Homology, Protein , Viral Envelope Proteins/genetics , Viral Matrix Proteins/genetics
15.
Microb Ecol ; 79(1): 203-212, 2020 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-326842

ABSTRACT

Bats are flying mammals distributed worldwide known to host several types of Coronavirus (CoV). Since they were reported as the probable source of spillover of highly pathogenic CoV into the human population, investigating the circulation of this virus in bats around the world became of great importance. We analyzed samples from 103 bats from two distinct regions in Brazil. Coronavirus from the Alphacoronavirus genus was detected in 12 animals, 11 from São José do Rio Preto-SP region and 1 from Barreiras-BA region, resulting in a prevalence of 17.18% and 2.56% respectively. The virus was detected not only in intestines but also in lungs and liver. Phylogenetic analysis based on nsP12 genomic region suggests that the sequences group according to host family and sampling location. Studies on the circulation of these viruses in bats remain important to understand the ecology and evolutionary relationship of these pathogens.


Subject(s)
Alphacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Chiroptera/virology , Alphacoronavirus/classification , Alphacoronavirus/genetics , Animals , Biological Evolution , Brazil , Genome, Viral , Intestines/virology , Liver/virology , Lung/virology , Phylogeny
16.
J Med Virol ; 92(10): 2105-2113, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-209797

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) outbreak due to novel coronavirus or severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection has come out as a major threat for mankind in recent times. It is continually taking an enormous toll on mankind by means of increasing number of deaths, associated comorbidities, and socioeconomic loss around the globe. Unavailability of chemotherapeutics/vaccine has posed tremendous challenges to scientists and doctors for developing an urgent therapeutic strategy. In this connection, the present in silico study aims to understand the sequence divergence of spike protein (the major infective protein of SARS-CoV-2), its mode of interaction with the angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 receptor (ACE2) receptor of human and related animal hosts/reservoir. Moreover, the involvement of the human Toll-like receptors (TLRs) against the spike protein has also been demonstrated. Our data indicated that the spike glycoprotein of SARS-CoV-2 is phylogenetically close to bat coronavirus and strongly binds with ACE2 receptor protein from both human and bat origin. We have also found that cell surface TLRs, especially TLR4 is most likely to be involved in recognizing molecular patterns from SARS-CoV-2 to induce inflammatory responses. The present study supported the zoonotic origin of SARS-CoV-2 from a bat and also revealed that TLR4 may have a crucial role in the virus-induced inflammatory consequences associated with COVID-19. Therefore, selective targeting of TLR4-spike protein interaction by designing competitive TLR4-antagonists could pave a new way to treat COVID-19. Finally, this study is expected to improve our understanding on the immunobiology of SARS-CoV-2 and could be useful in adopting spike protein, ACE2, or TLR-guided intervention strategy against COVID-19 shortly.


Subject(s)
Alphacoronavirus/chemistry , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/chemistry , Receptors, Virus/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Toll-Like Receptors/chemistry , Alphacoronavirus/classification , Alphacoronavirus/metabolism , Alphacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/classification , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , Binding Sites , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Chiroptera/immunology , Chiroptera/virology , Data Mining , Eutheria/immunology , Eutheria/virology , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Models, Molecular , Phylogeny , Protein Binding , Protein Conformation, alpha-Helical , Protein Conformation, beta-Strand , Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs , Receptors, Virus/classification , Receptors, Virus/genetics , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/classification , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Thermodynamics , Toll-Like Receptors/classification , Toll-Like Receptors/genetics , Toll-Like Receptors/metabolism , Viverridae/immunology , Viverridae/virology
17.
Mol Biol Evol ; 37(9): 2699-2705, 2020 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-52538

ABSTRACT

Wild mammalian species, including bats, constitute the natural reservoir of betacoronavirus (including SARS, MERS, and the deadly SARS-CoV-2). Different hosts or host tissues provide different cellular environments, especially different antiviral and RNA modification activities that can alter RNA modification signatures observed in the viral RNA genome. The zinc finger antiviral protein (ZAP) binds specifically to CpG dinucleotides and recruits other proteins to degrade a variety of viral RNA genomes. Many mammalian RNA viruses have evolved CpG deficiency. Increasing CpG dinucleotides in these low-CpG viral genomes in the presence of ZAP consistently leads to decreased viral replication and virulence. Because ZAP exhibits tissue-specific expression, viruses infecting different tissues are expected to have different CpG signatures, suggesting a means to identify viral tissue-switching events. The author shows that SARS-CoV-2 has the most extreme CpG deficiency in all known betacoronavirus genomes. This suggests that SARS-CoV-2 may have evolved in a new host (or new host tissue) with high ZAP expression. A survey of CpG deficiency in viral genomes identified a virulent canine coronavirus (alphacoronavirus) as possessing the most extreme CpG deficiency, comparable with that observed in SARS-CoV-2. This suggests that the canine tissue infected by the canine coronavirus may provide a cellular environment strongly selecting against CpG. Thus, viral surveys focused on decreasing CpG in viral RNA genomes may provide important clues about the selective environments and viral defenses in the original hosts.


Subject(s)
Alphacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Genome, Viral , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Reassortant Viruses/genetics , Alphacoronavirus/classification , Alphacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Animals , Betacoronavirus/classification , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Biological Evolution , COVID-19 , Camelus/virology , Chiroptera/virology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/virology , CpG Islands , Dogs , Hedgehogs/virology , Humans , Immune Evasion/genetics , Mice , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Protein Binding , RNA, Viral/genetics , RNA, Viral/metabolism , RNA-Binding Proteins/genetics , RNA-Binding Proteins/immunology , RNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism , Rabbits , Rats , Reassortant Viruses/classification , Reassortant Viruses/pathogenicity , SARS-CoV-2 , Virus Replication
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