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1.
Microbiol Spectr ; 9(3): e0073521, 2021 12 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1596765

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 infection can cause compromised respiratory function and thrombotic events. SARS-CoV-2 binds to and mediates downregulation of angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) on cells that it infects. Theoretically, diminished enzymatic activity of ACE2 may result in increased concentrations of pro-inflammatory molecules, angiotensin II, and Bradykinin, contributing to SARS-CoV-2 pathology. Using immunofluorescence microscopy of lung tissues from uninfected, and SARS-CoV-2 infected individuals, we find evidence that ACE2 is highly expressed in human pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells and significantly reduced along the alveolar lining of SARS-CoV-2 infected lungs. Ex vivo analyses of primary human cells, indicated that ACE2 is readily detected in pulmonary alveolar epithelial and aortic endothelial cells. Exposure of these cells to spike protein of SARS-CoV-2 was sufficient to reduce ACE2 expression. Moreover, exposure of endothelial cells to spike protein-induced dysfunction, caspase activation, and apoptosis. Exposure of endothelial cells to bradykinin caused calcium signaling and endothelial dysfunction (increased expression of von Willibrand Factor and decreased expression of Krüppel-like Factor 2) but did not adversely affect viability in primary human aortic endothelial cells. Computer-assisted analyses of molecules with potential to bind bradykinin receptor B2 (BKRB2), suggested a potential role for aspirin as a BK antagonist. When tested in our in vitro model, we found evidence that aspirin can blunt cell signaling and endothelial dysfunction caused by bradykinin in these cells. Interference with interactions of spike protein or bradykinin with endothelial cells may serve as an important strategy to stabilize microvascular homeostasis in COVID-19 disease. IMPORTANCE SARS-CoV-2 causes complex effects on microvascular homeostasis that potentially contribute to organ dysfunction and coagulopathies. SARS-CoV-2 binds to, and causes downregulation of angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) on cells that it infects. It is thought that reduced ACE2 enzymatic activity can contribute to inflammation and pathology in the lung. Our studies add to this understanding by providing evidence that spike protein alone can mediate adverse effects on vascular cells. Understanding these mechanisms of pathogenesis may provide rationale for interventions that could limit microvascular events associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Endothelial Cells/virology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/cytology , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/virology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/chemistry , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Aorta/cytology , Aorta/metabolism , Aorta/virology , Apoptosis , Bradykinin/chemistry , Bradykinin/metabolism , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Endothelial Cells/cytology , Endothelial Cells/metabolism , Homeostasis , Humans , Lung/blood supply , Lung/metabolism , Lung/virology , Microcirculation , Receptors, Bradykinin/chemistry , Receptors, Bradykinin/genetics , Receptors, Bradykinin/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics
3.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(5)2021 Mar 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389392

ABSTRACT

Alveolar type II (ATII) cells are a key structure of the distal lung epithelium, where they exert their innate immune response and serve as progenitors of alveolar type I (ATI) cells, contributing to alveolar epithelial repair and regeneration. In the healthy lung, ATII cells coordinate the host defense mechanisms, not only generating a restrictive alveolar epithelial barrier, but also orchestrating host defense mechanisms and secreting surfactant proteins, which are important in lung protection against pathogen exposure. Moreover, surfactant proteins help to maintain homeostasis in the distal lung and reduce surface tension at the pulmonary air-liquid interface, thereby preventing atelectasis and reducing the work of breathing. ATII cells may also contribute to the fibroproliferative reaction by secreting growth factors and proinflammatory molecules after damage. Indeed, various acute and chronic diseases are associated with intensive inflammation. These include oedema, acute respiratory distress syndrome, fibrosis and numerous interstitial lung diseases, and are characterized by hyperplastic ATII cells which are considered an essential part of the epithelialization process and, consequently, wound healing. The aim of this review is that of revising the physiologic and pathologic role ATII cells play in pulmonary diseases, as, despite what has been learnt in the last few decades of research, the origin, phenotypic regulation and crosstalk of these cells still remain, in part, a mystery.


Subject(s)
Alveolar Epithelial Cells/pathology , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/physiology , Lung Diseases/physiopathology , Lung/physiology , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/cytology , Animals , COVID-19/physiopathology , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Ions/metabolism , Lung/anatomy & histology , Lung Diseases/etiology , Lung Diseases/pathology , Pulmonary Surfactant-Associated Proteins/metabolism , Regeneration
4.
JCI Insight ; 6(4)2021 02 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1105583

ABSTRACT

An intact lung epithelial barrier is essential for lung homeostasis. The Na+, K+-ATPase (NKA), primarily serving as an ion transporter, also regulates epithelial barrier function via modulation of tight junctions. However, the underlying mechanism is not well understood. Here, we show that overexpression of the NKA ß1 subunit upregulates the expression of tight junction proteins, leading to increased alveolar epithelial barrier function by an ion transport-independent mechanism. Using IP and mass spectrometry, we identified a number of unknown protein interactions of the ß1 subunit, including a top candidate, myotonic dystrophy kinase-related cdc42-binding kinase α (MRCKα), which is a protein kinase known to regulate peripheral actin formation. Using a doxycycline-inducible gene expression system, we demonstrated that MRCKα and its downstream activation of myosin light chain is required for the regulation of alveolar barrier function by the NKA ß1 subunit. Importantly, MRCKα is expressed in both human airways and alveoli and has reduced expression in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), a lung illness that can be caused by multiple direct and indirect insults, including the infection of influenza virus and SARS-CoV-2. Our results have elucidated a potentially novel mechanism by which NKA regulates epithelial tight junctions and have identified potential drug targets for treating ARDS and other pulmonary diseases that are caused by barrier dysfunction.


Subject(s)
Myotonin-Protein Kinase/metabolism , Sodium-Potassium-Exchanging ATPase/metabolism , Tight Junctions/metabolism , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/cytology , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Animals , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Myotonin-Protein Kinase/genetics , Primary Cell Culture , Rats , Recombinant Proteins/genetics , Recombinant Proteins/metabolism , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/pathology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/virology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Sodium-Potassium-Exchanging ATPase/genetics
5.
Protein Cell ; 12(9): 717-733, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-973695

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is caused by infection with the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which is spread primary via respiratory droplets and infects the lungs. Currently widely used cell lines and animals are unable to accurately mimic human physiological conditions because of the abnormal status of cell lines (transformed or cancer cells) and species differences between animals and humans. Organoids are stem cell-derived self-organized three-dimensional culture in vitro and model the physiological conditions of natural organs. Here we showed that SARS-CoV-2 infected and extensively replicated in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs)-derived lung organoids, including airway and alveolar organoids which covered the complete infection and spread route for SARS-CoV-2 within lungs. The infected cells were ciliated, club, and alveolar type 2 (AT2) cells, which were sequentially located from the proximal to the distal airway and terminal alveoli, respectively. Additionally, RNA-seq revealed early cell response to virus infection including an unexpected downregulation of the metabolic processes, especially lipid metabolism, in addition to the well-known upregulation of immune response. Further, Remdesivir and a human neutralizing antibody potently inhibited SARS-CoV-2 replication in lung organoids. Therefore, human lung organoids can serve as a pathophysiological model to investigate the underlying mechanism of SARS-CoV-2 infection and to discover and test therapeutic drugs for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Alveolar Epithelial Cells/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , Lung/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/pharmacology , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/pharmacology , Alanine/therapeutic use , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/cytology , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/virology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/pharmacology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Down-Regulation , Drug Discovery , Human Embryonic Stem Cells/cytology , Human Embryonic Stem Cells/metabolism , Humans , Immunity , Lipid Metabolism , Lung/cytology , Lung/virology , RNA, Viral/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Virus Replication/drug effects
6.
Eur J Pharmacol ; 882: 173288, 2020 Sep 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-959742

ABSTRACT

In December 2019, many pneumonia cases with unidentified sources appeared in Wuhan, Hubei, China, with clinical symptoms like viral pneumonia. Deep sequencing analysis of samples from lower respiratory tract revealed a novel coronavirus, called 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV). Currently there is a rapid global spread. World Health Organization declare the disease a pandemic condition. The pathologic source of this disease was a new RNA virus from Coronaviridae family, which was named COVID-19. SARS-CoV-2 entry starts with the binding of the spike glycoprotein expressed on the viral envelope to ACE2 on the alveolar surface followed by clathrin-dependent endocytosis of the SARS-CoV-2 and ACE2 complex. SARS-CoV-2 enters the cells through endocytosis process, which is possibly facilitated, via a pH dependent endosomal cysteine protease cathepsins. Once inside the cells, SARS-CoV-2 exploits the endogenous transcriptional machinery of alveolar cells to replicate and spread through the entire lung. Endosomal acidic pH for SARS-CoV-2 processing and internalization is critical. After entering the cells, it possibly activates or hijack many intracellular pathways in favor of its replication. In the current opinion article, we will explain the possible involvement of unfolded protein response as a cellular stress response to the SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Alveolar Epithelial Cells/drug effects , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Endoplasmic Reticulum/drug effects , Ionophores/pharmacology , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/cytology , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/virology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Betacoronavirus/metabolism , COVID-19 , Clathrin-Coated Vesicles/drug effects , Clathrin-Coated Vesicles/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Endocytosis/drug effects , Endoplasmic Reticulum/metabolism , Endosomes/drug effects , Endosomes/metabolism , Humans , Ionophores/therapeutic use , Pandemics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Unfolded Protein Response/drug effects
7.
Nature ; 588(7839): 670-675, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-943910

ABSTRACT

The distal lung contains terminal bronchioles and alveoli that facilitate gas exchange. Three-dimensional in vitro human distal lung culture systems would strongly facilitate the investigation of pathologies such as interstitial lung disease, cancer and coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pneumonia caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Here we describe the development of a long-term feeder-free, chemically defined culture system for distal lung progenitors as organoids derived from single adult human alveolar epithelial type II (AT2) or KRT5+ basal cells. AT2 organoids were able to differentiate into AT1 cells, and basal cell organoids developed lumens lined with differentiated club and ciliated cells. Single-cell analysis of KRT5+ cells in basal organoids revealed a distinct population of ITGA6+ITGB4+ mitotic cells, whose offspring further segregated into a TNFRSF12Ahi subfraction that comprised about ten per cent of KRT5+ basal cells. This subpopulation formed clusters within terminal bronchioles and exhibited enriched clonogenic organoid growth activity. We created distal lung organoids with apical-out polarity to present ACE2 on the exposed external surface, facilitating infection of AT2 and basal cultures with SARS-CoV-2 and identifying club cells as a target population. This long-term, feeder-free culture of human distal lung organoids, coupled with single-cell analysis, identifies functional heterogeneity among basal cells and establishes a facile in vitro organoid model of human distal lung infections, including COVID-19-associated pneumonia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Lung/cytology , Models, Biological , Organoids/cytology , Organoids/virology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Tissue Culture Techniques , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/cytology , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/virology , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , Cell Differentiation , Cell Division , Clone Cells/cytology , Clone Cells/metabolism , Clone Cells/virology , Humans , In Vitro Techniques , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/growth & development , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/physiology , Integrin alpha6/analysis , Integrin beta4/analysis , Keratin-5/analysis , Organoids/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2/growth & development , Single-Cell Analysis , TWEAK Receptor/analysis
8.
EBioMedicine ; 61: 103104, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-912159

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 is a deadly pulmonary disease with peculiar characteristics, which include variable clinical course and thrombophilia. A thorough understanding of the pathological correlates of the disease is still missing. METHODS: Here we report the systematic analysis of 41 consecutive post-mortem samples from individuals who died of COVID-19. Histological analysis is complemented by immunohistochemistry for cellular and viral antigens and the detection of viral genomes by in situ RNA hybridization. FINDINGS: COVID-19 is characterized by extensive alveolar damage (41/41 of patients) and thrombosis of the lung micro- and macro-vasculature (29/41, 71%). Thrombi were in different stages of organization, consistent with their local origin. Pneumocytes and endothelial cells contained viral RNA even at the later stages of the disease. An additional feature was the common presence of a large number of dysmorphic pneumocytes, often forming syncytial elements (36/41, 87%). Despite occasional detection of virus-positive cells, no overt signs of viral infection were detected in other organs, which showed non-specific alterations. INTERPRETATION: COVID-19 is a unique disease characterized by extensive lung thrombosis, long-term persistence of viral RNA in pneumocytes and endothelial cells, along with the presence of infected cell syncytia. Several of COVID-19 features might be consequent to the persistence of virus-infected cells for the duration of the disease. FUNDING: This work was supported by a King's Together Rapid COVID-19 Call grant from King's College London. MG is supported by the European Research Council (ERC) Advanced Grant 787971 "CuRE" and by Programme Grant RG/19/11/34633 from the British Heart Foundation.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , RNA, Viral/metabolism , Thrombosis/etiology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/cytology , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/virology , Autopsy , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Critical Care , Endothelial Cells/virology , Female , Giant Cells/cytology , Giant Cells/virology , Humans , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism
9.
Stem Cell Reports ; 15(5): 1015-1025, 2020 11 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-864993

ABSTRACT

Despite the central importance of the respiratory system, the exact mechanisms governing lung repair after severe injury remain unclear. The notion that alveolar type 2 cells (AT2s) self-renew and differentiate into alveolar type 1 cells (AT1s) does not fully encompass scenarios where these progenitors are severely affected by disease, e.g., H1N1 influenza or SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19). Intrapulmonary p63+ progenitor cells, a rare cell type in mice but potentially encompassing more numerous classic basal cells in humans, are activated in such severe injury settings, proliferating and migrating into the injured alveolar parenchyma, providing a short-term "emergency" benefit. While the fate of these cells is controversial, most studies indicate that they represent a maladaptive repair pathway with a fate restriction toward airway cell types, rarely differentiating into AT2 or AT1 cells. Here, we discuss the role of intrapulmonary basal-like p63+ cells in alveolar regeneration and suggest a unified model to guide future studies.


Subject(s)
Lung/physiology , Regeneration , Stem Cells/metabolism , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/cytology , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Cell Differentiation , Humans , Lung/metabolism , Lung Diseases/pathology , Lung Diseases/therapy , Lung Diseases/virology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Stem Cell Transplantation , Stem Cells/cytology
10.
Cell Res ; 31(4): 415-432, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-759580

ABSTRACT

Aging is a major risk factor for many diseases, especially in highly prevalent cardiopulmonary comorbidities and infectious diseases including Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19). Resolving cellular and molecular mechanisms associated with aging in higher mammals is therefore urgently needed. Here, we created young and old non-human primate single-nucleus/cell transcriptomic atlases of lung, heart and artery, the top tissues targeted by SARS-CoV-2. Analysis of cell type-specific aging-associated transcriptional changes revealed increased systemic inflammation and compromised virus defense as a hallmark of cardiopulmonary aging. With age, expression of the SARS-CoV-2 receptor angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) was increased in the pulmonary alveolar epithelial barrier, cardiomyocytes, and vascular endothelial cells. We found that interleukin 7 (IL7) accumulated in aged cardiopulmonary tissues and induced ACE2 expression in human vascular endothelial cells in an NF-κB-dependent manner. Furthermore, treatment with vitamin C blocked IL7-induced ACE2 expression. Altogether, our findings depict the first transcriptomic atlas of the aged primate cardiopulmonary system and provide vital insights into age-linked susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2, suggesting that geroprotective strategies may reduce COVID-19 severity in the elderly.


Subject(s)
Aging , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Transcriptome , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/cytology , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/virology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , Ascorbic Acid/pharmacology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Cell Line , Endothelial Cells/cytology , Endothelial Cells/metabolism , Endothelial Cells/virology , Humans , Interleukin-7/metabolism , Interleukin-7/pharmacology , Macaca fascicularis , Myocytes, Cardiac/cytology , Myocytes, Cardiac/metabolism , Myocytes, Cardiac/virology , RNA-Seq , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Single-Cell Analysis , Transcriptome/drug effects
11.
Life Sci Alliance ; 3(9)2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-675904

ABSTRACT

The novel emerged SARS-CoV-2 has rapidly spread around the world causing acute infection of the respiratory tract (COVID-19) that can result in severe disease and lethality. For SARS-CoV-2 to enter cells, its surface glycoprotein spike (S) must be cleaved at two different sites by host cell proteases, which therefore represent potential drug targets. In the present study, we show that S can be cleaved by the proprotein convertase furin at the S1/S2 site and the transmembrane serine protease 2 (TMPRSS2) at the S2' site. We demonstrate that TMPRSS2 is essential for activation of SARS-CoV-2 S in Calu-3 human airway epithelial cells through antisense-mediated knockdown of TMPRSS2 expression. Furthermore, SARS-CoV-2 replication was also strongly inhibited by the synthetic furin inhibitor MI-1851 in human airway cells. In contrast, inhibition of endosomal cathepsins by E64d did not affect virus replication. Combining various TMPRSS2 inhibitors with furin inhibitor MI-1851 produced more potent antiviral activity against SARS-CoV-2 than an equimolar amount of any single serine protease inhibitor. Therefore, this approach has considerable therapeutic potential for treatment of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Alveolar Epithelial Cells/virology , Betacoronavirus/physiology , Furin/genetics , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/cytology , Animals , Binding Sites , Cell Line , Chlorocebus aethiops , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Proteolysis , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Vero Cells , Virus Internalization , Virus Replication
12.
Nature ; 586(7827): 113-119, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-672174

ABSTRACT

The emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) in 2019 has triggered an ongoing global pandemic of the severe pneumonia-like disease coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)1. The development of a vaccine is likely to take at least 12-18 months, and the typical timeline for approval of a new antiviral therapeutic agent can exceed 10 years. Thus, repurposing of known drugs could substantially accelerate the deployment of new therapies for COVID-19. Here we profiled a library of drugs encompassing approximately 12,000 clinical-stage or Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved small molecules to identify candidate therapeutic drugs for COVID-19. We report the identification of 100 molecules that inhibit viral replication of SARS-CoV-2, including 21 drugs that exhibit dose-response relationships. Of these, thirteen were found to harbour effective concentrations commensurate with probable achievable therapeutic doses in patients, including the PIKfyve kinase inhibitor apilimod2-4 and the cysteine protease inhibitors MDL-28170, Z LVG CHN2, VBY-825 and ONO 5334. Notably, MDL-28170, ONO 5334 and apilimod were found to antagonize viral replication in human pneumocyte-like cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells, and apilimod also demonstrated antiviral efficacy in a primary human lung explant model. Since most of the molecules identified in this study have already advanced into the clinic, their known pharmacological and human safety profiles will enable accelerated preclinical and clinical evaluation of these drugs for the treatment of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/analysis , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical , Drug Repositioning , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/pharmacology , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/pharmacology , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/cytology , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/drug effects , Betacoronavirus/growth & development , COVID-19 , Cell Line , Cysteine Proteinase Inhibitors/analysis , Cysteine Proteinase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Drug Synergism , Gene Expression Regulation/drug effects , Humans , Hydrazones , Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/cytology , Models, Biological , Morpholines/analysis , Morpholines/pharmacology , Pandemics , Pyrimidines , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2 , Small Molecule Libraries/analysis , Small Molecule Libraries/pharmacology , Triazines/analysis , Triazines/pharmacology , Virus Internalization/drug effects , Virus Replication/drug effects
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