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1.
Curr Opin Anaesthesiol ; 35(3): 351-356, 2022 Jun 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1878825

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) pandemic has highlighted the inequities in access to healthcare while also revealing our global connectivity. These inequities are emblematic of decades of underinvestment in healthcare systems, education, and research in low-middle income countries (LMICs), especially in surgery and anesthesiology. Five billion people remain without access to safe surgery, and we must take appropriate action now. RECENT FINDINGS: The pediatric perioperative mortality in low-resourced settings may be as high as 100 times greater than in high-resourced settings, and a pediatric surgery workforce density benchmark of 4/1 million population could increase survivability to over 80%. Delay in treatment for congenital surgically correctable issues dramatically increases disability-adjusted life years. Appropriate academic partnerships which promote education are desired but the lack of authorship position priority for LMIC-based researchers must be addressed. Five perioperative benchmark indicators have been published including: geospatial access to care within 2 h of location; workforce/100,000 population; volume of surgery/100,000 population; perioperative mortality within 30 days of surgery or until discharged; and risks for catastrophic expenditure from surgical care. SUMMARY: Research that determines ethical and acceptable partnership development between high- and low-resourced settings focusing on education and capacity building needs to be standardized and followed.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia , Anesthesiology , COVID-19 , Anesthesia/adverse effects , Child , Developing Countries , Global Health , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Workforce
2.
A A Pract ; 15(2): e01406, 2021 Feb 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1869126

ABSTRACT

The Internet is a source of professional self-education for medical students and residents. Unfortunately, much of the content discovered through search engines is of insufficient quality for professional education. The Anesthesia Toolbox (AT) was developed to provide online peer-reviewed educational resources for anesthesiology trainees and faculty. Since 2014, AT has developed 24 curricula, 822 content items, and 3238 quiz questions. As of March 2020, 64 anesthesiology residency programs in the United States subscribed to the AT (41% of total). Since the onset of the pandemic in March, AT has added 25 programs (28% increase) and gained 1156 users (26% increase).


Subject(s)
Anesthesia , Anesthesiology , Computer-Assisted Instruction , Internship and Residency , Anesthesiology/education , Humans , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States
3.
Semin Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth ; 26(2): 129-139, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1865252

ABSTRACT

This review focuses on the literature published during the calendar year 2021 that is of interest to anesthesiologists taking care of children and adults with congenital heart disease. Four major themes are discussed, including cardiovascular disease in children with COVID-19, aortic valve repair and replacement, bleeding and coagulation, and enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS).


Subject(s)
Anesthesia , Anesthesiology , COVID-19 , Cardiac Surgical Procedures , Heart Defects, Congenital , Adult , Child , Heart Defects, Congenital/surgery , Humans
6.
Anesth Analg ; 134(1): 216-224, 2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1822236

ABSTRACT

At the outbreak of World War II (WWII), anesthesiology was struggling to establish itself as a medical specialty. The battlefield abruptly exposed this young specialty to the formidable challenge of mass casualties, with an urgent need to provide proper fluid resuscitation, airway management, mechanical ventilation, and analgesia to thousands. But while Europe was suffering under the Nazi boot, anesthesia was preparing to rise to the challenge posed by the impending war. While war brings death and destruction, it also opens the way to medical advances. The aim of this study is to measure the evolution of anesthesia owing to WWII. We conducted a retrospective observational bibliometric study involving a quantitative and statistical analysis of publications. The following 7 journals were selected to cover European and North American anesthesia-related publications: Anesthesia & Analgesia, the British Journal of Anaesthesia, Anesthesiology, Schmerz-Narkose-Anaesthesie, Surgery, La Presse Médicale, and The Military Surgeon (later Military Medicine). Attention was focused on journal volumes published between 1920 and 1965. After reviewing the literature, we selected 12 keywords representing important advances in anesthesiology since 1920: "anesthesia," "balanced anesthesia," "barbiturates," "d-tubocurarine," "endotracheal intubation," "ether," "lidocaine," "morphine," "spinal anesthesia," "thiopental," "transfusion," and "trichloroethylene." Titles of original articles from all selected journals editions between 1920 and 1965 were screened for the occurrence of 1 of the 12 keywords. A total of 26,132 original article titles were screened for the occurrence of the keywords. A total of 1815 keywords were found. Whereas Anesthesia & Analgesia had the highest keyword occurrence (493 citations), Schmerz-Narkose-Anaesthesie had the lowest (38 citations). The number of publications of the 12 keywords was significantly higher in the postwar than in the prewar period (65% and 35%, respectively; P < .001). Not surprisingly, the anesthesiology journals have a higher occurrence of keywords than those journals covering other specialties. The overall occurrence of keywords also showed peaks during other major conflicts, namely the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939), the Korean War (1950-1953), and the Vietnam War (1955-1975). For the first time, this study demonstrates statistically the impact of WWII on the progress of anesthesiology. It also offers an objective record of the chronology of the major advances in anesthesiology before and after the conflict. While the war arguably helped to enhance anesthesiology as a specialty, in return anesthesiology helped to heal the wounds of war.


Subject(s)
Anesthesiology/history , Military Medicine/history , Anesthesia/history , Bibliometrics , Europe , History, 20th Century , Humans , Military Personnel , World War II
7.
Anaesthesiol Intensive Ther ; 54(1): 1-2, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1818526

ABSTRACT

I have attentively read the article "Minute Zero: an essential assessment in peri-operative ultrasound for anaesthesia" by Elena Segura-Grau et al. [1]. The authors have suggested using point-of-care ultrasonography (POCUS) as part of a comprehensive anaesthetic assessment in the perioperative period. Such an extension of the standard perioperative examination aimed at searching for pathologies that may affect the intra- and postoperative course performed by an anaes-thesiologist seems fully justified and may have a significant impact on treatment outcomes [2]. In the "Minute Zero" model, the authors have suggested that POCUS assessment of anaesthetised patients should be carried out twice - on admission to the operating theatre and before transfer to the postoperative ward. The described scheme is based on the well-known eFAST, FATE and BLUE protocols (assessment to determine the presence of free fluid in the body cavities, basic cardiac assessment, including IVC, and lung ultrasound assessment). The examination conducted in the manner specified by the authors provides a general but holistic picture of the patient, focused at detecting life-threatening pathologies. It is right to include a preoperative assessment of the filling of the stomach in the protocol, as the surface area of the pylorus found on ultrasound scans indicates the risk of aspiration during the induction of general anaesthesia [3, 4]. This may be of particular importance in patients undergoing emergency procedures, with gastrointestinal obstruction or in those with difficult contact (mainly children and the elderly). In the algorithm described, the assessment of bladder filling in the postoperative period has been emphasised. This is a huge asset, which is often overlooked and, as the authors rightly point out, can cause postoperative delirium, especially in the elderly. The authors have developed an examination card that enables to document the examination in a simple and transparent manner based on markings of the appropriate blanks, which makes the protocol very friendly. The additional pros of the publication are the attached sample ultrasound images, which perfectly illustrate the ease of diagnosis of basic pathologies.


Subject(s)
Anesthesiology , Anesthetics , Aged , Anesthesia, General , Child , Humans , Point-of-Care Systems , Ultrasonography/methods
10.
Anaesth Crit Care Pain Med ; 41(3): 101061, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1803328

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic, care providers (CPs) worldwide grappled with the extraordinary number of severely ill patients with high fatality rates. The objective of this study is to explore the experience of anaesthesiology CPs in temporary intensive care units during the COVID-19 pandemic's first wave. METHODS: CPs were interviewed at a university hospital in Paris, France. We conducted a qualitative study using interpretative phenomenological analysis. RESULTS: Fifteen participants were included (five nurses, three nurse managers, and seven physicians). The analysis uncovered four themes: 1. Overworked care providers in an intensive care unit under pressure; 2. The disrupted relationship among patients, their families, and end-of-life care; 3. Short-term coping strategies; 4. A long-term transformative experience for care providers. DISCUSSION: The COVID-19 pandemic has drained CPs physically and emotionally. Infection control protocols, lack of knowledge about this new disease, the establishment of open-space care settings, and the disruption of relationships have posed ethical dilemmas, leading CPs to question the meaning of their profession, and their future professional involvement. CPs at both an individual and institutional level employed numerous coping strategies, relying on a strong team spirit and a reinforced sense of duty. Nevertheless, after the end of the first wave, participants described the long-lasting psychological impact of this experience and frustration at the lack of recognition from their institutions and from policymakers. This study can inform institutional interventions and public health policy to support CPs during and after such a crisis to ensure their well-being and high standards of care.


Subject(s)
Anesthesiology , COVID-19 , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Pandemics , Qualitative Research
11.
14.
Semin Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth ; 26(1): 5-7, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1759632

Subject(s)
Anesthesiology , Humans
16.
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand ; 66(5): 636-637, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1691650

ABSTRACT

The Clinical Practice Committee of the Scandinavian Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine endorses the Living WHO guideline on therapeutics and COVID-19. This trustworthy continuously updated guideline serves as a highly useful decision aid for Nordic anaesthesiologists caring for patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Anesthesiology , COVID-19 , Critical Care , Humans , Societies, Medical , World Health Organization
17.
Paediatr Anaesth ; 32(4): 579, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1685401
18.
Anesth Analg ; 134(6): 1166-1174, 2022 Jun 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1673966

ABSTRACT

In today's world, departments of anesthesiology and professional organizations are rightfully expected to have racial, ethnic, and gender diversity. Diversity and inclusiveness are considered important contributors to an effective and collaborative work environment by promoting excellence in patient care, education, and research. This has been re-emphasized in the racial reckoning in the summer of 2020, and the ongoing health care disparities manifested by the global coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Moreover, the negative consequences of a lack of diversity and inclusion in health care have been shown to impact recruitment, retention, and the economic well-being of academic departments. In the present article, we review the current state of diversity in anesthesiology departments and professional organizations in the United States. We discuss strategies and important approaches to further enhance diversity to promote an inclusive perioperative work environment.


Subject(s)
Anesthesiology , COVID-19 , Cultural Diversity , Healthcare Disparities , Humans , Minority Groups , United States/epidemiology
19.
BMJ Open ; 12(2): e052972, 2022 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1673434

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to use qualitative interviews with surgical providers to explore challenges and solutions to providing surgical and anaesthesia care in Sierra Leone's hospitals. DESIGN: Data were collected through anonymous, semistructured interviews. We used a qualitative framework approach to analyse interview data and determine themes relating to challenges that were reported. SETTING: A purposive sample of 12 hospitals was selected throughout Sierra Leone to include district and referral hospitals of varying ownership (private, non-governmental organisation and government). PARTICIPANTS: The most senior surgical provider available during each hospital site visit participated in a semistructured interview. A total of 12 interviews were conducted. RESULTS: Providers described both challenges and solutions relating to the following categories: equipment and supplies, access to services, human resources, infrastructure, management and patient factors. These challenges were found to affect surgical care in hospitals by delaying surgical care, decreasing operative capacity and decreasing quality of care. Providers identified not only the root causes of these challenges, but also the varied workarounds and solutions they employ to overcome them. CONCLUSION: Surgical providers can offer important insights into challenges affecting surgical services in hospitals. Despite working in challenging environments with limited resources, providers have developed innovative solutions to improve surgical and anaesthesia care in hospitals in Sierra Leone. Qualitative research has an important role to play in improving understanding of the challenges facing surgeons in low-income countries.


Subject(s)
Anesthesiology , Surgeons , Hospitals , Humans , Qualitative Research , Sierra Leone , Workforce
20.
Braz J Anesthesiol ; 72(2): 185-188, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1670226

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Simulation-based education has become the most important part of resident training in anesthesiology, especially during the pandemic. It allows learning the skills and the management of different situations without putting residents in risk of contamination, considering COVID-19 is highly contagious. The hypothesis was that simulation is still associated with improvement of knowledge acquisitions despite the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Residents of anesthesiology and intensive care subjected to an anaphylaxis simulation scenario. Their knowledge levels were assessed by true/false questions before and one month after the simulation session. The STAI test was used to measure anxiety levels before and after the scenario. Data were analyzed statistically using Wilcoxon and McNemar tests. RESULTS: Junior residents (< 2 years) received significantly higher scores in post-training theoretical tests compared to their pre-training scores (79.2 ± 9.6, 84.5 ± 8.2, p = 0.002, n = 21). There was no difference between pre- and post-test scores of seniors (80.2 ± 9, 81.8 ± 10.4, p = 0.3). Pre- and post-anxiety inventory scores were nearly the same and both were in the moderate group (39.8 ± 10.1, 39.3 ± 12.1, p = 0.8). CONCLUSION: Simulation-based education improved the knowledge levels of the residents without raising anxiety levels. Thus, simulation-based training showed its value as an important tool of education during the pandemic, which needs to be further popularized for training at all institutions. Enlightening medical educators about this accomplished teaching method may lead to improved quality of medical education in developing countries and reshape how tomorrow's doctors are trained during pandemics.


Subject(s)
Anesthesiology , COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Simulation Training , Anesthesiology/education , Clinical Competence , Humans , Operating Rooms , Pandemics
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