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1.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(2): e20545, 2021 02 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1573803

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 cases are exponentially increasing worldwide; however, its clinical phenotype remains unclear. Natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning approaches may yield key methods to rapidly identify individuals at a high risk of COVID-19 and to understand key symptoms upon clinical manifestation and presentation. Data on such symptoms may not be accurately synthesized into patient records owing to the pressing need to treat patients in overburdened health care settings. In this scenario, clinicians may focus on documenting widely reported symptoms that indicate a confirmed diagnosis of COVID-19, albeit at the expense of infrequently reported symptoms. While NLP solutions can play a key role in generating clinical phenotypes of COVID-19, they are limited by the resulting limitations in data from electronic health records (EHRs). A comprehensive record of clinic visits is required-audio recordings may be the answer. A recording of clinic visits represents a more comprehensive record of patient-reported symptoms. If done at scale, a combination of data from the EHR and recordings of clinic visits can be used to power NLP and machine learning models, thus rapidly generating a clinical phenotype of COVID-19. We propose the generation of a pipeline extending from audio or video recordings of clinic visits to establish a model that factors in clinical symptoms and predict COVID-19 incidence. With vast amounts of available data, we believe that a prediction model can be rapidly developed to promote the accurate screening of individuals at a high risk of COVID-19 and to identify patient characteristics that predict a greater risk of a more severe infection. If clinical encounters are recorded and our NLP model is adequately refined, benchtop virologic findings would be better informed. While clinic visit recordings are not the panacea for this pandemic, they are a low-cost option with many potential benefits, which have recently begun to be explored.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care/standards , COVID-19/genetics , Communications Media/standards , Electronic Health Records/standards , Machine Learning/standards , Natural Language Processing , Humans , Phenotype , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Eur J Endocrinol ; 185(4): G35-G42, 2021 Aug 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1448609

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has changed the nature of medical consultations, emphasizing virtual patient counselling, with relevance for patients with diabetes insipidus (DI) or hyponatraemia. The main complication of desmopressin treatment in DI is dilutional hyponatraemia. Since plasma sodium monitoring is not always possible in times of COVID-19, we recommend to delay the desmopressin dose once a week until aquaresis occurs allowing excess retained water to be excreted. Patients should measure their body weight daily. Patients with DI admitted to the hospital with COVID-19 have a high risk for mortality due to volume depletion. Specialists must supervise fluid replacement and dosing of desmopressin. Patients after pituitary surgery should drink to thirst and measure their body weight daily to early recognize the development of postoperative SIAD. They should know hyponatraemia symptoms. Hyponatraemia in COVID-19 is common with a prevalence of 20-30% and is mostly due to SIAD or hypovolaemia. It mirrors disease severity and is an early predictor of mortality. Hypernatraemia may also develop in COVID-19 patients, with a prevalence of 3-5%, especially in ICU, and derives from different multifactorial reasons, for example, due to insensible water losses from pyrexia, increased respiration rate and use of diuretics. Hypernatraemic dehydration may contribute to the high risk of acute kidney injury in COVID-19. IV fluid replacement should be administered with caution in severe cases of COVID-19 because of the risk of pulmonary oedema.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetes Insipidus/therapy , Endocrinology/standards , Hyponatremia/therapy , Ambulatory Care/methods , Ambulatory Care/standards , Consensus , Diabetes Insipidus/epidemiology , Diabetes Insipidus/pathology , Distance Counseling/methods , Distance Counseling/standards , Endocrinology/history , Endocrinology/trends , Expert Testimony , History, 21st Century , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Hyponatremia/epidemiology , Hyponatremia/pathology , Pandemics , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/history , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/standards , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Telemedicine/history , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/standards
3.
J Urol ; 206(6): 1469-1479, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1410198

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: We examined changes in urological care delivery due to COVID-19 in the U.S. based on patient, practice, and local/regional demographic and pandemic response features. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We analyzed real-world data from the American Urological Association Quality (AQUA) Registry collected from electronic health record systems. Data represented 157 outpatient urological practices and 3,165 providers across 48 U.S. states and territories, including 3,297,721 unique patients, 12,488,831 total outpatient visits and 2,194,456 procedures. The primary outcome measure was the number of outpatient visits and procedures performed (inpatient or outpatient) per practice per week, measured from January 2019 to February 2021. RESULTS: We found large (>50%) declines in outpatient visits from March 2020 to April 2020 across patient demographic groups and states, regardless of timing of state stay-at-home orders. Nonurgent outpatient visits decreased more across various nonurgent procedures (49%-59%) than for procedures performed for potentially urgent diagnoses (38%-52%); surgical procedures for nonurgent conditions also decreased more (43%-79%) than those for potentially urgent conditions (43%-53%). African American patients had similar decreases in outpatient visits compared with Asians and Caucasians, but also slower recoveries back to baseline. Medicare-insured patients had the steepest declines (55%), while those on Medicaid and government insurance had the lowest percentage of recovery to baseline (73% and 69%, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: This study provides real-world evidence on the decline in urological care across demographic groups and practice settings, and demonstrates a differential impact on the utilization of urological health services by demographics and procedure type.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Pandemics/prevention & control , Urologic Diseases/therapy , Urology/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Ambulatory Care/standards , Ambulatory Care/statistics & numerical data , Ambulatory Care/trends , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/standards , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/statistics & numerical data , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , Telemedicine/standards , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/trends , United States/epidemiology , Urologic Surgical Procedures/standards , Urologic Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Urologic Surgical Procedures/trends , Urology/standards , Urology/trends , Young Adult
4.
Rev Mal Respir ; 37(6): 505-510, 2020 Jun.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1386577

ABSTRACT

The French-language Respiratory Medicine Society (SPLF) proposes a guide for the follow-up of patients who have presented with SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia. The proposals are based on known data from previous epidemics, on acute lesions observed in SARS-CoV-2 patients and on expert opinion. This guide proposes a follow-up based on three categories of patients: (1) patients managed outside hospital for possible or proven SARS-CoV-2 infection, referred by their physician for persistent dyspnoea; (2) patients hospitalized for SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia in a medical unit; (3) patients hospitalized for SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia in an intensive care unit. The subsequent follow-up will have to be adapted to the initial assessment. This guide emphasises the possibility of others causes of dyspnoea (cardiac, thromboembolic, hyperventilation syndrome…). These proposals may evolve over time as more knowledge becomes available.


Subject(s)
Aftercare/methods , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Aftercare/standards , Ambulatory Care/methods , Ambulatory Care/standards , COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/rehabilitation , Critical Care/methods , Critical Care/standards , Diagnostic Techniques, Respiratory System/standards , Disease Management , Emergency Medical Services/methods , Emergency Medical Services/standards , Health Priorities , Hospitalization , Humans , Inpatients , Outpatients , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/rehabilitation , Respiratory Therapy/methods , Respiratory Therapy/standards , Symptom Assessment/methods , Symptom Assessment/standards , Thromboembolism/prevention & control , Thrombophilia/drug therapy , Thrombophilia/etiology
5.
Prof Case Manag ; 26(5): 250-254, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1354348

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To review current literature on texting as a sustainable intervention of case management in the outpatient setting. FINDINGS: Texting, as a case management intervention, provides the medically complex client with a pathway to achieve care plan goals. Texting increases adherence, communication, and self-management. It can increase client enrollment in disease management programs, while providing support, flexibility, convenience, cost savings, and increased participation. IMPLICATIONS FOR CASE MANAGEMENT PRACTICE: In current practice, such as management of the coronavirus (COVID-19), other pandemics, or natural/environmental disasters, texting is a solution-focused intervention that can deliver and retrieve real-time information to a medically complex population. It can link patients to resources and increase outreach, efficiency, quality, and coordination of care. Texting can promote adherence to appointments, increase medication compliance and disease management interventions, and provide motivational change messages. However, there are legal and regulatory concerns that carry potential consequences and implications that should be approached judiciously (Mellette, 2015). Texting is not one size fits all; it can cause HIPAA breeches, hinder communication with certain populations, confuse health messaging, and replace human communication, thereby reducing staffing in practice.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care/standards , Case Management/standards , Communication , Guidelines as Topic , Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act/standards , Telemedicine/standards , Text Messaging/standards , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , United States
6.
J R Coll Physicians Edinb ; 51(1): 85-90, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1194768

ABSTRACT

Telemedicine use has expanded rapidly to cope with increasing demand on services by delivering remote clinical review and monitoring of long-term conditions. Triaging individual patients to determine their suitability for telephone, video or face-to-face consultations is necessary. This is crucial in the context of COVID-19 to ensure doctor-patient safety. Telemedicine was shown to be safe and feasible in managing certain chronic diseases and providing patient education. When reviewing newly referred or long-term patients, different specialty clinics have different requirements for physical examination. Clinicians prefer face-to-face consultations at the initial visit to establish a doctor-patient relationship; telephone or video consultations are reasonable options for long-term patients where physical examination may not be needed. Video consultations, often aided by sophisticated devices and apps or medical assistants, are useful to facilitate remote physical examination. Most patients prefer telemedicine as it saves time and travel cost and provides better access to appointments.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care , COVID-19 , Chronic Disease/therapy , Physical Examination/methods , Remote Consultation , Telemedicine , Ambulatory Care/methods , Ambulatory Care/standards , Ambulatory Care/trends , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Forecasting , Humans , Long-Term Care/trends , Physician-Patient Relations , Remote Consultation/methods , Remote Consultation/standards , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/standards
7.
Pediatrics ; 148(1)2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1105894

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The coronavirus pandemic created significant, abrupt challenges to the delivery of ambulatory health care. Because tertiary medical centers limited elective in-person services, telehealth was rapidly enacted in settings with minimal previous experience to allow continued access to care. With this quality improvement (QI) initiative, we aimed to achieve a virtual visit volume of at least 75% of our prepandemic volume. We also describe patient and provider experience with telehealth services. METHODS: Our QI team identified the primary drivers contributing to low telehealth volume and developed a telehealth scheduling protocol and data tracking system using QI-based strategies. Patients and providers were surveyed on their telehealth experience. RESULTS: At the onset of the pandemic, weekly visit volume dropped by 65% (99 weekly visits; historical average of 281). Over the subsequent 3 weeks, using rapid Plan-Do-Study-Act cycles, we achieved our goal volume. In surveys, it was indicated that most participants had never before used telehealth (71% of patients; 82% of providers) yet reported high satisfaction (90% of patients; 81% of providers). Both groups expressed concern over the lack of in-person assessments. Most respondents were interested in future use of telehealth. CONCLUSIONS: With a QI-based approach, we successfully maintained access to care via telehealth services for pediatric pulmonary patients during the coronavirus pandemic and found high rates of satisfaction among patients and providers. Telehealth will likely continue to be a part of our health care delivery platform, expanding the reach of our services. Further work is needed to understand the effects on clinical outcomes.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care Facilities/organization & administration , Ambulatory Care/standards , COVID-19 , Child Health Services/organization & administration , Lung Diseases , Quality Improvement , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Child , Child Health Services/standards , Hospitals, Pediatric , Humans , Lung Diseases/diagnosis , Lung Diseases/therapy , Telemedicine/standards , Time Factors
8.
Plast Surg Nurs ; 41(1): 27-33, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1099659

ABSTRACT

The readability of letters sent to patients plays a pivotal role in facilitating joint decision making and positive health outcomes. Guidance suggests that all correspondence should be directed to patients. Covid-19 led to an increase in direct-to-patient communication. This study aims to determine the quantity and quality of plastic surgery clinic letters sent to patients before and during the Covid-19 pandemic. A total of 127 pre-Covid clinic letters from November to December 2019 and 103 peri-Covid clinic letters from April to May 2020 were identified and assessed for readability. Text was analyzed using a standardized set of commonly used readability formulae, including SMOG, Flesch Reading Ease, and the Coleman-Liao Index. A total of 100 pre-Covid and 58 peri-Covid letters were suitable for inclusion. Median results for formulae that output a U.S. grade score ranged between 9 and 12.9 for letters written prior to Covid-19 and 9 and 13.2 for those written during Covid-19. Eight percent of letters were sent to patients pre-Covid, increasing to 28% during the pandemic. Letters sent to patients had a median grade score of between 8 and 12 prior to Covid-19 and 8 and 10.6 during Covid-19. Letters sent to clinicians ranged between 9 and 13 and 9 and 13.3, respectively. Outpatient plastic surgery letters are written at a readability level too high to facilitate understanding among the general population. The increase in direct-to-patient contact during the Covid-19 outbreak has not led to a significant improvement in the readability of clinic letters. The authors suggest an increase in letter standardization and raising awareness of readability when writing clinic letters.


Subject(s)
Comprehension , Correspondence as Topic , Health Literacy , Patient Participation/methods , Professional-Patient Relations , Surgery, Plastic/standards , Writing/standards , Ambulatory Care/methods , Ambulatory Care/standards , Humans , United Kingdom
9.
Clin J Oncol Nurs ; 25(1): 41-47, 2021 Feb 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1084640

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic generated challenges to the delivery of safe, efficient, and high-quality cancer care. In ambulatory oncology, where most cancer care is delivered, these challenges required the rapid development of infrastructure. OBJECTIVES: This article describes challenges to the design and implementation of ambulatory oncology infrastructures that support clinical oncology care during a pandemic. METHODS: This article reviews clinical experiences in interprofessional, multicenter, academic, and community settings during the COVID-19 pandemic. Cohesive and efficient services, collaborative processes, and workflows; patient triage and symptom management; technology and equipment; and communication strategies are discussed. National ambulatory care guidelines and practice recommendations are included as applicable and available. FINDINGS: Continued treatment delivery and support for patients with cancer, as well as infrastructure to minimize viral exposure to patients and oncology healthcare workers, are essential when caring for this high-risk population.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care/standards , COVID-19/nursing , Medical Oncology/standards , Neoplasms/nursing , Oncology Nursing/standards , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Telemedicine/standards , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
10.
Clin J Oncol Nurs ; 25(1): 48-55, 2021 Feb 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1081409

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has required healthcare systems to transform the delivery of care. Although the core principles of care for patients with cancer have not changed, this pandemic has led to heightened awareness concerning the fragility of patients with cancer and how healthcare systems can protect them. OBJECTIVES: The aims were to identify and implement inpatient and ambulatory care clinical practice changes during the COVID-19 pandemic, based on defining moments and coping strategies from clinical oncology nurses, advanced practice RNs, nurse leaders, and researchers. METHODS: This article presents a Lean Six Sigma framework, accompanied by numerous rapid cycle tests of change. FINDINGS: The COVID-19 pandemic required clinical healthcare providers at the authors' institution to focus on seven priority areas. Nurses tested and implemented practice changes.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , Ambulatory Care/standards , COVID-19/nursing , Health Personnel/psychology , Neoplasms/nursing , Oncology Nursing/standards , Preventive Medicine/standards , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Practice Guidelines as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological
12.
Clin Chim Acta ; 511: 352-359, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-909320

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Serological severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) antibody assays differ in the target antigen specificity, e.g. of antibodies directed against the viral spike or the nucleocapsid protein, and in the spectrum of detected immunoglobulins. The aim of the study was to evaluate the performance of two different routinely used immunoassays in hospitalized and outpatient COVID-19 cases. METHODS: The test characteristics of commercially available spike1 protein-based serological assays (Euroimmun, EI-assays), determining IgA or IgG and nucleocapsid-based assays (Virotech, VT-assays) determining IgA, IgM or IgG were compared in 139 controls and 116 hospitalized and outpatient COVID-19 cases. RESULTS: Hospitalized COVID-19 patients (n = 51; 115 samples) showed significantly higher concentrations of antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 and differed from outpatient cases (n = 65) by higher age, higher disease severity scores and earlier follow up blood sampling. Sensitivity of the two IgG assays was comparable in hospitalized patients tested ≥ 14 days (EI-assay: 88%, CI95% 67.6-99.9; VT-assay: 96%, CI95% 77.7-99.8). In outpatient COVID-19 cases sensitivity was significantly lower in the VT-assay (86.2%, CI95% 74.8-93.1) compared with the EI-assay (98.5%, CI95% 90.6-99.9). Assays for IgA and IgM demonstrated a lack of specificity or sensitivity. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that SARS-CoV-2 serological assays may need to be optimized to produce reliable results in outpatient COVID-19 cases who are low or even asymptomatic. Assays for IgA and IgM have limited diagnostic performance and do not prove an additional value for population-based screening approaches.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care/standards , COVID-19 Serological Testing/standards , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , Hospitalization , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Ambulatory Care/methods , COVID-19 Serological Testing/methods , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Young Adult
13.
Med Pr ; 72(2): 155-162, 2021 Apr 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-890724

ABSTRACT

In order to mitigate the spread of COVID-19, in the early stages of the pandemic outbreak, postponing elective procedures was recommended all around the world. Outpatient care and dental care were limited to telephone advice and emergency services. Dental staff is particularly vulnerable to SARS-CoV-2 contraction, because of the inevitable contact with patients' body fluids during aerosol-generating procedures. The implementation of diagnostic tests among ambulatory patients could improve the occupational safety among outpatient care personnel. The aim of this review was to introduce information regarding COVID-19 diagnostics with a particular focus on the methods which can be utilized in an outpatient and dental care setting. An online PubMed database review of articles on COVID-19 diagnostics, published on February 12-May 15, 2020, was conducted. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction is the gold standard in COVID-19 diagnostics, which determines if a person has an active infection. Unfortunately, its utilization in outpatient care is limited. Serological enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays identify people who were infected, including those who have had an asymptomatic infection, but they do not give sufficient information about the acute infection. Rapid serological assays developed to facilitate testing outside of laboratories, especially in dental offices, are not recommended by the World Health Organization to be used outside research settings, and they should not constitute the basis for clinical decision-making because of frequent false-negative results which may consequently contribute to personnel infections. Out of all available COVID-19 diagnostic methods, rapid serological assays seemed to be a method of choice in outpatient medical care. Unfortunately, their results turned out to be unreliable. The best methods to ensure the occupational safety of medical staff and to avoid cross-infections in outpatient care facilities include a thorough epidemiological interview, temperature measurement to rule out patients with an active infection, and the implementation of strict infection control procedures. Med Pr. 2021;72(2):155-62.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care/standards , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/prevention & control , Dental Care/standards , False Negative Reactions , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Serologic Tests/standards , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf ; 47(2): 86-98, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-866840

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Telemedicine use rapidly increased during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study assessed quality aspects of rapid expansion of a virtual urgent care (VUC) telehealth system and the effects of a secondary telephonic screening initiative during the pandemic. METHODS: A retrospective cohort analysis was performed in a single health care network of VUC patients from March 1, 2020, through April 20, 2020. Researchers abstracted demographic data, comorbidities, VUC return visits, emergency department (ED) referrals and ED visits, dispositions, intubations, and deaths. The team also reviewed incomplete visits. For comparison, the study evaluated outcomes of non-admission dispositions from the ED: return visits with and without admission and deaths. We separately analyzed the effects of enhanced callback system targeting higher-risk patients with COVID-like illness during the last two weeks of the study period. RESULTS: A total of 18,278 unique adult patients completed 22,413 VUC visits. Separately, 718 patient-scheduled visits were incomplete; the majority were no-shows. The study found that 50.9% of all patients and 74.1% of patients aged 60 years or older had comorbidities. Of VUC visits, 6.8% had a subsequent VUC encounter within 72 hours; 1.8% had a subsequent ED visit. Of patients with enhanced follow-up, 4.3% were referred for ED evaluation. Mortality was 0.20% overall; 0.21% initially and 0.16% with enhanced follow-up (p = 0.59). Males and black patients were significantly overrepresented in decedents. CONCLUSION: Appropriately deployed VUC services can provide a pragmatic strategy to care for large numbers of patients. Ongoing surveillance of operational, technical, and clinical factors is critical for patient quality and safety with this modality.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care/standards , Ambulatory Care/trends , COVID-19/epidemiology , Patient Safety , Quality of Health Care , Telemedicine/standards , Telemedicine/trends , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , New York/epidemiology , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
15.
J Crohns Colitis ; 14(14 Suppl 3): S785-S790, 2020 Oct 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-787155

ABSTRACT

Infusion centres are a central part in the management of patients with inflammatory bowel disease [IBD] and could be a source of transmission of SARS-COV-2. Here we aimed to develop global guidance for best practices of infusion centres for IBD patients and to determine the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on these centres. Under the auspices of the International Organization for the Study of Inflammatory Bowel Disease [IOIBD], a task force [TF] was formed, an online survey was developed to query infusion centre protocols during COVID-19, and recommendations were made, based on TF experience and opinion. Recommendations focus mainly on patients screening, infusion centres re-organization, personnel protection, and protocol modifications such as shortening infusion duration or replacing it with subcutaneous alternatives. Implementing these recommendations will hopefully reduce exposure of both IBD patients and care givers to SARS-COV-2 and improve the function and safety of infusion centres during the COVID-19 pandemic as well as potential future threats.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care Facilities/standards , Ambulatory Care/standards , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/administration & dosage , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Infection Control/standards , Inflammatory Bowel Diseases/drug therapy , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Adult , Advisory Committees , Ambulatory Care/methods , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19 , Clinical Protocols , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Drug Administration Schedule , Gastrointestinal Agents/administration & dosage , Gastrointestinal Agents/therapeutic use , Global Health , Health Care Surveys , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Inflammatory Bowel Diseases/complications , Infusions, Intravenous , Maintenance Chemotherapy/methods , Maintenance Chemotherapy/standards , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Injury ; 51(12): 2816-2821, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-764863

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Telemedicine provides a safe and effective means for the delivery of care by physicians amongst many subspecialties. Historically, orthopaedic practices in the United States have not widely utilized telemedicine for the delivery of orthopaedic care. As technology improves the adoption and utilization of telemedicine will likely grow, especially in light of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. Our study aims to assess patient and surgeon satisfaction and efficacy of telemedicine during a rapid adoption due to the global pandemic. METHODS: All patients who completed a telemedicine encounter (telephone or video) with an orthopaedic surgeon were contacted. Patients were individually contacted after their visit, and a standardized validated post-visit satisfaction survey was completed. Orthopaedic surgeons completed a standardized post-encounter survey after each visit. Pre-COVID-19 patient satisfaction data was used for comparison. RESULTS: Orthopaedic surgeons completed 612 telehealth encounters either via phone or video consultation between April 6, 2020 and May 22, 2020. 95% of patients rated both surgeon sensitivity to their needs and response to their concerns as 'good' or 'very good.' 93% of patients reported they would participate in a telemedicine encounter again. Surgeons reported high satisfaction with telemedicine encounters (80%, 86% phone and video respectively), and that 78.4% of the time a telemedicine encounter was successful in replacing an in-person visit. CONCLUSION: Patients and orthopaedic surgeons documented high levels of satisfaction with telehealth encounters during the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. Telemedicine does not appear to be a replacement for all in-person clinic encounters, however, when used in the appropriate context demonstrated favourable results. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level 4 Study.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care/methods , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Orthopedics/methods , Telemedicine/trends , Adult , Ambulatory Care/standards , Ambulatory Care/statistics & numerical data , Ambulatory Care/trends , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Orthopedic Surgeons/statistics & numerical data , Orthopedics/standards , Orthopedics/statistics & numerical data , Orthopedics/trends , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Satisfaction/statistics & numerical data , Prospective Studies , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/standards , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , United States/epidemiology
17.
Am J Med Qual ; 36(1): 1-4, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-751287

ABSTRACT

Although significant attention has been allocated to hospital management of COVID-19 patients during this pandemic, less discussed is the management of ambulatory patients. This has resulted in a challenge for ambulatory care providers in the management of COVID-19, particularly in areas with high disease prevalence. In this article, the authors share a pragmatic approach to ambulatory management of COVID-19 at Northwell Health, a large health system that employs approximately 300 primary care providers in the New York metro area. This includes guidance on various COVID-19 management topics: clinical assessment algorithms, guidance on patient tracking, and the importance of engaging in partnerships with other provider types. Sharing these experiences in the clinical management of COVID-19 may benefit other ambulatory providers in earlier stages of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care/methods , COVID-19/therapy , Algorithms , Ambulatory Care/standards , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Contact Tracing/methods , Home Care Services , Hospice Care , Humans , New York City/epidemiology , Patient Identification Systems/methods , Telemedicine/methods , Triage/methods
18.
J Med Internet Res ; 22(8): e19493, 2020 08 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-727352

ABSTRACT

During the recent coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic, telehealth has received greater attention due to its role in reducing hospital visits from patients with COVID-19 or other conditions, while supporting home isolation in patients with mild symptoms. The needs of patients with chronic diseases tend to be overlooked during the pandemic. With reduced opportunities for routine clinic visits, these patients are adopting various telehealth services such as video consultation and remote monitoring. We advocate for more innovative designs to be considered to enhance patients' feelings of "copresence"-a sense of connection with another interactant via digital technology-with their health care providers during this time. The copresence-enhanced design has been shown to reduce patients' anxiety and increase their confidence in managing their chronic disease condition. It has the potential to reduce the patient's need to reach out to their health care provider during a time when health care resources are being stretched.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Telemedicine , Ambulatory Care/standards , COVID-19 , Chronic Disease , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Health Personnel , Hospitals , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Referral and Consultation , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Head Neck ; 42(7): 1507-1515, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-614117

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) virus has altered the health care environment for the management of head and neck cancers. The purpose of these guidelines is to provide direction during the pandemic for rational Head and Neck Cancer management in order to achieve a medically and ethically appropriate balance of risks and benefits. METHODS: Creation of consensus document. RESULTS: The process yielded a consensus statement among a wide range of practitioners involved in the management of patients with head and neck cancer in a multihospital tertiary care health system. CONCLUSIONS: These guidelines support an ethical approach for the management of head and neck cancers during the COVID-19 epidemic consistent with both the local standard of care as well as the head and neck oncological literature.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Head and Neck Neoplasms/therapy , Infection Control/standards , Medical Oncology/standards , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Ambulatory Care/standards , COVID-19 , Combined Modality Therapy , Continuity of Patient Care/standards , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Head and Neck Neoplasms/diagnosis , Humans , Multi-Institutional Systems , Otorhinolaryngologic Surgical Procedures/standards , Palliative Care/standards , Patient Safety , Pennsylvania , Personal Protective Equipment , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Terminal Care/standards , Tertiary Care Centers
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