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2.
Anesth Analg ; 134(2): 348-356, 2022 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1635164

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has affected the personal and professional lives of all health care workers. Anesthesiologists frequently perform virus-aerosolizing procedures (eg, intubation and extubation) that place them at increased risk of infection. We sought to determine how the initial COVID-19 outbreak affected members of the Society for Pediatric Anesthesia (SPA) on both personal and professional levels. Specifically, we examined the potential effects of gender and age on personal stress, burnout, sleep deprivation, anxiety, depression, assessed job satisfaction, and explored financial impact. METHODS: After receiving approval from the SPA Committees for Research and Quality and Safety and the Colorado Multiple Institutional Review Board, we e-mailed a questionnaire to all 3245 SPA members. The survey included 22 questions related to well-being and 13 questions related to effects of COVID-19 on current and future practice, finances, retirement planning, academic time and productivity, and clinical and home responsibilities. To address low initial response rates and quantify nonresponse bias, we sent a shortened follow-up survey to a randomly selected subsample (n = 100) of SPA members who did not respond to the initial survey. Response differences between the 2 cohorts were determined. RESULTS: A total of 561 (17%) members responded to the initial questionnaire. Because of COVID-19, 21.7% of respondents said they would change their clinical responsibilities, and 10.6% would decrease their professional working time. Women were more likely than men to anticipate a future COVID-19-related job change (odds ratio [OR] = 1.92, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.12-2.63; P = .011), perhaps because of increased home responsibilities (OR = 2.63, 95% CI, 1.74-4.00; P < .001). Additionally, 14.2% of respondents planned to retire early, and 11.9% planned to retire later. Women and non-White respondents had higher likelihoods of burnout on univariate analysis (OR = 1.75, 95% CI, 1.06-2.94, P = .026 and OR = 1.82, 95% CI, 1.08-3.04, P = .017, respectively), and 25.1% of all respondents felt socially isolated. In addition, both changes in retirement planning and future occupational planning were strongly associated with total job satisfaction scores (both P < .001). CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic has affected the personal and professional lives of pediatric anesthesiologists, albeit not equally, as women and non-Whites have been disproportionately impacted. The pandemic has significantly affected personal finances, home responsibilities, and retirement planning; reduced clinical and academic practice time and responsibilities; and increased feelings of social isolation, stress, burnout, and depression/anxiety.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia/psychology , Anesthesiologists/psychology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Pediatrics , Surveys and Questionnaires , Adult , Anesthesia/trends , Anesthesiologists/trends , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Male , Middle Aged , Occupational Exposure/adverse effects , Occupational Exposure/prevention & control , Pediatrics/trends , Retirement/trends , Societies, Medical/trends
5.
Anesth Analg ; 134(2): 348-356, 2022 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1029346

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has affected the personal and professional lives of all health care workers. Anesthesiologists frequently perform virus-aerosolizing procedures (eg, intubation and extubation) that place them at increased risk of infection. We sought to determine how the initial COVID-19 outbreak affected members of the Society for Pediatric Anesthesia (SPA) on both personal and professional levels. Specifically, we examined the potential effects of gender and age on personal stress, burnout, sleep deprivation, anxiety, depression, assessed job satisfaction, and explored financial impact. METHODS: After receiving approval from the SPA Committees for Research and Quality and Safety and the Colorado Multiple Institutional Review Board, we e-mailed a questionnaire to all 3245 SPA members. The survey included 22 questions related to well-being and 13 questions related to effects of COVID-19 on current and future practice, finances, retirement planning, academic time and productivity, and clinical and home responsibilities. To address low initial response rates and quantify nonresponse bias, we sent a shortened follow-up survey to a randomly selected subsample (n = 100) of SPA members who did not respond to the initial survey. Response differences between the 2 cohorts were determined. RESULTS: A total of 561 (17%) members responded to the initial questionnaire. Because of COVID-19, 21.7% of respondents said they would change their clinical responsibilities, and 10.6% would decrease their professional working time. Women were more likely than men to anticipate a future COVID-19-related job change (odds ratio [OR] = 1.92, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.12-2.63; P = .011), perhaps because of increased home responsibilities (OR = 2.63, 95% CI, 1.74-4.00; P < .001). Additionally, 14.2% of respondents planned to retire early, and 11.9% planned to retire later. Women and non-White respondents had higher likelihoods of burnout on univariate analysis (OR = 1.75, 95% CI, 1.06-2.94, P = .026 and OR = 1.82, 95% CI, 1.08-3.04, P = .017, respectively), and 25.1% of all respondents felt socially isolated. In addition, both changes in retirement planning and future occupational planning were strongly associated with total job satisfaction scores (both P < .001). CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic has affected the personal and professional lives of pediatric anesthesiologists, albeit not equally, as women and non-Whites have been disproportionately impacted. The pandemic has significantly affected personal finances, home responsibilities, and retirement planning; reduced clinical and academic practice time and responsibilities; and increased feelings of social isolation, stress, burnout, and depression/anxiety.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia/psychology , Anesthesiologists/psychology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Pediatrics , Surveys and Questionnaires , Adult , Anesthesia/trends , Anesthesiologists/trends , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Male , Middle Aged , Occupational Exposure/adverse effects , Occupational Exposure/prevention & control , Pediatrics/trends , Retirement/trends , Societies, Medical/trends
6.
Best Pract Res Clin Anaesthesiol ; 35(3): 415-424, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-938789

ABSTRACT

The growth of office-based surgery (OBS) has been due to ease of scheduling and convenience for patients; office-based anesthesia safety continues to be well supported in the literature. In 2020, the Coronavirus Disease 19 (COVID-19) has resulted in dramatic shifts in healthcare, especially in the office-based setting. The goal of closing the economy was to flatten the curve, impacting office-based and ambulatory practices. Reopening of the economy and the return to ambulatory surgery and OBS and procedures have created a challenge due to COVID-19 and the infectious disease precautions that must be taken. Patients may be more apt to return to the outpatient setting to avoid the hospital, especially with the resurgence of COVID-19 cases locally, nationally, and worldwide. This review provides algorithms for screening and testing patients, selecting patients for procedures, choosing appropriate procedures, and selecting suitable personal protective equipment in this unprecedented period.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Surgical Procedures/standards , Anesthesia/standards , COVID-19/prevention & control , Patient Care/standards , Personal Protective Equipment/standards , Practice Guidelines as Topic/standards , Ambulatory Surgical Procedures/trends , Anesthesia/trends , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Patient Care/trends , Personal Protective Equipment/trends
7.
J Neurosurg Anesthesiol ; 33(1): 73-76, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-796379

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by a novel coronavirus, is highly contagious. Global medical systems have been heavily impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. Although the majority of patients with intracranial disease require time-sensitive surgery, how to conduct neurosurgery and prevent and control nosocomial infection during a pandemic is challenging. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the clinical data of patients undergoing neurosurgical and neurointerventional procedures at Beijing Tiantan Hospital, China during the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic between January 21 and July 31, 2020. A 3-level system of COVID-19 risk was established based on medical conditions, epidemiologic, and symptom inquiry and the results of triage. A transitional unit was established for patients in whom COVID-19 had not been ruled out on admission to hospital. RESULTS: A total of 4025 patients underwent neurosurgery during the study period, including 768 emergent and 3257 nonemergent procedures. Of these patients, 3722 were low-risk for COVID-19, 303 were moderate-risk, and none were high-risk. In addition, 1419 patients underwent neurointerventional procedures, including 114 emergent and 1305 nonemergent interventions, of which 1339 were low-risk patients, 80 were moderate-risk and none were high-risk. A total of 895 patients (neurosurgical and neurointerventional) were admitted to the transitional unit. Forty-five patients were diagnosed with COVID-19 and transferred to the COVID-19 designated hospital. There were no cases of COVID-19 nosocomial infections among surgical patients or health care workers. CONCLUSION: On the basis of our single-center experience, developing a full screening protocol for COVID-19, establishing a risk level, and using a transitional unit for those with unknown COVID-19 status are effective measures to provide a safe environment for patients and health care workers.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia/trends , COVID-19 , Neurosurgery/trends , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Cross Infection/epidemiology , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Operating Rooms/organization & administration , Patient Admission , Personal Protective Equipment , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Triage
9.
Urolithiasis ; 48(4): 345-351, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-324442

ABSTRACT

Stone disease is a unique condition that requires appropriate management in a timely manner as it can result in both emergent conditions and long term effects on kidney functions. In this study it is aimed to identify the up-to-date practice patterns related to preoperative evaluation and anesthesia for stone disease interventions during COVID-19 pandemic. The data of 473 patients from 11 centers in 5 different countries underwent interventions for urinary stones during the Covid-19 pandemic was collected and analyzed retrospectively. Information on the type of the stone related conditions, management strategies, anesthesiologic evaluation, anesthesia methods, and any alterations related to COVID-19 pandemic was collected. During the preoperative anesthesia evaluation thorax CT was performed in 268 (56.7%) and PCR from nasopharyngeal swab was performed in 31 (6.6%) patients. General anesthesia was applied in 337 (71.2%) patients and alteration in the method of anesthesia was recorded in 45 (9.5%) patients. A cut-off value of 21 days was detected for the hospitals to adapt changes related to COVID-19. Rate of preoperative testing, emergency procedures, conservative approaches and topical/regional anesthesia increased after 21 days. The preoperative evaluation for management of urinary stone disease is significantly affected by COVID-19 pandemic. There is significant alteration in anesthesia methods and interventions. The optimal methods for preoperative evaluation are still unknown and there is discordance between different centers. It takes 21 days for hospitals and surgeons to adapt and develop new strategies for preoperative evaluation and management of stones.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia/trends , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Preoperative Care/trends , Urinary Calculi/therapy , Adult , Aged , Anesthesia/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nephrolithotomy, Percutaneous/statistics & numerical data , Postoperative Complications/virology , Preoperative Care/statistics & numerical data
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