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1.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(14)2021 Jul 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1485149

ABSTRACT

Chronic neurodegenerative diseases are complex, and their pathogenesis is uncertain. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative brain alteration that is responsible for most dementia cases in the elderly. AD etiology is still uncertain; however, chronic neuroinflammation is a constant component of brain pathology. Infections have been associated with several neurological diseases and viruses of the Herpes family appear to be a probable cause of AD neurodegenerative alterations. Several different factors may contribute to the AD clinical progression. Exogeneous viruses or other microbes and environmental pollutants may directly induce neurodegeneration by activating brain inflammation. In this paper, we suggest that exogeneous brain insults may also activate retrotransposons and silent human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs). The initial inflammation of small brain areas induced by virus infections or other brain insults may activate HERV dis-regulation that contributes to neurodegenerative mechanisms. Chronic HERV activation in turn may cause progressive neurodegeneration that thereafter merges in cognitive impairment and dementia in genetically susceptible people. Specific treatment for exogenous end endogenous pathogens and decreasing pollutant exposure may show beneficial effect in early intervention protocol to prevent the progression of cognitive deterioration in the elderly.


Subject(s)
Alzheimer Disease/pathology , Alzheimer Disease/virology , Brain/pathology , Brain/virology , Endogenous Retroviruses/pathogenicity , Virus Diseases/pathology , Virus Diseases/virology , Animals , Cognition Disorders/pathology , Cognition Disorders/virology , Encephalitis/pathology , Encephalitis/virology , Humans
2.
Hum Mol Genet ; 29(6): 955-966, 2020 04 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455300

ABSTRACT

γ-secretase is a macromolecular complex that catalyzes intramembranous hydrolysis of more than 100 membrane-bound substrates. The complex is composed of presenilin (PS1 or PS2), anterior pharynx defect-1 (APH-1), nicastrin (NCT) and PEN-2 and early-onset; autosomal dominant forms of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are caused by inheritance of mutations of PS. No mutations in genes encoding NCT, or PEN-2 have been identified to date that cause AD. In this regard, a large genetic meta-analysis of four cohorts consisting of more than 600 000 individuals identified a common missense variant, rs117618017 in the APH1B gene that results in a T27I mutation, as a novel genome-wide significant locus. In order to confirm the findings that rs117618017 is associated with risk of AD, we performed a genetic screen from deep whole genome sequencing of the large NIMH family-based Alzheimer's Disease (AD) dataset. In parallel, we sought to uncover potential molecular mechanism(s) by which APH-1B T27I might be associated with AD by generating stable HEK293 cell lines, wherein endogenous APH-1A and APH-1B expression was silenced and into which either the wild type APH-1B or the APH-1B T27I variant was stably expressed. We then tested the impact of expressing either the wild type APH-1B or the APH-1B T27I variant on γ-secretase processing of human APP, the murine Notch derivative mNΔE and human neuregulin-1. We now report that we fail to confirm the association of rs1047552 with AD in our cohort and that cells expressing the APH-1B T27I variant show no discernable impact on the γ-secretase processing of established substrates compared with cells expressing wild-type APH-1B.


Subject(s)
Alzheimer Disease/pathology , Amyloid Precursor Protein Secretases/metabolism , Endopeptidases/genetics , Membrane Proteins/genetics , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide , Alzheimer Disease/genetics , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Mutation , Protein Binding
3.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(13)2021 Jun 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1304667

ABSTRACT

Amyloid beta (Aß)-induced abnormal neuroinflammation is recognized as a major pathological feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD), which results in memory impairment. Research exploring low-grade systemic inflammation and its impact on the development and progression of neurodegenerative disease has increased. A particular research focus has been whether systemic inflammation arises only as a secondary effect of disease, or it is also a cause of pathology. The inflammasomes, and more specifically the NLRP3 inflammasome, are crucial components of the innate immune system and are usually activated in response to infection or tissue damage. Although inflammasome activation plays critical roles against various pathogens in host defense, overactivation of inflammasome contributes to the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases, including acute central nervous system (CNS) injuries and chronic neurodegenerative diseases, such as AD. This review summarizes the current literature on the role of the NLRP3 inflammasome in the pathogenesis of AD, and its involvement in infections, particularly SARS-CoV-2. NLRP3 might represent the crossroad between the hypothesized neurodegeneration and the primary COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
Alzheimer Disease/pathology , Amyloid beta-Peptides/metabolism , Inflammasomes/metabolism , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/metabolism , Alzheimer Disease/metabolism , Animals , Coronavirus/pathogenicity , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Microglia/metabolism , Virus Diseases/immunology , Virus Diseases/pathology
4.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(13)2021 Jun 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1295856

ABSTRACT

Amyloid beta (Aß)-induced abnormal neuroinflammation is recognized as a major pathological feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD), which results in memory impairment. Research exploring low-grade systemic inflammation and its impact on the development and progression of neurodegenerative disease has increased. A particular research focus has been whether systemic inflammation arises only as a secondary effect of disease, or it is also a cause of pathology. The inflammasomes, and more specifically the NLRP3 inflammasome, are crucial components of the innate immune system and are usually activated in response to infection or tissue damage. Although inflammasome activation plays critical roles against various pathogens in host defense, overactivation of inflammasome contributes to the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases, including acute central nervous system (CNS) injuries and chronic neurodegenerative diseases, such as AD. This review summarizes the current literature on the role of the NLRP3 inflammasome in the pathogenesis of AD, and its involvement in infections, particularly SARS-CoV-2. NLRP3 might represent the crossroad between the hypothesized neurodegeneration and the primary COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
Alzheimer Disease/pathology , Amyloid beta-Peptides/metabolism , Inflammasomes/metabolism , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/metabolism , Alzheimer Disease/metabolism , Animals , Coronavirus/pathogenicity , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Microglia/metabolism , Virus Diseases/immunology , Virus Diseases/pathology
5.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(4)2021 Feb 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1069829

ABSTRACT

Alzheimer's disease is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder and represents the main cause of dementia globally. Currently, the world is suffering from the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), a virus that uses angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) as a receptor to enter the host cells. In COVID-19, neurological manifestations have been reported to occur. The present study demonstrates that the protein expression level of ACE2 is upregulated in the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease. The increased ACE2 expression is not age-dependent, suggesting the direct relationship between Alzheimer's disease and ACE2 expression. Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, and brains with the disease examined in this study also exhibited higher carbonylated proteins, as well as an increased thiol oxidation state of peroxiredoxin 6 (Prx6). A moderate positive correlation was found between the increased ACE2 protein expression and oxidative stress in brains with Alzheimer's disease. In summary, the present study reveals the relationships between Alzheimer's disease and ACE2, the receptor for SARS-CoV-2. These results suggest the importance of carefully monitoring patients with both Alzheimer's disease and COVID-19 in order to identify higher viral loads in the brain and long-term adverse neurological consequences.


Subject(s)
Alzheimer Disease/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/metabolism , Hippocampus/metabolism , Pandemics , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Up-Regulation , Alzheimer Disease/complications , Alzheimer Disease/pathology , Amyloid beta-Peptides/metabolism , Autopsy , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/virology , Hippocampus/pathology , Humans , Oxidation-Reduction , Oxidative Stress , Peroxiredoxin VI/metabolism , Plaque, Amyloid/metabolism , Protein Carbonylation , Severity of Illness Index , Virus Internalization
6.
Mech Ageing Dev ; 192: 111363, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-797286

ABSTRACT

Neprilysin (NEP) is an integral membrane-bound metallopeptidase with a wide spectrum of substrates and physiological functions. It plays an important role in proteolytic processes in the kidney, cardiovascular regulation, immune response, cell proliferation, foetal development etc. It is an important neuropeptidase and amyloid-degrading enzyme which makes NEP a therapeutic target in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Moreover, it plays a preventive role in development of cancer, obesity and type-2 diabetes. Recently a role of NEP in COVID-19 pathogenesis has also been suggested. Despite intensive research into NEP structure and functions in different organisms, changes in its expression and regulation during brain development and ageing, especially in age-related pathologies, is still not fully understood. This prevents development of pharmacological treatments from various diseases in which NEP is implicated although recently a dual-acting drug sacubitril-valsartan (LCZ696) combining a NEP inhibitor and angiotensin receptor blocker has been approved for treatment of heart failure. Also, various natural compounds capable of upregulating NEP expression, including green tea (EGCG), have been proposed as a preventive medicine in prostate cancer and AD. This review summarizes the existing literature and our own research on the expression and activity of NEP in normal brain development, ageing and under pathological conditions.


Subject(s)
Aging/immunology , Alzheimer Disease/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/immunology , Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic/immunology , Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic/immunology , Neoplasm Proteins/immunology , Neoplasms/immunology , Neprilysin/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Aging/pathology , Alzheimer Disease/pathology , Animals , COVID-19/pathology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/pathology , Humans , Neoplasms/pathology
7.
Int J Mol Sci ; 21(17)2020 Aug 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-724888

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study is to examine the use of an inflammasome competitor as a preventative agent. Coronaviruses have zoonotic potential due to the adaptability of their S protein to bind receptors of other species, most notably demonstrated by SARS-CoV. The binding of SARS-CoV-2 to TLR (Toll-like receptor) causes the release of pro-IL-1ß, which is cleaved by caspase-1, followed by the formation and activation of the inflammasome, which is a mediator of lung inflammation, fever, and fibrosis. The NLRP3 (NACHT, LRR and PYD domains-containing protein 3) inflammasome is implicated in a variety of human diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD), prion diseases, type 2 diabetes, and numerous infectious diseases. By examining the use of 4,4'-diaminodiphenyl sulfone (DDS) in the treatment of patients with Hansen's disease, also diagnosed as Alzheimer's disease, this study demonstrates the diverse mechanisms involved in the activation of inflammasomes. TLRs, due to genetic polymorphisms, can alter the immune response to a wide variety of microbial ligands, including viruses. In particular, TLR2Arg677Trp was reported to be exclusively present in Korean patients with lepromatous leprosy (LL). Previously, mutation of the intracellular domain of TLR2 has demonstrated its role in determining the susceptibility to LL, though LL was successfully treated using a combination of DDS with rifampicin and clofazimine. Of the three tested antibiotics, DDS was effective in the molecular regulation of NLRP3 inflammasome activators that are important in mild cognitive impairment (MCI), Parkinson's disease (PD), and AD. The specific targeting of NLRP3 itself or up-/downstream factors of the NLRP3 inflammasome by DDS may be responsible for its observed preventive effects, functioning as a competitor.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Dapsone/pharmacology , Inflammasomes/metabolism , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Alzheimer Disease/pathology , COVID-19 , Clofazimine/pharmacology , Cognitive Dysfunction/pathology , Humans , Interleukin-1beta/metabolism , Leprosy/drug therapy , Leprosy/genetics , Pandemics , Parkinsonian Disorders/pathology , Rifampin/pharmacology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Toll-Like Receptor 2/genetics
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