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3.
J Am Heart Assoc ; 11(17): e026143, 2022 09 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2001999

ABSTRACT

Background Published randomized controlled trials are underpowered for binary clinical end points to assess the safety and efficacy of renin-angiotensin system inhibitors (RASi) in adults with COVID-19. We therefore performed a meta-analysis to assess the safety and efficacy of RASi in adults with COVID-19. Methods and Results MEDLINE, EMBASE, ClinicalTrials.gov, and the Cochrane Controlled Trial Register were searched for randomized controlled trials that randomly assigned patients with COVID-19 to RASi continuation/commencement versus no RASi therapy. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality at ≤30 days. A total of 14 randomized controlled trials met the inclusion criteria and enrolled 1838 participants (aged 59 years, 58% men, mean follow-up 26 days). Of the trials, 11 contributed data. We found no effect of RASi versus control on all-cause mortality (7.2% versus 7.5%; relative risk [RR], 0.95; [95% CI, 0.69-1.30]) either overall or in subgroups defined by COVID-19 severity or trial type. Network meta-analysis identified no difference between angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors versus angiotensin II receptor blockers. RASi users had a nonsignificant reduction in acute myocardial infarction (2.1% versus 3.6%; RR, 0.59; [95% CI, 0.33-1.06]), but increased risk of acute kidney injury (7.0% versus 3.6%; RR, 1.82; [95% CI, 1.05-3.16]), in trials that initiated and continued RASi. There was no increase in need for dialysis or differences in congestive cardiac failure, cerebrovascular events, venous thromboembolism, hospitalization, intensive care admission, inotropes, or mechanical ventilation. Conclusions This meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials evaluating angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin II receptor blockers versus control in patients with COVID-19 found no difference in all-cause mortality, a borderline decrease in myocardial infarction, and an increased risk of acute kidney injury with RASi. Our findings provide strong evidence that RASi can be used safely in patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury , COVID-19 , Hypertension , Myocardial Infarction , Acute Kidney Injury/chemically induced , Adult , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/pharmacology , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/therapeutic use , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/adverse effects , Antihypertensive Agents/therapeutic use , Female , Humans , Male , Myocardial Infarction/drug therapy , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Renin-Angiotensin System
5.
Molecules ; 27(15)2022 Jul 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1969391

ABSTRACT

Angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) used in the treatment of hypertension and potentially in SARS-CoV-2 infection exhibit inverse agonist effects at angiotensin AR1 receptors, suggesting the receptor may have evolved to accommodate naturally occurring angiotensin 'antipeptides'. Screening of the human genome has identified a peptide (EGVYVHPV) encoded by mRNA, complementary to that encoding ANG II itself, which is an inverse agonist. Thus, opposite strands of DNA encode peptides with opposite effects at AR1 receptors. Agonism and inverse agonism at AR1 receptors can be explained by a receptor 'switching' between an activated state invoking receptor dimerization/G protein coupling and an inverse agonist state mediated by an alternative/second messenger that is slow to reverse. Both receptor states appear to be driven by the formation of the ANG II charge-relay system involving TyrOH-His/imidazole-Carboxylate (analogous to serine proteases). In this system, tyrosinate species formed are essential for activating AT1 and AT2 receptors. ANGII is also known to bind to the zinc-coordinated metalloprotease angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) used by the COVID-19 virus to enter cells. Here we report in silico results demonstrating the binding of a new class of anionic biphenyl-tetrazole sartans ('Bisartans') to the active site zinc atom of the endopeptidase Neprilysin (NEP) involved in regulating hypertension, by modulating humoral levels of beneficial vasoactive peptides in the RAS such as vasodilator angiotensin (1-7). In vivo and modeling evidence further suggest Bisartans can inhibit ANG II-induced pulmonary edema and may be useful in combatting SARS-CoV-2 infection by inhibiting ACE2-mediated viral entry to cells.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hypertension , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/pharmacology , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/therapeutic use , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Humans , Hypertension/drug therapy , Neprilysin/metabolism , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Proto-Oncogene Mas , Receptors, Angiotensin/metabolism , Renin-Angiotensin System , SARS-CoV-2 , Zinc/pharmacology
7.
Curr Hypertens Rep ; 24(10): 425-433, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1899316

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review summarises the literature data and provides an overview of the role and impact of the use of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) inhibitors in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection. RECENT FINDINGS: The angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) has a key role in the regulation of the RAAS pathway, downregulating angiotensin II and attenuating inflammation, vasoconstriction and oxidative stress. Additionally, it plays an instrumental part in COVID-19 infection as it facilitates the cell entry of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and enables its replication. The use and role of RAAS inhibitors therefore during the COVID-19 pandemic have been intensively investigated. Although it was initially assumed that RAAS inhibitors may relate to worse clinical outcomes and severe disease, data from large studies and meta-analyses demonstrated that they do not have an adverse impact on clinical outcomes or prognosis. On the contrary, some experimental and retrospective observational cohort studies showed a potential protective mechanism, although this effect remains to be seen in large clinical trials.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hypertension , Aldosterone/metabolism , Angiotensin II/metabolism , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/pharmacology , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/therapeutic use , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Antihypertensive Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Humans , Hypertension/drug therapy , Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonists/therapeutic use , Pandemics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Renin/metabolism , Renin-Angiotensin System/physiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Crit Care Med ; 50(9): 1306-1317, 2022 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1860941

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To determine whether angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) or angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors are associated with improved outcomes in hospitalized patients with COVID-19 according to sex and to report sex-related differences in renin-angiotensin system (RAS) components. DESIGN: Prospective observational cohort study comparing the effects of ARB or ACE inhibitors versus no ARBs or ACE inhibitors in males versus females. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 downregulates ACE-2, potentially increasing angiotensin II (a pro-inflammatory vasoconstrictor). Sex-based differences in RAS dysregulation may explain sex-based differences in responses to ARBs because the ACE2 gene is on the X chromosome. We recorded baseline characteristics, comorbidities, prehospital ARBs or ACE inhibitor treatment, use of organ support and mortality, and measured RAS components at admission and days 2, 4, 7, and 14 in a subgroup ( n = 46), recorded d -dimer ( n = 967), comparing males with females. SETTING: ARBs CORONA I is a multicenter Canadian observational cohort of patients hospitalized with acute COVID-19. This analysis includes patients admitted to 10 large urban hospitals across the four most populated provinces. PATIENTS: One-thousand six-hundred eighty-six patients with polymerase chain reaction-confirmed COVID-19 (February 2020 to March 2021) for acute COVID-19 illness were included. INTERVENTIONS: None. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Males on ARBs before admission had decreased use of ventilation (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 0.52; p = 0.007) and vasopressors (aOR = 0.55; p = 0.011) compared with males not on ARBs or ACE inhibitors. No significant effects were observed in females for these outcomes. The test for interaction was significant for use of ventilation ( p = 0.006) and vasopressors ( p = 0.044) indicating significantly different responses to ARBs according to sex. Males had significantly higher plasma ACE-1 at baseline and angiotensin II at day 7 and 14 than females. CONCLUSIONS: ARBs use was associated with less ventilation and vasopressors in males but not females. Sex-based differences in RAS dysregulation may contribute to sex-based differences in outcomes and responses to ARBs in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hypertension , Angiotensin II/pharmacology , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/pharmacology , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/therapeutic use , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Canada , Female , Humans , Male , Prospective Studies , Renin-Angiotensin System/drug effects , Renin-Angiotensin System/physiology , Sex Characteristics
10.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(9)2022 May 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1820297

ABSTRACT

Blockers of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) have been reported to increase the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE)2, the cellular receptor of SARS-CoV-2, and thus the risk and course of COVID-19. Therefore, we investigated if angiotensin (Ang) II and RAS blockers affected ACE2 expression and SARS-CoV-2 infectivity in human epithelial bronchial Calu-3 cells. By infectivity and spike-mediated cell-cell fusion assays, we showed that Ang II acting on the angiotensin type 1 receptor markedly increased ACE2 at mRNA and protein levels, resulting in enhanced SARS-CoV-2 cell entry. These effects were abolished by irbesartan and not affected by the blockade of ACE-1-mediated Ang II formation with ramipril, and of ACE2- mediated Ang II conversion into Ang 1-7 with MLN-4760. Thus, enhanced Ang II production in patients with an activated RAS might expose to a greater spread of COVID-19 infection in lung cells. The protective action of Angiotensin type 1 receptor antagonists (ARBs) documented in these studies provides a mechanistic explanation for the lack of worse outcomes in high-risk COVID-19 patients on RAS blockers.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , COVID-19 , Angiotensin II/metabolism , Angiotensin II/pharmacology , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/pharmacology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , Humans , Receptor, Angiotensin, Type 1/genetics , Receptor, Angiotensin, Type 1/metabolism , Renin-Angiotensin System , SARS-CoV-2 , Up-Regulation
11.
Diabetes Metab Syndr ; 16(5): 102484, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1783291

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND & AIMS: To assess the impact of pre-admission renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitor (RAASi) and statin use on mortality following COVID-19 hospitalization in adults with pre-existing diabetes. METHODS: Retrospective cohort study of adults with diabetes admitted to ninety-nine participating hospitals in the United Kingdom, France and Spain during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. Logistic regression models adjusted for demographic factors and comorbidity were used to describe associations with mortality in hospital or within 28 days of admission and individual or combined RAASi and statin therapy prescription followed by a country level meta-analysis. RESULTS: Complete data were available for 3474 (42.6%) individuals. Prescribing patterns varied by country: 25-50% neither RAASi nor statin therapy, 14-36% both RAASi and statin therapy, 9-24% RAASi therapy alone, 12-36% statin alone. Overall, 20-37% of patients died within 28 days. Meta-analysis found no evidence of an association between mortality and prescription of RAASi therapy (OR 1.09, CI 0.78-1.52 (I2 22.2%)), statin (OR 0.97, CI 0.59-1.61 (I2 72.9%)) or both (OR 1.14, CI 0.67-1.92 (I2 78.3%)) compared to those prescribed neither drug class. CONCLUSIONS: This large multicentre, multinational study found no evidence of an association between mortality from COVID-19 infection in people with diabetes and use of either RAASi, statin or combination therapy. This provides reassurance that clinicians should not change their RAASi and statin therapy prescribing practice in people with diabetes during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors , Hyperkalemia , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic , Adult , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/pharmacology , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/therapeutic use , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Antihypertensive Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Diabetes Mellitus/drug therapy , Hospitalization , Hospitals , Humans , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Hyperkalemia/complications , Hyperkalemia/drug therapy , Hyperkalemia/epidemiology , Multicenter Studies as Topic , Pandemics , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/complications , Renin-Angiotensin System , Retrospective Studies
12.
J Card Fail ; 28(7): 1222-1226, 2022 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1748169

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There are limited data regarding the management of guideline-directed medical therapy (GDMT) for heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) with virtual visits in comparison with in-office visits. We sought to compare the changes in GDMT (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers, angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitors, mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists, and sodium glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitors) and loop diuretics across visit types. METHODS AND RESULTS: This study included 13,481 outpatient visits performed for 5439 unique patients with HFrEF between March 16, 2020, and March 15, 2021. The rates of initiation and discontinuation of GDMT were documented, and multivariable logistic regression was performed to test associations with outcomes between modes of visit. The rates of medication initiation were higher in office (11.7%) compared with video (9.6%) or telephone (7.2%) visits. In multivariable adjusted analysis, the initiation of at least 1 GDMT class was similar between in-office visits and video visits (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0.97, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.82-1.14, P = .703). Telephone visits were associated with less frequent initiation of at least 1 class of GDMT in comparison with in-office visits (adjusted OR 0.64, 95% CI 0.55-0.75; P < .001) and video visits (adjusted OR 0.67, 95% CI 0.55-0.81, P < .001). Despite similar rates of baseline loop diuretic use, patients seen with both video visits (adjusted OR 0.70, 95% CI 0.52-0.94, P = .018) and telephone visits (adjusted OR 0.64, 95% CI 0.49-0.83, P < .001) were less likely to have a loop diuretic initiated when compared with in-office visits. CONCLUSIONS: The initiation of GDMT for HFrEF was similar between in-office and video visits and lower with telephone visits, whereas the initiation of a loop diuretic was less frequent in both types of virtual visits. These data suggest that video streaming capabilities should be encouraged for virtual visits.


Subject(s)
Heart Failure , Telemedicine , Adrenergic beta-Antagonists/therapeutic use , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/pharmacology , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/therapeutic use , Heart Failure/drug therapy , Heart Failure/epidemiology , Humans , Outpatients , Sodium Potassium Chloride Symporter Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Stroke Volume , Telephone
13.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(3)2022 Feb 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1745038

ABSTRACT

This review article is focused on antihypertensive drugs, namely angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARB), and their immunomodulatory properties reported in hypertensive patients as well as in experimental settings involving studies on animal models and cell lines. The immune regulatory action of ACEI and ARB is mainly connected with the inhibition of proinflammatory cytokine secretion, diminished expression of adhesion molecules, and normalization of CRP concentration in the blood plasma. The topic has significant importance in future medical practice in the therapy of patients with comorbidities with underlying chronic inflammatory responses. Thus, this additional effect of immune regulatory action of ACEI and ARB may also benefit the treatment of patients with metabolic syndrome, allergies, or autoimmune disorders.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/pharmacology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , Immunomodulation/drug effects , Animals , Antihypertensive Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19 , Humans
15.
Life Sci ; 293: 120324, 2022 Mar 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1616648

ABSTRACT

AIMS: Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) 2 is the receptor for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 which causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Viral cellular entry requires ACE2 and transmembrane protease serine 2 (TMPRSS2). ACE inhibitors (ACEIs) or angiotensin (Ang) receptor blockers (ARBs) influence ACE2 in animals, though evidence in human lungs is lacking. We investigated ACE2 and TMPRSS2 in type II pneumocytes, the key cells that maintain lung homeostasis, in lung parenchymal of ACEI/ARB-treated subjects compared to untreated control subjects. MAIN METHODS: Ang II and Ang-(1-7) levels and ACE2 and TMPRSS2 protein expression were measured by radioimmunoassay and immunohistochemistry, respectively. KEY FINDINGS: We found that the ratio Ang-(1-7)/Ang II, a surrogate marker of ACE2 activity, as well as the amount of ACE2-expressing type II pneumocytes were not different between ACEI/ARB-treated and untreated subjects. ACE2 protein content correlated positively with smoking habit and age. The percentage of TMPRSS2-expressing type II pneumocytes was higher in males than females and in subjects under 60 years of age but it was not different between ACEI/ARB-treated and untreated subjects. However, there was a positive association of TMPRSS2 protein content with age and smoking in ACEI/ARB-treated subjects, with high TMPRSS2 protein levels most evident in ACEI/ARB-treated older adults and smokers. SIGNIFICANCE: ACEI/ARB treatment influences human lung TMPRSS2 but not ACE2 protein content and this effect is dependent on age and smoking habit. This finding may help explain the increased susceptibility to COVID-19 seen in smokers and older patients with treated cardiovascular-related pathologies.


Subject(s)
Alveolar Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/pharmacology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , Renin-Angiotensin System/physiology , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/chemistry , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/drug effects , Angiotensin I/metabolism , Angiotensin II/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/analysis , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/antagonists & inhibitors , Female , Humans , Lung/chemistry , Lung/drug effects , Lung/metabolism , Male , Middle Aged , Peptide Fragments/metabolism , Renin-Angiotensin System/drug effects , Retrospective Studies , Serine Endopeptidases/analysis , Smoking/metabolism , Smoking/pathology
16.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 24397, 2021 12 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1585779

ABSTRACT

Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is an important factor in coronavirus disease (COVID-19) interactions. Losartan (LOS) belongs to the angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) family. Additionally, the protective role of ACE2 restored by LOS has been suggested and clinically examined in the treatment of COVID-19 patients. Furthermore, clinical trials with LOS have been conducted. However, the mechanism through which LOS enhances ACE2 expression remains unclear. In addition, the response of ACE2 to LOS differs among patients. Our LOS-treated patient data revealed a correlated mechanism of ACE2 with components of the renin-angiotensinogen system. We observed a significant positive regulation of MAS1 and ACE2 expression. In the context of LOS treatment of COVID-19, ACE2 expression could depend on LOS regulated MAS1. Thus, MAS1 expression could predict the COVID-19 treatment response of LOS.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/pharmacology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Losartan/pharmacology , Renin-Angiotensin System/drug effects , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/therapeutic use , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Databases, Factual , Humans , Losartan/therapeutic use , /metabolism , Receptor, Angiotensin, Type 1/genetics , Receptor, Angiotensin, Type 1/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Up-Regulation/drug effects
17.
BMJ ; 375: n2938, 2021 11 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1537932

Subject(s)
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists/adverse effects , Blood Pressure/drug effects , Diabetes Mellitus/prevention & control , Hypertension/drug therapy , Thiazides/adverse effects , Adrenergic beta-Antagonists/therapeutic use , Aminobutyrates/pharmacology , Aminobutyrates/therapeutic use , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/pharmacology , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/therapeutic use , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Animals , Biphenyl Compounds/pharmacology , Biphenyl Compounds/therapeutic use , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/virology , Calcium Channel Blockers/adverse effects , Calcium Channel Blockers/therapeutic use , Cats , Diabetes Mellitus/etiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/drug therapy , Dogs , Drug Combinations , Gastric Inhibitory Polypeptide/adverse effects , Gastric Inhibitory Polypeptide/pharmacology , Gastric Inhibitory Polypeptide/therapeutic use , Heart Sounds/physiology , History, 20th Century , Humans , Hypertension/complications , Immunization, Passive/methods , Immunization, Passive/statistics & numerical data , Incretins/adverse effects , Incretins/pharmacology , Incretins/therapeutic use , Insulin Glargine/adverse effects , Insulin Glargine/history , Insulin Glargine/pharmacology , Insulin Glargine/therapeutic use , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Thiazides/therapeutic use , Valsartan/pharmacology , Valsartan/therapeutic use
18.
Ann Palliat Med ; 11(4): 1253-1263, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518874

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Some studies have speculated that patients on angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) are more susceptible to adverse outcomes of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Here, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the safety and efficacy of administering ACEIs and ARBs to patients with COVID-19. METHODS: Studies of COVID-19 were collected from the PubMed, Embase, medRxiv and BioRxiv databases. The pooled relative risk odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) were calculated. Subgroup analyses were conducted by medication (ACEIs and ARBs) and geographical location (China and outside China). Inter-study heterogeneity was assessed using meta-regression. Begg's test, Egger's test and funnel plots were adopted to evaluate possible publication bias. RESULTS: Thirty studies containing 10,434 adult patients were included in our meta-analysis. The pooled result indicated that the administration of ACEIs or ARBs reduced the risk of severe/death outcomes for COVID-19 patients. Meanwhile, a significant reduction in the risk of severe/death outcomes was observed to be associated with the administration of ACEIs or ARBs among COVID-19 patients in China, but this association was weaker for studies outside China. Furthermore, ACEI therapy was found to carry a significantly lower risk of an adverse clinical outcome. DISCUSSION: Our systematic review and meta-analysis found that neither ACEIs nor ARBs worsen the clinical outcomes of COVID-19 patients. On the contrary, we found that patients treated with ACEIs or ARBs have a reduced risk of severe/death outcomes, especially in Asia. Furthermore, ACEIs may reduce the risk of severe/death outcomes. Therefore, treatment interruption of ACEI or ARB therapy during COVID-19 infection is not recommended.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hypertension , Adult , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/pharmacology , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/therapeutic use , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Humans , Hypertension/chemically induced , Hypertension/complications , Hypertension/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Viruses ; 13(11)2021 11 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1502528

ABSTRACT

Men are disproportionately affected by the coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19), and face higher odds of severe illness and death compared to women. The vascular effects of androgen signaling and inflammatory cytokines in severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2)-mediated endothelial injury are not defined. We determined the effects of SARS-CoV-2 spike protein-mediated endothelial injury under conditions of exposure to androgen dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-α) and tested potentially therapeutic effects of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonism by spironolactone. Circulating endothelial injury markers VCAM-1 and E-selectin were measured in men and women diagnosed with COVID-19. Exposure of endothelial cells (ECs) in vitro to DHT exacerbated spike protein S1-mediated endothelial injury transcripts for the cell adhesion molecules E-selectin, VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 and anti-fibrinolytic PAI-1 (p < 0.05), and increased THP-1 monocyte adhesion to ECs (p = 0.032). Spironolactone dramatically reduced DHT+S1-induced endothelial activation. TNF-α exacerbated S1-induced EC activation, which was abrogated by pretreatment with spironolactone. Analysis from patients hospitalized with COVID-19 showed concordant higher circulating VCAM-1 and E-Selectin levels in men, compared to women. A beneficial effect of the FDA-approved drug spironolactone was observed on endothelial cells in vitro, supporting a rationale for further evaluation of mineralocorticoid antagonism as an adjunct treatment in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Dihydrotestosterone/pharmacology , Endothelium, Vascular/pathology , Inflammation , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/physiology , Spironolactone/pharmacology , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/pharmacology , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/virology , Cell Adhesion Molecules/blood , Cells, Cultured , Endothelium, Vascular/drug effects , Endothelium, Vascular/metabolism , Female , Humans , Male , Sex Characteristics , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/pharmacology , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/physiology , Valsartan/pharmacology
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