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3.
Am J Public Health ; 111(12): 2141-2148, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1559282

ABSTRACT

While underscoring the need for timely, nationally representative data in ambulatory, hospital, and long-term-care settings, the COVID-19 pandemic posed many challenges to traditional methods and mechanisms of data collection. To continue generating data from health care and long-term-care providers and establishments in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, the National Center for Health Statistics had to modify survey operations for several of its provider-based National Health Care Surveys, including quickly adding survey questions that captured the experiences of providing care during the pandemic. With the aim of providing information that may be useful to other health care data collection systems, this article presents some key challenges that affected data collection activities for these national provider surveys, as well as the measures taken to minimize the disruption in data collection and to optimize the likelihood of disseminating quality data in a timely manner. (Am J Public Health. 2021;111(12):2141-2148. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2021.306514).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Care Surveys/methods , Ambulatory Care/organization & administration , Data Collection/methods , Data Collection/standards , Electronic Health Records/organization & administration , Health Care Surveys/standards , Hospitalization , Humans , Long-Term Care/organization & administration , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Time Factors , United States/epidemiology
4.
Addict Biol ; 27(1): e13090, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1556187

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) first emerged in China in November 2019. Most governments have responded to the COVID-19 pandemic by imposing a lockdown. Some evidence suggests that a period of isolation might have led to a spike in alcohol misuse, and in the case of patients with alcohol use disorder (AUD), social isolation can favour lapse and relapse. The aim of our position paper is to provide specialists in the alcohol addiction field, in psychopharmacology, gastroenterology and in internal medicine, with appropriate tools to better manage patients with AUD and COVID-19,considering some important topics: (a) the susceptibility of AUD patients to infection; (b) the pharmacological interaction between medications used to treat AUD and to treat COVID-19; (c) the reorganization of the Centre for Alcohol Addiction Treatment for the management of AUD patients in the COVID-19 era (group activities, telemedicine, outpatients treatment, alcohol-related liver disease and liver transplantation, collecting samples); (d) AUD and SARS-CoV-2 vaccination. Telemedicine/telehealth will undoubtedly be useful/practical tools even though it remains at an elementary level; the contribution of the family and of caregivers in the management of AUD patients will play a significant role; the multidisciplinary intervention involving experts in the treatment of AUD with specialists in the treatment of COVID-19 disease will need implementation. Thus, the COVID-19 pandemic is rapidly leading addiction specialists towards a new governance scenario of AUD, which necessarily needs an in-depth reconsideration, focusing attention on a safe approach in combination with the efficacy of treatment.


Subject(s)
Alcoholism/therapy , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Alcoholics Anonymous , Alcoholism/epidemiology , Ambulatory Care/organization & administration , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Disease Susceptibility , Drug Interactions , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Liver Cirrhosis, Alcoholic/epidemiology , Liver Cirrhosis, Alcoholic/therapy , Liver Transplantation , Recurrence , SARS-CoV-2 , Societies, Medical , Telemedicine
6.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(41): e27399, 2021 Oct 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1501200

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has intensified globally since its origin in Wuhan, China in December 2019. Many medical groups across the United States have experienced extraordinary clinical and financial pressures due to COVID-19 as a result of a decline in elective inpatient and outpatient surgical procedures and most nonurgent elective physician visits. The current study reports how our medical group in a metropolitan community in Kentucky rebooted our ambulatory and inpatient services following the guidance of our state's phased reopening. Particular attention focused on the transition between the initial COVID-19 surge and post-COVID-19 surge and how our medical group responded to meet community needs. Ten strategies were incorporated in our medical group, including heightened communication; ambulatory telehealth; safe and clean outpatient environment; marketing; physician, other medical provider, and staff compensation; high quality patient experience; schedule optimization; rescheduling tactics; data management; and primary care versus specialty approaches. These methods are applicable to both the current rebooting stage as well as to a potential resurgence of COVID-19 in the future.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care/organization & administration , Office Visits/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Ambulatory Care/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care, Integrated/organization & administration , Humans , Kentucky/epidemiology , Pandemics , Primary Health Care/organization & administration , Quality Improvement , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Arch Dis Child ; 107(3): e13, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1484003

ABSTRACT

Around the UK, commissioners have different models for delivering NHS 111, General Practice (GP) out-of-hours and urgent care services, focusing on telephony to help deliver urgent and emergency care. During the (early phases of the) COVID-19 pandemic, NHS 111 experienced an unprecedented volume of calls. At any time, 25%-30% of calls relate to children and young people (CYP). In response, the CYP's Transformation and Integrated Urgent Care teams at NHS England and NHS Improvement (NHSE/I) assisted in redeploying volunteer paediatricians into the integrated urgent care NHS 111 Clinical Assessment Services (CAS), taking calls about CYP. From this work, key stakeholders developed a paediatric 111 consultation framework, as well as learning outcomes, key capabilities and illustrations mapped against the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health (RCPCH) Progress curriculum domains, to aid paediatricians in training to undertake NHS 111 activities. These learning outcomes and key capabilities have been endorsed by the RCPCH Curriculum Review Group and are recommended to form part of the integrated urgent care service specification and workforce blueprint to improve outcomes for CYP.


Subject(s)
After-Hours Care/organization & administration , Ambulatory Care/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pediatrics/organization & administration , Referral and Consultation/organization & administration , Curriculum , Humans , Pediatrics/education , Pilot Projects , SARS-CoV-2 , State Medicine , Telephone , United Kingdom/epidemiology
10.
Rev Cardiovasc Med ; 22(3): 677-690, 2021 09 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1439022

ABSTRACT

Heart Failure (HF) is characterized by an elevated readmission rate, with almost 50% of events occurring after the first episode over the first 6 months of the post-discharge period. In this context, the vulnerable phase represents the period when patients elapse from a sub-acute to a more stabilized chronic phase. The lack of an accurate approach for each HF subtype is probably the main cause of the inconclusive data in reducing the trend of recurrent hospitalizations. Most care programs are based on the main diagnosis and the HF stages, but a model focused on the specific HF etiology is lacking. The HF clinic route based on the HF etiology and the underlying diseases responsible for HF could become an interesting approach, compared with the traditional programs, mainly based on non-specific HF subtypes and New York Heart Association class, rather than on detailed etiologic and epidemiological data. This type of care may reduce the 30-day readmission rates for HF, increase the use of evidence-based therapies, prevent the exacerbation of each comorbidity, improve patient compliance, and decrease the use of resources. For all these reasons, we propose a dedicated outpatient HF program with a daily practice scenario that could improve the early identification of symptom progression and the quality-of-life evaluation, facilitate the access to diagnostic and laboratory tools and improve the utilization of financial resources, together with optimal medical titration and management.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care/organization & administration , COVID-19 , Cardiology Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Delivery of Health Care, Integrated/organization & administration , Heart Failure/therapy , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Heart Failure/diagnosis , Heart Failure/epidemiology , Heart Failure/physiopathology , Humans , Patient Readmission , Prognosis
11.
Actas Urol Esp (Engl Ed) ; 45(8): 530-536, 2021 10.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1415156

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE: The COVID-19 pandemic has brought about changes in the management of urology patients, especially those with prostate cancer. The aim of this work is to show the changes in the ambulatory care practices by individualized telematic care for each patient profile. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Articles published from March 2020 to January 2021 were reviewed. We selected those that provided the highest levels of evidence regarding risk in different aspects: screening, diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of prostate cancer. RESULTS: We developed a classification system based on priorities, at different stages of the disease (screening, diagnosis, treatment and follow-up) to which the type of care given, in-person or telephone visits, was adapted. We established 4 options, as follows: in priority A or low, care will be given by telephone in all cases; in priority B or intermediate, if patients are considered subsidiary of an in-person visit after telephone consultation, they will be scheduled within 3 months; in priority C or high, patients will be seen in person within a margin from 1 to 3 months and in priority D or very high, patients must always be seen in person within a margin of up to 48 h and considered very preferential. CONCLUSIONS: Telematic care in prostate cancer offers an opportunity to develop new performance and follow-up protocols, which should be thoroughly analyzed in future studies, in order to create a safe environment and guarantee oncologic outcomes for patients.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Pandemics , Prostatic Neoplasms/therapy , Telemedicine , Appointments and Schedules , Continuity of Patient Care , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Health Priorities/organization & administration , Humans , Male , Prostatic Neoplasms/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Time Factors
18.
Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol ; 87(5): 603-610, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1222345

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is implicated in the ongoing pandemic across the globe since December 2019. It was first notified by China from Wuhan on 31 December 2020 and transmission to healthcare workers was first reported on 20 January 2020. Human-to-human transmission is mainly by droplet infection. At present no effective vaccine is available. Our speciality needs to collectively address the urgent issue of risk of transmission in dermatology practice. A case series of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) from Wuhan described that 41.3% of their patients may have acquired the infection from the hospital. Of all the infected health care workers, 77.5% worked in general wards and departments. These data highlight the significant risk of nosocomial transmission of COVID-19 and also the higher risk in general wards and departments compared to the emergency room or intensive care unit. Dermatology patients are generally seen in clinics and in outpatient departments in hospitals. Patients wait together in the waiting area, intermingle and then are seen by the physician in their chamber. This can cause transmission of the pathogen among patients and from patient to physician. Social distancing, hand hygiene and the use of personal protective equipment are important for preventing the spread of infection and dermatology practices also have to incorporate these aspects. Telemedicine is becoming an important tool for the management of dermatology patients in these times. At-risk patients in dermatology also need to be given priority care. Protocols for the use of immunosuppressants and biologics in dermatology during the pandemic are being developed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Dermatology/organization & administration , Skin Diseases/therapy , Ambulatory Care/methods , Ambulatory Care/organization & administration , Biological Products/therapeutic use , COVID-19/transmission , Cross Infection/transmission , Humans , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , India , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Skin Diseases/complications , Skin Diseases/diagnosis , Telemedicine/legislation & jurisprudence , Vaccination , Waiting Rooms
19.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(15): e25495, 2021 Apr 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1180673

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: While the new Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic rapidly spread across the world, South America was reached later in relation to Asia, Europe and the United States of America (USA). Brazil concentrates now the largest number of cases in the continent and, as the disease speedily progressed throughout the country, prompt and challenging operational strategies had to be taken by institutions caring for COVID-19 and non-COVID-19 patients in order to assure optimal workflows, triage, and management. Although hospitals in the USA, Europe and Asia have shared their experience on this subject, little has been discussed about such strategies in South America or by the perspective of outpatient centers, which are paramount in the radiology field. This article shares the guidelines adopted early in the pandemic by a nationwide outpatient healthcare center composed by a network of more than 200 patient service centers and nearly 2,000 radiologists in Brazil, discussing operational and patient management strategies, staff protection, changes adopted in the fellowship program, and the effectiveness of such measures.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care , COVID-19 , Change Management , Civil Defense , Critical Pathways , Strategic Planning , Technology, Radiologic , Ambulatory Care/methods , Ambulatory Care/organization & administration , Ambulatory Care/statistics & numerical data , Brazil/epidemiology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Civil Defense/organization & administration , Civil Defense/statistics & numerical data , Critical Pathways/organization & administration , Critical Pathways/trends , Humans , Organizational Innovation , Practice Guidelines as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , Strategic Planning/standards , Strategic Planning/statistics & numerical data , Technology, Radiologic/methods , Technology, Radiologic/organization & administration , Technology, Radiologic/statistics & numerical data
20.
JCO Oncol Pract ; 17(3): e343-e354, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1154056

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: We present the strategy of a comprehensive cancer center organized to make operations pandemic proof and achieve continuity of cancer care during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Disease Outbreak Response (DORS) measures implemented at our center and its satellite clinics included strict infection prevention, manpower preservation, prudent resource allocation, and adaptation of standard-of-care treatments. Critical day-to-day clinical operations, number of persons screened before entry, staff temperature monitoring, and personal protection equipment stockpile were reviewed as a dashboard at daily DORS taskforce huddles. Polymerase chain reaction swab tests performed for patients and staff who met defined criteria for testing of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection were tracked. Descriptive statistics of outpatient attendances and treatment caseloads from February 3 to May 23, 2020, were compared with the corresponding period in 2019. RESULTS: We performed COVID-19 swabs for 80 patients and 93 staff, detecting three cancer patients with community-acquired COVID-19 infections with no nosocomial transmission. Patients who required chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or surgery and patients who are on maintenance treatment continued to receive timely treatment without disruption. The number of intravenous chemotherapy treatments was maintained at 97.8% compared with 2019, whereas that of weekly radiotherapy treatments remained stable since December 2019. All cancer-related surgeries proceeded without delay, with a 0.3% increase in workload. Surveillance follow-ups were conducted via teleconsultation, accounting for a 30.7% decrease in total face-to-face clinic consultations. CONCLUSION: Through the coordinated efforts of a DORS taskforce, it is possible to avoid nosocomial SARS-CoV-2 transmissions among patients and staff without compromising on care delivery at a national cancer center.


Subject(s)
Advisory Committees , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cancer Care Facilities/organization & administration , Continuity of Patient Care/organization & administration , Infection Control/organization & administration , Ambulatory Care/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , Community-Acquired Infections/epidemiology , Cross Infection/epidemiology , Health Care Rationing , Health Personnel , Hospitalization , Humans , Mass Screening , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , SARS-CoV-2 , Singapore/epidemiology
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