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1.
Przegl Epidemiol ; 75(3): 315-325, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1689534

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has taken a heavy toll of 4 million deaths. We were all looking forward to the authorisation of safe vaccines. Soon after vaccination programmes started, the reports about anaphylaxis began to emerge. Growing anxiety has urged regulatory agencies and academic societies to issue adequate recommendations regarding patient eligibility to vaccination. AIM OF THE STUDY: Observation of patients who had a history of a severe anaphylactic reaction and/or anaphylactic shock and were vaccinated against COVID-19. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A single-centre, prospective, observational study was conducted at the Department of Infectious Diseases and Paediatrics at Stefan Zeromski Specialist Hospital in Krakow, Poland. Adult patients with a history of a severe anaphylactic reaction and/or anaphylactic shock and patients without it were administered the Comirnaty vaccine by Pfizer-BioNTech or the ChAdOx1-S vaccine by AstraZeneca in a two-dose schedule at the department. The patients were then observed at the department for 60 minutes. A week after each vaccination dose, the patients were contacted by telephone in order to collect data about a late allergic reaction. RESULTS: In total, 403 patients were enrolled. For the Pfizer BioNTech Comirnaty vaccine, the study group (i.e. patients with a history of severe anaphylactic reactions to various substances, other than those present in the vaccine) included 151 patients, and there were 161 controls. For the AstraZeneca ChAdOx1-S vaccine, the study group included 47 patients, and 44 patients formed the control group. Nine cases of severe anaphylactic reactions were reported: 3 in the study groups (1.5%) and 6 in the control groups (3%). Anaphylactic shock after vaccine administration occurred in one patient from the control group. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 vaccination with using Pfizer-BioNTech Comirnaty and AstraZeneca ChAdOx1-S is safe also for patients with a history of a severe anaphylactic reaction and/or anaphylactic shock. Severe anaphylactic reactions and anaphylactic shock, although rare, may also develop in patients without a prior history of allergic conditions. The Personnel od vaccination centres should be therefore trained to provide medical help. Incorrect patient exclusions delay the attainment of the goal determined for the vaccination programme.


Subject(s)
Anaphylaxis , COVID-19 , Adult , Anaphylaxis/chemically induced , COVID-19 Vaccines , Child , Humans , Poland , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
2.
Allergy Asthma Proc ; 42(6): 515-521, 2021 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1607107

ABSTRACT

Background: Acute allergic reactions to messenger RNA (mRNA) vaccines are rare but may limit public health immunization efforts. Objectives: To characterize suspected allergic reactions to the first dose of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) mRNA vaccine and to assess the safety and utility of a two-step graded-dose protocol for the second dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine in patients with a history of low suspicion of anaphylaxis to their first dose. Methods: This was a retrospective evaluation of referrals to the allergy and immunology clinic for a presumed allergic reaction to the first dose of the COVID-19 mRNA vaccine (Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna) between December 17, 2020, and February 28, 2021. Recommendations for the second dose and outcomes were evaluated by trained board-certified allergists. Results: Seventy-seven patients presented with a Pfizer-BioNTech reaction (56 [72.7%]) or with a Moderna reaction (21 [27.3%]). Most patients (69.7%) had symptom onset within 4 hours. Most commonly reported symptoms were cutaneous (51.9%), cardiovascular (48.1%), and respiratory (33.8%) symptoms. Recommendations included to proceed with the single dose (70.1%), two-step graded dose (19.5%), or deferral (10.4%). Twelve of 15 patients completed the second dose with a graded-dose protocol. Of these patients, five reported at least one or more similar symptoms as experienced with their first dose. Conclusion: Of the patients with presumed allergic reactions to their first dose of COVID-19 mRNA vaccine, most were able to safely receive the second dose. For those with a low suspicion of anaphylaxis, the two-step graded protocol with the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine was well tolerated. A graded-dose protocol could be an effective strategy for second-dose vaccination in those who may otherwise defer the second dose.


Subject(s)
Anaphylaxis/chemically induced , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19/prevention & control , Hypersensitivity , Vaccines, Synthetic/adverse effects , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccines, Synthetic/administration & dosage
3.
Allergy Asthma Proc ; 43(1): 37-39, 2022 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1604942

ABSTRACT

Background: After Emergency Use Authorization of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccines, guidance was provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that persons with an immediate allergic reaction to a messenger RNA (mRNA) COVID-19 vaccine should be evaluated by an allergist/immunologist before receipt of the second dose. Methods: In vaccinating health-care personnel, we referred those with significant reactions to allergy/immunology specialists so that they could safely receive the second dose. Results: We found that many reactions after the first dose were nonallergic but could be debilitating and a barrier to the second dose. We created a protocol of premedications to allow health-care personnel to safely receive their second mRNA COVID-19 vaccine dose. Conclusion: This protocol is adaptable and can be used in settings where allergy/immunology referral is not immediately available.


Subject(s)
Anaphylaxis , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19 , Vaccines, Synthetic/adverse effects , /adverse effects , Anaphylaxis/chemically induced , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , RNA, Messenger
4.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(12): e2140364, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1591621

ABSTRACT

Importance: Little is known about the factors associated with COVID-19 vaccine adverse effects in a real-world population. Objective: To evaluate factors potentially associated with participant-reported adverse effects after COVID-19 vaccination. Design, Setting, and Participants: The COVID-19 Citizen Science Study, an online cohort study, includes adults aged 18 years and older with a smartphone or internet access. Participants complete daily, weekly, and monthly surveys on health and COVID-19-related events. This analysis includes participants who provided consent between March 26, 2020, and May 19, 2021, and received at least 1 COVID-19 vaccine dose. Exposures: Participant-reported COVID-19 vaccination. Main Outcomes and Measures: Participant-reported adverse effects and adverse effect severity. Candidate factors in multivariable logistic regression models included age, sex, race, ethnicity, subjective social status, prior COVID-19 infection, medical conditions, substance use, vaccine dose, and vaccine brand. Results: The 19 586 participants had a median (IQR) age of 54 (38-66) years, and 13 420 (68.8%) were women. Allergic reaction or anaphylaxis was reported in 26 of 8680 participants (0.3%) after 1 dose of the BNT162b2 (Pfizer/BioNTech) or mRNA-1273 (Moderna) vaccine, 27 of 11 141 (0.2%) after 2 doses of the BNT162b2 or mRNA-1273 vaccine or 1 dose of the JNJ-78436735 (Johnson & Johnson) vaccine. The strongest factors associated with adverse effects were vaccine dose (2 doses of BNT162b2 or mRNA-1273 or 1 dose of JNJ-78436735 vs 1 dose of BNT162b2 or mRNA-1273; odds ratio [OR], 3.10; 95% CI, 2.89-3.34; P < .001), vaccine brand (mRNA-1273 vs BNT162b2, OR, 2.00; 95% CI, 1.86-2.15; P < .001; JNJ-78436735 vs BNT162b2: OR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.52-0.79; P < .001), age (per 10 years: OR, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.72-0.76; P < .001), female sex (OR, 1.65; 95% CI, 1.53-1.78; P < .001), and having had COVID-19 before vaccination (OR, 2.17; 95% CI, 1.77-2.66; P < .001). Conclusions and Relevance: In this real-world cohort, serious COVID-19 vaccine adverse effects were rare and comparisons across brands could be made, revealing that full vaccination dose, vaccine brand, younger age, female sex, and having had COVID-19 before vaccination were associated with greater odds of adverse effects. Large digital cohort studies may provide a mechanism for independent postmarket surveillance of drugs and devices.


Subject(s)
/adverse effects , /adverse effects , COVID-19/prevention & control , /administration & dosage , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Anaphylaxis/chemically induced , Drug Hypersensitivity/etiology , Female , Humans , Immunization Schedule , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Factors
5.
Vaccine ; 40(3): 477-482, 2022 01 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1569120

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Acute adverse events and anaphylaxis were reported after the administration of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) mRNA vaccines. We aim to explore the nature and outcome of adverse events following BNT162B2 vaccine in a community vaccination center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. METHOD: Within 30 min post vaccination, all acute adverse events (AAEs) that occurred before March 31st, 2021, and in people older than 16 years were reviewed (AAE group). We used the case definition of Brighton collaboration on vaccine safety to define anaphylaxis. Patients' demographics, comorbidities, allergy history, and outcome at disposition were collected. Observation duration after vaccination was short (<15 min) or extended (<3 h). Statistical analysis was performed to study AAEs association with the study variables and outcomes. RESULTS: Out of 71,221 vaccine recipients, 144 (0.002%) had developed 345 AAEs, at a rate of 48.4 events per 10,000 dose administered. The majority of cases in AAE group were first dose recipients (93.8%) and previously healthy (59%), while the minority had a previous history of allergy (6.3%) or a laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 (4.2%). We found a significant association between female gender and the occurrence of any AAE (p-value = 0.002). Per every 10,000 doses administered, non-anaphylactic AAEs were dizziness (17.8), headache (9.7), nausea (7.1), or syncope (3.2). Only one in every ten AAEs was considered serious and resulted in an extended observation (4.8 per 10,000 doses), but only 1/144 required hospitalization for non-anaphylaxis reasons (0.1 per 10,000 doses). According to the Brighton collaboration definition of anaphylaxis, no single case of high certainty anaphylaxis was recorded. No death was documented in this cohort. CONCLUSION: Acute adverse events due toBNT162b2 vaccinewere rare andmostlynon-seriouswith a tendency to occur more in women. Further prospectivestudieson largervaccine recipientsto evaluatethe incidenceof anaphylaxis in the Saudi population are warranted.


Subject(s)
Anaphylaxis , COVID-19 , Anaphylaxis/chemically induced , Anaphylaxis/epidemiology , Female , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology
6.
Curr Opin Pediatr ; 33(6): 610-617, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1546085

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: A known history of a severe allergic reaction (e.g., anaphylaxis) to any component of the vaccine is the only contraindication to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) mRNA vaccination. It is important for pediatricians to understand the likelihood of an allergic reaction to COVID-19 mRNA vaccines, including its excipients. RECENT FINDINGS: Episodes concerning for anaphylaxis were immediately reported following early administration of COVID-19 mRNA vaccines to adults. Although allergic type symptoms were reported equally in recipients of placebos and test vaccines in phase 3 clinical trials, post-authorization prospective studies state that 0.2-2% of vaccine recipients have experienced allergic reactions. Subsequent allergy testing of affected individuals has focused largely on evaluation of allergic sensitization to a novel vaccine excipient, polyethylene glycol (PEG). PEG is a polymer incorporated in numerous pharmaceutical products because of its favorable, inert properties. The results of allergy testing in adults to date indicate that IgE mediated anaphylaxis to PEG allergy is rarely identified after COVID-19 mRNA vaccine reactions. Numerous individuals with presumed anaphylaxis have tolerated a second vaccine after evaluation and testing by an allergist, suggesting either misdiagnosis or a novel immune mechanism. SUMMARY: Confirmed anaphylactic reactions to COVID-19 mRNA vaccines are rare, likely due to a lack of preexisting IgE against the vaccine components, including PEG.


Subject(s)
Anaphylaxis , COVID-19 , Adult , Anaphylaxis/chemically induced , Anaphylaxis/diagnosis , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , Prospective Studies , RNA, Messenger , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Vaccine ; 40(2): 183-186, 2022 01 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1537111

ABSTRACT

We retrieved data on 8940 anaphylaxis cases post-COVID-19 vaccination from the US Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System and the European EudraVigilance from week 52/2020 through week 31/2021 and compared them with those of other vaccines. Overall, 837,830,000 COVID-19 vaccine doses were delivered in the US and Europe during the study period, for which the vaccine name was known. The mean anaphylaxis rate was estimated at 10.67 cases per 106 doses of COVID-19 vaccines (range: 7.99-19.39 cases per 106 doses depending on the vaccine). COVID-19 vaccines ranked fifth in reported anaphylaxis rates, behind rabies, tick-borne encephalitis, measles-mumps-rubella-varicella, and human papillomavirus vaccines (70.77, 20, 19.8, and 13.65 cases per 106 vaccine doses, respectively). COVID-19 vaccines are within the range of anaphylaxis rates reported across several common vaccines in these two passive reporting systems. These data should be communicated to reassure the general population about the safety profile of COVID-19 vaccines.


Subject(s)
Anaphylaxis , COVID-19 , Anaphylaxis/chemically induced , Anaphylaxis/epidemiology , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , Infant , Measles-Mumps-Rubella Vaccine/adverse effects , Mumps Vaccine , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Vaccine ; 39(44): 6464-6469, 2021 10 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440395

ABSTRACT

Among 6146 hospital employees, 118 subjects with severe allergic background were identified through a screening questionnaire and stratified into 3 groups (Low-risk (LR), Intermediate (IR) and High-risk (HR) group), based on their allergic anamnesis. Data reports on hypersensitivity reactions (HypR) have been collected in both allergic and non-allergic subjects. Seventeen patients (14%) in the allergic population had a HypR after the first, the second or both doses. Skin manifestations were the most frequent ones. Allergic events were more frequent in HR (35%) than IR (10%; p = 0.005) or LR (0%; p = 0.074) subjects. No patient had anaphylaxis. All patients completed the vaccination schedule. 13 HypR occurred in patients without severe allergic background (13/6028, 0,2%) including one (1/6148, 0.016% of total population) WAO grade-4 anaphylaxis. Our data suggest that BNT162b2 mRNA Covid-19 vaccine is relatively safe also in patients with severe allergic background; however, some precautions are required for high-risk patients.


Subject(s)
Anaphylaxis , COVID-19 , Vaccines , Algorithms , Anaphylaxis/chemically induced , Anaphylaxis/diagnosis , Anaphylaxis/epidemiology , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccines/adverse effects
13.
J Med Virol ; 93(10): 6027-6029, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1432410

ABSTRACT

In the setting of a coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) global pandemic and increased disease burden, vaccination has become one of the major solutions. With the increase in vaccination numbers worldwide, it is important to stay vigilant to the potential side effects and life-threatening complications of such vaccines. We report the case of a 30-year-old male with a biphasic allergic reaction post messenger (mRNA) Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccination. Several reports of allergic reactions have been cited in the literature after the administration of the mRNA Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine. It is important to keep a high index of suspicion in severe anaphylactic cases as some patients may have a recurrence of symptoms after discharge. It is crucial to acknowledge the potential risk of anaphylaxis in select individuals and have the appropriate measures in place to deal with adverse events. In case of severe symptoms, the administration of epinephrine is advised to prevent the development of a delayed biphasic anaphylactic reaction.


Subject(s)
Anaphylaxis/chemically induced , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Adult , Anaphylaxis/drug therapy , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , Epinephrine/therapeutic use , Humans , Male , Recurrence , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Treatment Outcome , Vaccines, Synthetic/adverse effects
14.
Vaccine ; 39(38): 5368-5375, 2021 09 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1377852

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Anaphylaxis is a rare, serious allergic reaction. Its identification in large healthcare databases can help better characterize this risk. OBJECTIVE: To create an ICD-10 anaphylaxis algorithm, estimate its positive predictive values (PPVs) in a post-vaccination risk window, and estimate vaccination-attributable anaphylaxis rates in the Medicare Fee For Service (FFS) population. METHODS: An anaphylaxis algorithm with core and extended portions was constructed analyzing ICD-10 anaphylaxis claims data in Medicare FFS from 2015 to 2017. Cases of post-vaccination anaphylaxis among Medicare FFS beneficiaries were then identified from October 1, 2015 to February 28, 2019 utilizing vaccine relevant anaphylaxis ICD-10 codes. Information from medical records was used to determine true anaphylaxis cases based on the Brighton Collaboration's anaphylaxis case definition. PPVs were estimated for incident anaphylaxis and the subset of vaccine-attributable anaphylaxis within a 2-day post-vaccination risk window. Vaccine-attributable anaphylaxis rates in Medicare FFS were also estimated. RESULTS: The study recorded 66,572,128 vaccinations among 21,685,119 unique Medicare FFS beneficiaries. The algorithm identified a total of 190 suspected anaphylaxis cases within the 2-day post-vaccination window; of these 117 (62%) satisfied the core algorithm, and 73 (38%) additional cases satisfied the extended algorithm. The core algorithm's PPV was 66% (95% CI [56%, 76%]) for identifying incident anaphylaxis and 44% (95% CI [34%, 56%]) for vaccine-attributable anaphylaxis. The vaccine-attributable anaphylaxis incidence rate after any vaccination was 0.88 per million doses (95% CI [0.67, 1.16]). CONCLUSION: The ICD-10 claims algorithm for anaphylaxis allows the assessment of anaphylaxis risk in real-world data. The algorithm revealed vaccine-attributable anaphylaxis is rare among vaccinated Medicare FFS beneficiaries.


Subject(s)
Anaphylaxis , Vaccines , Aged , Algorithms , Anaphylaxis/chemically induced , Anaphylaxis/epidemiology , Humans , Incidence , International Classification of Diseases , Medicare , United States/epidemiology , Vaccines/adverse effects
15.
Euro Surveill ; 26(33)2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1367740

ABSTRACT

The South Korea mass vaccination programme administered 3.8 million doses of COVID-19 vaccinations between 26 February and 30 April 2021. After 173 suspected anaphylaxis reports to the nationwide monitoring system for adverse events following immunisation, 44 anaphylaxis cases were confirmed using Brighton Collaboration case definitions. The rates per million doses were 18.2 cases and 6.2 cases for Vaxzevria and Comirnaty, respectively. Median time of onset was 14 min after vaccination and most cases had recovered at the time of review.


Subject(s)
Anaphylaxis , COVID-19 , Anaphylaxis/chemically induced , Anaphylaxis/diagnosis , Anaphylaxis/epidemiology , Humans , Mass Vaccination , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination/adverse effects
16.
Drug Saf ; 44(11): 1209-1214, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1340491

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: In mid-February, the nationwide immunization plan for the prevention of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) started in Japan (at first primarily focused on health professionals) using an mRNA-based vaccine (Pfizer/BioNTech). During the phase-in period from February to March, attention was focused on post-vaccination anaphylaxis and anaphylactoid symptoms from the viewpoint of ensuring the safety of the vaccination program. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this report was to provide an update on the status of anaphylaxis and anaphylactoid symptoms occurring after vaccination for COVID-19, as reported under the Adverse Event Following Immunization (AEFI) reporting system in Japan. METHODS: The Pharmaceutical and Medical Devices Agency (PMDA) received AEFI reports from health professionals and manufacturers under the reporting system for AEFI after vaccination for COVID-19, which has been in operation since mid-February 2021. Reported AEFIs of anaphylaxis and anaphylactoid symptoms were assessed using the Brighton Collaboration Criteria to assess diagnostic certainty. RESULTS: 1-month since Japan started the vaccination program for COVID-19 in February 2021, 578,835 doses have been administered to health professionals, with the PMDA receiving 181 suspected event reports of anaphylaxis and anaphylactoid symptoms. In 171 of these 181 cases, women developed these symptoms. Among 181 cases evaluated according to the Brighton Collaboration Criteria, 47 cases (26%) were classified as level 1-3 (reporting rate: 8.1/100,000 doses). CONCLUSION: The results appear similar to reported AEFIs in foreign studies of coronavirus vaccine administration to health professionals, although the reporting rate was higher. Further work is needed to examine the causal relationship of anaphylaxis reactions to coronavirus vaccine administration. Issues of multiple reporting and possible sex/age bias also remain to be analyzed.


Subject(s)
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems , Anaphylaxis/chemically induced , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19/prevention & control , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Anaphylaxis/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Acta Med Port ; 34(7-8): 541-547, 2021 Jun 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1315067

ABSTRACT

The first reports of hypersensitivity reactions following the rollout of COVID-19 vaccination programs have raised public concern. Given the recent availability and novel mechanisms of COVID-19 vaccines, there is limited data on possible hypersensitivity reactions. Although it seems rare, the incidence of anaphylaxis for approved COVID-19 vaccines has been suggested as being higher when compared to previous vaccines. Adequate risk assessment, recognition, classification, and management of hypersensitivity reactions is crucial to ensure safe immunization and avoid misinformation and vaccine hesitancy. In this review, we present an overview of the types of hypersensitivity reactions that can potentially occur due to vaccination and the possible allergenic components of COVID-19 vaccines, as well as a suggestion for causality and risk assessment for the BNT162b2, mRNA-1273 and AZD1222 vaccines.


Após o início dos programas de vacinação contra a COVID-19, os primeiros relatos de reações de hipersensibilidade suscitaram alguma preocupação. Dada a recente disponibilidade e os novos mecanismos das vacinas contra a COVID-19, existem poucos dados relativos a possíveis reações de hipersensibilidade. A incidência de anafilaxia às vacinas COVID-19 parece ser mais elevada comparativamente a vacinas anteriores, embora seja igualmente rara. Uma avaliação adequada dos riscos, reconhecimento, classificação e correta abordagem das reações de hipersensibilidade é crucial para garantir uma imunização segura e evitar desinformação e hesitação na vacinação. Nesta revisão, apresentamos uma visão geral das potenciais reações de hipersensibilidade que podem ocorrer após a vacinação com as vacinas BNT162b2, mRNA-1273 e AZD1222, os seus possíveis constituintes alergénicos, bem como uma sugestão de avaliação do risco em doentes alérgicos e causalidade.


Subject(s)
Anaphylaxis , COVID-19 , Vaccines , Anaphylaxis/chemically induced , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccines/adverse effects
19.
Vaccine ; 39(32): 4407-4409, 2021 07 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1284600

ABSTRACT

Two mRNA vaccines for COVID-19, Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna, are approved for emergency use in the United States. After their approval and dosing in millions of recipients, reports of anaphylaxis began to appear in the Vaccine Adverse Reporting System (VAERS). Here we provide an analysis of the relationship between prior history of allergy and/or anaphylaxis and anaphylaxis rates following the administration of mRNA COVID-19 vaccines. Overall reported incidence of anaphylaxis was estimated to be rare at 4.2 cases per million doses. It appeared that the relative incidence of anaphylaxis following administration of these COVID-19 vaccines was two and seven times higher for recipients with a prior history of allergies and/or anaphylaxis, respectively. This report provides valuable metrics to make evidence-based decisions for subjects with pre-existing allergic conditions receiving a COVID-19 mRNA vaccine.


Subject(s)
Anaphylaxis , COVID-19 , Vaccines , Anaphylaxis/chemically induced , Anaphylaxis/epidemiology , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , RNA, Messenger/genetics , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology , Vaccines/adverse effects
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