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1.
CPT Pharmacometrics Syst Pharmacol ; 10(10): 1161-1170, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1320090

ABSTRACT

The antiretroviral drug favipiravir (FPV) inhibits RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. It has been developed for the treatment of the novel coronavirus (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2) infection disease, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). However, its pharmacokinetics in patients with COVID-19 is poorly understood. In this study, we measured FPV serum concentration by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and conducted population pharmacokinetic analysis. A total of 39 patients were enrolled in the study: 33 were administered FPV 1600 mg twice daily (b.i.d.) on the first day followed by 600 mg b.i.d., and 6 were administered FPV 1800 mg b.i.d. on the first day followed by 800 mg or 600 mg b.i.d. The median age was 68 years (range, 27-89 years), 31 (79.5%) patients were men, median body surface area (BSA) was 1.72 m2 (range, 1.11-2.2 m2 ), and 10 (25.6%) patients required invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) at the start of FPV. A total of 204 serum concentrations were available for pharmacokinetic analysis. A one-compartment model with first-order elimination was used to describe the pharmacokinetics. The estimated mean clearance/bioavailability (CL/F) and distribution volume/bioavailability (V/F) were 5.11 L/h and 41.6 L, respectively. Covariate analysis revealed that CL/F was significantly related to dosage, IMV use, and BSA. A simulation study showed that the 1600 mg/600 mg b.i.d. regimen was insufficient for the treatment of COVID-19 targeting the 50% effective concentration (9.7 µg/mL), especially in patients with larger BSA and/or IMV. A higher FPV dosage is required for COVID-19, but dose-dependent nonlinear pharmacokinetics may cause an unexpected significant pharmacokinetic change and drug toxicity. Further studies are warranted to explore the optimal FPV regimen.


Subject(s)
Amides/administration & dosage , Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , COVID-19/drug therapy , Pyrazines/administration & dosage , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Amides/pharmacokinetics , Antiviral Agents/pharmacokinetics , COVID-19/blood , Chromatography, Liquid , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Drug Administration Schedule , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Models, Theoretical , Pyrazines/pharmacokinetics , Retrospective Studies , Tandem Mass Spectrometry , Treatment Outcome
2.
Mol Pharm ; 18(8): 3108-3115, 2021 08 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1305357

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has spread across the world, and no specific antiviral drugs have yet been approved to combat this disease. Favipiravir (FAV) is an antiviral drug that is currently in clinical trials for use against COVID-19. However, the delivery of FAV is challenging because of its limited solubility, and its formulation is difficult with common organic solvents and water. To address these issues, four FAV ionic liquids (FAV-ILs) were synthesized as potent antiviral prodrugs and were fully characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometry, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), derivative thermogravimetry (DTG), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The aqueous solubility and in vivo pharmacokinetic properties of the FAV-ILs were also evaluated. The FAV-ILs exhibited improved aqueous solubility by 78 to 125 orders of magnitude when compared with that of free FAV. Upon oral dosing in mice, the absolute bioavailability of the ß-alanine ethyl ester FAV formulation was increased 1.9-fold compared with that of the control FAV formulation. The peak blood concentration, elimination half-life, and mean absorption time of FAV were also increased by 1.5-, 2.0-, and 1.5-fold, respectively, compared with the control. Furthermore, the FAV in the FAV-ILs exhibited significantly different biodistribution compared with the control FAV formulation. Interestingly, drug accumulation in the lungs and liver was improved 1.5-fold and 1.3-fold, respectively, compared with the control FAV formulation. These results indicate that the use of ILs exhibits potential as a simple, scalable strategy to improve the solubility and oral absorption of hydrophobic drugs, such as FAV.


Subject(s)
Amides/administration & dosage , Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , Ionic Liquids/chemistry , Pyrazines/administration & dosage , Administration, Oral , Amides/chemical synthesis , Amides/chemistry , Amides/pharmacokinetics , Animals , COVID-19/drug therapy , Female , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Pyrazines/chemical synthesis , Pyrazines/chemistry , Pyrazines/pharmacokinetics , Solubility , Tissue Distribution
3.
Pediatr Nephrol ; 36(11): 3771-3776, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1237500

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The rising number of infections due to Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-2 (popularly known as COVID-19) has brought to the fore new antiviral drugs as possible treatments, including favipiravir. However, there is currently no data regarding the safety of this drug in patients with kidney impairment. The aim of this paper, therefore, is to share our experience of the use of favipiravir in pediatric patients affected by COVID-19 with any degree of kidney impairment. METHODS: The study enrolled pediatric patients aged under 18 years and confirmed as suffering from COVID-19 and multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) with any degree of kidney injury, who were treated with favipiravir at the time of admission. RESULTS: Out of a total of 11 patients, 7 were diagnosed with MIS-C and 4 with severe COVID-19. The median age of the cases was 15.45 (9-17.8) years and the male/female ratio was 7/4. At the time of admission, the median serum creatinine level was 1.1 mg/dl. Nine patients were treated with favipiravir for 5 days, and 2 patients for 5 days followed by remdesivir for 5-10 days despite kidney injury at the time of admission. Seven patients underwent plasma exchange for MIS-C while 2 severely affected cases underwent continuous kidney replacement therapy (CKRT) as well. One severe COVID-19 patient received plasma exchange as well as CKRT. Serum creatinine values returned to normal in mean 3.07 days. CONCLUSIONS: Favipiravir seems a suitable therapeutic option in patients affected by COVID-19 with kidney injury without a need for dose adjustment.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/physiopathology , Amides/administration & dosage , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , Pyrazines/administration & dosage , Renal Elimination , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/drug therapy , Acute Kidney Injury/drug therapy , Acute Kidney Injury/immunology , Acute Kidney Injury/virology , Adenosine Monophosphate/administration & dosage , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/pharmacokinetics , Adolescent , Alanine/administration & dosage , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/pharmacokinetics , Amides/pharmacokinetics , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Child , Creatinine/blood , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Drug Therapy, Combination , Female , Glomerular Filtration Rate , Humans , Male , Pyrazines/pharmacokinetics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/complications , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/immunology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/virology , Treatment Outcome
4.
Biochem Biophys Res Commun ; 555: 134-139, 2021 05 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1157141

ABSTRACT

There is an urgent need for antivirals targeting the SARS-CoV-2 virus to fight the current COVID-19 pandemic. The SARS-CoV-2 main protease (3CLpro) represents a promising target for antiviral therapy. The lack of selectivity for some of the reported 3CLpro inhibitors, specifically versus cathepsin L, raises potential safety and efficacy concerns. ALG-097111 potently inhibited SARS-CoV-2 3CLpro (IC50 = 7 nM) without affecting the activity of human cathepsin L (IC50 > 10 µM). When ALG-097111 was dosed in hamsters challenged with SARS-CoV-2, a robust and significant 3.5 log10 (RNA copies/mg) reduction of the viral RNA copies and 3.7 log10 (TCID50/mg) reduction in the infectious virus titers in the lungs was observed. These results provide the first in vivo validation for the SARS-CoV-2 3CLpro as a promising therapeutic target for selective small molecule inhibitors.


Subject(s)
Amides/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/antagonists & inhibitors , Cysteine Proteinase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Disease Models, Animal , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Amides/pharmacokinetics , Animals , COVID-19/virology , Cathepsin L/antagonists & inhibitors , Cell Line , Cricetinae , Cysteine Proteinase Inhibitors/pharmacokinetics , Female , Humans , Inhibitory Concentration 50 , Male , Mesocricetus/virology , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2/growth & development , Serine Endopeptidases , Substrate Specificity , Virus Replication/drug effects
5.
EBioMedicine ; 62: 103125, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-938894

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The pharmacokinetics and appropriate dose regimens of favipiravir are unknown in hospitalized influenza patients; such data are also needed to determine dosage selection for favipiravir trials in COVID-19. METHODS: In this dose-escalating study, favipiravir pharmacokinetics and tolerability were assessed in critically ill influenza patients. Participants received one of two dosing regimens; Japan licensed dose (1600 mg BID on day 1 and 600 mg BID on the following days) and the higher dose (1800 mg/800 mg BID) trialed in uncomplicated influenza. The primary pharmacokinetic endpoint was the proportion of patients with a minimum observed plasma trough concentration (Ctrough) ≥20 mg/L at all measured time points after the second dose. RESULTS: Sixteen patients were enrolled into the low dose group and 19 patients into the high dose group of the study. Favipiravir Ctrough decreased significantly over time in both groups (p <0.01). Relative to day 2 (48 hrs), concentrations were 91.7% and 90.3% lower in the 1600/600 mg group and 79.3% and 89.5% lower in the 1800/800 mg group at day 7 and 10, respectively. In contrast, oseltamivir concentrations did not change significantly over time. A 2-compartment disposition model with first-order absorption and elimination described the observed favipiravir concentration-time data well. Modeling demonstrated that less than 50% of patients achieved Ctrough ≥20 mg/L for >80% of the duration of treatment of the two dose regimens evaluated (18.8% and 42.1% of patients for low and high dose regimen, respectively). Increasing the favipravir dosage predicted a higher proportion of patients reaching this threshold of 20 mg/L, suggesting that dosing regimens of ≥3600/2600 mg might be required for adequate concentrations. The two dosing regimens were well-tolerated in critical ill patients with influenza. CONCLUSION: The two dosing regimens proposed for uncomplicated influenza did not achieve our pre-defined treatment threshold.


Subject(s)
Amides , Influenza, Human/drug therapy , Oseltamivir , Pyrazines , Aged , Amides/administration & dosage , Amides/pharmacokinetics , Drug Therapy, Combination , Female , Humans , Influenza, Human/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Oseltamivir/administration & dosage , Oseltamivir/pharmacokinetics , Pyrazines/administration & dosage , Pyrazines/pharmacokinetics , Severity of Illness Index
6.
Trials ; 21(1): 935, 2020 Nov 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-934299

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The GETAFIX trial will test the hypothesis that favipiravir is a more effective treatment for COVID-19 infection in patients who have early stage disease, compared to current standard of care. This study will also provide an important opportunity to investigate the safety and tolerability of favipiravir, the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profile of this drug and mechanisms of resistance in the context of COVID-19 infection, as well as the effect of favipiravir on hospitalisation duration and the post COVID-19 health and psycho-social wellbeing of patients recruited to the study. TRIAL DESIGN: GETAFIX is an open label, parallel group, two arm phase II/III randomised trial with 1:1 treatment allocation ratio. Patients will be randomised to one of two arms and the primary endpoint will assess the superiority of favipiravir plus standard treatment compared to standard treatment alone. PARTICIPANTS: This trial will recruit adult patients with confirmed positive valid COVID-19 test, who are not pregnant or breastfeeding and have no prior major co-morbidities. This is a multi-centre trial, patients will be recruited from in-patients and outpatients from three Glasgow hospitals: Royal Alexandra Hospital; Queen Elizabeth University Hospital; and the Glasgow Royal Infirmary. Patients must meet all of the following criteria: 1. Age 16 or over at time of consent 2. Exhibiting symptoms associated with COVID-19 3. Positive for SARS-CoV-2 on valid COVID-19 test 4. Point 1, 2, 3, or 4 on the WHO COVID-19 ordinal severity scale at time of randomisation. (Asymptomatic with positive valid COVID-19 test, Symptomatic Independent, Symptomatic assistance needed, Hospitalized, with no oxygen therapy) 5. Have >=10% risk of death should they be admitted to hospital as defined by the ISARIC4C risk index: https://isaric4c.net/risk 6. Able to provide written informed consent 7. Negative pregnancy test (women of childbearing potential*) 8. Able to swallow oral medication Patients will be excluded from the trial if they meet any of the following criteria: 1. Renal impairment requiring, or likely to require, dialysis or haemofiltration 2. Pregnant or breastfeeding 3. Of child bearing potential (women), or with female partners of child bearing potential (men) who do not agree to use adequate contraceptive measures for the duration of the study and for 3 months after the completion of study treatment 4. History of hereditary xanthinuria 5. Other patients judged unsuitable by the Principal Investigator or sub-Investigator 6. Known hypersensitivity to favipiravir, its metabolites or any excipients 7. Severe co-morbidities including: patients with severe hepatic impairment, defined as: • greater than Child-Pugh grade A • AST or ALT > 5 x ULN • AST or ALT >3 x ULN and Total Bilirubin > 2xULN 8. More than 96 hours since first positive COVID-19 test sample was taken 9. Unable to discontinue contra-indicated concomitant medications This is a multi-centre trial, patients will be recruited from in-patients and outpatients from three Glasgow hospitals: Royal Alexandra Hospital; Queen Elizabeth University Hospital; and the Glasgow Royal Infirmary. INTERVENTION AND COMPARATOR: Patients randomised to the experimental arm of GETAFIX will receive standard treatment for COVID-19 at the discretion of the treating clinician plus favipiravir. These patients will receive a loading dose of favipiravir on day 1 of 3600mg (1800mg 12 hours apart). On days 2-10, patients in the experimental arm will receive a maintenance dose of favipiravir of 800mg 12 hours apart (total of 18 doses). Patients randomised to the control arm of the GETAFIX trial will receive standard treatment for COVID-19 at the discretion of the treating clinician. MAIN OUTCOMES: The primary outcome being assessed in the GETAFIX trial is the efficacy of favipiravir in addition to standard treatment in patients with COVID-19 in reducing the severity of disease compared to standard treatment alone. Disease severity will be assessed using WHO COVID 10 point ordinal severity scale at day 15 +/- 48 hours. All randomised participants will be followed up until death or 60 days post-randomisation (whichever is sooner). RANDOMISATION: Patients will be randomised 1:1 to the experimental versus control arm using computer generated random sequence allocation. A minimisation algorithm incorporating a random component will be used to allocate patients. The factors used in the minimisation will be: site, age (16-50/51-70/71+), history of hypertension or currently obsess (BMI>30 or obesity clinically evident; yes/no), 7 days duration of symptoms (yes/no/unknown), sex (male/female), WHO COVID-19 ordinal severity score at baseline (1/2or 3/4). BLINDING (MASKING): No blinding will be used in the GETAFIX trial. Both participants and those assessing outcomes will be aware of treatment allocation. NUMBERS TO BE RANDOMISED (SAMPLE SIZE): In total, 302 patients will be randomised to the GETAFIX trial: 151 to the control arm and 151 to the experimental arm. There will be an optional consent form for patients who may want to contribute to more frequent PK and PD sampling. The maximum number of patients who will undergo this testing will be sixteen, eight males and eight females. This option will be offered to all patients who are being treated in hospital at the time of taking informed consent, however only patients in the experimental arm of the trial will be able to undergo this testing. TRIAL STATUS: The current GETAFIX protocol is version 4.0 12th September 2020. GETAFIX opened to recruitment on 26th October 2020 and will recruit patients over a period of approximately six months. TRIAL REGISTRATION: GETAFIX was registered on the European Union Drug Regulating Authorities Clinical Trials (EudraCT) Database on 15th April 2020; Reference number 2020-001904-41 ( https://www.clinicaltrialsregister.eu/ctr-search/trial/2020-001904-41/GB ). GETAFIX was registered on ISRCTN on 7th September 2020; Reference number ISRCTN31062548 ( https://www.isrctn.com/ISRCTN31062548 ). FULL PROTOCOL: The full protocol is attached as an additional file, accessible from the Trials website (Additional file 1). In the interest in expediting dissemination of this material, the familiar formatting has been eliminated; this Letter serves as a summary of the key elements of the full protocol. The study protocol has been reported in accordance with the Standard Protocol Items: Recommendations for Clinical Interventional Trials (SPIRIT) guidelines (see Additional file 2).


Subject(s)
Amides/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pyrazines/therapeutic use , Adult , Amides/administration & dosage , Amides/pharmacokinetics , Amides/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , Antiviral Agents/pharmacokinetics , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , Case-Control Studies , Coronavirus Infections/classification , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Pandemics/classification , Pneumonia, Viral/classification , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Pyrazines/administration & dosage , Pyrazines/pharmacokinetics , Pyrazines/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2 , Safety , Scotland/epidemiology , Severity of Illness Index , Treatment Outcome
7.
Eur J Pharm Sci ; 157: 105631, 2021 Feb 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-893750

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Effective antiviral drugs for COVID-19 are still lacking. This study aims to evaluate the clinical outcomes and plasma concentrations of baloxavir acid and favipiravir in COVID-19 patients. METHODS: Favipiravir and baloxavir acid were evaluated for their antiviral activity against SARS-CoV-2 in vitro before the trial initiation. We conducted an exploratory trial with 3 arms involving hospitalized adult patients with COVID-19. Patients were randomized assigned in a 1:1:1 ratio into baloxavir marboxil group, favipiravir group, and control group. The primary outcome was the percentage of subjects with viral negative by Day 14 and the time from randomization to clinical improvement. Virus load reduction, blood drug concentration and clinical presentation were also observed. The trial was registered with Chinese Clinical Trial Registry (ChiCTR 2000029544). RESULTS: Baloxavir acid showed antiviral activity in vitro with the half-maximal effective concentration (EC50) of 5.48 µM comparable to arbidol and lopinavir, but favipiravir didn't demonstrate significant antiviral activity up to 100 µM. Thirty patients were enrolled. The percentage of patients who turned viral negative after 14-day treatment was 70%, 77%, and 100% in the baloxavir marboxil, favipiravir, and control group respectively, with the medians of time from randomization to clinical improvement was 14, 14 and 15 days, respectively. One reason for the lack of virological effect and clinical benefits may be due to insufficient concentrations of these drugs relative to their antiviral activities. One of the limitations of this study is the time from symptom onset to randomization, especially in the baloxavir marboxil and control groups, which is higher than the favipiravir group. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings could not prove a benefit of addition of either baloxavir marboxil or favipiravir under the trial dosages to the existing standard treatment.


Subject(s)
Amides , COVID-19 , Dibenzothiepins , Morpholines , Pyrazines , Pyridones , Triazines , Amides/administration & dosage , Amides/blood , Amides/pharmacokinetics , Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , Antiviral Agents/blood , Antiviral Agents/pharmacokinetics , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/physiopathology , Dibenzothiepins/administration & dosage , Dibenzothiepins/blood , Dibenzothiepins/pharmacokinetics , Drug Monitoring/methods , Female , Humans , Inhibitory Concentration 50 , Male , Middle Aged , Morpholines/administration & dosage , Morpholines/blood , Morpholines/pharmacokinetics , Pyrazines/administration & dosage , Pyrazines/blood , Pyrazines/pharmacokinetics , Pyridones/administration & dosage , Pyridones/blood , Pyridones/pharmacokinetics , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Symptom Assessment , Treatment Outcome , Triazines/administration & dosage , Triazines/blood , Triazines/pharmacokinetics , Viral Load/drug effects
8.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 117(43): 26955-26965, 2020 10 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-841910

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) rapidly spread around the globe after its emergence in Wuhan in December 2019. With no specific therapeutic and prophylactic options available, the virus has infected millions of people of which more than half a million succumbed to the viral disease, COVID-19. The urgent need for an effective treatment together with a lack of small animal infection models has led to clinical trials using repurposed drugs without preclinical evidence of their in vivo efficacy. We established an infection model in Syrian hamsters to evaluate the efficacy of small molecules on both infection and transmission. Treatment of SARS-CoV-2-infected hamsters with a low dose of favipiravir or hydroxychloroquine with(out) azithromycin resulted in, respectively, a mild or no reduction in virus levels. However, high doses of favipiravir significantly reduced infectious virus titers in the lungs and markedly improved lung histopathology. Moreover, a high dose of favipiravir decreased virus transmission by direct contact, whereas hydroxychloroquine failed as prophylaxis. Pharmacokinetic modeling of hydroxychloroquine suggested that the total lung exposure to the drug did not cause the failure. Our data on hydroxychloroquine (together with previous reports in macaques and ferrets) thus provide no scientific basis for the use of this drug in COVID-19 patients. In contrast, the results with favipiravir demonstrate that an antiviral drug at nontoxic doses exhibits a marked protective effect against SARS-CoV-2 in a small animal model. Clinical studies are required to assess whether a similar antiviral effect is achievable in humans without toxic effects.


Subject(s)
Amides/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Pyrazines/therapeutic use , Amides/pharmacokinetics , Animals , COVID-19/drug therapy , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cricetinae , Disease Models, Animal , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical , Female , Hydroxychloroquine/pharmacokinetics , Lung/drug effects , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Pyrazines/pharmacokinetics , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome , Vero Cells , Viral Load/drug effects
9.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 4682, 2020 09 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-779999

ABSTRACT

The ongoing Corona Virus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), has emphasized the urgent need for antiviral therapeutics. The viral RNA-dependent-RNA-polymerase (RdRp) is a promising target with polymerase inhibitors successfully used for the treatment of several viral diseases. We demonstrate here that Favipiravir predominantly exerts an antiviral effect through lethal mutagenesis. The SARS-CoV RdRp complex is at least 10-fold more active than any other viral RdRp known. It possesses both unusually high nucleotide incorporation rates and high-error rates allowing facile insertion of Favipiravir into viral RNA, provoking C-to-U and G-to-A transitions in the already low cytosine content SARS-CoV-2 genome. The coronavirus RdRp complex represents an Achilles heel for SARS-CoV, supporting nucleoside analogues as promising candidates for the treatment of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Amides/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pyrazines/pharmacology , Amides/pharmacokinetics , Animals , Antiviral Agents/pharmacokinetics , COVID-19 , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase , Models, Molecular , Mutagenesis/drug effects , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Pyrazines/pharmacokinetics , RNA, Viral/genetics , RNA, Viral/metabolism , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/chemistry , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Sequence Analysis , Vero Cells , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/chemistry , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism , Virus Replication/drug effects
10.
Tohoku J Exp Med ; 251(2): 87-90, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-593619

ABSTRACT

In light of the recent pandemic, favipiravir (Avigan®), a purine nucleic acid analog and antiviral agent approved for use in influenza in Japan, is being studied for the treatment of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Increase in blood uric acid level is a frequent side effect of favipiravir. Here, we discussed the mechanism of blood uric acid elevation during favipiravir treatment. Favipiravir is metabolized to an inactive metabolite M1 by aldehyde oxidase and xanthine oxidase, and excreted into urine. In the kidney, uric acid handling is regulated by the balance of reabsorption and tubular secretion in the proximal tubules. Favipiravir and M1 act as moderate inhibitors of organic anion transporter 1 and 3 (OAT1 and OAT3), which are involved in uric acid excretion in the kidney. In addition, M1 enhances uric acid reuptake via urate transporter 1 (URAT1) in the renal proximal tubules. Thus, favipiravir is thought to decrease uric acid excretion into urine, resulting in elevation of uric acid levels in blood. Elevated uric acid levels were returned to normal after discontinuation of favipiravir, and favipiravir is not used for long periods of time for the treatment of viral infection. Thus, the effect on blood uric acid levels was subclinical in most studies. Nevertheless, the adverse effect of favipiravir might be clinically important in patients with a history of gout, hyperuricemia, kidney function impairment (in which blood concentration of M1 increases), and where there is concomitant use of other drugs affecting blood uric acid elevation.


Subject(s)
Amides/adverse effects , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Hyperuricemia/chemically induced , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pyrazines/adverse effects , Uric Acid/blood , Aldehyde Oxidase/metabolism , Amides/pharmacokinetics , Amides/urine , Antiviral Agents/pharmacokinetics , Biotransformation , COVID-19 , Drug Interactions , Humans , Hyperuricemia/physiopathology , Kidney/metabolism , Kidney Diseases/metabolism , Molecular Structure , Organic Anion Transport Protein 1/antagonists & inhibitors , Organic Anion Transporters/metabolism , Organic Anion Transporters, Sodium-Independent/antagonists & inhibitors , Organic Cation Transport Proteins/metabolism , Pandemics , Pyrazines/pharmacokinetics , Pyrazines/urine , Xanthine Oxidase/metabolism
11.
Clin Transl Sci ; 13(5): 880-885, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-436861

ABSTRACT

Since December 2019, a novel coronavirus (severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)) infection has been rapidly spreading worldwide and causing the respiratory illness, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The antiretroviral drug favipiravir (FPV) has been experimentally used for COVID-19 treatment since March 2020 in Japan. However, the pharmacokinetics of FPV in critically ill patients is unknown. We measured the serum concentration of FPV using high-performance liquid chromatography in patients with severe COVID-19 who were admitted to the intensive care unit and placed on mechanical ventilation. The patients were administered 1,600 mg of FPV twice daily on day 1, followed by 600 mg twice daily from day 2 to day 5 (or more if needed). Suspensions of FPV tablets were administered through a nasogastric tube. Seven patients were enrolled in this study. Forty-nine blood samples were obtained from the eligible patients to evaluate FPV concentration. The FPV trough (after 8-12 hours) concentrations of most samples were lower than the lower limit of quantification (1 µg/mL) and half-maximal effective concentration (9.7 µg/mL) against SARS-CoV-2 previously tested in vitro. FPV trough concentration in critically ill patients was much lower than that of healthy subjects in a previous clinical trial, which is a cause for great concern. Further study is required to determine the optimal strategy for treatment of patients with severe COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Amides/pharmacokinetics , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Critical Illness/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pyrazines/pharmacokinetics , Adult , Aged , Amides/administration & dosage , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Drug Administration Schedule , Female , Humans , Intubation, Gastrointestinal , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Pyrazines/administration & dosage , Respiration, Artificial , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Suspensions , Tablets , Treatment Outcome
12.
Clin Pharmacol Ther ; 108(2): 242-247, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-30729

ABSTRACT

An outbreak of 2019-nCoV infection has spread across the world. No specific antiviral drugs have been approved for the treatment of COVID-2019. In addition to the recommended antiviral drugs, such as interferon-ɑ, lopinavir/ritonavir, ribavirin, and chloroquine phosphate, some clinical trials focusing on virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) inhibitors have been registered and initiated. Favipiravir, a purine nucleic acid analog and potent RdRp inhibitor approved for use in influenza, is also considered in several clinical trials. Herein, we summarized the pharmacokinetic characteristics of favipiravir and possible drug-drug interactions from the view of drug metabolism. We hope this will be helpful for the design of clinical trials for favipiravir in COVID-2019, as data regarding in vitro virus inhibition and efficacy in preclinical animal studies are still not available.


Subject(s)
Amides/pharmacokinetics , Antiviral Agents/pharmacokinetics , Pyrazines/pharmacokinetics , Acetaminophen/pharmacokinetics , Amides/administration & dosage , Amides/blood , Animals , Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , Antiviral Agents/blood , COVID-19/drug therapy , Clinical Trials as Topic , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Drug Interactions , Humans , Pyrazines/administration & dosage , Pyrazines/blood
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