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1.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(24)2021 Dec 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580688

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) triggered the pandemic Coronavirus Disease 19 (COVID-19), causing millions of deaths. The elderly and those already living with comorbidity are likely to die after SARS-CoV-2 infection. People suffering from Alzheimer's disease (AD) have a higher risk of becoming infected, because they cannot easily follow health roles. Additionally, those suffering from dementia have a 40% higher risk of dying from COVID-19. Herein, we collected from Gene Expression Omnibus repository the brain samples of AD patients who died of COVID-19 (AD+COVID-19), AD without COVID-19 (AD), COVID-19 without AD (COVID-19) and control individuals. We inspected the transcriptomic and interactomic profiles by comparing the COVID-19 cohort against the control cohort and the AD cohort against the AD+COVID-19 cohort. SARS-CoV-2 in patients without AD mainly activated processes related to immune response and cell cycle. Conversely, 21 key nodes in the interactome are deregulated in AD. Interestingly, some of them are linked to beta-amyloid production and clearance. Thus, we inspected their role, along with their interactors, using the gene ontologies of the biological process that reveals their contribution in brain organization, immune response, oxidative stress and viral replication. We conclude that SARS-CoV-2 worsens the AD condition by increasing neurotoxicity, due to higher levels of beta-amyloid, inflammation and oxidative stress.


Subject(s)
Alzheimer Disease/genetics , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/genetics , Alzheimer Disease/complications , Alzheimer Disease/virology , Amyloid beta-Peptides/metabolism , Brain/virology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Comorbidity/trends , Databases, Factual , Gene Expression/genetics , Gene Expression Profiling/methods , Humans , Inflammation/metabolism , Neurotoxicity Syndromes/metabolism , Oxidative Stress/physiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Transcriptome/genetics
3.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(15)2021 Jul 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1350316

ABSTRACT

Increasing evidence suggests that elderly people with dementia are vulnerable to the development of severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). In Alzheimer's disease (AD), the major form of dementia, ß-amyloid (Aß) levels in the blood are increased; however, the impact of elevated Aß levels on the progression of COVID-19 remains largely unknown. Here, our findings demonstrate that Aß1-42, but not Aß1-40, bound to various viral proteins with a preferentially high affinity for the spike protein S1 subunit (S1) of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and the viral receptor, angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). These bindings were mainly through the C-terminal residues of Aß1-42. Furthermore, Aß1-42 strengthened the binding of the S1 of SARS-CoV-2 to ACE2 and increased the viral entry and production of IL-6 in a SARS-CoV-2 pseudovirus infection model. Intriguingly, data from a surrogate mouse model with intravenous inoculation of Aß1-42 show that the clearance of Aß1-42 in the blood was dampened in the presence of the extracellular domain of the spike protein trimers of SARS-CoV-2, whose effects can be prevented by a novel anti-Aß antibody. In conclusion, these findings suggest that the binding of Aß1-42 to the S1 of SARS-CoV-2 and ACE2 may have a negative impact on the course and severity of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Further investigations are warranted to elucidate the underlying mechanisms and examine whether reducing the level of Aß1-42 in the blood is beneficial to the fight against COVID-19 and AD.


Subject(s)
Amyloid beta-Peptides/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Peptide Fragments/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , A549 Cells , Alzheimer Disease/complications , Alzheimer Disease/metabolism , Amyloid beta-Peptides/chemistry , Animals , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/metabolism , Chlorocebus aethiops , Humans , Interleukin-6/metabolism , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Transgenic , Peptide Fragments/chemistry , Protein Subunits/chemistry , Protein Subunits/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Vero Cells , Virus Internalization
4.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(15)2021 Jul 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1335101

ABSTRACT

Increasing evidence suggests that elderly people with dementia are vulnerable to the development of severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). In Alzheimer's disease (AD), the major form of dementia, ß-amyloid (Aß) levels in the blood are increased; however, the impact of elevated Aß levels on the progression of COVID-19 remains largely unknown. Here, our findings demonstrate that Aß1-42, but not Aß1-40, bound to various viral proteins with a preferentially high affinity for the spike protein S1 subunit (S1) of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and the viral receptor, angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). These bindings were mainly through the C-terminal residues of Aß1-42. Furthermore, Aß1-42 strengthened the binding of the S1 of SARS-CoV-2 to ACE2 and increased the viral entry and production of IL-6 in a SARS-CoV-2 pseudovirus infection model. Intriguingly, data from a surrogate mouse model with intravenous inoculation of Aß1-42 show that the clearance of Aß1-42 in the blood was dampened in the presence of the extracellular domain of the spike protein trimers of SARS-CoV-2, whose effects can be prevented by a novel anti-Aß antibody. In conclusion, these findings suggest that the binding of Aß1-42 to the S1 of SARS-CoV-2 and ACE2 may have a negative impact on the course and severity of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Further investigations are warranted to elucidate the underlying mechanisms and examine whether reducing the level of Aß1-42 in the blood is beneficial to the fight against COVID-19 and AD.


Subject(s)
Amyloid beta-Peptides/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Peptide Fragments/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , A549 Cells , Alzheimer Disease/complications , Alzheimer Disease/metabolism , Amyloid beta-Peptides/chemistry , Animals , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/metabolism , Chlorocebus aethiops , Humans , Interleukin-6/metabolism , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Transgenic , Peptide Fragments/chemistry , Protein Subunits/chemistry , Protein Subunits/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Vero Cells , Virus Internalization
5.
Med Sci Monit ; 27: e934077, 2021 Jul 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1326004

ABSTRACT

Current treatments for patients with Alzheimer's disease aim to improve behavioral, cognitive, and non-cognitive symptoms. There have been no new drug approvals for preventing or treating Alzheimer's disease for more than two decades. Drug development in Alzheimer's disease aims to identify disease-modifying therapies that will delay or slow the clinical course of this disease. More than 50% of the current Alzheimer's disease drug pipeline now involves immunotherapies or oral small molecule agents. The most promising disease-modifying drug targets are amyloid ß and tau protein. In June 2021, aducanumab, a humanized recombinant monoclonal antibody to amyloid ß, was the first potential disease-modifying therapy approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment. Accelerated approval of aducanumab was based on the results of only one of two phase 3 clinical trials. Several clinical trials of targeted disease-modifying immunotherapies to the tau protein and amyloid ß that commenced before the current COVID-19 pandemic have been delayed. This Editorial aims to provide an update on past, present, and future disease-modifying therapies in Alzheimer's disease, including targeted therapies for amyloid ß and tau protein.


Subject(s)
Alzheimer Disease/drug therapy , Alzheimer Disease/metabolism , Amyloid beta-Peptides/metabolism , tau Proteins/metabolism , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Cognitive Dysfunction/drug therapy , Cognitive Dysfunction/immunology , Humans , Immunotherapy/methods , Immunotherapy/trends , Tauopathies/drug therapy
6.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(13)2021 Jun 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1304667

ABSTRACT

Amyloid beta (Aß)-induced abnormal neuroinflammation is recognized as a major pathological feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD), which results in memory impairment. Research exploring low-grade systemic inflammation and its impact on the development and progression of neurodegenerative disease has increased. A particular research focus has been whether systemic inflammation arises only as a secondary effect of disease, or it is also a cause of pathology. The inflammasomes, and more specifically the NLRP3 inflammasome, are crucial components of the innate immune system and are usually activated in response to infection or tissue damage. Although inflammasome activation plays critical roles against various pathogens in host defense, overactivation of inflammasome contributes to the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases, including acute central nervous system (CNS) injuries and chronic neurodegenerative diseases, such as AD. This review summarizes the current literature on the role of the NLRP3 inflammasome in the pathogenesis of AD, and its involvement in infections, particularly SARS-CoV-2. NLRP3 might represent the crossroad between the hypothesized neurodegeneration and the primary COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
Alzheimer Disease/pathology , Amyloid beta-Peptides/metabolism , Inflammasomes/metabolism , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/metabolism , Alzheimer Disease/metabolism , Animals , Coronavirus/pathogenicity , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Microglia/metabolism , Virus Diseases/immunology , Virus Diseases/pathology
7.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(13)2021 Jun 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1295856

ABSTRACT

Amyloid beta (Aß)-induced abnormal neuroinflammation is recognized as a major pathological feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD), which results in memory impairment. Research exploring low-grade systemic inflammation and its impact on the development and progression of neurodegenerative disease has increased. A particular research focus has been whether systemic inflammation arises only as a secondary effect of disease, or it is also a cause of pathology. The inflammasomes, and more specifically the NLRP3 inflammasome, are crucial components of the innate immune system and are usually activated in response to infection or tissue damage. Although inflammasome activation plays critical roles against various pathogens in host defense, overactivation of inflammasome contributes to the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases, including acute central nervous system (CNS) injuries and chronic neurodegenerative diseases, such as AD. This review summarizes the current literature on the role of the NLRP3 inflammasome in the pathogenesis of AD, and its involvement in infections, particularly SARS-CoV-2. NLRP3 might represent the crossroad between the hypothesized neurodegeneration and the primary COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
Alzheimer Disease/pathology , Amyloid beta-Peptides/metabolism , Inflammasomes/metabolism , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/metabolism , Alzheimer Disease/metabolism , Animals , Coronavirus/pathogenicity , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Microglia/metabolism , Virus Diseases/immunology , Virus Diseases/pathology
8.
Biochem Biophys Res Commun ; 554: 94-98, 2021 05 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1157142

ABSTRACT

The post-infection of COVID-19 includes a myriad of neurologic symptoms including neurodegeneration. Protein aggregation in brain can be considered as one of the important reasons behind the neurodegeneration. SARS-CoV-2 Spike S1 protein receptor binding domain (SARS-CoV-2 S1 RBD) binds to heparin and heparin binding proteins. Moreover, heparin binding accelerates the aggregation of the pathological amyloid proteins present in the brain. In this paper, we have shown that the SARS-CoV-2 S1 RBD binds to a number of aggregation-prone, heparin binding proteins including Aß, α-synuclein, tau, prion, and TDP-43 RRM. These interactions suggests that the heparin-binding site on the S1 protein might assist the binding of amyloid proteins to the viral surface and thus could initiate aggregation of these proteins and finally leads to neurodegeneration in brain. The results will help us to prevent future outcomes of neurodegeneration by targeting this binding and aggregation process.


Subject(s)
Amyloid/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , Heparin/metabolism , Neurodegenerative Diseases/metabolism , Protein Aggregation, Pathological , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Amyloid beta-Peptides/metabolism , Brain/metabolism , Brain/pathology , Brain/virology , COVID-19/virology , DNA-Binding Proteins/chemistry , DNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism , Humans , Molecular Docking Simulation , Neurodegenerative Diseases/virology , Prions/metabolism , Protein Binding , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , alpha-Synuclein/metabolism , tau Proteins/metabolism
9.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(4)2021 Feb 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1069829

ABSTRACT

Alzheimer's disease is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder and represents the main cause of dementia globally. Currently, the world is suffering from the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), a virus that uses angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) as a receptor to enter the host cells. In COVID-19, neurological manifestations have been reported to occur. The present study demonstrates that the protein expression level of ACE2 is upregulated in the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease. The increased ACE2 expression is not age-dependent, suggesting the direct relationship between Alzheimer's disease and ACE2 expression. Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, and brains with the disease examined in this study also exhibited higher carbonylated proteins, as well as an increased thiol oxidation state of peroxiredoxin 6 (Prx6). A moderate positive correlation was found between the increased ACE2 protein expression and oxidative stress in brains with Alzheimer's disease. In summary, the present study reveals the relationships between Alzheimer's disease and ACE2, the receptor for SARS-CoV-2. These results suggest the importance of carefully monitoring patients with both Alzheimer's disease and COVID-19 in order to identify higher viral loads in the brain and long-term adverse neurological consequences.


Subject(s)
Alzheimer Disease/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/metabolism , Hippocampus/metabolism , Pandemics , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Up-Regulation , Alzheimer Disease/complications , Alzheimer Disease/pathology , Amyloid beta-Peptides/metabolism , Autopsy , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/virology , Hippocampus/pathology , Humans , Oxidation-Reduction , Oxidative Stress , Peroxiredoxin VI/metabolism , Plaque, Amyloid/metabolism , Protein Carbonylation , Severity of Illness Index , Virus Internalization
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