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1.
Spine (Phila Pa 1976) ; 47(22): 1599-1606, 2022 Nov 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2135625

ABSTRACT

STUDY DESIGN: A cross-sectional study based on an online questionnaire. OBJECTIVE: The aim was to investigate the prevalence and intensity of low back pain (LBP) in people with lower limb amputation (LLA) and to analyze the association factors that can influence the genesis of LBP. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: It is still unclear whether LBP is more prevalent in the amputated population than in its nonamputated counterpart. Given the multifactorial nature of LBP, it is necessary to explore possible factors that can influence its presence and intensity, to build a solid background to define a better rehabilitation pathway for the management of these people. METHODS: The online questionnaire included six sections: informed consent of the study, demographic information, comorbid conditions, history of LLA, history of LBP, and acceptance of the amputation. RESULTS: Between March and June 2021, 239 participants [mean age (SD): 49.2 (11.5); female 11%] completed the survey (response rate: 32%). From the results of this study, LBP in LLA showed a prevalence of 82% postamputation and 70% in the last year. A logistic regression with a backward method showed that participants who had problems in the not affected leg presented 1.58 (95% confidence interval: 0.70; 2.45) times higher odds to have LBP after the amputation. CONCLUSION: This study shows that the prevalence of LBP in lower limb amputees appears to be higher than in the general population, with similar levels of pain intensity and frequency. The highest percentage of people with a sedentary lifestyle not practicing any kind of sports emphasizes the importance of educating this population on the importance of physical activity. New strategies to invest in the education of this population in terms of physical activity are needed. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level 4.


Subject(s)
Amputees , Low Back Pain , Humans , Female , Low Back Pain/epidemiology , Low Back Pain/surgery , Low Back Pain/rehabilitation , Cross-Sectional Studies , Amputation/adverse effects , Amputees/rehabilitation , Lower Extremity/surgery
2.
Diabetes Metab Syndr ; 16(10): 102618, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2061069

ABSTRACT

AIMS: A number of reports have illustrated the barriers that the war in Ukraine puts to diabetes care. While their recommendations are valuable for glycemic control and the prevention or early detection of life - threatening diabetes complications, such as hypoglycemia and ketoacidosis, the discourse on diabetic foot is limited. This letter emphasizes the implications of the war in diabetic foot care and discusses potential solutions. METHODS: The authors searched peer - reviewed and grey literature to identify records related to the prevalence of diabetic foot in Ukraine and the standards of care before and after the invasion of Ukraine. RESULTS: Thousands of people in Ukraine sustain diabetic foot ulcers and, thus, are at high risk for lower limb amputations due to the limited access to healthcare services in the country. If not addressed, disability associated with chronic ulcers and amputations can severely affect individual and public health in Ukraine. Strengthening primary and remote care, educating people on self - care and providing adequate supplies for the management of diabetic foot have a major potential to prevent amputations, disability and death. CONCLUSIONS: Providing adequate diabetic foot care in Ukraine and other regions tormented by armed conflicts is vital for the health of the local population and the potential of the affected countries to recover after the crisis.


Subject(s)
Diabetes Mellitus , Diabetic Foot , Humans , Diabetic Foot/epidemiology , Diabetic Foot/therapy , Diabetic Foot/etiology , Ukraine/epidemiology , Amputation , Self Care , Prevalence
3.
Wound Repair Regen ; 30(5): 553-559, 2022 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2032381

ABSTRACT

We aimed to validate the prognostic value of subclassifying moderate diabetic foot infections into two categories: moderate and moderate/severe. We conducted a prospective study of a cohort of 200 patients with moderate and severe infections. Moderate infections were subclassified after applying a previously published score. Variables associated with prognosis were: need for any amputation, major amputation, need for hospitalisation, length of hospitalisation, length of antibiotic therapy, reinfection rate and infection-related mortality. Infections were moderate in 111 cases (55.5%) and severe in 89 (44.5%). Osteomyelitis (OM) was diagnosed in 114 cases (57%), 73 moderate (36.5%) and 41 severe (20.5%). Patients with severe OM had a higher rate of amputations, major amputations, hospitalisations and need for antibiotic therapy, and a longer duration of antibiotics when compared with moderate OM. After applying the score, moderate infections were subclassified into 73 moderate cases (65.7%) and 38 moderate/severe cases (34.3%). Moderate/severe had a higher rate of amputations, major amputations, hospitalisations and need for antibiotics than moderate ones. No differences regarding prognosis were found between moderate/severe and severe infections with systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Moderate/severe diabetic foot infections, which could also be known as severe infections without systemic inflammatory response syndrome, should be recognised as a new subgroup. We propose to merge severe diabetic foot infections with and without systemic inflammatory response syndrome into a unique category due to its prognostic value. Furthermore, OM should be added to both moderate and severe new categories of diabetic foot infections.


Subject(s)
Diabetes Mellitus , Diabetic Foot , Osteomyelitis , Skin Diseases , Amputation , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Diabetic Foot/therapy , Humans , Osteomyelitis/complications , Osteomyelitis/diagnosis , Osteomyelitis/therapy , Prospective Studies , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/complications , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/diagnosis , Wound Healing
5.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 101(35): e30139, 2022 Sep 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2008663

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In the context of the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, people have had to stay at home more and make fewer trips to the hospital. Furthermore, hospitals give priority to the treatment of COVID-19 patients. These factors are not conducive to the treatment of diabetic foot, and even increase the risk of amputation. Therefore, how to better treat patients with diabetic foot during the COVID-19 epidemic, prevent further aggravation of the disease and reduce the risk of amputation in patients with diabetic foot has become an urgent problem for doctors around the world. METHODS: The researchers searched PubMed, the Cochrane Library, and the Embase database. The retrieval time was set from the database establishment to October 2021. All studies on treatment of diabetic foot in the COVID-19 pandemic were included in our study. RESULTS: A total of 6 studies were included in this study. In the 6 protocols for treating patients with diabetic foot, the researchers classified patients according to the condition of their diabetic foot. Diabetic foot patients with general conditions received treatment at home, and doctors can guide the wound dressing change and medication treatment of patients through telemedicine. Patients with severe conditions of diabetic foot were admitted to hospital for treatment. Patients were screened for COVID-19 before hospitalization, those infected or suspected of COVID-19 were treated in isolation, and those not infected with COVID-19 were treated in a general ward. CONCLUSION: Through this systematic review, we proposed a new protocol for the treatment of patients with diabetic foot in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. It provided reference for the treatment of diabetic foot in the context of COVID-19 epidemic. However, the global applicability of the treatment protocol for diabetic foot in the context of COVID-19 epidemic proposed in this study needs further clinical testing.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Diabetic Foot , Telemedicine , Amputation , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diabetic Foot/epidemiology , Diabetic Foot/therapy , Humans , Pandemics
6.
Prosthet Orthot Int ; 46(3): 213-219, 2022 Jun 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1961255

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study investigated the impact of COVID-19 restrictions on ambulatory activity and health-related quality of life (HR-QoL) in people with a lower limb amputation (LLA) in Norway. We hypothesized that the restrictions would negatively affect HR-QoL and decrease prosthetic wear time and ambulatory activity in participants with already limited mobility. METHODS: Twenty individuals with LLA (age and time since amputation 56.2 ± 11.9 and 22.3 ± 20.1 years, respectively) participated. Ambulatory activity (stepwatch: prosthetic wear time; steps per day; minutes of low-intensity (1-15 steps min-1), moderate-intensity (16-40 steps min-1), and high-intensity ambulation (>40 steps min-1)) and HR-QoL (EQ-5D-5L) data were collected prepandemic and 8-12 months later during pandemic restrictions. Semistructured interviews identified personal experiences of coping with restrictions. RESULTS: Prosthetic wear time decreased significantly (-1.0 ± 1.5 hours day-1, p < 0.05). Steps per day (440 ± 1481), moderate-intensity and high-intensity ambulation (3.7 ± 23.4, and 4.8 ± 13.9 minutes day-1, respectively), and EQ-5D-5L index (.02 ± .10) increased, whereas low-intensity ambulation decreased (-1.5 ± 16.1 minutes day-1), all nonsignificant changes. Qualitative analysis identified three themes related to coping with restrictions: (1) personal situation, (2) a prosthetic user's perspective, and (3) mindset. CONCLUSIONS: Increased time spent at home might explain the decreased prosthetic wear time. Contrary to the hypothesis, participants did not decrease their physical activity, and the declined low-intensity ambulation was offset by increased moderate-intensity and high-intensity ambulation. A positive mindset, intrinsic motivation, and health awareness may be important factors for maintaining ambulatory activity and HR-QoL in people with LLA.


Subject(s)
Artificial Limbs , COVID-19 , Adult , Amputation , Humans , Lower Extremity/surgery , Quality of Life , Walking
7.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 22(1): 593, 2022 May 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1951206

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: People living with chronic conditions and physical disabilities face many challenges accessing healthcare services. In Lebanon, in 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic and concomitant economic crisis further exacerbated the living conditions of this segment of the population. This study explored the barriers to accessing healthcare services among people living with diabetes and lower-limb amputation during the pandemic. METHODS: We conducted semi-structured, in-depth phone interviews with users of the Physical Rehabilitation Program, offered by the International Committee of the Red Cross. We used a purposive sampling technique to achieve maximum variation. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, translated, and analyzed using thematic analysis following the "codebook" approach. Transcripts were coded and grouped in a matrix that allowed the development of themes and sub-themes inductively and deductively generated. RESULTS: Eight participants (7 males, 1 female) agreed to be interviewed and participated in the study between March and April, 2021. Barriers to healthcare services access were grouped according to five emerging themes: (1) economic barriers, included increasing costs of food, health services and medications, transportation, shortage of medications, and limited income; (2) structural barriers: availability of transportation, physical environment, and service quality and availability; (3) cultural barriers: marginalization due to their physical disabilities; favoritism in service provision; (4) personal barriers: lack of psychosocial support and limited knowledge about services; (5) COVID-19 barriers: fear of getting sick when visiting healthcare facilities, and heightened social isolation due to lockdowns and physical distancing. CONCLUSION: The underlying economic crisis has worsened the conditions of people living with diabetes and lower-limb amputation. The pandemic has made these individuals more vulnerable to external and contextual factors that cannot be addressed only at an individual level. In the absence of a protective legal framework to mitigate inequalities, we provide recommendations for governments and nongovernmental institutions to develop solutions for more equitable access to healthcare for this segment of the population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Amputation , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Female , Health Services , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Lebanon/epidemiology , Male , Pandemics
8.
Wounds ; 34(5): 146-150, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1940057

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: As did many other nations, the Turkish government implemented precautions and lockdown measures in response to the rapid spread of the COVID-19 viral infection. The pandemic has caused millions of deaths globally, resulted in the development of comorbidities, and negatively affected national health care systems. The increased workload at hospitals and spread of the virus among health care professionals have resulted in delays in health care services delivery. The fear of COVID-19 transmission has resulted in people mostly staying at home. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to present the effects of the pandemic on the behavior of patients with diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients with DFU were categorized into 2 groups: patients hospitalized during the COVID-19 pandemic and patients hospitalized during the same period in 2019 (prepandemic). Demographic data, length of hospital stay, place of residence, Wagner grade of DFU, comorbidities, laboratory parameters, wound duration, duration of diabetes, and treatments applied were recorded. RESULTS: During the pandemic, the length of hospital stay decreased, and patient referrals from other cities significantly decreased (P <.001). Hemoglobin A1c level was higher and Wagner grade was more advanced during the pandemic period (P =.014 and P =.033, respectively). The number of patients undergoing debridement alone decreased during the pandemic period, while those requiring amputation increased (P =.008 and P =.005, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with DFU delayed seeking timely proper medical advice during the pandemic. This resulted in a significantly higher amputation rate, with physical, psychosocial, and economic consequences. Virtual techniques (eg, video consultation) can be used to identify patients who require hospitalization. Close follow-up can be provided via home nursing care and by supplying advanced wound care products for in-home use. Patients with DFU should be encouraged to seek proper medical advice and take recommended precautions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Diabetic Foot , Amputation , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Diabetic Foot/epidemiology , Diabetic Foot/therapy , Humans , Pandemics
9.
Eur J Epidemiol ; 37(6): 587-590, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1888919

ABSTRACT

Most studies reported reduced health care use among people with diabetes during the COVID-19 pandemic. This may be due to restricted medical services or people avoiding health care services because they fear being infected with COVID-19 in health care facilities. The aim of our study was to analyse hospitalisation and mortality in people with and without diabetes in Germany during the COVID-19 pandemic year 2020 compared to 2017-2019. The data were sourced from a German statutory health insurance company covering 3.2 million people. We estimated age-sex standardised rates of mortality, all-cause hospitalisation, hospitalisation due to coronary heart disease (CHD), acute myocardial infarction (AMI), stroke, diabetic foot syndrome (DFS), and major and minor amputations in people with and without diabetes. We predicted rates for 2020 using Poisson regression based on results from 2017-2019 and compared these with the observed rates.In people with diabetes, the hospitalisation rate for major amputation was significantly increased, while all-cause hospitalisation rate and hospitalisation due to CHD, AMI and DFS were significantly decreased compared to the previous period. Moreover, we found a significantly increased mortality and hospitalisation rate for minor amputation in people without diabetes while all-cause hospitalisation and hospitalisation due to CHD and AMI was significantly lower during the COVID-19 pandemic year 2020.We observed changes in health care utilisation and outcomes during the COVID-19 pandemic compared to previous years in people with and without diabetes. Concerning diabetes care, the increase of hospitalisations due to amputation in people with diabetes with a simultaneous reduction in DFS needs special attention.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coronary Disease , Diabetes Mellitus , Diabetic Foot , Myocardial Infarction , Amputation , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diabetic Foot/epidemiology , Diabetic Foot/surgery , Hospitalization , Humans , Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , Pandemics
10.
J Vasc Surg ; 76(4): 987-996.e3, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1885971

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Chronic limb-threatening ischemia (CLTI) is associated with adverse limb outcomes and increased mortality. However, a small subset of the CLTI population will have no feasible conventional methods of revascularization. In such cases, venous arterialization (VA) could provide an alternative for limb salvage. The objective of the present study was to review the outcomes of VA at our institution. METHODS: We performed a single-institution review of 41 patients who had been followed up prospectively and had undergone either superficial or deep VA. The data collected included patient demographics, comorbidities, VA technique (endovascular vs hybrid), and WIfI (wound, ischemia, and foot infection) limb staging. Data were collected at 1-month, 6-month, and 1-year intervals and included the following outcomes: patency, wound healing, major adverse limb events, major amputation, and death. Descriptive statistics were used for analysis. RESULTS: The study group included 41 patients who had undergone successful open hybrid superficial or deep endovascular VA; 21 (51.2%) had undergone a purely endovascular procedure and 20 (48.8%), hybrid VA. The WIfI clinical stage was as follows: stage 4, 33 (80.5%); stage 3, 6 (14.6%); and stage 2, 1 (2.4%). Of the 41 patients, 24 (58.5%) had completed follow-up at 6 months and 16 (39%) at 1 year. At 1 year, the VA primary patency was 28.6% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.15%-0.43%), primary assisted patency was 44.3% (95% CI, 0.27%-0.60%), and secondary patency was 67% (95% CI, 0.49%-0.80%). The complete wound healing rate was 2.7% (n = 1) at 1 month, 62.5% (n = 15) at 6 months, and 18.8% (n = 3) at 1 year. Overall wound healing at 1 year was 46.3% (n = 19). The number of major adverse limb events at 1 year was 15 (36.5%) and included 8 reinterventions (19.5%) and 7 major amputations (17%). The number of deaths was zero (0%) at 1 month and four (19%) at 6 months. Two deaths (9.5%) were attributed to COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019). No further deaths had occurred within 1 year. The limb salvage survival probability at 1 year was 81%. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that for a select subset of CLTI patients presenting with a high WIfI clinical limb stage and no viable options for conventional open or endovascular arterial revascularization, superficial and deep VA are feasible options to achieve limb salvage.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Endovascular Procedures , Peripheral Arterial Disease , Amputation , Chronic Limb-Threatening Ischemia , Endovascular Procedures/adverse effects , Humans , Ischemia/diagnostic imaging , Ischemia/surgery , Limb Salvage/adverse effects , Peripheral Arterial Disease/diagnostic imaging , Peripheral Arterial Disease/surgery , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
11.
ANZ J Surg ; 92(9): 2305-2311, 2022 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1883180

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Frailty predicts adverse perioperative outcomes and increased mortality in patients having vascular surgery. Frailty assessment is a potential tool to inform resource allocation, and shared decision-making about vascular surgery in the resource constrained COVID-19 pandemic environment. This cohort study describes the prevalence of frailty in patients having vascular surgery and the association between frailty, mortality and perioperative outcomes. METHODS: The COVID-19 Vascular Service in Australia (COVER-AU) prospective cohort study evaluates 30-day and six-month outcomes for consecutive patients having vascular surgery in 11 Australian vascular units, March-July 2020. The primary outcome was mortality, with secondary outcomes procedure-related outcomes and hospital utilization. Frailty was assessed using the nine-point visual Clinical Frailty Score, scores of 5 or more considered frail. RESULTS: Of the 917 patients enrolled, 203 were frail (22.1%). The 30 day and 6 month mortality was 2.0% (n = 20) and 5.9% (n = 35) respectively with no significant difference between frail and non-frail patients (OR 1.68, 95%CI 0.79-3.54). However, frail patients stayed longer in hospital, had more perioperative complications, and were more likely to be readmitted or have a reoperation when compared to non-frail patients. At 6 months, frail patients had twice the odds of major amputation compared to non-frail patients, after adjustment (OR 2.01; 95% CI 1.17-3.78), driven by a high rate of amputation during the period of reduced surgical activity. CONCLUSION: Our findings highlight that older, frail patients, experience potentially preventable adverse outcomes and there is a need for targeted interventions to optimize care, especially in times of healthcare stress.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Frailty , Aged , Amputation , Australia/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Frail Elderly , Frailty/epidemiology , Geriatric Assessment , Humans , Length of Stay , Pandemics , Postoperative Complications/etiology , Prospective Studies , Risk Factors , Vascular Surgical Procedures/adverse effects
12.
Ann Vasc Surg ; 84: 6-11, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1872929

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 was initially identified as an acute respiratory disease, but it was quickly recognized that multiple organ systems could be affected. Venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism have been well reported. However, there is a paucity of data on COVID-19-related arterial thrombosis. We examined the incidence, characteristics, treatment, and outcome in patients with acute COVID-19-related arterial thrombosis in a large health maintenance organization (HMO). METHODS: A retrospective multicenter case review was performed from March 2020 to March 2021. Cases were identified through a questionnaire sent to vascular surgeons. Patient characteristics, imaging, treatment, and outcome were reviewed. Successful revascularization was defined as restoration of blood flow with viability of the end organ and absence of death within 30 days. Limb salvage was defined as prevention of major amputation (transtibial or transfemoral) and absence of death in 30 days. RESULTS: There were 37,845 patients admitted with COVID-19 complications during this time. Among this group, 26 patients (0.07%) had COVID-19-related arterial thrombosis. The mean age was 61.7 years (range, 33-82 years) with 20 men (77%) and 6 women (23%). Ethnic minorities comprised 25 of 26 cases (96%). Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) was present in 4 of 26 (15%), active smoking in 1 of 26 (3.8%), and diabetes in 19 of 26 (73%) cases. Most patients developed acute arterial ischemia in the outpatient setting, 20 of 26 (77%). Of the outpatients, 6 of 20 (30%) had asymptomatic COVID-19 and 14 of 20 (70%) had only mild upper respiratory symptoms. Distribution of ischemia was as follows: 23 patients had at least one lower extremity ischemia, one patient had cerebral and lower extremity, one had mesenteric and lower extremity, and one had upper extremity ischemia. Revascularization was attempted in 21 patients, of which 12 of 21 (57%) were successful. Limb salvage was successful in 13 of 26 (50%) patients. The overall mortality was 31% (8/26). CONCLUSIONS: Our experience in a large HMO revealed that the incidence of COVID-19-related arterial thrombosis was low. The actual incidence is likely to be higher since our method of case collection was incomplete. The majority of arterial thrombosis occurred in the outpatient setting in patients with asymptomatic or mild/moderate COVID-19 respiratory disease. Acute ischemia was the inciting factor for hospitalization in these cases. Acute lower extremity ischemia was the most common presentation, and limb salvage rate was lower than that expected when compared to ischemia related to PAD. Arterial thrombosis associated with COVID-19 portends a significantly higher mortality. Education of primary care providers is paramount to prevent delayed diagnosis as most patients initially developed ischemia in the outpatient setting and did not have a high cardiovascular risk profile.


Subject(s)
Arterial Occlusive Diseases , COVID-19 , Peripheral Arterial Disease , Thrombosis , Amputation/adverse effects , Arterial Occlusive Diseases/diagnostic imaging , Arterial Occlusive Diseases/epidemiology , Arterial Occlusive Diseases/surgery , COVID-19/complications , Female , Health Maintenance Organizations , Humans , Ischemia/diagnostic imaging , Ischemia/etiology , Ischemia/therapy , Limb Salvage/adverse effects , Lower Extremity/blood supply , Male , Middle Aged , Peripheral Arterial Disease/diagnostic imaging , Peripheral Arterial Disease/epidemiology , Peripheral Arterial Disease/therapy , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Thrombosis/complications , Thrombosis/diagnostic imaging , Thrombosis/therapy , Treatment Outcome
13.
Surgery ; 171(5): 1422-1426, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1829571

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To determine the impact of COVID-19 infection in patients with chronic limb-threatening ischemia, mainly the limb salvage estimates rate and the overall survival. METHODS: This was a retrospective, consecutive cohort study of chronic limb-threatening ischemia in patients with COVID-19 infection. RESULTS: Overall, 35 patients with chronic limb-threatening ischemia and COVID-19 infection were evaluated. The mean age of the patients was 72.51 years, and most of them were male (60%), with arterial hypertension (85.7%), followed by diabetes mellitus (80%) and tobacco user (71.4%). There was a higher prevalence of wound, ischemia and foot infection (WIfI) classification 4 with 58.8% and Rutherford grade 5 (74.3%). The factors related to overall mortality rate were: D-dimer >1,000 mg/dL (hazard ratio = 22.7, P < .001, confidence interval = 10.49-26.52), respiratory symptoms (hazard ratio = 16.6, P < .001, confidence interval = 9.87-20.90), chest computed tomography compromising higher than 50% of the pulmonary tract (hazard ratio = 16,0, P < .001, confidence interval = 10.41-20.55), acute kidney failure (hazard ratio = 21.58, P < .001, confidence interval = 16.5-30.5), chronic kidney disease (hazard ratio = 4.4, P = .036, confidence interval = 1.45-10.1), therapeutic anticoagulation (hazard ratio = 8.37, P = .004, confidence interval = 1.35-8.45), and WIfI classification (hazard ratio = 5.28, P = .022, confidence interval = 1.34-10.01). The following were related to limb loss: D-dimer >1,000 mg/mL (hazard ratio = 5.47, P = .02, confidence interval = 1.94-10.52), respiratory symptoms (hazard ratio = 5.42, P = .02, confidence interval = 1.87-10.90), and WIfI classification (hazard ratio = 4.44, P = .035, confidence interval = 1.34-8.01). CONCLUSION: This study concluded that COVID-19 has a catastrophic impact among patients with chronic limb-threatening ischemia. The main factors related to overall mortality were D-dimer >1,000 mg/dL, respiratory symptoms, chest computed tomography compromising higher than 50% of the pulmonary tract, acute kidney failure, chronic kidney disease, therapeutic anticoagulation, and WIfI classification. The factors related to limb loss were WIfI classification, D-dimer >1,000 mg/mL and respiratory symptoms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Peripheral Arterial Disease , Wound Infection , Aged , Amputation , Anticoagulants , COVID-19/complications , Chronic Limb-Threatening Ischemia , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Ischemia/surgery , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Limb Salvage , Male , Peripheral Arterial Disease/surgery , Predictive Value of Tests , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome , Wound Healing , Wound Infection/diagnosis , Wound Infection/surgery
14.
Ann R Coll Surg Engl ; 104(7): e211-e215, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1808510

ABSTRACT

A new variant of coronavirus (2019-nCoV) causing acute respiratory distress in humans was identified for the first time in 2019, in Wuhan, China. One of the many complications of infection with this coronavirus is hypercoagulopathy, resulting in acute thrombosis; often leading to acute limb ischaemia. Herein, we report 20 cases of COVID-19 with peripheral arterial thrombosis involving either upper or lower limbs. Some patients underwent vascular procedures and most had to undergo amputation at some level. All the cases (n=20) were referred to us during the 8-month period June 2020 to March 2021. The most common age group was between 51 and 60 years, of whom 80% were males; all the patients had diabetes. The right lower limb was most affected (50%); 15 patients underwent embolectomy. Twenty-five per cent of patients presented with wet gangrene. One patient with upper limb thrombosis recovered after embolectomy and did not require any amputation. Eighty-five per cent of patients underwent some form of amputation and the mortality rate was 10%. Arterial thrombosis is one complication patients may develop during COVID-19 illness, which may affect the outcome. Patients with comorbid conditions like diabetes are at higher risk of developing arterial thrombosis during COVID-19 infection. Susceptibility to coagulopathy may continue even after patient discharge and it is important that both patients and treating physicians are aware of this limb-threatening complication and seek early medical attention.


Subject(s)
Arterial Occlusive Diseases , COVID-19 , Peripheral Vascular Diseases , Thrombosis , Amputation , Arterial Occlusive Diseases/complications , COVID-19/complications , Female , Humans , Ischemia/complications , Ischemia/surgery , Male , Middle Aged , Thrombosis/etiology , Thrombosis/surgery , Treatment Outcome
15.
Ann Vasc Surg ; 83: 80-86, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1797149

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To determine the impact of coronavirus (COVID-19) infection in patients with acute limb ischemia (ALI), mainly the limb salvage estimates the rate and the overall survival rate. METHODS: This was a prospective, consecutive cohort study of ALI patients with or without COVID-19 infection. Two groups of patients were identified: patients with ALI and COVID-19 infection and patients with ALI and without COVID-19 infection. The comparisons among the 2 groups were performed with proper statistical analysis methods. RESULTS: Two groups of patients were identified: ALI and COVID-19 infection with 23 patients and ALI without COVID-19 infection with 49 patients. The overall mortality rate (OMR) was 20.8% (15 patients) in total cohort within the first 30 days. COVID-19 group had a higher OMR than non-COVID-19 group (30.4% vs. 16.7%, P = 0.04). The limb salvage rate at 30 days was 79.1% in total cohort; however, non-COVID-19 infection group had higher limb salvage rates than COVID-19 infection group (89.7% vs. 60.8%, P = 0.01). A univariate and multivariate logistic regression was performed to test the factors related to a major amputation rate. Among the factors evaluated, the following were related to limb loss: D-dimer > 1,000 mg/mL (hazards ratio [HR] = 3.76, P = 0.027, CI = 1.85-5.89) and COVID-19 infection (HR = 1.38, P = 0.035, CI = 1.03-4.75). Moreover, a univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to analyze the factors related to overall mortality. Among the factors evaluated, the following were related to OMR: D-dimer > 1,000 mg/dL (HR = 2.28, P = 0.038, CI: 1.94-6.52), COVID-19 infection (HR = 1.8, P = 0.018, CI = 1.01-4.01), and pharmacomechanical thrombectomy >150 cycles (HR = 2.01, P = 0.002, CI = 1.005-6.781). CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 has a worse prognosis among patients with ALI, with higher rates of limb loss and overall mortality relative to non-COVID patients. The main factors related to overall mortality were D-dimer > 1,000 mg/dL, COVID-19 infection, and pharmacomechanical thrombectomy >150 cycles. The factors related to limb loss were D-dimer > 1,000 mg/mL and COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
Arterial Occlusive Diseases , COVID-19 , Endovascular Procedures , Peripheral Vascular Diseases , Acute Disease , Amputation , Arterial Occlusive Diseases/complications , Arterial Occlusive Diseases/therapy , COVID-19/complications , Cohort Studies , Humans , Ischemia/diagnosis , Ischemia/therapy , Limb Salvage , Lower Extremity , Prospective Studies , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
16.
Jt Dis Relat Surg ; 33(1): 203-207, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776919

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study aims to evaluate the indirect impact of the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on diabetes-related lower extremity amputations. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients who underwent lower limb amputation due to complications of diabetes between August 2019 and February 2020 (control group) and August 2020 and February 2021 (pandemic group) were retrospectively reviewed. None of the patients had a previous COVID-19 infection. Patients' amputation level and latest diabetes follow-up date until amputation were recorded. RESULTS: A total of 19 feet of 19 patients (14 males, 5 females; mean age: 70.0±10.5 years; range, 53 to 91 years) in the control group and 18 feet of 18 patients (12 males, 6 females; mean age: 70.4±11.3 years; range, 54 to 91 years) were included. There was no statistically significant difference in amputation levels between the two groups (p=0.959). The mean time elapsed from the last diabetes control in the control and the pandemic group was 5.9±12.8 months and 8.2±9.8 months, respectively (p=0.038). A total of eight (42.1%) patients in the control group and seven (38.9%) patients in the pandemic group did not have a follow-up for diabetes in the last year prior to amputation (p=0.842). CONCLUSION: Although the COVID-19 pandemic seems to cause a delay in the routine medical care of patients with diabetes, it appears not to have an indirect effect on the lower extremity amputation level and incidence. Patients' adherence may be the major determinant in amputation surgery.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Amputation , COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/surgery , Female , Foot , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies
17.
BMJ Case Rep ; 15(2)2022 Feb 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1723593

ABSTRACT

A man aged 26 years presented with complaints of diminution of vision in his right eye for 1 year following a fist injury. He had a history of laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis in both eyes 5 years earlier. On examination, his uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA) in the right eye was 1.0 logMAR. Slit-lamp examination of the right eye revealed a superotemporal dislocation of the flap with coexisting epithelial ingrowth encroaching the pupillary area. Due to the presence of long-standing fixed flap folds, a flap amputation was performed along with removal of the epithelial ingrowth using 0.02% mitomycin C as adjunct. Postoperatively, the UDVA was 0.3 logMAR on day 1, which improved to 0.2 logMAR at 1 week. At 1 year, the UDVA was 0.2 logMAR improving to 0.1 logMAR with refraction, with minimal paracentral corneal haze and no signs of corneal ectasia.


Subject(s)
Epithelium, Corneal , Keratomileusis, Laser In Situ , Adult , Amputation , Epithelium, Corneal/surgery , Humans , Keratomileusis, Laser In Situ/adverse effects , Male , Postoperative Complications , Refraction, Ocular , Surgical Flaps
18.
Rehabilitation (Stuttg) ; 61(1): 14-16, 2022 02.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1721680
19.
Eur J Phys Rehabil Med ; 58(3): 452-461, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1687746

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Advanced technologies have made available the development of microprocessor prosthetic knee (MPK) to improve autonomy of patients with lower limb amputation. In the present systematic review, we aimed to evaluate the impact of the use of all types of MPK on patients' functional status and quality of life. EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: We conducted this review according to the PRISMA Guidelines on Medline (via Ovid), Scopus and SportDiscuss. All identified articles were screened for their eligibility by two reviewers using Covidence software. The Cochrane Risk of Bias (RoB) or the NIH Quality Assessment Tool were used to assess the quality of the studies. EVIDENCE SYNTHESIS: Eighteen articles were included in the present review (7 randomized controlled trials - RCT), 6 cross-sectional and 5 follow-up studies). Number of participants included varied from 20 to 602, protocols' length varied from a single session to 12 weeks of use of MPK. Taken together, MPK users compared to NMPK users tend to present better functional status and mobility. Quality of life was also positively impacted in MPK users. On the other hand, the superiority of more advanced MPKs such as the Genium® is less clear, especially given the improvements over time of other MPKs such as the C-leg® and the Rheo knee®. CONCLUSIONS: Based on our results, while it is clear that MPKs outperform NMPKs both for functional status and quality of life, additional benefits of one MPK over another is less clear. Future studies are needed to clarify these aspects.


Subject(s)
Amputees , Knee Prosthesis , Amputation , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Lower Extremity/surgery , Microcomputers , Prosthesis Design , Quality of Life
20.
Foot (Edinb) ; 52: 101909, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1664936

ABSTRACT

Diabetic foot ulcer is a preventable complication of diabetes that imposes a significant burden on the community. It leads to amputation and increased disability if left untreated and thus bears profound implications on the individual, the community and the health system at large. Diabetic foot (DF) is an area of research interest where interdisciplinary researchers are trying to elucidate the best strategy to halt the progression of chronic diabetic wounds. It is an area where tissue engineering research is making a strong impact through the use of scaffolds and skin substitutes for diabetic wound healing. This review aims at discussing the geographical health economics, its impact on healing and factors influencing financial costs of DFU. The upcoming economic and clinical impacts due to disease outbreak such as the 2020 COVID-19 has also been discussed. Finally, it will discuss novel therapy available with emphasis on skin tissue engineering scaffolds with a cost-benefit analysis. The review aims at promoting better management of people with diabetes with emphasis on emerging treatments and technologies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Diabetic Foot , Amputation , Cost-Benefit Analysis , Diabetic Foot/therapy , Humans , Wound Healing
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