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1.
J Neurointerv Surg ; 13(12): 1088-1094, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526521

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The optimal anesthesia management for patients with stroke undergoing mechanical thrombectomy (MT) during the COVID-19 pandemic has become a matter of controversy. Some recent guidelines have favored general anesthesia (GA) in patients perceived as high risk for intraprocedural conversion from sedation to GA, including those with dominant hemispheric occlusions/aphasia or baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score >15. We aim to identify the rate and predictors of conversion to GA during MT in a high-volume center where monitored anesthesia care (MAC) is the default modality. METHODS: A retrospective review of a prospectively maintained MT database from January 2013 to July 2020 was undertaken. Analyses were conducted to identify the predictors of intraprocedural conversion to GA. In addition, we analyzed the GA conversion rates in subgroups of interest. RESULTS: Among 1919 MT patients, 1681 (87.6%) started treatment under MAC (median age 65 years (IQR 55-76); baseline NIHSS 16 (IQR 11-21); 48.4% women). Of the 1677 eligible patients, 26 (1.6%) converted to GA including 1.4% (22/1615) with anterior and 6.5% (4/62) with posterior circulation strokes. The only predictor of GA conversion was posterior circulation stroke (OR 4.99, 95% CI 1.67 to 14.96, P=0.004). The conversion rates were numerically higher in right than in left hemispheric occlusions (1.6% vs 1.2%; OR 1.37, 95% CI 0.59 to 3.19, P=0.47) and in milder than in more severe strokes (NIHSS ≤15 vs >15: 2% vs 1.2%; OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.28 to 1.36, P=0.23). CONCLUSIONS: Our study showed that the overall rate of conversion from MAC to GA during MT was low (1.6%) and, while higher in posterior circulation strokes, it was not predicted by either hemispheric dominance or stroke severity. Caution should be given before changing clinical practice during moments of crisis.


Subject(s)
Brain Ischemia , COVID-19 , Stroke , Aged , Anesthesia, General/adverse effects , Brain Ischemia/surgery , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/surgery , Thrombectomy , Treatment Outcome , United States
2.
J Int Med Res ; 49(9): 3000605211043245, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1486544

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Pulmonary complication is common in older patients after surgery. We analyzed risk factors of lower respiratory tract infection after general anesthesia among older patients. METHODS: In this retrospective investigation, we included older patients who underwent surgery with general anesthesia. Logistic regression analyses were performed to determine risk factors of lower respiratory tract infection. RESULTS: A total 418 postoperative patients with general anesthesia were included; the incidence of lower respiratory tract infection was 9.33%. Ten cases were caused by gram-positive bacteria, 26 cases by gram-negative bacteria, and 2 cases by fungus. We found significant differences in age, smoking, diabetes, oral/nasal tracheal intubation, and surgery duration. Logistic regression analysis indicated that age ≥70 years (odds ratio [OR] 2.028, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.115-3.646), smoking (OR 2.314, 95% CI 1.073-4.229), diabetes (OR 2.185, 95% CI 1.166-4.435), nasotracheal intubation (OR 3.528, 95% CI 1.104-5.074), and duration of surgery ≥180 minutes (OR 1.334, 95% CI 1.015-1.923) were independent risk factors of lower respiratory tract infections. CONCLUSIONS: Older patients undergoing general anesthesia after tracheal intubation have a high risk of lower respiratory tract infections. Clinical interventions should be provided to prevent pulmonary infections in patients with relevant risk factors.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia, General , Respiratory Tract Infections , Aged , Anesthesia, General/adverse effects , Humans , Intubation, Intratracheal , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Postoperative Complications/etiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/etiology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors
3.
Ann Emerg Med ; 77(5): 532-544, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1038930

ABSTRACT

STUDY OBJECTIVE: Awareness with paralysis is a devastating complication for patients receiving mechanical ventilation and risks long-term psychological morbidity. Data from the emergency department (ED) demonstrate a high rate of longer-acting neuromuscular blocking agent use, delayed analgosedation, and a lack of sedation depth monitoring. These practices are discordant with recommendations for preventing awareness with paralysis. Despite this, awareness with paralysis has not been rigorously studied in the ED population. Our objective is to assess the prevalence of awareness with paralysis in ED patients receiving mechanical ventilation. METHODS: This was a single-center, prospective, observational cohort study on 383 mechanically ventilated ED patients. After extubation, we assessed patients for awareness with paralysis by using the modified Brice questionnaire. Three expert reviewers independently adjudicated awareness with paralysis. We report the prevalence of awareness with paralysis (primary outcome); the secondary outcome was perceived threat, a mediator for development of posttraumatic stress disorder. RESULTS: The prevalence of awareness with paralysis was 2.6% (10/383). Exposure to rocuronium at any point in the ED was significantly different between patients who experienced awareness with paralysis (70%) versus the rest of the cohort (31.4%) (unadjusted odds ratio 5.1; 95% confidence interval 1.30 to 20.1). Patients experiencing awareness with paralysis had higher mean values on the threat perception scale, denoting a higher degree of perceived threat, compared with patients who did not experience awareness with paralysis (13.4 [SD 7.7] versus 8.5 [SD 6.2]; mean difference 4.9; 95% confidence interval 0.94 to 8.8). CONCLUSION: Awareness with paralysis occurs in a significant minority of ED patients who receive mechanical ventilation. Potential associations of awareness with paralysis with ED care and increased perceived threat warrant further evaluation.


Subject(s)
Awareness , Paralysis/psychology , Respiration, Artificial/psychology , Adult , Aged , Anesthesia, General/adverse effects , Anesthesia, General/psychology , Case-Control Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Respiration, Artificial/adverse effects , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
J Neurointerv Surg ; 13(12): 1088-1094, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1043454

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The optimal anesthesia management for patients with stroke undergoing mechanical thrombectomy (MT) during the COVID-19 pandemic has become a matter of controversy. Some recent guidelines have favored general anesthesia (GA) in patients perceived as high risk for intraprocedural conversion from sedation to GA, including those with dominant hemispheric occlusions/aphasia or baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score >15. We aim to identify the rate and predictors of conversion to GA during MT in a high-volume center where monitored anesthesia care (MAC) is the default modality. METHODS: A retrospective review of a prospectively maintained MT database from January 2013 to July 2020 was undertaken. Analyses were conducted to identify the predictors of intraprocedural conversion to GA. In addition, we analyzed the GA conversion rates in subgroups of interest. RESULTS: Among 1919 MT patients, 1681 (87.6%) started treatment under MAC (median age 65 years (IQR 55-76); baseline NIHSS 16 (IQR 11-21); 48.4% women). Of the 1677 eligible patients, 26 (1.6%) converted to GA including 1.4% (22/1615) with anterior and 6.5% (4/62) with posterior circulation strokes. The only predictor of GA conversion was posterior circulation stroke (OR 4.99, 95% CI 1.67 to 14.96, P=0.004). The conversion rates were numerically higher in right than in left hemispheric occlusions (1.6% vs 1.2%; OR 1.37, 95% CI 0.59 to 3.19, P=0.47) and in milder than in more severe strokes (NIHSS ≤15 vs >15: 2% vs 1.2%; OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.28 to 1.36, P=0.23). CONCLUSIONS: Our study showed that the overall rate of conversion from MAC to GA during MT was low (1.6%) and, while higher in posterior circulation strokes, it was not predicted by either hemispheric dominance or stroke severity. Caution should be given before changing clinical practice during moments of crisis.


Subject(s)
Brain Ischemia , COVID-19 , Stroke , Aged , Anesthesia, General/adverse effects , Brain Ischemia/surgery , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/surgery , Thrombectomy , Treatment Outcome , United States
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