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1.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 9(1): 1567-1579, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-707709

ABSTRACT

Diverse SARS-like coronaviruses (SL-CoVs) have been identified from bats and other animal species. Like SARS-CoV, some bat SL-CoVs, such as WIV1, also use angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) from human and bat as entry receptor. However, whether these viruses can also use the ACE2 of other animal species as their receptor remains to be determined. We report herein that WIV1 has a broader tropism to ACE2 orthologs than SARS-CoV isolate Tor2. Among the 9 ACE2 orthologs examined, human ACE2 exhibited the highest efficiency to mediate the infection of WIV1 pseudotyped virus. Our findings thus imply that WIV1 has the potential to infect a wide range of wild animals and may directly jump to humans. We also showed that cell entry of WIV1 could be restricted by interferon-induced transmembrane proteins (IFITMs). However, WIV1 could exploit the airway protease TMPRSS2 to partially evade the IFITM3 restriction. Interestingly, we also found that amphotericin B could enhance the infectious entry of SARS-CoVs and SL-CoVs by evading IFITM3-mediated restriction. Collectively, our findings further underscore the risk of exposure to animal SL-CoVs and highlight the vulnerability of patients who take amphotericin B to infection by SL-CoVs, including the most recently emerging (SARS-CoV-2).


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/physiology , Chiroptera/virology , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , RNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Virus Internalization , Animals , Betacoronavirus/classification , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Rats , SARS Virus/physiology , Viverridae
2.
Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol ; 318(5): H1084-H1090, 2020 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-707207

ABSTRACT

The novel SARS coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 pandemic may be particularly deleterious to patients with underlying cardiovascular disease (CVD). The mechanism for SARS-CoV-2 infection is the requisite binding of the virus to the membrane-bound form of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and internalization of the complex by the host cell. Recognition that ACE2 is the coreceptor for the coronavirus has prompted new therapeutic approaches to block the enzyme or reduce its expression to prevent the cellular entry and SARS-CoV-2 infection in tissues that express ACE2 including lung, heart, kidney, brain, and gut. ACE2, however, is a key enzymatic component of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS); ACE2 degrades ANG II, a peptide with multiple actions that promote CVD, and generates Ang-(1-7), which antagonizes the effects of ANG II. Moreover, experimental evidence suggests that RAAS blockade by ACE inhibitors, ANG II type 1 receptor antagonists, and mineralocorticoid antagonists, as well as statins, enhance ACE2 which, in part, contributes to the benefit of these regimens. In lieu of the fact that many older patients with hypertension or other CVDs are routinely treated with RAAS blockers and statins, new clinical concerns have developed regarding whether these patients are at greater risk for SARS-CoV-2 infection, whether RAAS and statin therapy should be discontinued, and the potential consequences of RAAS blockade to COVID-19-related pathologies such as acute and chronic respiratory disease. The current perspective critically examines the evidence for ACE2 regulation by RAAS blockade and statins, the cardiovascular benefits of ACE2, and whether ACE2 blockade is a viable approach to attenuate COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/physiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/enzymology , Cardiovascular Diseases/virology , Coronavirus Infections/enzymology , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/enzymology , Animals , Betacoronavirus/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Rats , Rats, Inbred Lew , Virus Internalization
3.
J Infect Dis ; 222(4): 551-555, 2020 07 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-704462

ABSTRACT

We simulated 3 transmission modes, including close-contact, respiratory droplets and aerosol routes, in the laboratory. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) can be highly transmitted among naive human angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (hACE2) mice via close contact because 7 of 13 naive hACE2 mice were SARS-CoV-2 antibody seropositive 14 days after being introduced into the same cage with 3 infected-hACE2 mice. For respiratory droplets, SARS-CoV-2 antibodies from 3 of 10 naive hACE2 mice showed seropositivity 14 days after introduction into the same cage with 3 infected-hACE2 mice, separated by grids. In addition, hACE2 mice cannot be experimentally infected via aerosol inoculation until continued up to 25 minutes with high viral concentrations.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Aerosols , Anal Canal/virology , Animals , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Chlorocebus aethiops , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Male , Mice , Mice, Transgenic , Pandemics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/genetics , Pharynx/virology , RNA, Viral/isolation & purification , Respiratory System/virology , Risk , Specific Pathogen-Free Organisms , Time Factors , Vero Cells , Viral Load , Weight Loss
4.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 117(24): 13596-13602, 2020 06 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-700699

ABSTRACT

The ongoing sixth mass species extinction is the result of the destruction of component populations leading to eventual extirpation of entire species. Populations and species extinctions have severe implications for society through the degradation of ecosystem services. Here we assess the extinction crisis from a different perspective. We examine 29,400 species of terrestrial vertebrates, and determine which are on the brink of extinction because they have fewer than 1,000 individuals. There are 515 species on the brink (1.7% of the evaluated vertebrates). Around 94% of the populations of 77 mammal and bird species on the brink have been lost in the last century. Assuming all species on the brink have similar trends, more than 237,000 populations of those species have vanished since 1900. We conclude the human-caused sixth mass extinction is likely accelerating for several reasons. First, many of the species that have been driven to the brink will likely become extinct soon. Second, the distribution of those species highly coincides with hundreds of other endangered species, surviving in regions with high human impacts, suggesting ongoing regional biodiversity collapses. Third, close ecological interactions of species on the brink tend to move other species toward annihilation when they disappear-extinction breeds extinctions. Finally, human pressures on the biosphere are growing rapidly, and a recent example is the current coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19) pandemic, linked to wildlife trade. Our results reemphasize the extreme urgency of taking much-expanded worldwide actions to save wild species and humanity's crucial life-support systems from this existential threat.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Ecosystem , Extinction, Biological , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Vertebrates , Animals , Animals, Wild , Climate Change , Commerce , Conservation of Natural Resources , Endangered Species , Human Activities , Pandemics , Population Density , Vertebrates/classification
5.
J Exp Med ; 217(11)2020 11 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-697830

ABSTRACT

The emergence of SARS-CoV-2 and the ensuing explosive epidemic of COVID-19 disease has generated a need for assays to rapidly and conveniently measure the antiviral activity of SARS-CoV-2-specific antibodies. Here, we describe a collection of approaches based on SARS-CoV-2 spike-pseudotyped, single-cycle, replication-defective human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1), and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), as well as a replication-competent VSV/SARS-CoV-2 chimeric virus. While each surrogate virus exhibited subtle differences in the sensitivity with which neutralizing activity was detected, the neutralizing activity of both convalescent plasma and human monoclonal antibodies measured using each virus correlated quantitatively with neutralizing activity measured using an authentic SARS-CoV-2 neutralization assay. The assays described herein are adaptable to high throughput and are useful tools in the evaluation of serologic immunity conferred by vaccination or prior SARS-CoV-2 infection, as well as the potency of convalescent plasma or human monoclonal antibodies.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/analysis , Antibodies, Viral/analysis , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Immunoassay/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Monoclonal/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Cell Line , Chimera/genetics , Chimera/immunology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus Infections/virology , HEK293 Cells , HIV-1/genetics , HIV-1/immunology , Humans , Neutralization Tests/methods , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Recombination, Genetic , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Vero Cells , Vesicular stomatitis Indiana virus/genetics , Vesicular stomatitis Indiana virus/immunology
6.
Int J Mol Sci ; 21(12)2020 Jun 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-692289

ABSTRACT

In the 21st century, three highly pathogenic betacoronaviruses have emerged, with an alarming rate of human morbidity and case fatality. Genomic information has been widely used to understand the pathogenesis, animal origin and mode of transmission of coronaviruses in the aftermath of the 2002-2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and 2012 Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) outbreaks. Furthermore, genome sequencing and bioinformatic analysis have had an unprecedented relevance in the battle against the 2019-2020 coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, the newest and most devastating outbreak caused by a coronavirus in the history of mankind. Here, we review how genomic information has been used to tackle outbreaks caused by emerging, highly pathogenic, betacoronavirus strains, emphasizing on SARS-CoV, MERS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2. We focus on shared genomic features of the betacoronaviruses and the application of genomic information to phylogenetic analysis, molecular epidemiology and the design of diagnostic systems, potential drugs and vaccine candidates.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Genome, Viral , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Animals , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Drug Design , Genes, Viral , Humans , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/genetics , Molecular Epidemiology , Phylogeny , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , SARS Virus/genetics , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/virology , Viral Vaccines/genetics , Viral Vaccines/immunology
7.
J Virol ; 94(15)2020 07 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-690841

ABSTRACT

Currently, there are four seasonal coronaviruses associated with relatively mild respiratory tract disease in humans. However, there is also a plethora of animal coronaviruses which have the potential to cross the species border. This regularly results in the emergence of new viruses in humans. In 2002, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) emerged and rapidly disappeared in May 2003. In 2012, Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) was identified as a possible threat to humans, but its pandemic potential so far is minimal, as human-to-human transmission is ineffective. The end of 2019 brought us information about severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) emergence, and the virus rapidly spread in 2020, causing an unprecedented pandemic. At present, studies on the virus are carried out using a surrogate system based on the immortalized simian Vero E6 cell line. This model is convenient for diagnostics, but it has serious limitations and does not allow for understanding of the biology and evolution of the virus. Here, we show that fully differentiated human airway epithelium cultures constitute an excellent model to study infection with the novel human coronavirus SARS-CoV-2. We observed efficient replication of the virus in the tissue, with maximal replication at 2 days postinfection. The virus replicated in ciliated cells and was released apically.IMPORTANCE Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) emerged by the end of 2019 and rapidly spread in 2020. At present, it is of utmost importance to understand the biology of the virus, rapidly assess the treatment potential of existing drugs, and develop new active compounds. While some animal models for such studies are under development, most of the research is carried out in Vero E6 cells. Here, we propose fully differentiated human airway epithelium cultures as a model for studies on SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/physiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Respiratory Mucosa/virology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/virology , Virus Replication , Animals , Cell Line , Cells, Cultured , Chlorocebus aethiops , Humans , Pandemics , Vero Cells
9.
J Int Med Res ; 48(7): 300060520939746, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-690568

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 infection is a serious global concern. Increased morbidity and mortality is associated with older age, male gender, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and smoking. As COVID-19 spreads from coastal borders, both state to state and country to country, our understanding of its pathophysiology has evolved. Age and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) play especially important roles in COVID-19 progression. T2DM is an age-related disease associated with metabolic syndrome, obesity, insulin resistance (hyperinsulinemia), hyperlipidemia, hypertension, hyperglycemia, and endothelial activation and dysfunction. This review evaluates the relationships and intersection between endothelial cell activation and dysfunction in T2DM and COVID-19. COVID-19 induces multiple injuries of the terminal bronchioles and alveolar blood-gas barrier and associated ultrastructural tissue remodeling. COVID-19 may unmask multiple vulnerabilities associated with T2DM including damage to the endothelial glycocalyx and multiple end-organ macro and microvascular diseases. Unmasking existing vulnerabilities in diabetic patients with COVID-19 is important. Globally, we must come together to better understand why T2DM is associated with increased COVID-19 morbidity and mortality.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/physiopathology , Endothelial Cells/physiology , Metabolic Syndrome/complications , Metabolic Syndrome/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Animals , Blood-Air Barrier/pathology , Blood-Air Barrier/physiopathology , Bronchioles/pathology , Bronchioles/physiopathology , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Drug Repositioning , Endothelial Cells/pathology , Humans , Metabolic Syndrome/epidemiology , Models, Biological , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pulmonary Alveoli/physiology , Pulmonary Alveoli/physiopathology , Rats , Wound Healing/physiology
10.
Front Immunol ; 11: 1581, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-688990

ABSTRACT

To ultimately combat the emerging COVID-19 pandemic, it is desired to develop an effective and safe vaccine against this highly contagious disease caused by the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus. Our literature and clinical trial survey showed that the whole virus, as well as the spike (S) protein, nucleocapsid (N) protein, and membrane (M) protein, have been tested for vaccine development against SARS and MERS. However, these vaccine candidates might lack the induction of complete protection and have safety concerns. We then applied the Vaxign and the newly developed machine learning-based Vaxign-ML reverse vaccinology tools to predict COVID-19 vaccine candidates. Our Vaxign analysis found that the SARS-CoV-2 N protein sequence is conserved with SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV but not from the other four human coronaviruses causing mild symptoms. By investigating the entire proteome of SARS-CoV-2, six proteins, including the S protein and five non-structural proteins (nsp3, 3CL-pro, and nsp8-10), were predicted to be adhesins, which are crucial to the viral adhering and host invasion. The S, nsp3, and nsp8 proteins were also predicted by Vaxign-ML to induce high protective antigenicity. Besides the commonly used S protein, the nsp3 protein has not been tested in any coronavirus vaccine studies and was selected for further investigation. The nsp3 was found to be more conserved among SARS-CoV-2, SARS-CoV, and MERS-CoV than among 15 coronaviruses infecting human and other animals. The protein was also predicted to contain promiscuous MHC-I and MHC-II T-cell epitopes, and the predicted linear B-cell epitopes were found to be localized on the surface of the protein. Our predicted vaccine targets have the potential for effective and safe COVID-19 vaccine development. We also propose that an "Sp/Nsp cocktail vaccine" containing a structural protein(s) (Sp) and a non-structural protein(s) (Nsp) would stimulate effective complementary immune responses.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Machine Learning , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Viral Vaccines , Animals , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Epitopes, B-Lymphocyte/genetics , Epitopes, B-Lymphocyte/immunology , Humans , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/genetics , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/immunology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/genetics , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Viral Proteins/genetics , Viral Proteins/immunology , Viral Vaccines/genetics , Viral Vaccines/immunology
11.
Indian J Med Microbiol ; 38(1): 1-8, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-688753

ABSTRACT

A novel coronavirus infection, which began as an outbreak of unusual viral pneumonia in Wuhan, a central city in China, has evolved into a global health crisis. The outbreak is an unembellished reminder of the hazard coronaviruses pose to public health. Government and researchers around the world have been taking swift measures to control the outbreak and conduct aetiological studies to understand the various facets of the outbreak. This review is an attempt at providing an insight about the current understanding, knowledge gaps and a perspective on the future of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infections. All the authentic data published so far on COVID-19 has been systematically analysed. PubMed, NCBI, World Health Organisation, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare (India), and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention databases and bibliographies of relevant studies up to 22nd June 2020 have been included. The Wuhan outbreak is a stark reminder of the continuing threat posed by zoonotic diseases to global health. Despite an armamentarium of Government officials, researchers and medical fraternity working towards the containment of this novel coronavirus viral pneumonia continues to spread at an alarming rate infecting multitudes and claiming hundreds of lives.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Zoonoses/transmission , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Animals , Biomedical Research/trends , Child , Child, Preschool , Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Female , Global Health , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Young Adult
12.
Front Immunol ; 11: 1625, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-688729

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is a clinical syndrome ranging from mild symptoms to severe pneumonia that often leads to respiratory failure, need for mechanical ventilation, and death. Most of the lung damage is driven by a surge in inflammatory cytokines [interleukin-6, interferon-γ, and granulocyte-monocyte stimulating factor (GM-CSF)]. Blunting this hyperinflammation with immunomodulation may lead to clinical improvement. GM-CSF is produced by many cells, including macrophages and T-cells. GM-CSF-derived signals are involved in differentiation of macrophages, including alveolar macrophages (AMs). In animal models of respiratory infections, the intranasal administration of GM-CSF increased the proliferation of AMs and improved outcomes. Increased levels of GM-CSF have been recently described in patients with COVID-19 compared to healthy controls. While GM-CSF might be beneficial in some circumstances as an appropriate response, in this case the inflammatory response is maladaptive by virtue of being later and disproportionate. The inhibition of GM-CSF signaling may be beneficial in improving the hyperinflammation-related lung damage in the most severe cases of COVID-19. This blockade can be achieved through antagonism of the GM-CSF receptor or the direct binding of circulating GM-CSF. Initial findings from patients with COVID-19 treated with a single intravenous dose of mavrilimumab, a monoclonal antibody binding GM-CSF receptor α, showed oxygenation improvement and shorter hospitalization. Prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled trials are ongoing. Anti-GM-CSF monoclonal antibodies, TJ003234 and gimsilumab, will be tested in clinical trials in patients with COVID-19, while lenzilumab received FDA approval for compassionate use. These trials will help inform whether blunting the inflammatory signaling provided by the GM-CSF axis in COVID-19 is beneficial.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Coronavirus Infections , Drug Delivery Systems , Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor/immunology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Receptors, Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor/antagonists & inhibitors , Animals , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Disease Models, Animal , Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor/antagonists & inhibitors , Humans , Inflammation/drug therapy , Inflammation/immunology , Inflammation/pathology , Macrophages, Alveolar/immunology , Macrophages, Alveolar/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Receptors, Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor/immunology , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Signal Transduction/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/pathology
13.
J Proteome Res ; 19(4): 1351-1360, 2020 04 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-688546

ABSTRACT

As the infection of 2019-nCoV coronavirus is quickly developing into a global pneumonia epidemic, the careful analysis of its transmission and cellular mechanisms is sorely needed. In this Communication, we first analyzed two recent studies that concluded that snakes are the intermediate hosts of 2019-nCoV and that the 2019-nCoV spike protein insertions share a unique similarity to HIV-1. However, the reimplementation of the analyses, built on larger scale data sets using state-of-the-art bioinformatics methods and databases, presents clear evidence that rebuts these conclusions. Next, using metagenomic samples from Manis javanica, we assembled a draft genome of the 2019-nCoV-like coronavirus, which shows 73% coverage and 91% sequence identity to the 2019-nCoV genome. In particular, the alignments of the spike surface glycoprotein receptor binding domain revealed four times more variations in the bat coronavirus RaTG13 than in the Manis coronavirus compared with 2019-nCoV, suggesting the pangolin as a missing link in the transmission of 2019-nCoV from bats to human.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Genome, Viral/genetics , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Models, Molecular , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Amino Acid Sequence , Animals , Betacoronavirus/classification , Eutheria/virology , HIV-1/genetics , Humans , Metagenome , Pandemics , Protein Structure, Tertiary , Sequence Alignment , Sequence Analysis, Protein , Snakes/virology
15.
J Biol Chem ; 295(15): 4780-4781, 2020 04 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-686585

ABSTRACT

The nucleotide analogue remdesivir is an investigational drug for the treatment of human coronavirus infection. Remdesivir is a phosphoramidate prodrug and is known to target viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases. In this issue, Gordon et al. identify that remdesivir acts as a delayed RNA chain terminator for MERS-CoV polymerase complexes.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus/drug effects , Coronavirus/enzymology , RNA Replicase/antagonists & inhibitors , Adenosine Monophosphate/pharmacology , Alanine/pharmacology , Animals , Coronavirus/physiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Exonucleases , Humans , Pandemics , Virus Replication/drug effects
16.
Zhonghua Gan Zang Bing Za Zhi ; 28(2): 100-106, 2020 Feb 20.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-686167

ABSTRACT

Objective: To explore and analyze the possible mechanism of liver injury in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (novel coronavirus pneumonia, NCP). Methods: The correlation between ALT, AST and other liver enzyme changes condition and NCP patients' disease status reported in the literature was comprehensively analyzed. ACE2 expression in liver tissue for novel coronavirus was analyzed based on single cell sequencing (GSE115469) data. RNA-Seq method was used to analyze Ace2 expression and transcription factors related to its expression in liver tissues at various time-points after hepatectomy in mouse model of acute liver injury with partial hepatectomy. t-test or Spearman rank correlation analysis was used for statistical analysis. Results: ALT and AST were abnormally elevated in some patients with novel coronavirus infection, and the rate and extent of ALT and AST elevation in severe NCP patients were higher than those in non-severe patients. Liver tissue results of single cell sequencing and immunohistochemistry showed that ACE2 was only expressed in bile duct epithelial cells of normal liver tissues, and very low in hepatocytes. In a mouse model of acute liver injury with partial hepatectomy, Ace2 expression was down-regulated on the first day, but it was elevated up to twice of the normal level on the third day, and returned to normal level on seventh day when the liver recovered and hepatocyte proliferation stopped. Whether this phenomenon suggests that the bile duct epithelial cells with positive expression of Ace2 participate in the process of liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy deserves further study. In RNA-Seq data, 77 transcription factors were positively correlated with the expression of Ace2 (r > 0.2, FDR < 0.05), which were mainly enriched in the development, differentiation, morphogenesis and cell proliferation of glandular epithelial cells. Conclusion: We assumed that in addition to the over activated inflammatory response in patients with NCP, the up-regulation of ACE2 expression in liver tissue caused by compensatory proliferation of hepatocytes derived from bile duct epithelial cells may also be the possible mechanism of liver tissue injury caused by 2019 novel coronavirus infection.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Animals , Humans , Liver , Mice , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A
17.
Immunol Cell Biol ; 98(4): 287-304, 2020 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-685605

ABSTRACT

The human fragment crystallizable (Fc)γ receptor (R) interacts with antigen-complexed immunoglobulin (Ig)G ligands to both activate and modulate a powerful network of inflammatory host-protective effector functions that are key to the normal physiology of immune resistance to pathogens. More than 100 therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are approved or in late stage clinical trials, many of which harness the potent FcγR-mediated effector systems to varying degrees. This is most evident for antibodies targeting cancer cells inducing antibody-dependent killing or phagocytosis but is also true to some degree for the mAbs that neutralize or remove small macromolecules such as cytokines or other Igs. The use of mAb therapeutics has also revealed a "scaffolding" role for FcγR which, in different contexts, may either underpin the therapeutic mAb action such as immune agonism or trigger catastrophic adverse effects. The still unmet therapeutic need in many cancers, inflammatory diseases or emerging infections such as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) requires increased effort on the development of improved and novel mAbs. A more mature appreciation of the immunobiology of individual FcγR function and the complexity of the relationships between FcγRs and antibodies is fueling efforts to develop more potent "next-gen" therapeutic antibodies. Such development strategies now include focused glycan or protein engineering of the Fc to increase affinity and/or tailor specificity for selective engagement of individual activating FcγRs or the inhibitory FcγRIIb or alternatively, for the ablation of FcγR interaction altogether. This review touches on recent aspects of FcγR and IgG immunobiology and its relationship with the present and future actions of therapeutic mAbs.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal , Immunotherapy , Receptors, IgG/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Monoclonal/immunology , Antibodies, Monoclonal/therapeutic use , Antibody-Dependent Cell Cytotoxicity/immunology , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Humans , Neoplasms/immunology , Neoplasms/therapy , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy
20.
J Breath Res ; 14(4): 041001, 2020 07 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-682126

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the importance of rapid, cost effective, accurate, and non-invasive testing for viral infections. Volatile compounds (VCs) have been suggested for several decades as fulfilling these criteria. However currently very little work has been done in trying to diagnose viral infections using VCs. Much of the work carried out to date involves the differentiation of bacterial and viral sources of infection and often the detection of bacterial and viral co-infection. However, this has usually been done in vitro and very little work has involved the use of human participants. Viruses hijack the host cell metabolism and do not produce their own metabolites so identifying virus specific VCs is at best a challenging task. However, there are proteins and lipids that are potential candidates as markers of viral infection. The current understanding is that host cell glycolysis is upregulated under viral infection to increase the available energy for viral replication. There is some evidence that viral infection leads to the increase of production of fatty acids, alkanes, and alkanes related products. For instance, 2,3-butandione, aldehydes, 2,8-dimethyl-undecane and n-propyl acetate have all been correlated with viral infection. Currently, the literature points to markers of oxidative stress (e.g. nitric oxide, aldehydes etc) being the most useful in the determination of viral infection. The issue, however, is that there are also many other conditions that can lead to oxidative stress markers being produced. In this review a range of (mainly mass spectrometric) methods are discussed for viral detection in breath, including breath condensate. Currently MALDI-ToF-MS is likely to be the preferred method for the identification of viral strains and variants of those strains, however it is limited by its need for the viral strains to have been sequenced and logged in a database.


Subject(s)
Breath Tests/methods , Virus Diseases/diagnosis , Aldehydes/metabolism , Animals , Betacoronavirus , Biomarkers/metabolism , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry , Hepatitis B/diagnosis , Hepatitis B/metabolism , Humans , Influenza, Human/diagnosis , Influenza, Human/metabolism , Mass Spectrometry , Nitric Oxide/metabolism , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/diagnosis , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/metabolism , Oxidative Stress , Pandemics , Picornaviridae Infections/diagnosis , Picornaviridae Infections/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Rotavirus Infections/diagnosis , Rotavirus Infections/metabolism , Spectrometry, Mass, Electrospray Ionization , Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization , Swine , Virus Diseases/metabolism , Viruses
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