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2.
Anesth Analg ; 134(2): 348-356, 2022 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1635164

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has affected the personal and professional lives of all health care workers. Anesthesiologists frequently perform virus-aerosolizing procedures (eg, intubation and extubation) that place them at increased risk of infection. We sought to determine how the initial COVID-19 outbreak affected members of the Society for Pediatric Anesthesia (SPA) on both personal and professional levels. Specifically, we examined the potential effects of gender and age on personal stress, burnout, sleep deprivation, anxiety, depression, assessed job satisfaction, and explored financial impact. METHODS: After receiving approval from the SPA Committees for Research and Quality and Safety and the Colorado Multiple Institutional Review Board, we e-mailed a questionnaire to all 3245 SPA members. The survey included 22 questions related to well-being and 13 questions related to effects of COVID-19 on current and future practice, finances, retirement planning, academic time and productivity, and clinical and home responsibilities. To address low initial response rates and quantify nonresponse bias, we sent a shortened follow-up survey to a randomly selected subsample (n = 100) of SPA members who did not respond to the initial survey. Response differences between the 2 cohorts were determined. RESULTS: A total of 561 (17%) members responded to the initial questionnaire. Because of COVID-19, 21.7% of respondents said they would change their clinical responsibilities, and 10.6% would decrease their professional working time. Women were more likely than men to anticipate a future COVID-19-related job change (odds ratio [OR] = 1.92, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.12-2.63; P = .011), perhaps because of increased home responsibilities (OR = 2.63, 95% CI, 1.74-4.00; P < .001). Additionally, 14.2% of respondents planned to retire early, and 11.9% planned to retire later. Women and non-White respondents had higher likelihoods of burnout on univariate analysis (OR = 1.75, 95% CI, 1.06-2.94, P = .026 and OR = 1.82, 95% CI, 1.08-3.04, P = .017, respectively), and 25.1% of all respondents felt socially isolated. In addition, both changes in retirement planning and future occupational planning were strongly associated with total job satisfaction scores (both P < .001). CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic has affected the personal and professional lives of pediatric anesthesiologists, albeit not equally, as women and non-Whites have been disproportionately impacted. The pandemic has significantly affected personal finances, home responsibilities, and retirement planning; reduced clinical and academic practice time and responsibilities; and increased feelings of social isolation, stress, burnout, and depression/anxiety.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia/psychology , Anesthesiologists/psychology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Pediatrics , Surveys and Questionnaires , Adult , Anesthesia/trends , Anesthesiologists/trends , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Male , Middle Aged , Occupational Exposure/adverse effects , Occupational Exposure/prevention & control , Pediatrics/trends , Retirement/trends , Societies, Medical/trends
4.
Paediatr Anaesth ; 31(6): 720-729, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1123578

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Pediatric anesthesiology has been greatly impacted by COVID-19 in the delivery of care to patients and to the individual providers. With this study, we sought to survey pediatric centers and highlight the variations in care related to perioperative medicine during the COVID-19 pandemic, including the availability of protective equipment, the practice of pediatric anesthesia, and economic impact. AIM: The aim of the survey was to determine how COVID-19 directly impacted pediatric anesthesia practices during the study period. METHODS: A survey concerning four major domains (testing, safety, clinical management/policy, economics) was developed. It was pilot tested for clarity and content by members of the Pediatric Anesthesia COVID-19 Collaborative. The survey was administered by email to all Pediatric Anesthesia COVID-19 Collaborative members on September 1, 2020. Respondents had six weeks to complete the survey and were instructed to answer the questions based on their institution's practice during September 1 - October 13, 2020. RESULTS: Sixty-three institutions (100% response rate) participated in the COVID-19 Pediatric Anesthesia Survey. Forty-one hospitals (65%) were from the United States, and 35% included other countries. N95 masks were available to anesthesia teams at 91% of institutions (n = 57) (95% CI: 80%-96%). COVID-19 testing criteria of anesthesia staff and guidelines to return to work varied by institution. Structured simulation training aimed at improving COVID-19 safety and patient care occurred at 62% of institutions (n = 39). Pediatric anesthesiologists were economically affected by a reduction in their employer benefits and restriction of travel due to employer imposed quarantine regulations. CONCLUSION: Our data indicate that the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted the testing, safety, clinical management, and economics of pediatric anesthesia practice. Further investigation into the long-term consequences for the specialty is indicated.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia , Anesthesiologists/psychology , Anesthesiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Pediatricians/psychology , Pediatrics , Practice Guidelines as Topic , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Testing , Child , Humans , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment , Practice Patterns, Physicians' , SARS-CoV-2 , Societies, Medical , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States
6.
J Clin Anesth ; 70: 110192, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065301

ABSTRACT

STUDY OBJECTIVE: Anesthesiologists have a high prevalence of burnout with adverse effects on professionalism and safety. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of an interactive anesthesiology educational program on the wellness of anesthesia providers and their children, as assessed by a modified Professional Fulfillment Index. DESIGN: Prospective observational study. SETTING: Perioperative area. PATIENTS: Thirty clinicians participated in the program. Twenty respondents, representing 67% of participants and each corresponding to a parent and their child or children, completed the post-event survey. INTERVENTIONS: An interactive anesthesiology educational program incorporating children, between the ages of five and eighteen years old, of anesthesia providers was held in the perioperative area. The program was held over four hours and was comprised of four sessions including pediatric anesthesia, neuroanesthesia, airway, and ultrasound stations. MEASUREMENTS: Anesthesia providers and their children were administered a post-event assessment, including a modified Professional Fulfillment Index and satisfaction survey. MAIN RESULTS: All twenty (100%) of respondents indicated it was "very true" or "completely true" that their child was happy with the program, and that it was worthwhile and satisfying to both the anesthesia provider and their child. Nineteen (95%) of reporting participants indicated it was "very true" or "completely true" that it was meaningful to have the department host such a program and 17 (85%) respondents felt their child now better understands the anesthesia work of the parent. All clinician volunteers indicated it was "very true" or "completely true" that they were contributing professionally during the program in ways that they valued most. CONCLUSION: An interactive educational wellness initiative provides an effective and feasible method for increasing professional fulfillment and satisfaction among anesthesia providers while educating our youngest generation of learners. Implementation of such a program may also occur with modifications such as televideo to maintain COVID-19 precautions.


Subject(s)
Anesthesiologists/psychology , Anesthesiology/education , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Adolescent , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Male , Personal Satisfaction , Prospective Studies
7.
Anesth Analg ; 134(2): 348-356, 2022 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1029346

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has affected the personal and professional lives of all health care workers. Anesthesiologists frequently perform virus-aerosolizing procedures (eg, intubation and extubation) that place them at increased risk of infection. We sought to determine how the initial COVID-19 outbreak affected members of the Society for Pediatric Anesthesia (SPA) on both personal and professional levels. Specifically, we examined the potential effects of gender and age on personal stress, burnout, sleep deprivation, anxiety, depression, assessed job satisfaction, and explored financial impact. METHODS: After receiving approval from the SPA Committees for Research and Quality and Safety and the Colorado Multiple Institutional Review Board, we e-mailed a questionnaire to all 3245 SPA members. The survey included 22 questions related to well-being and 13 questions related to effects of COVID-19 on current and future practice, finances, retirement planning, academic time and productivity, and clinical and home responsibilities. To address low initial response rates and quantify nonresponse bias, we sent a shortened follow-up survey to a randomly selected subsample (n = 100) of SPA members who did not respond to the initial survey. Response differences between the 2 cohorts were determined. RESULTS: A total of 561 (17%) members responded to the initial questionnaire. Because of COVID-19, 21.7% of respondents said they would change their clinical responsibilities, and 10.6% would decrease their professional working time. Women were more likely than men to anticipate a future COVID-19-related job change (odds ratio [OR] = 1.92, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.12-2.63; P = .011), perhaps because of increased home responsibilities (OR = 2.63, 95% CI, 1.74-4.00; P < .001). Additionally, 14.2% of respondents planned to retire early, and 11.9% planned to retire later. Women and non-White respondents had higher likelihoods of burnout on univariate analysis (OR = 1.75, 95% CI, 1.06-2.94, P = .026 and OR = 1.82, 95% CI, 1.08-3.04, P = .017, respectively), and 25.1% of all respondents felt socially isolated. In addition, both changes in retirement planning and future occupational planning were strongly associated with total job satisfaction scores (both P < .001). CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic has affected the personal and professional lives of pediatric anesthesiologists, albeit not equally, as women and non-Whites have been disproportionately impacted. The pandemic has significantly affected personal finances, home responsibilities, and retirement planning; reduced clinical and academic practice time and responsibilities; and increased feelings of social isolation, stress, burnout, and depression/anxiety.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia/psychology , Anesthesiologists/psychology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Pediatrics , Surveys and Questionnaires , Adult , Anesthesia/trends , Anesthesiologists/trends , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Male , Middle Aged , Occupational Exposure/adverse effects , Occupational Exposure/prevention & control , Pediatrics/trends , Retirement/trends , Societies, Medical/trends
11.
Anaesthesiol Intensive Ther ; 52(1): 34-41, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-621289

ABSTRACT

Over the past three months, the world has faced an unprecedented health hazard. The World Health Organization has announced a pandemic infection with an unknown species of coronavirus called SARS-CoV-2. Spreading mainly through the droplet route, the virus causes mild symptoms in the majority of cases, the most common being: fever (80%), dry cough (56%), fatigue (22%) and muscle pain (7%); less common symptoms include a sore throat, a runny nose, diarrhea, hemoptysis and chills. A life-threatening complication of SARS-CoV-2 infection is an acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), which occurs more often in older adults, those with immune disorders and co-morbidities. Severe forms of the infection, being an indication for treatment in the intensive care unit, comprise acute lung inflammation, ARDS, sepsis and septic shock. The article presents basic information about etiology, pathogenesis and diagnostics (with particular emphasis on the importance of tomocomputer imaging), clinical picture, treatment and prevention of the infection. It goes on to emphasize the specific risks of providing anesthesiology and intensive care services. Due to the fact that effective causal treatment is not yet available and the number of infections and deaths increases day by day, infection prevention and strict adherence to recommendations of infection control organizations remain the basis for fighting the virus.


Subject(s)
Anesthesiologists/psychology , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Age Factors , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/etiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Cough/diagnosis , Cough/etiology , Disease Progression , Fever/diagnosis , Fever/etiology , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/etiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Surg Infect (Larchmt) ; 21(4): 350-356, 2020 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-51186

ABSTRACT

Background: The novel coronavirus (COVID-19) emerged in Wuhan, China, in December 2019. This study aims to evaluate the knowledge of anesthesiology specialists and residents in Turkey about COVID-19 and their attitudes toward the strategies and application methods to be used for a suspected/confirmed COVID-19 case that needs to be operated on or followed up in an intensive care unit, as well as to raise awareness about this issue. Methods: This descriptive study comprised anesthesiology specialists and residents working in various health institutions in Turkey. The data used in this study were obtained online between March 13, 2020 and March 25, 2020 through the website SurveyMonkey (SurveyMonkey, San Mateo, CA) by using a survey form. We contacted members of the Turkish Anaesthesiology and Reanimation Society through the social media platforms Twitter, LinkedIn, and WhatsApp, as well as through their e-mail addresses and invited them to participate in the study. Those who agreed to participate responded to the aforementioned survey. We used SPSS 22.0 (IBM, Armonk, NY) to analyze the survey data statistically. Results: A total of 346 anesthesiology specialists and residents participated in the study. Although the majority of the participants exhibited the correct attitudes toward airway management, research assistants with little professional experience were observed to be undecided or had the tendency to make incorrect decisions. Conclusions: The COVID-19 pandemic is spreading rapidly worldwide. The incidence of COVID-19 cases is increasing daily, and this disease can cause patient death. Anesthesiology specialists and residents who perform emergency operations on these patients in settings other than intensive care units should follow simple and easy-to-understand algorithms to ensure safety. The provision of theoretical and practical training to healthcare providers before they meet patients will help ensure patient-healthcare provider safety and prevent panic, which can cause distress among healthcare providers.


Subject(s)
Airway Management/standards , Anesthesiology/standards , Attitude of Health Personnel , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Adult , Airway Management/psychology , Algorithms , Anesthesiologists/psychology , Anesthesiologists/standards , Anesthesiology/education , COVID-19 , Clinical Competence , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Critical Care/psychology , Critical Care/standards , Female , Health Care Surveys , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Health Personnel/psychology , Health Personnel/standards , Humans , Infection Control/standards , Internship and Residency/standards , Male , Middle Aged , Occupational Stress/etiology , Occupational Stress/prevention & control , Occupational Stress/psychology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Panic , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Social Media , Specialization , Surgical Procedures, Operative/psychology , Surgical Procedures, Operative/standards , Turkey , Young Adult
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