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1.
J Korean Med Sci ; 36(42): e295, 2021 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1497009

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To minimize nosocomial infection against coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), most hospitals conduct a prescreening process to evaluate the patient or guardian of any symptoms suggestive of COVID-19 or exposure to a COVID-19 patient at entrances of hospital buildings. In our hospital, we have implemented a two-level prescreening process in the outpatient clinic: an initial prescreening process at the entrance of the outpatient clinic (PPEO) and a second prescreening process is repeated in each department. If any symptoms or epidemiological history are identified at the second level, an emergency code is announced through the hospital's address system. The patient is then guided outside through a designated aisle. In this study, we analyze the cases missed in the PPEO that caused the emergency code to be applied. METHODS: All cases reported from March 2020 to April 2021 were analyzed retrospectively. We calculated the incidence of cases missed by the PPEO per 1,000 outpatients and compared the incidence between first-time hospital visitors and those visiting for the second time or more; morning and afternoon office hours; and days of the week. RESULTS: During the study period, the emergency code was applied to 449 cases missed by the PPEO. Among those cases, 20.7% were reported in otorhinolaryngology, followed by 11.6% in gastroenterology, 5.8% in urology, and 5.8% in dermatology. Fever was the most common symptom (59.9%), followed by cough (19.8%). The incidence of cases per 1,000 outpatients was significantly higher among first-time visitors than among those visiting for the second time or more (1.77 [confidence interval (CI), 1.44-2.10] vs. 0.59 [CI, 0.52-0.65], respectively) (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Fever was the most common symptom missed by the PPEO, and otorhinolaryngology and gastroenterology most frequently reported missed cases. Cases missed by the PPEO were more likely to occur among first-time visitors than returning visitors. The results obtained from this study can provide insights or recommendations to other healthcare facilities in operating prescreening processes during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care Facilities/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cough/etiology , Fever/etiology , Mass Screening/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Ambulatory Care , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Female , Humans , Incidence , Infection Control , Male , Mass Screening/organization & administration , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Young Adult
2.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 70(37): 1291-1293, 2021 Sep 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1441399

ABSTRACT

Data on COVID-19 vaccine effectiveness (VE) since the B.1.617.2 (Delta) variant of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, became the predominant circulating strain in the United States are limited (1-3). CDC used the VISION Network* to examine medical encounters (32,867) from 187 hospitals and 221 emergency departments (EDs) and urgent care (UC) clinics across nine states during June-August 2021, beginning on the date the Delta variant accounted for >50% of sequenced isolates in each medical facility's state. VISION Network methods have been published (4).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Ambulatory Care Facilities/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Middle Aged , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
4.
Med J Aust ; 215(5): 217-221, 2021 09 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1355152

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To examine the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of SARS-CoV-2-positive children in Australia during 2020. DESIGN, SETTING: Multicentre retrospective study in 16 hospitals of the Paediatric Research in Emergency Departments International Collaborative (PREDICT) network; eleven in Victoria, five in four other Australian states. PARTICIPANTS: Children aged 0-17 years who presented to hospital-based COVID-19 testing clinics, hospital wards, or emergency departments during 1 February - 30 September 2020 and who were positive for SARS-CoV-2. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Epidemiological and clinical characteristics of children positive for SARS-CoV-2. RESULTS: A total of 393 SARS-CoV-2-positive children (181 girls, 46%) presented to the participating hospitals (426 presentations, including 131 to emergency departments [31%]), the first on 3 February 2020. Thirty-three children presented more than once (8%), including two who were transferred to participating tertiary centres (0.5%). The median age of the children was 5.3 years (IQR, 1.9-12.0 years; range, 10 days to 17.9 years). Hospital admissions followed 51 of 426 presentations (12%; 44 children), including 17 patients who were managed remotely by hospital in the home. Only 16 of the 426 presentations led to hospital medical interventions (4%). Two children (0.5%) were diagnosed with the paediatric inflammatory multisystem syndrome temporally associated with SARS-CoV-2 (PIMS-TS). CONCLUSION: The clinical course for most SARS-CoV-2-positive children who presented to Australian hospitals was mild, and did not require medical intervention.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Testing/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/diagnosis , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/epidemiology , Adolescent , Ambulatory Care Facilities/statistics & numerical data , Australia , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Retrospective Studies , Symptom Assessment
6.
PLoS One ; 16(7): e0254990, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1319522

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The objective of this study was to identify clinical risk factors for COVID-19 in a German outpatient fever clinic that allow distinction of SARS-CoV-2 infected patients from other patients with flu-like symptoms. METHODS: This is a retrospective, single-centre cohort study. Patients were included visiting the fever clinic from 4th of April 2020 to 15th of May 2020. Symptoms, comorbidities, and socio-demographic factors were recorded in a standardized fashion. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify risk factors of COVID-19, on the bases of those a model discrimination was assessed using area under the receiver operation curves (AUROC). RESULTS: The final analysis included 930 patients, of which 74 (8%) had COVID-19. Anosmia (OR 10.71; CI 6.07-18.9) and ageusia (OR 9.3; CI 5.36-16.12) were strongly associated with COVID-19. High-risk exposure (OR 12.20; CI 6.80-21.90), especially in the same household (OR 4.14; CI 1.28-13.33), was also correlated; the more household members, especially with flu-like symptoms, the higher the risk of COVID-19. Working in an essential workplace was also associated with COVID-19 (OR 2.35; CI 1.40-3.96), whereas smoking was inversely correlated (OR 0.19; CI 0.08-0.44). A model that considered risk factors like anosmia, ageusia, concomitant of symptomatic household members and smoking well discriminated COVID-19 patients from other patients with flu-like symptoms (AUROC 0.84). CONCLUSIONS: We report a set of four readily available clinical parameters that allow the identification of high-risk individuals of COVID-19. Our study will not replace molecular testing but will help guide containment efforts while waiting for test results.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care Facilities/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/complications , Fever/complications , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Models, Statistical , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment
7.
J Health Care Poor Underserved ; 32(2): 948-957, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1268207

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has dramatically altered the landscape of health care delivery, prompting a rapid, widespread adoption of telehealth in primary care practices. Using a pooled sample of 1,344 primary care clinics in Texas, we examined the adoption of telehealth in Texas during the initial months of the COVID-19 pandemic, by comparing medically underserved area (MUA) clinics and non-medically underserved area (non-MUA) clinics. Our analysis suggests that compared with MUA clinics, clinics in non-MUAs were more likely to conduct a majority of their visits via telehealth before May 1st, 2020. However, later surveys indicated that differences in telehealth use between MUA and non-MUA clinics lessened, suggesting that some of the barriers that MUA clinics initially faced might have resolved over time. This research provides an additional perspective in discussions about telehealth adoption on a widespread, permanent basis in Texas and the U.S.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care Facilities/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Healthcare Disparities , Primary Health Care , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Health Services Needs and Demand , Humans , Medically Underserved Area , Pandemics , Texas/epidemiology
8.
Diabetes Metab Syndr ; 15(4): 102175, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1267654

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: We aimed to assess patient perception toward the rapid implementation of virtual phone clinics among Saudi adult patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic. METHODS: This cross-sectional, web-based study included Saudi adult patients with T1DM who attended at least one virtual phone visit with the diabetes clinic at King Abdulaziz Medical City, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, between August 1 and December 31, 2020. Patients anonymously answered a Google form-created Arabic questionnaire. Information about patient characteristics, outcome, and perception of the virtual phone visit were obtained. Data were presented using descriptive statistics, chi-square, one-way ANOVA, independent t-, and Welch's t-tests. RESULTS: The questionnaire was sent to 281 patients, of whom 201 completed it. 59.2% patients were satisfied with their overall virtual phone clinic experience, and 75.6% preferred to continue attending the virtual phone clinics in the future. The average perception value of patients toward virtual phone clinics was 67.76 ± 19.9, suggesting good perception among the majority. Negative or neutral views of current health, asking to be physically seen, and missing a virtual appointment were associated with significantly lower average patient perception value (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Most Saudi patients with T1DM have adapted to virtual phone consultations, exhibiting good satisfaction and perception, and high preference to continue using this system in the future. The utilization of the service to assist patients with diabetes is highly encouraged, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic. Strategies need to be developed to further enhance the patient experience.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care Facilities/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/prevention & control , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Remote Consultation/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/psychology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/virology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Perception , Referral and Consultation , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
10.
Eur J Orthop Surg Traumatol ; 31(1): 105-109, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1064508

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was declared a pandemic by the World Health Organisation on 11 March 2020. The aim of this study is to assess the impact of COVID-19 on orthopaedic practice and training in the UK. METHODS: Surgeons throughout UK hospitals were asked to complete an electronic survey relating to orthopaedic practice and training in their hospital. The nationwide survey was conducted during the first peak of COVID-19 cases in the UK between 20 March 2020 and 20 April 2020. RESULTS: All 202 UK participants reported disruption to their daily practice. 91% reported all elective operating had been cancelled and trauma continued as normal in only 24% of cases. 70% reported disruption to trauma operating. Elective clinic capacity significantly reduced with no elective clinics running as normal. 55% reported their elective clinics completely cancelled, whilst 38% reported elective clinics running at a reduced capacity, with non-urgent appointments postponed. Only 9% of fracture clinics ran as normal, and 69% had a reduced service. 67% reported teaching and study leave cancelled. Significantly, 69% of participants felt the pandemic would result in a delay to completion of registrar training programmes. CONCLUSION: This is the first nationwide survey assessing the impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 on UK orthopaedic practice and training, during the peak of the pandemic. It highlights the scale of the challenge ahead for the specialty, including during the recovery phase and post-recovery phase of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Orthopedic Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Orthopedics/education , Pandemics , Ambulatory Care Facilities/statistics & numerical data , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Surveys and Questionnaires , United Kingdom/epidemiology
13.
J Healthc Manag ; 65(6): 443-452, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1054365

ABSTRACT

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: The COVID-19 pandemic, with its resultant social distancing, has disrupted the delivery of healthcare for both patients and providers. Fortunately, changes to legislation and regulation in response to the pandemic allowed Emory Healthcare to rapidly implement telehealth care. Beginning in early March 2020 and continuing through the initial 2-month implementation period (when data collection stopped), clinicians received telehealth training and certification. Standard workflows created by means of a hub-and-spoke operational model enabled rapid sharing and deployment of best practices throughout the system's physician group practice. Lean process huddles facilitated successful implementation. In total, 2,374 healthcare professionals, including 986 attending physicians, 416 residents and fellows, and 555 advanced practice providers, were trained and certified for telehealth; 53,751 new- and established-patient audio-video telehealth visits and 10,539 established-patient telephone visits were performed in 8 weeks for a total of 64,290 virtual visits. This initiative included a new COVID-19 virtual patient clinic that saw 705 patients in a 6-week period. A total of $14,662,967 was charged during this time; collection rates were similar to in-person visits. Initial patient satisfaction scores were equivalent to in-person visits. We conclude that rapid deployment of virtual visits can be accomplished through a structured, organized approach including training, certification, and Lean principles. A hub-and-spoke model enables bidirectional feedback and timely improvements, thus facilitating swifter implementation and a quick rise in patient volume. Financial sustainability is achievable, but to sustain that, telehealth requires the support of continued deregulation by legislative and regulatory bodies.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care Facilities/organization & administration , Ambulatory Care Facilities/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Health Personnel/education , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Georgia/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Kidney Int ; 98(6): 1519-1529, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1023690

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to estimate the incidence of COVID-19 disease in the French national population of dialysis patients, their course of illness and to identify the risk factors associated with mortality. Our study included all patients on dialysis recorded in the French REIN Registry in April 2020. Clinical characteristics at last follow-up and the evolution of COVID-19 illness severity over time were recorded for diagnosed cases (either suspicious clinical symptoms, characteristic signs on the chest scan or a positive reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction) for SARS-CoV-2. A total of 1,621 infected patients were reported on the REIN registry from March 16th, 2020 to May 4th, 2020. Of these, 344 died. The prevalence of COVID-19 patients varied from less than 1% to 10% between regions. The probability of being a case was higher in males, patients with diabetes, those in need of assistance for transfer or treated at a self-care unit. Dialysis at home was associated with a lower probability of being infected as was being a smoker, a former smoker, having an active malignancy, or peripheral vascular disease. Mortality in diagnosed cases (21%) was associated with the same causes as in the general population. Higher age, hypoalbuminemia and the presence of an ischemic heart disease were statistically independently associated with a higher risk of death. Being treated at a selfcare unit was associated with a lower risk. Thus, our study showed a relatively low frequency of COVID-19 among dialysis patients contrary to what might have been assumed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Renal Dialysis/statistics & numerical data , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Ambulatory Care Facilities/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Case-Control Studies , Critical Care/statistics & numerical data , Female , France/epidemiology , Hemodialysis, Home/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Acuity , Prevalence , Protective Factors , Registries , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Factors
15.
Turk J Med Sci ; 51(3): 962-971, 2021 06 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1024685

ABSTRACT

Background/aim: The aim of this paper was to determine the general tendencies of urology patients and effect of COVID-19 pandemic on daily urological practice at tertiary centers located in the most affected area in Turkey. Materials and methods: We retrospectively analyzed the data of 39,677 patients (group 1) that applied to 6 different large-volume tertiary centers in Istanbul for outpatient consultation, surgery, or other procedures in the 3-month period between March 16 and June 14, 2020. The distribution of the number of patients who applied to subspecialty sections of urology outpatient clinics and inpatient services were recorded by weeks. That data was compared to data obtained from 145,247 patients that applied to the same centers in the same period of the previous year (group 2). The reflection of worldwide and Turkish COVID-19 case distribution on the daily urological practice was analyzed. Results: There was a decrease in the number of patients in all subspecialty sections the in group 1 compared to group 2; however, there was a significant proportional increase in urooncology and general urology admissions. A decrease of approximately 75% was observed in the total number of surgeries (p < 0.001). We detected a negative correlation between the numbers of admission to all outpatient clinics and COVID-19 cases or deaths in Turkey (p < 0.05). The same negative correlation was present for all surgical procedures and consultations (p < 0.05). The multivariate linear regression analysis revealed that the number of cases in Turkey, and the number of deaths worldwide affect the number of outpatient clinic admissions (R2 = 0.38, p = 0.028) and urological surgery (R2 = 0.33, p = 0.020) in Turkey negatively. Conclusion: This novel pandemic has implications even for urology practice. Urological surgical procedures were more affected by COVID-19-related deaths in Turkey and worldwide. Outpatient admissions and urological surgeries decreased significantly by increasing COVID-19 case numbers in Turkey and worldwide deaths.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care Facilities/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospitalization/trends , Pandemics , Urologic Diseases/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Male , Referral and Consultation , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Time Factors , Turkey/epidemiology
16.
J Endocrinol Invest ; 44(8): 1689-1698, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-996502

ABSTRACT

CONTEXT: The COVID-19 outbreak in Italy is the major concern of Public Health in 2020: measures of containment were progressively expanded, limiting Outpatients' visit. OBJECTIVE: We have developed and applied an emergency plan, tailored for Outpatients with endocrine diseases. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study from March to May 2020. SETTING: Referral University-Hospital center. PATIENTS: 1262 patients in 8 weeks. INTERVENTIONS: The emergency plan is based upon the endocrine triage, the stay-safe procedures and the tele-Endo. During endocrine triage every patient was contacted by phone to assess health status and define if the visit will be performed face-to-face (F2F) or by tele-Medicine (tele-Endo). In case of F2F, targeted stay-safe procedures have been adopted. Tele-Endo, performed by phone and email, is dedicated to COVID-19-infected patients, to elderly or frail people, or to those with a stable disease. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: To assess efficacy of the emergency plan to continue the follow-up of Outpatients. RESULTS: The number of visits cancelled after endocrine triage (9%) is lower than that cancelled independently by the patients (37%, p < 0.001); the latter reduced from 47 to 19% during the weeks of lockdown (p = 0.032). 86% of patients contacted by endocrine-triage received a clinical response (F2F and tele-Endo visits). F2F visit was offered especially to young patients; tele-Endo was applied to 63% of geriatric patients (p < 0.001), visits' outcome was similar between young and aged patients. CONCLUSIONS: The emergency plan respects the WHO recommendations to limit viral spread and is useful to continue follow-up for outpatients with endocrine diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Endocrinology , Referral and Consultation , Telemedicine , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Ambulatory Care Facilities/organization & administration , Ambulatory Care Facilities/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disease Outbreaks , Endocrinology/methods , Endocrinology/organization & administration , Endocrinology/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Outpatients/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Quarantine/methods , Quarantine/organization & administration , Quarantine/statistics & numerical data , Referral and Consultation/organization & administration , Referral and Consultation/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Triage/methods , Triage/organization & administration , Triage/statistics & numerical data
18.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 69(50): 1925-1929, 2020 Dec 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-983904

ABSTRACT

As of December 14, 2020, children and adolescents aged <18 years have accounted for 10.2% of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) cases reported in the United States.* Mitigation strategies to prevent infection with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, among persons of all ages, are important for pandemic control. Characterization of risk factors for SARS-CoV-2 infection among children and adolescents can inform efforts by parents, school and program administrators, and public health officials to reduce SARS-CoV-2 transmission. To assess school, community, and close contact exposures associated with pediatric COVID-19, a case-control study was conducted to compare exposures reported by parents or guardians of children and adolescents aged <18 years with SARS-CoV-2 infection confirmed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) testing (case-patients) with exposures reported among those who received negative SARS-CoV-2 RT-PCR test results (control participants). Among 397 children and adolescents investigated, in-person school or child care attendance ≤14 days before the SARS-CoV-2 test was reported for 62% of case-patients and 68% of control participants and was not associated with a positive SARS-CoV-2 test result (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 0.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.5-1.3). Among 236 children aged ≥2 years who attended child care or school during the 2 weeks before SARS-CoV-2 testing, parents of 64% of case-patients and 76% of control participants reported that their child and all staff members wore masks inside the facility (aOR = 0.4, 95% CI = 0.2-0.8). In the 2 weeks preceding SARS-CoV-2 testing, case-patients were more likely to have had close contact with a person with known COVID-19 (aOR = 3.2, 95% CI = 2.0-5.0), have attended gatherings† with persons outside their household, including social functions (aOR = 2.4, 95% CI = 1.1-5.5) or activities with other children (aOR = 3.3, 95% CI = 1.3-8.4), or have had visitors in the home (aOR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.2-2.9) than were control participants. Close contacts with persons with COVID-19 and gatherings contribute to SARS-CoV-2 infections in children and adolescents. Consistent use of masks, social distancing, isolation of infected persons, and quarantine of those who are exposed to the virus continue to be important to prevent COVID-19 spread.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care Facilities/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 Testing/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/diagnosis , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Male , Mississippi/epidemiology , Risk Factors
19.
Sex Transm Dis ; 48(1): e5-e7, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-977420

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 is responsible for a global pandemic and has impacted health care accessibility and delivery. Clinic data were reviewed for an STI clinic from September 2019 to May 2020. A significant decrease in rates of STI visits and treatments during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic was observed.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care Facilities/statistics & numerical data , Ambulatory Care/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Services Accessibility/statistics & numerical data , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Rhode Island , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/prevention & control
20.
Perspect Sex Reprod Health ; 52(4): 217-225, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-963789

ABSTRACT

CONTEXT: The ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic has affected abortion providers and abortion care, and the strategies clinics are adopting to navigate the pandemic, have not been well documented. METHODS: In April-May 2020, representatives from 103 independent abortion clinics (i.e., those not affiliated with Planned Parenthood) completed a survey that included close-ended questions about how the pandemic, the public health response, and designations of abortion as a nonessential service had affected their clinic, as well as open-ended questions about the pandemic's impact. Analyses were primarily descriptive but included an exploration of regional variation. RESULTS: All U.S. regions were represented in the sample. At 51% of clinics, clinicians or staff had been unable to work because of the pandemic or public health responses. Temporary closures were more common among clinics in the South (35%) and Midwest (21%) than in the Northeast and West (5% each). More than half of clinics had canceled or postponed nonabortion services (e.g., general gynecologic care); cancelation or postponement of abortion services was less common (25-38%, depending on type) and again especially prevalent in the South and Midwest. Respondents reported the pandemic had had numerous effects on their clinics, including disrupting their workforce, clinic flow and work practices; increasing expenses; and reducing revenues. State laws (including designations of abortion as nonessential) had exacerbated these difficulties. CONCLUSIONS: Although independent abortion clinics have faced considerable challenges from the pandemic, most continued to provide abortion care. Despite this resiliency, additional support may be needed to ensure sustainability of these clinics.


Subject(s)
Abortion, Induced/statistics & numerical data , Ambulatory Care Facilities/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/statistics & numerical data , Female , Health Care Surveys , Humans , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
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