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1.
Blood Coagul Fibrinolysis ; 32(7): 427-433, 2021 Oct 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526210

ABSTRACT

Immune thrombocytopenia is a haematological, autoimmune disorder characterized by elevated platelet demolition due to the presence of antiplatelet autoantibodies derived from B cells and to an irregular, deficient process of platelets production in bone marrow. In this review, after a brief presentation of 'old' strategies used nowadays yet, we focused on new drugs used in the treatment of immune thrombocytopenia and their mechanism of action and posology, basing on the last scientific literature. The observation that CoViD-19 can be associated with immune thrombocytopenia is also put in evidence. Particular attention will be dedicated on the concept that the ideal treatment should represent a solution not only for the failure of normal processes of production and survival of platelets, but also it should improve quality of life of patients, with minimum adverse events. Anyway, despite enormous advances of the last years, further investigations are necessary in order to define scrupulously long-term efficacy of new molecules proposed.


Subject(s)
Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/drug therapy , Aminopyridines/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , Histocompatibility Antigens Class I , Humans , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Morpholines/therapeutic use , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/etiology , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/immunology , Pyrimidines/therapeutic use , Receptors, Fc/antagonists & inhibitors , Receptors, Thrombopoietin/agonists , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Syk Kinase/antagonists & inhibitors , Thiazoles/therapeutic use , Thiophenes/therapeutic use
2.
Cell Rep Med ; 1(8): 100145, 2020 11 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065661

ABSTRACT

A screen by Kost-Alimova et al.1 suggests that the FDA-approved SYK inhibitor fostamatinib inhibits MUC1 in the respiratory tract and has the potential to treat serious outcomes of coronavirus COVID-19, including acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and acute lung injury (ALI).


Subject(s)
Acute Lung Injury/drug therapy , Aminopyridines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Drug Repositioning , Morpholines/therapeutic use , Pyrimidines/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Acute Lung Injury/etiology , Acute Lung Injury/metabolism , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/metabolism , Humans , Mucin-1/metabolism , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/metabolism , Syk Kinase/antagonists & inhibitors
3.
Curr Opin Obstet Gynecol ; 33(1): 53-58, 2021 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066445

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The present review summarizes recent original publications addressing the topic of risk-adapted adjuvant therapy in early breast cancer (EBC). As neoadjuvant therapy has become a standard for triple negative and HER2+ EBC, it focusses on luminal EBC. RECENT FINDINGS: Gene expression assays have become standard of care in luminal EBC, at least for patients with node negative disease. Two prospective randomized clinical trials, TAILORx (Oncotype DX) and MINDACT (MammaPrint) have presented additional analyses underlining the clinical utility of the tests. In times of COVID-19, immunohistochemically determined ER, PR, and Ki67 and early Ki67 response to endocrine therapy can be used to safely allocate patients for preoperative endocrine therapy and delay surgeries if resources are scarce. In patients with luminal high-risk disease, adding a CDK 4/6 inhibitor (abemaciclib) improves patient outcome already after short-term follow-up. SUMMARY: Determination of recurrence risk will remain important in luminal EBC for optimal therapy decisions. In the future, risk-adapted treatment concepts will include decision making for chemotherapy but also for endocrine-based approaches.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal/therapeutic use , Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy , Breast Neoplasms/genetics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Aminopyridines/therapeutic use , Benzimidazoles/therapeutic use , Breast Neoplasms/pathology , Breast Neoplasms/surgery , Female , Gene Expression Profiling , Humans , Ki-67 Antigen/metabolism , Neoadjuvant Therapy , Piperazines/therapeutic use , Pyridines/therapeutic use , Receptor, ErbB-2/genetics , Receptor, ErbB-2/metabolism , Receptors, Estrogen/genetics , Receptors, Estrogen/metabolism , Receptors, Progesterone/genetics , Receptors, Progesterone/metabolism , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Cell Calcium ; 94: 102360, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1064903

ABSTRACT

Ion channels are necessary for correct lysosomal function including degradation of cargoes originating from endocytosis. Almost all enveloped viruses, including coronaviruses (CoVs), enter host cells via endocytosis, and do not escape endosomal compartments into the cytoplasm (via fusion with the endolysosomal membrane) unless the virus-encoded envelope proteins are cleaved by lysosomal proteases. With the ongoing outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-CoV-2, endolysosomal two-pore channels represent an exciting and emerging target for antiviral therapies. This review focuses on the latest knowledge of the effects of lysosomal ion channels on the cellular entry and uncoating of enveloped viruses, which may aid in development of novel therapies against emerging infectious diseases such as SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/virology , Ion Channels/physiology , Lysosomes/virology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Viral Envelope/physiology , Virus Internalization , Virus Uncoating , Aminopyridines/pharmacology , Aminopyridines/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Drug Design , Endocytosis , Endosomes/metabolism , Endosomes/virology , Heterocyclic Compounds, 3-Ring/pharmacology , Heterocyclic Compounds, 3-Ring/therapeutic use , Humans , Hydrazones/pharmacology , Hydrazones/therapeutic use , Ion Channels/classification , Lysosomes/enzymology , Lysosomes/metabolism , Models, Biological , Morpholines/pharmacology , Morpholines/therapeutic use , Pyrimidines/pharmacology , Pyrimidines/therapeutic use , Vacuolar Proton-Translocating ATPases/physiology , Virus Internalization/drug effects , Virus Uncoating/drug effects
5.
Curr Opin Obstet Gynecol ; 33(1): 53-58, 2021 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-990853

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The present review summarizes recent original publications addressing the topic of risk-adapted adjuvant therapy in early breast cancer (EBC). As neoadjuvant therapy has become a standard for triple negative and HER2+ EBC, it focusses on luminal EBC. RECENT FINDINGS: Gene expression assays have become standard of care in luminal EBC, at least for patients with node negative disease. Two prospective randomized clinical trials, TAILORx (Oncotype DX) and MINDACT (MammaPrint) have presented additional analyses underlining the clinical utility of the tests. In times of COVID-19, immunohistochemically determined ER, PR, and Ki67 and early Ki67 response to endocrine therapy can be used to safely allocate patients for preoperative endocrine therapy and delay surgeries if resources are scarce. In patients with luminal high-risk disease, adding a CDK 4/6 inhibitor (abemaciclib) improves patient outcome already after short-term follow-up. SUMMARY: Determination of recurrence risk will remain important in luminal EBC for optimal therapy decisions. In the future, risk-adapted treatment concepts will include decision making for chemotherapy but also for endocrine-based approaches.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal/therapeutic use , Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy , Breast Neoplasms/genetics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Aminopyridines/therapeutic use , Benzimidazoles/therapeutic use , Breast Neoplasms/pathology , Breast Neoplasms/surgery , Female , Gene Expression Profiling , Humans , Ki-67 Antigen/metabolism , Neoadjuvant Therapy , Piperazines/therapeutic use , Pyridines/therapeutic use , Receptor, ErbB-2/genetics , Receptor, ErbB-2/metabolism , Receptors, Estrogen/genetics , Receptors, Estrogen/metabolism , Receptors, Progesterone/genetics , Receptors, Progesterone/metabolism , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Pulm Pharmacol Ther ; 66: 101978, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-947382

ABSTRACT

The recent pandemic of COVID-19 caused by the novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) presents an extraordinary challenge to identify effective drugs for prevention and treatment. The pathogenesis implicate acute respiratory disorder (ARD) which is attributed to significantly triggered "cytokine storm" and compromised immune system. This article summarizes the likely benefits of roflumilast, a Phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE-4) inhibitor as a comprehensive support COVID-19 pathogenesis. Roflumilast, a well-known anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory drug, is protective against respiratory models of chemical and smoke induced lung damage. There is significant data which demonstrate the protective effect of PDE-4 inhibitor in respiratory viral models and is likely to be beneficial in combating COVID-19 pathogenesis. Roflumilast is effective in patients with severe COPD by reducing the rate of exacerbations with the improvement of the lung function, which might further be beneficial for better clinical outcomes in COVID-19 patients. However, further clinical trials are warranted to examine this conjecture.


Subject(s)
Aminopyridines/therapeutic use , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Benzamides/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Phosphodiesterase 4 Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Aminopyridines/adverse effects , Aminopyridines/pharmacology , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/adverse effects , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Benzamides/adverse effects , Benzamides/pharmacology , COVID-19/immunology , Cyclopropanes/adverse effects , Cyclopropanes/pharmacology , Cyclopropanes/therapeutic use , Cytokines/biosynthesis , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Pandemics , Phosphodiesterase 4 Inhibitors/adverse effects , Phosphodiesterase 4 Inhibitors/pharmacology
7.
Eur J Pharmacol ; 889: 173615, 2020 Dec 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-808499

ABSTRACT

Nowadays, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) represents the most serious inflammatory respiratory disease worldwide. Despite many proposed therapies, no effective medication has yet been approved. Neutrophils appear to be the key mediator for COVID-19-associated inflammatory immunopathologic, thromboembolic and fibrotic complications. Thus, for any therapeutic agent to be effective, it should greatly block the neutrophilic component of COVID-19. One of the effective therapeutic approaches investigated to reduce neutrophil-associated inflammatory lung diseases with few adverse effects was roflumilast. Being a highly selective phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitors (PDE4i), roflumilast acts by enhancing the level of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), that probably potentiates its anti-inflammatory action via increasing neprilysin (NEP) activity. Because activating NEP was previously reported to mitigate several airway inflammatory ailments; this review thoroughly discusses the proposed NEP-based therapeutic properties of roflumilast, which may be of great importance in curing COVID-19. However, further clinical studies are required to confirm this strategy and to evaluate its in vivo preventive and therapeutic efficacy against COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Aminopyridines/pharmacology , Aminopyridines/therapeutic use , Benzamides/pharmacology , Benzamides/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Neprilysin/drug effects , Cyclopropanes/pharmacology , Cyclopropanes/therapeutic use , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Med Hypotheses ; 144: 110246, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-741427

ABSTRACT

According to WHO the worst of the COVID-19 pandemic is yet to come. Despite of the exceptional measures being undertaken by regulatory agencies to expedite vaccine development, we may be several months if not years away from an effective vaccine. In such unprecedented times, the only resort nations have at their disposal is to identify and repurpose existing drugs against COVID-19 based on their known clinical or pharmacological profile which can provide direct or corroborative evidence of favorable benefit: risk in the management of COVID-19. Immune-mediated inflammation remains the hallmark of severe complications related to COVID-19 and while corticosteroids have shown preliminary evidence of benefit, they can act like a double-edged sword for majority of COVID-19 patients. Therefore, there is a need to identify 'non-steroid' potent and safe anti-inflammatory agents for use in therapeutic armamentarium against COVID-19. This article makes a case for one such existing drug, roflumilast, that can emerge as a steroid-sparing alternative against COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Aminopyridines/therapeutic use , Benzamides/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Steroids/therapeutic use , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , Animals , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Cyclopropanes/therapeutic use , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Cytokines/metabolism , Humans , Immune System , Immunity, Innate , Inflammation , Models, Theoretical , Phosphodiesterase 4 Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Risk , Thalidomide/analogs & derivatives , Thalidomide/therapeutic use
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