Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 212
Filter
2.
Anesth Analg ; 134(1): 216-224, 2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1822236

ABSTRACT

At the outbreak of World War II (WWII), anesthesiology was struggling to establish itself as a medical specialty. The battlefield abruptly exposed this young specialty to the formidable challenge of mass casualties, with an urgent need to provide proper fluid resuscitation, airway management, mechanical ventilation, and analgesia to thousands. But while Europe was suffering under the Nazi boot, anesthesia was preparing to rise to the challenge posed by the impending war. While war brings death and destruction, it also opens the way to medical advances. The aim of this study is to measure the evolution of anesthesia owing to WWII. We conducted a retrospective observational bibliometric study involving a quantitative and statistical analysis of publications. The following 7 journals were selected to cover European and North American anesthesia-related publications: Anesthesia & Analgesia, the British Journal of Anaesthesia, Anesthesiology, Schmerz-Narkose-Anaesthesie, Surgery, La Presse Médicale, and The Military Surgeon (later Military Medicine). Attention was focused on journal volumes published between 1920 and 1965. After reviewing the literature, we selected 12 keywords representing important advances in anesthesiology since 1920: "anesthesia," "balanced anesthesia," "barbiturates," "d-tubocurarine," "endotracheal intubation," "ether," "lidocaine," "morphine," "spinal anesthesia," "thiopental," "transfusion," and "trichloroethylene." Titles of original articles from all selected journals editions between 1920 and 1965 were screened for the occurrence of 1 of the 12 keywords. A total of 26,132 original article titles were screened for the occurrence of the keywords. A total of 1815 keywords were found. Whereas Anesthesia & Analgesia had the highest keyword occurrence (493 citations), Schmerz-Narkose-Anaesthesie had the lowest (38 citations). The number of publications of the 12 keywords was significantly higher in the postwar than in the prewar period (65% and 35%, respectively; P < .001). Not surprisingly, the anesthesiology journals have a higher occurrence of keywords than those journals covering other specialties. The overall occurrence of keywords also showed peaks during other major conflicts, namely the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939), the Korean War (1950-1953), and the Vietnam War (1955-1975). For the first time, this study demonstrates statistically the impact of WWII on the progress of anesthesiology. It also offers an objective record of the chronology of the major advances in anesthesiology before and after the conflict. While the war arguably helped to enhance anesthesiology as a specialty, in return anesthesiology helped to heal the wounds of war.


Subject(s)
Anesthesiology/history , Military Medicine/history , Anesthesia/history , Bibliometrics , Europe , History, 20th Century , Humans , Military Personnel , World War II
4.
5.
Anesth Prog ; 69(1): 59-60, 2022 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775598
6.
Br J Anaesth ; 128(6): 903-908, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1748196

ABSTRACT

Clinical practice guidelines are increasingly important to guide clinical care. However, they can vary widely in quality, and many recommendations are based on low-level evidence. The COVID-19 pandemic highlighted the need for new flexible formats for rigorously developed guidelines. Future guideline development should be standardised, graded, registered, and updated to ensure that they are 'living' works in progress.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia , COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control
8.
BMC Anesthesiol ; 22(1): 46, 2022 02 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1690973

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There are limited data to detail the perioperative anesthetic management and the incidence of postoperative respiratory complications among patients requiring an anesthetic procedure while being SARS-CoV-2 positive or suspected. METHODS: An observational multicenter cohort study was performed including consecutive patients who were SARS-CoV-2 confirmed or suspected and who underwent scheduled and emergency anesthesia between March 17 and May 26, 2020. RESULTS: A total of 187 patients underwent anesthesia with SARS-CoV-2 confirmed or suspected, with ultimately 135 (72.2%) patients positive and 52 (27.8%) negative. The median SOFA score was 2 [0; 5], and the median ARISCAT score was 49 [36; 67]. The major respiratory complications rate was 48.7% (n = 91) with 40.4% (n = 21) and 51.9% (n = 70) in the SARS-CoV-2-negative and -positive groups, respectively (p = 0.21). Among both positive and negative groups, patients with a high ARISCAT risk score (> 44) had a higher risk of presenting major respiratory complications (p < 0.01 and p = 0.1, respectively). DISCUSSION: When comparing SARS-COV-2-positive and -negative patients, no significant difference was found regarding the rate of postoperative complications, while baseline characteristics strongly impact these outcomes. This finding suggests that patients should be scheduled for anesthetic procedures based on their overall risk of postoperative complication, and not just based on their SARS-CoV-2 status.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia , COVID-19/complications , Aged , Anesthesia/adverse effects , Cohort Studies , Elective Surgical Procedures , Emergency Medical Services , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Perioperative Care , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Registries , Respiratory Tract Diseases/complications , Respiratory Tract Diseases/epidemiology , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Treatment Outcome
9.
Paediatr Anaesth ; 32(4): 579, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1685401
10.
Anesth Analg ; 134(2): 348-356, 2022 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1635164

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has affected the personal and professional lives of all health care workers. Anesthesiologists frequently perform virus-aerosolizing procedures (eg, intubation and extubation) that place them at increased risk of infection. We sought to determine how the initial COVID-19 outbreak affected members of the Society for Pediatric Anesthesia (SPA) on both personal and professional levels. Specifically, we examined the potential effects of gender and age on personal stress, burnout, sleep deprivation, anxiety, depression, assessed job satisfaction, and explored financial impact. METHODS: After receiving approval from the SPA Committees for Research and Quality and Safety and the Colorado Multiple Institutional Review Board, we e-mailed a questionnaire to all 3245 SPA members. The survey included 22 questions related to well-being and 13 questions related to effects of COVID-19 on current and future practice, finances, retirement planning, academic time and productivity, and clinical and home responsibilities. To address low initial response rates and quantify nonresponse bias, we sent a shortened follow-up survey to a randomly selected subsample (n = 100) of SPA members who did not respond to the initial survey. Response differences between the 2 cohorts were determined. RESULTS: A total of 561 (17%) members responded to the initial questionnaire. Because of COVID-19, 21.7% of respondents said they would change their clinical responsibilities, and 10.6% would decrease their professional working time. Women were more likely than men to anticipate a future COVID-19-related job change (odds ratio [OR] = 1.92, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.12-2.63; P = .011), perhaps because of increased home responsibilities (OR = 2.63, 95% CI, 1.74-4.00; P < .001). Additionally, 14.2% of respondents planned to retire early, and 11.9% planned to retire later. Women and non-White respondents had higher likelihoods of burnout on univariate analysis (OR = 1.75, 95% CI, 1.06-2.94, P = .026 and OR = 1.82, 95% CI, 1.08-3.04, P = .017, respectively), and 25.1% of all respondents felt socially isolated. In addition, both changes in retirement planning and future occupational planning were strongly associated with total job satisfaction scores (both P < .001). CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic has affected the personal and professional lives of pediatric anesthesiologists, albeit not equally, as women and non-Whites have been disproportionately impacted. The pandemic has significantly affected personal finances, home responsibilities, and retirement planning; reduced clinical and academic practice time and responsibilities; and increased feelings of social isolation, stress, burnout, and depression/anxiety.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia/psychology , Anesthesiologists/psychology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Pediatrics , Surveys and Questionnaires , Adult , Anesthesia/trends , Anesthesiologists/trends , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Male , Middle Aged , Occupational Exposure/adverse effects , Occupational Exposure/prevention & control , Pediatrics/trends , Retirement/trends , Societies, Medical/trends
11.
Paediatr Anaesth ; 32(2): 385-390, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1629429

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is mainly considered an "adult pandemic," but it also has strong implications for children and consequently for pediatric anesthesia. Despite the lethality of SARS-CoV-2 infection being directly correlated with age, children have equally experienced the negative impacts of this pandemic. In fact, the spectrum of COVID-19 symptoms among children ranges from very mild to those resembling adults, but may also present as a multisystemic inflammatory syndrome. Moreover, the vast majority of children might be affected by asymptomatic or pauci-symptomatic infection making them the "perfect" carriers for spreading the disease in the community. Beyond the clinical manifestations of SARS-CoV-2 infection, the COVID-19 pandemic may ultimately have catastrophic health and socioeconomic consequences for children and adolescents, which are yet to be defined. The aim of this narrative review is to highlight how COVID-19 pandemic has affected and changed the pediatric anesthesia practice and which lessons are to be learned in case of a future "pandemic." In particular, the rapid evolution and dissemination of research and clinical findings have forced the scientific community to adapt and alter clinical practice on an unseen and pragmatic manner. Equally, implementation of new platforms, techniques, and devices together with artificial intelligence and large-scale collaborative efforts may present a giant step for mankind. The valuable lessons of this pandemic will ultimately translate into new treatments modalities for various diseases but will also have the potential for safety improvement and better quality of care. However, this pandemic has revealed the vulnerability and deficiencies of our health-care system. If not addressed properly, we may end up with a tsunami of burnout and compassionate fatigue among health-care professionals. Pediatric anesthesia and critical care staff are no exceptions.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia , COVID-19 , Adolescent , Adult , Artificial Intelligence , Child , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Anesth Prog ; 68(4): 245-247, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575523
13.
Iatreia ; 34(4): 375-382, oct.-dic. 2021. tab, graf
Article in Spanish | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1573008

ABSTRACT

RESUMEN Introducción: el SARS-CoV-2 es un nuevo coronavirus descrito por primera vez en China y con alta capacidad de propagación. Su presentación clínica más frecuente son los síntomas respiratorios, aunque se han descrito otros como los gastrointestinales. La transmisión ocurre por gotas, aerosoles, vía fecal oral, conjuntiva, fómites y por contacto directo con fluidos corporales del paciente. En este sentido, los procedimientos realizados en las salas de endoscopia deben considerarse de alto riesgo. Objetivo: describir y analizar las medidas de prevención frente al SARS-CoV-2 para la práctica endoscópica-anestésica u otros procedimientos que requieran sedación, con el fin de disminuir la exposición y así minimizar el contagio del personal de salud. Resultados: la respuesta global se ha enfocado en la utilización de elementos de protección personal para tratar de disminuir el riesgo al que se encuentra expuesto el personal de salud. Sin embargo, debido a la prontitud de la emergencia, no se han podido generar evidencias de alta calidad que permitan dar recomendaciones definitivas. Reflexión: el personal de salud debe tomar todas las medidas de protección que puedan ser consideradas como efectivas, además deconstruir protocolos y fomentar la adherencia a los mismos.


SUMMARY Introduction: SARS-CoV-2 is a new coronavirus described for the first time in China, with high capacity of propagation. Its most frequent clinical presentation is respiratory symptoms; however, others have been described as gastrointestinal. Transmission occurs by droplets, aerosols, oral fecal route, conjunctiva, fomites and by direct contact with body fluids of the patient. In this sense, the procedures performed in endoscopy rooms should be considered high risk. Objective: To describe and analyze preventive measures against SARS-CoV-2 for endoscopic-anesthesia practice or other procedures that require sedation, in order to reduce exposure and thus minimize contagion of health personnel. Results: The global response has focused on the use of personal protective equipment to try to reduce the risk to which health care personnel are exposed, but due to the urgency of the emergency, it has not been possible to generate high quality evidence to give definitive recommendations. Reflection: Health personnel should take all protective measures that can be considered effective, and also deconstruct protocols and encourage adherence to them.


Subject(s)
Humans , Coronavirus , Personal Protection , Endoscopy , Conscious Sedation , Anesthesia
14.
BMC Med Educ ; 21(1): 609, 2021 Dec 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1566521

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: COVID-19 prevention and control demand a reduction in crowd gathering, which has a significant impact on traditional teaching and offline case-based learning (CBL). In order to mitigate the impact of the COVID-19 outbreak on clinical teaching, we aimed to compare the effects of an online CBL with traditional teaching model on learning outcomes of anesthesia residents. METHODS: Residents rotated in the Department of Anesthesiology in Beijing Tsinghua Changgung Hospital from January 2020 to February 2021 were included in Group W (n = 19), which implemented the W-CBL teaching model. The performance of residents was evaluated with theory test and 2 survey questionnaires (A and B) were conducted after 1 month of rotating. All 20 residents rotating in the Department of Anesthesiology at our hospital from January 2018 to December 2019 were included in Group C, which implemented the traditional teaching model. Their examination results were acquired through the teaching files and survey questionnaire (A) were administered through WeChat. RESULTS: During the 1-month rotation, a total of 10 cases were discussed in Group W. The average score for theory test was higher in Group W than that in Group C (84.57 ± 4.87 vs. 79.35 ± 3.70, P = 0.001). The satisfaction rate was also in favor of Group W regarding to clinical thinking, communication skills, learning interest and self-learning ability (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Online CBL based on WeChat platform is an effective and acceptable teaching strategy in comparison to lecture-based learning (LBL) among residents embarking on clinical anesthesia courses.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia , Anesthesiology , COVID-19 , Anesthesiology/education , Humans , Learning , SARS-CoV-2 , Teaching
15.
Paediatr Anaesth ; 32(1): 91-92, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1566315
16.
Cancer Treat Res Commun ; 29: 100491, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1536506

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The growing interest on how peri-­operative interventions, especially regional anesthesia, during cancer surgery can alter oncological outcome increasing disease free survival is probably responsible for the birth of the new subspecialty called onco-anesthesia. A paradigm shift in the concept of anesthetic management has occurred recently owing to the innumerable diverse revelations from the ongoing research in this field. DISCUSSION: Long lasting but reversible epigenetic changes can occur due to surgical stress and perioperative anesthetic medications. The exact relationship between these factors and tumor biology is being studied further. A popular topic under research now is the influence of regional anesthesia on cancer recurrence. Combining nerve blocks with total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) brings down the requirement of opioids and volatile anesthetic agents implicated in cancer recurrence. The study of mechanism of pain at the molecular level has led to the discovery of novel modes of prevention of chronic post-surgical pain. Newer combination aggressive treatment therapies -intraoperative chemotherapy and radiotherapy, isolated limb perfusion, photodynamic therapy and robotic surgery require specialized anesthetic management. The COVID pandemic introduced new guidelines for safe management of oncosurgical patients .Use of genomic mapping to personalize pain management will be the breakthrough of the decade. CONCLUSION: The discovery that anesthetic strategy could have significant oncological sequel is a quantum leap forward. Avoiding some anesthetic medications may decrease cancer recurrence. Comprehensive cancer care and translational research will pave the way to uncover safe anesthetic practices.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia/methods , Cancer Pain/therapy , Female , Humans , Male
17.
Anasthesiol Intensivmed Notfallmed Schmerzther ; 56(11-12): 782-790, 2021 Dec.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1532178

ABSTRACT

On March 14, 2020, the first Bavaria-wide exit restriction was imposed and university teaching in its familiar form was drastically restricted. For intensive care physicians and anesthetists, there was a special area of tension in many places due to the extraordinary demand for the treatment of critically ill patients and the restructuring and maintenance of teaching. We report on the realignment of the anesthesia seminar in an online flipped classroom and the development towards a hybrid model. As such, an adequate transfer of knowledge could take place under difficult conditions and at the same time the teaching concept could be further developed.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia , Anesthesiology , COVID-19 , Physicians , Anesthesiology/education , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Teaching
18.
Br J Anaesth ; 128(1): 1-3, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525704

ABSTRACT

The British Journal of Anaesthesia (BJA) had an eventful 2021, following what was a cataclysmic 2020 for the whole world. Despite the tragic challenges of multiple waves of the COVID-19 pandemic and the unparalleled burdens this created for everyone working in anaesthesia and critical care, the BJA underwent a major transformation during 2021. The BJA strongly supported research and education relevant to the pandemic, and to the broader missions of anaesthesia, critical, and pain medicine. Innovations to the BJA in 2021 included a special section on COVID-19 and the Anaesthetist; a new open access journal in the BJA stable; creation of a new social media editor position; new webinar and author interview series; transition to a new manuscript management system; and a move away from paper to electronic publication.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia , COVID-19 , Periodicals as Topic/trends , Anesthesiology , Humans , Publishing/trends , Social Media , United Kingdom
20.
J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth ; 36(4): 940-951, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526115

ABSTRACT

This special article is the fourteenth in an annual series for the Journal of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Anesthesia. The authors thank the Editor-in-Chief, Dr. Kaplan, and the editorial board for the opportunity to continue this series; namely, the research highlights of the past year in the specialty of cardiothoracic and vascular anesthesiology. The major themes selected for 2021 are outlined in this introduction, and each highlight is reviewed in detail in the main body of the article. The literature highlights in the specialty for 2021 begin with an update on structural heart disease, with a focus on updates in arrhythmia and aortic valve disorders. The second major theme is an update on coronary artery disease, with discussion of both medical and procedural management. The third major theme is focused on the perioperative management of patients with COVID-19, with the authors highlighting literature discussing the impact of the disease on the right ventricle and thromboembolic events. The fourth and final theme is an update in heart failure, with discussion of diverse aspects of this area. The themes selected for this fourteenth special article are only a few of the diverse advances in the specialty during 2021. These highlights will inform the reader of key updates on a variety of topics, leading to improvement of perioperative outcomes for patients with cardiothoracic and vascular disease.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia , Anesthesiology , COVID-19 , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL