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1.
JAMA ; 327(3): 237-247, 2022 01 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1669298

ABSTRACT

Importance: Following reductions in US ambulatory care early in the pandemic, it remains unclear whether care consistently returned to expected rates across insurance types and services. Objective: To assess whether patients with Medicaid or Medicare-Medicaid dual eligibility had significantly lower than expected return to use of ambulatory care rates than patients with commercial, Medicare Advantage, or Medicare fee-for-service insurance. Design, Setting, and Participants: In this retrospective cohort study examining ambulatory care service patterns from January 1, 2019, through February 28, 2021, claims data from multiple US payers were combined using the Milliman MedInsight research database. Using a difference-in-differences design, the extent to which utilization during the pandemic differed from expected rates had the pandemic not occurred was estimated. Changes in utilization rates between January and February 2020 and each subsequent 2-month time frame during the pandemic were compared with the changes in the corresponding months from the year prior. Age- and sex-adjusted Poisson regression models of monthly utilization counts were used, offsetting for total patient-months and stratifying by service and insurance type. Exposures: Patients with Medicaid or Medicare-Medicaid dual eligibility compared with patients with commercial, Medicare Advantage, or Medicare fee-for-service insurance, respectively. Main Outcomes and Measures: Utilization rates per 100 people for 6 services: emergency department, office and urgent care, behavioral health, screening colonoscopies, screening mammograms, and contraception counseling or HIV screening. Results: More than 14.5 million US adults were included (mean age, 52.7 years; 54.9% women). In the March-April 2020 time frame, the combined use of 6 ambulatory services declined to 67.0% (95% CI, 66.9%-67.1%) of expected rates, but returned to 96.7% (95% CI, 96.6%-96.8%) of expected rates by the November-December 2020 time frame. During the second COVID-19 wave in the January-February 2021 time frame, overall utilization again declined to 86.2% (95% CI, 86.1%-86.3%) of expected rates, with colonoscopy remaining at 65.0% (95% CI, 64.1%-65.9%) and mammography at 79.2% (95% CI, 78.5%-79.8%) of expected rates. By the January-February 2021 time frame, overall utilization returned to expected rates as follows: patients with Medicaid at 78.4% (95% CI, 78.2%-78.7%), Medicare-Medicaid dual eligibility at 73.3% (95% CI, 72.8%-73.8%), commercial at 90.7% (95% CI, 90.5%-90.9%), Medicare Advantage at 83.2% (95% CI, 81.7%-82.2%), and Medicare fee-for-service at 82.0% (95% CI, 81.7%-82.2%; P < .001; comparing return to expected utilization rates among patients with Medicaid and Medicare-Medicaid dual eligibility, respectively, with each of the other insurance types). Conclusions and Relevance: Between March 2020 and February 2021, aggregate use of 6 ambulatory care services increased after the preceding decrease in utilization that followed the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. However, the rate of increase in use of these ambulatory care services was significantly lower for participants with Medicaid or Medicare-Medicaid dual eligibility than for those insured by commercial, Medicare Advantage, or Medicare fee-for-service.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care/trends , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Ambulatory Care/statistics & numerical data , Colonoscopy/statistics & numerical data , Colonoscopy/trends , Databases, Factual , Fee-for-Service Plans/statistics & numerical data , Fee-for-Service Plans/trends , Female , Health Services Needs and Demand/statistics & numerical data , Health Services Needs and Demand/trends , Humans , Insurance, Health/statistics & numerical data , Insurance, Health/trends , Male , Mammography/statistics & numerical data , Mammography/trends , Medicaid/statistics & numerical data , Medicare/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/trends , Time Factors , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
2.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 118(51)2021 12 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1569345

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic presented enormous data challenges in the United States. Policy makers, epidemiological modelers, and health researchers all require up-to-date data on the pandemic and relevant public behavior, ideally at fine spatial and temporal resolution. The COVIDcast API is our attempt to fill this need: Operational since April 2020, it provides open access to both traditional public health surveillance signals (cases, deaths, and hospitalizations) and many auxiliary indicators of COVID-19 activity, such as signals extracted from deidentified medical claims data, massive online surveys, cell phone mobility data, and internet search trends. These are available at a fine geographic resolution (mostly at the county level) and are updated daily. The COVIDcast API also tracks all revisions to historical data, allowing modelers to account for the frequent revisions and backfill that are common for many public health data sources. All of the data are available in a common format through the API and accompanying R and Python software packages. This paper describes the data sources and signals, and provides examples demonstrating that the auxiliary signals in the COVIDcast API present information relevant to tracking COVID activity, augmenting traditional public health reporting and empowering research and decision-making.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Databases, Factual , Health Status Indicators , Ambulatory Care/trends , Epidemiologic Methods , Humans , Internet/statistics & numerical data , Physical Distancing , Surveys and Questionnaires , Travel , United States/epidemiology
5.
J Urol ; 206(6): 1469-1479, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1410198

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: We examined changes in urological care delivery due to COVID-19 in the U.S. based on patient, practice, and local/regional demographic and pandemic response features. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We analyzed real-world data from the American Urological Association Quality (AQUA) Registry collected from electronic health record systems. Data represented 157 outpatient urological practices and 3,165 providers across 48 U.S. states and territories, including 3,297,721 unique patients, 12,488,831 total outpatient visits and 2,194,456 procedures. The primary outcome measure was the number of outpatient visits and procedures performed (inpatient or outpatient) per practice per week, measured from January 2019 to February 2021. RESULTS: We found large (>50%) declines in outpatient visits from March 2020 to April 2020 across patient demographic groups and states, regardless of timing of state stay-at-home orders. Nonurgent outpatient visits decreased more across various nonurgent procedures (49%-59%) than for procedures performed for potentially urgent diagnoses (38%-52%); surgical procedures for nonurgent conditions also decreased more (43%-79%) than those for potentially urgent conditions (43%-53%). African American patients had similar decreases in outpatient visits compared with Asians and Caucasians, but also slower recoveries back to baseline. Medicare-insured patients had the steepest declines (55%), while those on Medicaid and government insurance had the lowest percentage of recovery to baseline (73% and 69%, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: This study provides real-world evidence on the decline in urological care across demographic groups and practice settings, and demonstrates a differential impact on the utilization of urological health services by demographics and procedure type.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Pandemics/prevention & control , Urologic Diseases/therapy , Urology/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Ambulatory Care/standards , Ambulatory Care/statistics & numerical data , Ambulatory Care/trends , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/standards , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/statistics & numerical data , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , Telemedicine/standards , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/trends , United States/epidemiology , Urologic Surgical Procedures/standards , Urologic Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Urologic Surgical Procedures/trends , Urology/standards , Urology/trends , Young Adult
7.
Med Care ; 59(8): 694-698, 2021 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1393508

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Concerns exist regarding exacerbation of existing disparities in health care access with the rapid implementation of telemedicine during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. However, data on pre-existing disparities in telemedicine utilization is currently lacking. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to study: (1) the prevalence of outpatient telemedicine visits before the COVID-19 pandemic by patient subgroups based on age, comorbidity burden, residence rurality, and median household income; and (2) associated diagnosis categories. RESEARCH DESIGN: This was a retrospective cohort study. SUBJECT: Commercial claims data from the Truven MarketScan database (2014-2018) representing n=846,461,609 outpatient visits. MEASURES: We studied characteristics and utilization of outpatient telemedicine services before the COVID-19 pandemic by patient subgroups based on age, comorbidity burden, residence rurality, and median household income. Disparities were assessed in unadjusted and adjusted (regression) analyses. RESULTS: With overall telemedicine uptake of 0.12% (n=1,018,092/846,461,609 outpatient visits) we found that pre-COVID-19 disparities in telemedicine use became more pronounced over time with lower use in patients who were older, had more comorbidities, were in rural areas, and had lower median household incomes (all trends and effect estimates P<0.001). CONCLUSION: These results contextualize pre-existing disparities in telemedicine use and are crucial in the monitoring of potential disparities in telemedicine access and subsequent outcomes after the rapid expansion of telemedicine during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care/trends , COVID-19/therapy , Health Services Accessibility/trends , Healthcare Disparities/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/trends , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Infection Control/trends , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Satisfaction/statistics & numerical data , Quality Improvement , Retrospective Studies
8.
World Neurosurg ; 155: e576-e587, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1386731

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The severe acute respiratory coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV2) crisis led to many restrictions in daily life and protective health care actions in all hospitals to ensure basic medical supply. This questionnaire-based study among spinal surgeons in central Europe was generated to investigate the impact of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and consecutively the differences in restrictions in spinal surgery units. METHODS: An online survey consisting of 32 questions on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and the related restrictions on spinal surgery units was created. Surgical fellows and consultants from neurosurgical, orthopedic, and trauma departments were included in our questionnaire-based study with the help of Austrian, German, and Swiss scientific societies. RESULTS: In a total of 406 completed questionnaires, most participants reported increased preventive measurements at daily clinical work (split-team work schedule [44%], cancellation of elective and/or semielective surgeries [91%]), reduced occurrence of emergencies (91%), decreased outpatient work (45%) with increased telemedical care (73%) and a reduced availability of medical equipment (75%) as well as medical staff (30%). Although most physicians considered the political restrictive decisions to be not suitable, most considered the medical measures to be appropriate. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in comparable restrictive measures for spinal surgical departments in central Europe. Elective surgical interventions were reduced, providing additional resources reserved for severe acute respiratory coronavirus 2-positive patients. Although similar restrictions were introduced in most participants' departments, the supply of personal protective equipment and the outpatient care remained insufficient and should be re-evaluated intensively for future global health care crises.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Neurosurgeons/trends , Neurosurgical Procedures/trends , Spinal Diseases/epidemiology , Spinal Diseases/surgery , Surveys and Questionnaires , Adult , Ambulatory Care/trends , COVID-19/prevention & control , Delivery of Health Care/trends , Europe/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Personal Protective Equipment/trends
9.
Lancet Oncol ; 22(7): 970-976, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1331315

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted health-care systems, leading to concerns about its subsequent impact on non-COVID disease conditions. The diagnosis and management of cancer is time sensitive and is likely to be substantially affected by these disruptions. We aimed to assess the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on cancer care in India. METHODS: We did an ambidirectional cohort study at 41 cancer centres across India that were members of the National Cancer Grid of India to compare provision of oncology services between March 1 and May 31, 2020, with the same time period in 2019. We collected data on new patient registrations, number of patients visiting outpatient clinics, hospital admissions, day care admissions for chemotherapy, minor and major surgeries, patients accessing radiotherapy, diagnostic tests done (pathology reports, CT scans, MRI scans), and palliative care referrals. We also obtained estimates from participating centres on cancer screening, research, and educational activities (teaching of postgraduate students and trainees). We calculated proportional reductions in the provision of oncology services in 2020, compared with 2019. FINDINGS: Between March 1 and May 31, 2020, the number of new patients registered decreased from 112 270 to 51 760 (54% reduction), patients who had follow-up visits decreased from 634 745 to 340 984 (46% reduction), hospital admissions decreased from 88 801 to 56 885 (36% reduction), outpatient chemotherapy decreased from 173634 to 109 107 (37% reduction), the number of major surgeries decreased from 17 120 to 8677 (49% reduction), minor surgeries from 18 004 to 8630 (52% reduction), patients accessing radiotherapy from 51 142 to 39 365 (23% reduction), pathological diagnostic tests from 398 373 to 246 616 (38% reduction), number of radiological diagnostic tests from 93 449 to 53 560 (43% reduction), and palliative care referrals from 19 474 to 13 890 (29% reduction). These reductions were even more marked between April and May, 2020. Cancer screening was stopped completely or was functioning at less than 25% of usual capacity at more than 70% of centres during these months. Reductions in the provision of oncology services were higher for centres in tier 1 cities (larger cities) than tier 2 and 3 cities (smaller cities). INTERPRETATION: The COVID-19 pandemic has had considerable impact on the delivery of oncology services in India. The long-term impact of cessation of cancer screening and delayed hospital visits on cancer stage migration and outcomes are likely to be substantial. FUNDING: None. TRANSLATION: For the Hindi translation of the abstract see Supplementary Materials section.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Delivery of Health Care, Integrated/trends , Health Services Accessibility/trends , Medical Oncology/trends , Neoplasms/therapy , Ambulatory Care/trends , COVID-19/diagnosis , Delayed Diagnosis , Early Detection of Cancer/trends , Hospitalization/trends , Hospitals, High-Volume/trends , Humans , India/epidemiology , Neoplasms/diagnosis , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Time Factors , Time-to-Treatment , Waiting Lists
10.
Mayo Clin Proc ; 96(9): 2332-2341, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1294051

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To assess the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on clinical research and the use of electronic approaches to mitigate this impact. METHODS: We compared the utilization of electronic consenting, remote visits, and remote monitoring by study monitors in all research studies conducted at Mayo Clinic sites (Arizona, Florida, and Minnesota) before and during the COVID-19 pandemic (ie, between May 1, 2019 and December 31, 2020). Participants are consented through a participant-tracking system linked to the electronic health record. RESULTS: Between May 2019, and December 2020, there were 130,800 new consents across every modality (electronic and paper) to participate in a non-trial (107,176 [82%]) or a clinical trial (23,624 [18%]). New consents declined from 5741 in February 2020 to 913 in April 2020 but increased to 11,864 in November 2020. The mean (standard deviation [SD]) proportion of electronic consent increased from 22 (2%) before to 45 (20%) during the pandemic (P=.001). Mean (SD) remote electronic consenting increased from 0.3 (0.5%) to 29 (21%) (P<.001). The mean (SD) number of patients with virtual visits increased from 3.5 (2.4%) to 172 (135%) (P=.003) per month between pre-COVID (July 2019 to February 2020) and post-COVID (March to December 2020) periods. Virtual visits used telemedicine (68%) or video (32%). Requests for remote monitor access to complete visits increased from 44 (17%) per month between May 2019 and February 2020 to 111 (74%) per month between March and December 2020 (P=.10). CONCLUSION: After a sharp early decline, the enrollment of new participants and ongoing study visits recovered during the COVID-19 pandemic. This recovery was accompanied by the increased use of electronic tools.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care/trends , COVID-19/epidemiology , Electronic Health Records/trends , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/trends , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , United States/epidemiology
11.
Eur J Clin Invest ; 51(8): e13623, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1258930

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We investigated the influence of population-wide COVID-19 lockdown measures implemented on 16, March 2020 on routine and emergency care of cancer outpatients at a tertiary care cancer centre in Vienna, Austria. METHODS: We compared the number/visits of cancer outpatients receiving oncological therapies at the oncologic day clinic (DC) and admissions at the emergency department (ED) of our institution in time periods before (pre-lockdown period: 1 January - 15 March 2020) and after (post-lockdown period: 16 March- 31 May 2020) lockdown implementation with the respective reference periods of 2018 and 2019. Additionally, we analysed Emergency Severity Index (ESI) score of unplanned cancer patient presentations to the ED in the same post-lockdown time periods. Patient outcome was described as 3-month mortality rate (3-MM). RESULTS: In total, 16 703 visits at the DC and 2664 patient visits for the respective time periods were recorded at the ED. No decrease in patient visits was observed at the DC after lockdown implementation (P = .351), whereas a substantial decrease in patient visits at the ED was seen (P < .001). This translates into a 26%-31% reduction of cancer-related patient visits per half month after the lockdown at the ED (P < .001 vs. 2018 + 2019). There was no difference in the distribution of ESI scores at ED presentation (P = .805), admission rates or 3-MM in association with lockdown implementation (P = .086). CONCLUSION: We demonstrate the feasibility of maintaining antineoplastic therapy administration during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, our data underline the need for adapted management strategies for emergency presentations of cancer patients.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care/trends , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cancer Care Facilities , Emergency Service, Hospital/trends , Mortality/trends , Neoplasms/therapy , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Austria , Communicable Disease Control , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Public Policy , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
12.
J Subst Abuse Treat ; 127: 108462, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1225317

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To describe weekly changes in the number of substance use disorder treatment (SUDT) facility visits in 2020 compared to 2019 using cell phone location data. METHODS: We calculated the percentage weekly change in visits to SUDT facilities from the week of January 5 through the week of October 11, 2020, relative to the week of January 6 through the week of October 13, 2019. We stratified facilities by county COVID-19 incidence per 10,000 residents in each week and by 2018 fatal drug overdose rate. Finally, we conducted a multivariable linear regression analysis examining percent change in visits per week as a function of county-level COVID-19 tercile, a series of calendar month indicators, and the interaction of county-level COVID-19 tercile and month. We repeated the regression analysis replacing COVID-19 tercile with overdose tercile. RESULTS: Beginning the eleventh week of 2020, the number of visits to SUDT facilities declined substantially, reaching a nadir of 48% of 2019 visits in early July. In contrast to January, there were significantly fewer visits in 2020 compared to 2019 in all subsequent months (p < 0.01 in all months). Multivariable regression results found that facilities in the tercile of counties experiencing the most COVID-19 cases had a significantly greater reduction in the number of SUDT visits in 2020 for the months of June through August than facilities in counties with the fewest COVID-19 rates (p < 0.05). The study found no statistically significant difference in the change in the number of visits by facilities in counties with historically different overdose rates. DISCUSSION: Our findings support the hypothesis that a reduction has occurred in the average weekly number of visits to SUDT facilities. The size of the effect differs based on the number of COVID-19 cases but not on historical overdose rate.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care/trends , COVID-19 , Drug Overdose , Substance-Related Disorders , Drug Overdose/epidemiology , Drug Overdose/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , Substance-Related Disorders/epidemiology , Substance-Related Disorders/therapy
13.
J R Coll Physicians Edinb ; 51(1): 85-90, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1194768

ABSTRACT

Telemedicine use has expanded rapidly to cope with increasing demand on services by delivering remote clinical review and monitoring of long-term conditions. Triaging individual patients to determine their suitability for telephone, video or face-to-face consultations is necessary. This is crucial in the context of COVID-19 to ensure doctor-patient safety. Telemedicine was shown to be safe and feasible in managing certain chronic diseases and providing patient education. When reviewing newly referred or long-term patients, different specialty clinics have different requirements for physical examination. Clinicians prefer face-to-face consultations at the initial visit to establish a doctor-patient relationship; telephone or video consultations are reasonable options for long-term patients where physical examination may not be needed. Video consultations, often aided by sophisticated devices and apps or medical assistants, are useful to facilitate remote physical examination. Most patients prefer telemedicine as it saves time and travel cost and provides better access to appointments.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care , COVID-19 , Chronic Disease/therapy , Physical Examination/methods , Remote Consultation , Telemedicine , Ambulatory Care/methods , Ambulatory Care/standards , Ambulatory Care/trends , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Forecasting , Humans , Long-Term Care/trends , Physician-Patient Relations , Remote Consultation/methods , Remote Consultation/standards , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/standards
14.
CMAJ Open ; 9(2): E324-E330, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1168152

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Virtual care for patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) allows providers to monitor COVID-19-positive patients with variable trajectories while reducing the risk of transmission to others and ensuring health care capacity in acute care facilities. The objective of this descriptive analysis was to assess the initial adoption, feasibility and safety of a family medicine-led remote monitoring program, COVIDCare@Home, to manage the care of patients with COVID-19 in the community. METHODS: COVIDCare@Home is a multifaceted, interprofessional team-based remote monitoring program developed at an ambulatory academic centre, the Women's College Hospital in Toronto. A descriptive analysis of the first cohort of patients admitted from Apr. 8 to May 11, 2020, was conducted. Lessons from the implementation of the program are described, focusing on measure of adoption (number of visits per patient total, with a physician or with a nurse; length of follow-up), feasibility (received an oximeter or thermometer; consultation with general internal medicine, social work or mental health, pharmacy or acute ambulatory care unit) and safety (hospitalizations, mortality and emergency department visits). RESULTS: The COVIDCare@Home program cared for a first cohort of 97 patients (median age 41 yr, 67% female) with 415 recorded virtual visits. Patients had a median time from positive testing for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) to first appointment of 3 (interquartile range [IQR] 2-4) days, with a median virtual follow-up time of 8 (IQR 5-10) days. A total of 4 (4%) had an emergency department visit, with no patients requiring hospitalization and no deaths; 16 (16%) of patients required support with mental and social health needs. INTERPRETATION: A family medicine-led, team-based remote monitoring program can safely manage the care of outpatients diagnosed with COVID-19. Virtual care approaches, particularly those that support patients with more complex health and social needs, may be an important part of ongoing health system efforts to manage subsequent waves of COVID-19 and other diseases.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care/trends , COVID-19 , Family Practice , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Telemedicine/methods , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19 Testing/methods , Canada/epidemiology , Comprehensive Health Care , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Family Health , Family Practice/methods , Family Practice/organization & administration , Feasibility Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Program Evaluation , Social Support
16.
PLoS One ; 16(3): e0249251, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1150560

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the early phase of the Covid-19 pandemic, reductions of hospital admissions with a focus on emergencies have been observed for several medical and surgical conditions, while trend data during later stages of the pandemic are scarce. Consequently, this study aims to provide up-to-date hospitalization trends for several conditions including cardiovascular, psychiatry, oncology and surgery cases in both the in- and outpatient setting. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Using claims data of 86 Helios hospitals in Germany, consecutive cases with an in- or outpatient hospital admission between March 13, 2020 (the begin of the "protection" stage of the German pandemic plan) and December 10, 2020 (end of study period) were analyzed and compared to a corresponding period covering the same weeks in 2019. Cause-specific hospitalizations were defined based on the primary discharge diagnosis according to International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD-10) or German procedure classification codes for cardiovascular, oncology, psychiatry and surgery cases. Cumulative hospitalization deficit was computed as the difference between the expected and observed cumulative admission number for every week in the study period, expressed as a percentage of the cumulative expected number. The expected admission number was defined as the weekly average during the control period. A total of 1,493,915 hospital admissions (723,364 during the study and 770,551 during the control period) were included. At the end of the study period, total cumulative hospitalization deficit was -10% [95% confidence interval -10; -10] for cardiovascular and -9% [-10; -9] for surgical cases, higher than -4% [-4; -3] in psychiatry and 4% [4; 4] in oncology cases. The utilization of inpatient care and subsequent hospitalization deficit was similar in trend with some variation in magnitude between cardiovascular (-12% [-13; -12]), psychiatry (-18% [-19; -17]), oncology (-7% [-8; -7]) and surgery cases (-11% [-11; -11]). Similarly, cardiovascular and surgical outpatient cases had a deficit of -5% [-6; -5] and -3% [-4; -3], respectively. This was in contrast to psychiatry (2% [1; 2]) and oncology cases (21% [20; 21]) that had a surplus in the outpatient sector. While in-hospital mortality, was higher during the Covid-19 pandemic in cardiovascular (3.9 vs. 3.5%, OR 1.10 [95% CI 1.06-1.15], P<0.01) and in oncology cases (4.5 vs. 4.3%, OR 1.06 [95% CI 1.01-1.11], P<0.01), it was similar in surgical (0.9 vs. 0.8%, OR 1.06 [95% CI 1.00-1.13], P = 0.07) and in psychiatry cases (0.4 vs. 0.5%, OR 1.01 [95% CI 0.78-1.31], P<0.95). CONCLUSIONS: There have been varying changes in care pathways and in-hospital mortality in different disciplines during the Covid-19 pandemic in Germany. Despite all the inherent and well-known limitations of claims data use, this data may be used for health care surveillance as the pandemic continues worldwide. While this study provides an up-to-date analysis of utilization of hospital care in the largest German hospital network, short- and long-term consequences are unknown and deserve further studies.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care/trends , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Cardiovascular Diseases/mortality , Cardiovascular Diseases/pathology , Databases, Factual , Germany/epidemiology , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization/trends , Hospitals , Humans , Neoplasms/mortality , Neoplasms/pathology , Odds Ratio , Patient Admission/trends , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
17.
Orv Hetil ; 162(6): 203-211, 2021 02 07.
Article in Hungarian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1145499

ABSTRACT

Összefoglaló. Bevezetés: Az új típusú koronavírus-járvány (COVID-19) az egészségügyi ellátóhálózatot egy eddig ismeretlen helyzet elé állította. A nemzetközi adatok alapján a szemészeti járóbeteg-ellátásban jelentos változások alakultak ki. Célkituzés: Felmérni a COVID-19-járvány okozta kvantitatív és kvalitatív változásokat az Észak-Közép-budai Centrum, Új Szent János Kórház és Szakrendelo Szemészeti Osztályának járóbeteg-szakellátásában. Módszer: A pandémia elso hullámában (2020. április 1-30.) mért járóbeteg-forgalmi adatokat hasonlítottuk össze a megelozo év azonos periódusában rögzített adatokkal. A betegek demográfiai jellemzoi mellett megvizsgáltuk a sürgosségi besorolásukat, valamint a panaszokhoz kötheto fodiagnózis-csoportok eloszlását. Rögzítettük a telemedicina keretein belül történt ellátások számát. Eredmények: 2020 vizsgált idoszakában 916, míg az elozo év azonos hónapjában 2835 járóbeteg-eset került rögzítésre. A 2020-as idoszakban a törvényi szabályozás szerint sürgos panaszokkal jelentkezo betegek aránya nem változott (p = 0,38), azonban a szakorvosi megítélés szerint sürgos panaszokkal érkezo betegek aránya nott (p<0,001) az elozo évhez viszonyítva. A zöld hályog, kötohártya-gyulladás, árpa, sérülés és nedves típusú maculadegeneratio miatt ellátásra jelentkezo betegek aránya szignifikánsan nott (p<0,001 mind), míg a szürke hályog, a száraz típusú maculadegeneratio, egyéb, a szemhéj és a könnyutak betegségei, utóhályog miatt és a szemészeti betegség nélkül érkezok aránya csökkent (p<0,001 mind). A telemedicina keretei között ellátott betegek száma 2020-ban közel a tizenötszörösére emelkedett 2019-hez képest (p<0,001). Következtetés: A COVID-19-pandémia elso hulláma során markáns betegszámcsökkenést regisztráltunk a szemészeti járóbeteg-szakellátásban. Több fodiagnózis-csoport esetén számolhatunk jelentos terápiavesztéssel és halasztott ellátási igény jelentkezésével. Az adatok kiértékelése segítséget nyújthat az elkövetkezo években az ellátási folyamat proaktív átszervezésében, a humáneroforrás-szükségletek jobb tervezésében, valamint a teleoftalmológiai ellátás fejlesztésében. Orv Hetil. 2021; 162(6): 203-211. INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic put the healthcare network in a hitherto unknown situation. The ophthalmic outpatient care changed internationally. OBJECTIVE: To assess the quantitative and qualitative changes of the outpatient specialty care at the Ophthalmology Department of the North-Central-Buda Center, New St. John's Hospital and Clinic, through the pandemic. METHOD: Outpatient service data during the first wave of the pandemic (April 2020) were compared with those in April 2019. Patient demographics, emergency classification, distribution of the main diagnostic groups (associated with complaints) and services provided via telemedicine were collected. RESULTS: There were 2835 patient visits in 2019 and 916 in 2020. For 2020, the proportion of patients with emergency classification according to legal regulations did not change (p = 0.38), however, using the ophthalmologist's classification increased (p<0.001) significantly. The proportion of patients with glaucoma, conjunctivitis, chalazeon, injury and wet macular degeneration increased (p<0.001 all), while the proportion of patients with cataract, dry macular degeneration, other diseases, other adnexal diseases, secondary cataract and without ophthalmic pathology decreased significantly (p<0.001 for all). Patient number using telemedicine treatment was about 15× of those treated in 2019 (p<0.001). CONCLUSION: During the first wave of the pandemic, a marked decrease in ophthalmic outpatient care volume was recorded. In the case of several main diagnosis groups, significant therapy loss and a delayed need for care could be expected. Evaluation of the data helps in the upcoming years in proactive reorganization of the care process, in better planning of human resource needs, and in improvement of teleophthalmology care. Orv Hetil. 2021; 162(6): 203-211.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care/trends , COVID-19 , Ophthalmology , Pandemics , Telemedicine , Hospitals , Humans , Hungary , Outpatients
18.
BMC Ophthalmol ; 21(1): 139, 2021 Mar 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1143189

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To minimize the risk of viral transmission, ophthalmology practices limited face-to-face encounters to only patients with urgent and emergent ophthalmic conditions in the weeks after the start of the COVID-19 epidemic in the United States. The impact of this is unknown. METHODS: We did a retrospective analysis of the change in the frequency of ICD-10 code use and patient volumes in the 6 weeks before and after the changes in clinical practice associated with COVID-19. RESULTS: The total number of encounters decreased four-fold after the implementation of clinic changes associated with COVID-19. The low vision, pediatric ophthalmology, general ophthalmology, and cornea divisions had the largest total decrease of in-person visits. Conversely, the number of telemedicine visits increased sixty-fold. The number of diagnostic codes associated with ocular malignancies, most ocular inflammatory disorders, and retinal conditions requiring intravitreal injections increased. ICD-10 codes associated with ocular screening exams for systemic disorders decreased during the weeks post COVID-19. CONCLUSION: Ophthalmology practices need to be prepared to experience changes in practice patterns, implementation of telemedicine, and decreased patient volumes during a pandemic. Knowing the changes specific to each subspecialty clinic is vital to redistribute available resources correctly.


Subject(s)
Academic Medical Centers/trends , Ambulatory Care/trends , COVID-19/epidemiology , Eye Diseases/diagnosis , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Ophthalmology/trends , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/transmission , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , International Classification of Diseases , Ophthalmology/methods , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Retrospective Studies , Telemedicine/methods , United States
20.
Australas Psychiatry ; 29(2): 194-199, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1099852

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The Australian federal government introduced new COVID-19 psychiatrist Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS) telehealth items to assist with providing private specialist care. We investigate private psychiatrists' uptake of video and telephone telehealth, as well as total (telehealth and face-to-face) consultations for Quarter 3 (July-September), 2020. We compare these to the same quarter in 2019. METHOD: MBS-item service data were extracted for COVID-19-psychiatrist video and telephone telehealth item numbers and compared with Quarter 3 (July-September), 2019, of face-to-face consultations for the whole of Australia. RESULTS: The number of psychiatry consultations (telehealth and face-to-face) rose during the first wave of the pandemic in Quarter 3, 2020, by 14% compared to Quarter 3, 2019, with telehealth 43% of this total. Face-to-face consultations in Quarter 3, 2020 were only 64% of the comparative number of Quarter 3, 2019 consultations. Most telehealth involved short telephone consultations of ⩽15-30 min. Video consultations comprised 42% of total telehealth provision: these were for new patient assessments and longer consultations. These figures represent increased face-to-face consultation compared to Quarter 2, 2020, with substantial maintenance of telehealth consultations. CONCLUSIONS: Private psychiatrists continued using the new COVID-19 MBS telehealth items for Quarter 3, 2020 to increase the number of patient care contacts in the context of decreased face-to-face consultations compared to 2019, but increased face-to-face consultations compared to Quarter 2, 2020.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Mental Disorders/therapy , Mental Health Services/trends , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , Private Practice/trends , Psychiatry/trends , Telemedicine/trends , Ambulatory Care/methods , Ambulatory Care/organization & administration , Ambulatory Care/trends , Australia , COVID-19/epidemiology , Facilities and Services Utilization/trends , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Health Services Accessibility/trends , Humans , Mental Health Services/organization & administration , National Health Programs , Pandemics , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/organization & administration , Private Practice/organization & administration , Psychiatry/organization & administration , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Telephone/trends , Videoconferencing/trends
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