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1.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(12): e2141328, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1592856

ABSTRACT

Importance: Hospitalized patients with COVID-19 pneumonia have high rates of morbidity and mortality. Objective: To assess the efficacy of colchicine in hospitalized patients with COVID-19 pneumonia. Design, Setting, and Participants: The Estudios Clínicos Latino América (ECLA) Population Health Research Institute (PHRI) COLCOVID trial was a multicenter, open-label, randomized clinical trial performed from April 17, 2020, to March 28, 2021, in adults with confirmed or suspected SARS-CoV-2 infection followed for up to 28 days. Participants received colchicine vs usual care if they were hospitalized with COVID-19 symptoms and had severe acute respiratory syndrome or oxygen desaturation. The main exclusion criteria were clear indications or contraindications for colchicine, chronic kidney disease, and negative results on a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction test for SARS-CoV-2 before randomization. Data were analyzed from June 20 to July 25, 2021. Interventions: Patients were assigned in a 1:1 ratio to usual care or usual care plus colchicine. Colchicine was administered orally in a loading dose of 1.5 mg immediately after randomization, followed by 0.5 mg orally within 2 hours of the initial dose and 0.5 mg orally twice a day for 14 days or discharge, whichever occurred first. Main Outcomes and Measures: The first coprimary outcome was the composite of a new requirement for mechanical ventilation or death evaluated at 28 days. The second coprimary outcome was death at 28 days. Results: A total of 1279 hospitalized patients (mean [SD] age, 61.8 [14.6] years; 449 [35.1%] women and 830 [64.9%] men) were randomized, including 639 patients in the usual care group and 640 patients in the colchicine group. Corticosteroids were used in 1171 patients (91.5%). The coprimary outcome of mechanical ventilation or 28-day death occurred in 160 patients (25.0%) in the colchicine group and 184 patients (28.8%) in the usual care group (hazard ratio [HR], 0.83; 95% CI, 0.67-1.02; P = .08). The second coprimary outcome, 28-day death, occurred in 131 patients (20.5%) in the colchicine group and 142 patients (22.2%) in the usual care group (HR, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.70-1.12). Diarrhea was the most frequent adverse effect of colchicine, reported in 68 patients (11.3%). Conclusions and Relevance: This randomized clinical trial found that compared with usual care, colchicine did not significantly reduce mechanical ventilation or 28-day mortality in patients hospitalized with COVID-19 pneumonia. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04328480.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/therapy , Colchicine/therapeutic use , Hospitalization , Intubation, Intratracheal , Respiration, Artificial , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , Adult , Aged , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/adverse effects , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/pathology , Colchicine/adverse effects , Female , Humans , Inflammation/drug therapy , Inflammation/etiology , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Standard of Care
2.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 7327, 2021 12 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1585856

ABSTRACT

The global disruption caused by the 2020 coronavirus pandemic stressed the supply chain of many products, including pharmaceuticals. Multiple drug repurposing studies for COVID-19 are now underway. If a winning therapeutic emerges, it is unlikely that the existing inventory of the medicine, or even the chemical raw materials needed to synthesize it, will be available in the quantities required. Here, we utilize retrosynthetic software to arrive at alternate chemical supply chains for the antiviral drug umifenovir, as well as eleven other antiviral and anti-inflammatory drugs. We have experimentally validated four routes to umifenovir and one route to bromhexine. In one route to umifenovir the software invokes conversion of six C-H bonds into C-C bonds or functional groups. The strategy we apply of excluding known starting materials from search results can be used to identify distinct starting materials, for instance to relieve stress on existing supply chains.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/chemistry , COVID-19/drug therapy , Indoles/chemistry , Software , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/chemistry , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Drug Repositioning , Humans , Indoles/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects
4.
Front Immunol ; 12: 631233, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575223

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease-19 caused by the novel RNA betacoronavirus SARS-CoV2 has first emerged in Wuhan, China in December 2019, and since then developed into a worldwide pandemic with >99 million people afflicted and >2.1 million fatal outcomes as of 24th January 2021. SARS-CoV2 targets the lower respiratory tract system leading to pneumonia with fever, cough, and dyspnea. Most patients develop only mild symptoms. However, a certain percentage develop severe symptoms with dyspnea, hypoxia, and lung involvement which can further progress to a critical stage where respiratory support due to respiratory failure is required. Most of the COVID-19 symptoms are related to hyperinflammation as seen in cytokine release syndrome and it is believed that fatalities are due to a COVID-19 related cytokine storm. Treatments with anti-inflammatory or anti-viral drugs are still in clinical trials or could not reduce mortality. This makes it necessary to develop novel anti-inflammatory therapies. Recently, the therapeutic potential of phytocannabinoids, the unique active compounds of the cannabis plant, has been discovered in the area of immunology. Phytocannabinoids are a group of terpenophenolic compounds which biological functions are conveyed by their interactions with the endocannabinoid system in humans. Here, we explore the anti-inflammatory function of cannabinoids in relation to inflammatory events that happen during severe COVID-19 disease, and how cannabinoids might help to prevent the progression from mild to severe disease.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/therapy , Cannabinoids/therapeutic use , Cannabis/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/therapy , Phytotherapy , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Endocannabinoids/metabolism , Humans , Pandemics
5.
Rev Med Virol ; 31(6): e2221, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575100

ABSTRACT

The current pandemic caused by SARS-CoV-2 virus infection is known as Covid-19 (coronavirus disease 2019). This disease can be asymptomatic or can affect multiple organ systems. Damage induced by the virus is related to dysfunctional activity of the immune system, but the activity of molecules such as C-reactive protein (CRP) as a factor capable of inducing an inflammatory status that may be involved in the severe evolution of the disease, has not been extensively evaluated. A systematic review was performed using the NCBI-PubMed database to find articles related to Covid-19 immunity, inflammatory response, and CRP published from December 2019 to December 2020. High levels of CRP were found in patients with severe evolution of Covid-19 in which several organ systems were affected and in patients who died. CRP activates complement, induces the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and induces apoptosis which, together with the inflammatory status during the disease, can lead to a severe outcome. Several drugs can decrease the level or block the effect of CRP and might be useful in the treatment of Covid-19. From this review it is reasonable to conclude that CRP is a factor that can contribute to severe evolution of Covid-19 and that the use of drugs able to lower CRP levels or block its activity should be evaluated in randomized controlled clinical trials.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , C-Reactive Protein/antagonists & inhibitors , COVID-19/drug therapy , Complement System Proteins/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , ADAM17 Protein/antagonists & inhibitors , ADAM17 Protein/genetics , ADAM17 Protein/immunology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/antagonists & inhibitors , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/immunology , Biomarkers/blood , C-Reactive Protein/genetics , C-Reactive Protein/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Celecoxib/therapeutic use , Complement System Proteins/genetics , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/pathology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Cytokines/antagonists & inhibitors , Cytokines/genetics , Cytokines/immunology , Disease Progression , Doxycycline/therapeutic use , Gene Expression Regulation , Humans , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Severity of Illness Index , Survival Analysis
6.
Eur Respir Rev ; 30(162)2021 Dec 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574091

ABSTRACT

Hospitalised patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) have a high mortality rate. There are an increasing number of published randomised controlled trials for anti-inflammatory, anti-viral and other treatments. The European Respiratory Society Living Guidelines for the Management of Hospitalised Adults with COVID-19 were published recently, providing recommendations on appropriate pharmacotherapy.Patient, Intervention, Comparator and Outcomes questions for key interventions were identified by an international panel and systematic reviews were conducted to identify randomised controlled trials meeting the inclusion criteria. The importance of end-points were rated, and mortality was identified as the key "critical" outcome for all interventions. Random-effects meta-analysis was used to pool studies and provide effect estimates for the impact of treatments on mortality.Corticosteroids, hydroxychloroquine, azithromycin, remdesivir, anti-interleukin (IL)-6 monoclonal antibodies, colchicine, lopinavir/ritonavir and interferon-ß have been reviewed.Our results found further evidence in support of the use of corticosteroids, particularly dexamethasone, and anti-IL-6 receptor monoclonal antibody therapy. These data support the need to identify additional therapies with beneficial effects on mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Anti-Inflammatory Agents , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Humans , Respiration, Artificial , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Biomolecules ; 11(12)2021 12 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1554985

ABSTRACT

Inflammation involves a complex biological response of the body tissues to damaging stimuli. When dysregulated, inflammation led by biomolecular mediators such as caspase-1 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) can play a detrimental role in the progression of different medical conditions such as cancer, neurological disorders, autoimmune diseases, and cytokine storms caused by viral infections such as COVID-19. Computational approaches can accelerate the search for dual-target drugs able to simultaneously inhibit the aforementioned proteins, enabling the discovery of wide-spectrum anti-inflammatory agents. This work reports the first multicondition model based on quantitative structure-activity relationships and a multilayer perceptron neural network (mtc-QSAR-MLP) for the virtual screening of agency-regulated chemicals as versatile anti-inflammatory therapeutics. The mtc-QSAR-MLP model displayed accuracy higher than 88%, and was interpreted from a physicochemical and structural point of view. When using the mtc-QSAR-MLP model as a virtual screening tool, we could identify several agency-regulated chemicals as dual inhibitors of caspase-1 and TNF-alpha, and the experimental information later retrieved from the scientific literature converged with our computational results. This study supports the capabilities of our mtc-QSAR-MLP model in anti-inflammatory therapy with direct applications to current health issues such as the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Caspase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Drug Repositioning/methods , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/antagonists & inhibitors , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/chemistry , COVID-19/drug therapy , Caspase 1/metabolism , Caspase Inhibitors/chemistry , Humans , Inflammation/drug therapy , Molecular Docking Simulation , Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/metabolism
8.
Nutrients ; 13(12)2021 Nov 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1542693

ABSTRACT

Bromelain is a major sulfhydryl proteolytic enzyme found in pineapple plants, having multiple activities in many areas of medicine. Due to its low toxicity, high efficiency, high availability, and relative simplicity of acquisition, it is the object of inexhaustible interest of scientists. This review summarizes scientific reports concerning the possible application of bromelain in treating cardiovascular diseases, blood coagulation and fibrinolysis disorders, infectious diseases, inflammation-associated diseases, and many types of cancer. However, for the proper application of such multi-action activities of bromelain, further exploration of the mechanism of its action is needed. It is supposed that the anti-viral, anti-inflammatory, cardioprotective and anti-coagulatory activity of bromelain may become a complementary therapy for COVID-19 and post-COVID-19 patients. During the irrepressible spread of novel variants of the SARS-CoV-2 virus, such beneficial properties of this biomolecule might help prevent escalation and the progression of the COVID-19 disease.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Blood Coagulation Disorders/drug therapy , Bromelains/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Cardiotonic Agents/therapeutic use , Cardiovascular Diseases/drug therapy , Neoplasms/drug therapy , Plant Proteins/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Ananas/enzymology , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/chemistry , Anticoagulants/chemistry , Bromelains/chemistry , Cardiotonic Agents/chemistry , Fibrinolysis/drug effects , Humans , Plant Proteins/chemistry
9.
Mol Biol Rep ; 48(12): 8221-8225, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525563

ABSTRACT

Arglabin (l(R),10(S)-epoxy-5(S),5(S),7(S)-guaia-3(4),ll(13)-dien-6,12-olide), is a natural sesquiterpene γ-lactone which was first isolated from Artemisia glabella. The compound has been shown to possess anti-inflammatory activity through inhibition of the NLR Family pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome and production of proinflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL)-1ß and IL-18. A more hydrophilic derivative of the compound also exhibited antitumor activity in the breast, colon, ovarian, and lung cancer. Some other synthetic derivatives of the compound have also been synthesized with antitumor, cytotoxic, antibacterial, and antifungal activities. Since both NLRP3 inflammasome and cytokine storm are associated with the pathogenesis of COVID-19 and its lethality, compounds like arglabin might have therapeutic potential to attenuate the inflammasome-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome and/or the cytokine storm associated with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Sesquiterpenes, Guaiane/therapeutic use , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Artemisia , COVID-19/metabolism , Cytokine Release Syndrome/drug therapy , Cytokines , Humans , Inflammasomes/drug effects , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/drug effects , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/metabolism , Pandemics , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Sesquiterpenes, Guaiane/chemistry , Sesquiterpenes, Guaiane/metabolism , Signal Transduction/drug effects
10.
Front Immunol ; 12: 754127, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518487

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 presentations range from mild to moderate through severe disease but also manifest with persistent illness or viral recrudescence. We hypothesized that the spectrum of COVID-19 disease manifestations was a consequence of SARS-CoV-2-mediated delay in the pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) response, including dampened type I interferon signaling, thereby shifting the balance of the immune response to be dominated by damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) signaling. To test the hypothesis, we constructed a parsimonious mechanistic mathematical model. After calibration of the model for initial viral load and then by varying a few key parameters, we show that the core model generates four distinct viral load, immune response and associated disease trajectories termed "patient archetypes", whose temporal dynamics are reflected in clinical data from hospitalized COVID-19 patients. The model also accounts for responses to corticosteroid therapy and predicts that vaccine-induced neutralizing antibodies and cellular memory will be protective, including from severe COVID-19 disease. This generalizable modeling framework could be used to analyze protective and pathogenic immune responses to diverse viral infections.


Subject(s)
Alarmins/immunology , COVID-19 , Models, Biological , SARS-CoV-2 , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , Adult , Aged , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , Middle Aged , Reproducibility of Results , Viral Load
11.
Drug Des Devel Ther ; 15: 4503-4525, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1511886

ABSTRACT

Curcumin is a natural compound with great potential for disease treatment. A large number of studies have proved that curcumin has a variety of biological activities, among which anti-inflammatory effect is a significant feature of it. Inflammation is a complex and pervasive physiological and pathological process. The physiological and pathological mechanisms of inflammatory bowel disease, psoriasis, atherosclerosis, COVID-19 and other research focus diseases are not clear yet, and they are considered to be related to inflammation. The anti-inflammatory effect of curcumin can effectively improve the symptoms of these diseases and is expected to be a candidate drug for the treatment of related diseases. This paper mainly reviews the anti-inflammatory effect of curcumin, the inflammatory pathological mechanism of related diseases, the regulatory effect of curcumin on these, and the latest research results on the improvement of curcumin pharmacokinetics. It is beneficial to the further study of curcumin and provides new ideas and insights for the development of curcumin anti-inflammatory preparations.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Curcumin/pharmacology , Inflammation/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Animals , Atherosclerosis/drug therapy , Curcumin/therapeutic use , Depression/drug therapy , Humans
13.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 21725, 2021 11 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1504567

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 enters the intestine by the spike protein binding to angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptors in enterocyte apical membranes, leading to diarrhea in some patients. Early treatment of COVID-19-associated diarrhea could relieve symptoms and limit viral spread within the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Diosmectite, an aluminomagnesium silicate adsorbent clay with antidiarrheal effects, is recommended in some COVID-19 management protocols. In rotavirus models, diosmectite prevents pathogenic effects by binding the virus and its enterotoxin. We tested the trapping and anti-inflammatory properties of diosmectite in a SARS-CoV-2 model. Trapping effects were tested in Caco-2 cells using spike protein receptor-binding domain (RBD) and heat-inactivated SARS-CoV-2 preparations. Trapping was assessed by immunofluorescence, alone or in the presence of cells. The effect of diosmectite on nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) activation and CXCL10 secretion induced by the spike protein RBD and heat-inactivated SARS-CoV-2 were analyzed by Western blot and ELISA, respectively. Diosmectite bound the spike protein RBD and SARS-CoV-2 preparation, and inhibited interaction of the spike protein RBD with ACE2 receptors on the Caco-2 cell surface. Diosmectite exposure also inhibited NF-kappaB activation and CXCL10 secretion. These data provide direct evidence that diosmectite can bind SARS-CoV-2 components and inhibit downstream inflammation, supporting a mechanistic rationale for consideration of diosmectite as a management option for COVID-19-associated diarrhea.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Chemokine CXCL10/metabolism , NF-kappa B p50 Subunit/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Silicates/chemistry , Adsorption , Aluminum Compounds/chemistry , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Anti-Inflammatory Agents , Binding Sites , Caco-2 Cells , Chromatography, Liquid , Clay , Diarrhea/etiology , Diarrhea/therapy , Enterocytes/metabolism , Gastroenterology , Humans , Magnesium Compounds/chemistry , Mass Spectrometry , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Protein Binding/drug effects , Protein Domains , Rotavirus , Silicates/metabolism
14.
Mech Ageing Dev ; 199: 111551, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1492370

ABSTRACT

Polyphenols are chemopreventive through the induction of nuclear factor erythroid 2 related factor 2 (Nrf2)-mediated proteins and anti-inflammatory pathways. These pathways, encoding cytoprotective vitagenes, include heat shock proteins, such as heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), as well as glutathione redox system to protect against cancer initiation and progression. Phytochemicals exhibit biphasic dose responses on cancer cells, activating at low dose, signaling pathways resulting in upregulation of vitagenes, as in the case of the Nrf2 pathway upregulated by hydroxytyrosol (HT) or curcumin and NAD/NADH-sirtuin-1 activated by resveratrol. Here, the importance of vitagenes in redox stress response and autophagy mechanisms, as well as the potential use of dietary antioxidants in the prevention and treatment of multiple types of cancer are discussed. We also discuss the possible relationship between SARS-CoV-2, inflammation and cancer, exploiting innovative therapeutic approaches with HT-rich aqueous olive pulp extract (Hidrox®), a natural polyphenolic formulation, as well as the rationale of Vitamin D supplementation. Finally, we describe innovative approaches with organoids technology to study human carcinogenesis in preclinical models from basic cancer research to clinical practice, suggesting patient-derived organoids as an innovative tool to test drug toxicity and drive personalized therapy.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Antioxidants/pharmacology , Drug Development , NF-E2-Related Factor 2/metabolism , Organoids/drug effects , Oxidative Stress/drug effects , Polyphenols/pharmacology , Vitamin D/pharmacology , Animals , Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Humans , NF-E2-Related Factor 2/genetics , Neoplasms/drug therapy , Neoplasms/genetics , Neoplasms/metabolism , Neoplasms/pathology , Organoids/metabolism , Oxidation-Reduction , Oxidative Stress/genetics
15.
J Trace Elem Med Biol ; 69: 126887, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1487875

ABSTRACT

An increasing evidence suggests that vanadium compounds are novel potential drugs in the treatment of diabetes, atherosclerosis, and cancer. Vanadium has also demonstrated activities against RNA viruses and is a promising candidate for treating acute respiratory diseases. The antidiabetic, antihypertensive, lipid-lowering, cardioprotective, antineoplastic, antiviral, and other potential effects of vanadium are summarized here. Given the beneficial antihyperglycemic and antiinflammatory effects as well as the potential mechanistic link between the COVID-19 and diabetes, vanadium compounds could be considered as a complement to the prescribed treatment of COVID-19. Thus, further clinical trials are warranted to confirm these favorable effects of vanadium treatment in COVID-19 patients, which appear not to be studied yet.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19 , Vanadium/pharmacology , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Diabetes Mellitus/drug therapy , Humans , Hypoglycemic Agents/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2 , Vanadium Compounds/pharmacology
16.
Future Microbiol ; 16: 1289-1301, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1484978

ABSTRACT

COVID-19, caused by the SARS-CoV-2 outbreak, has resulted in a massive global health crisis. Bioactive molecules extracted or synthesized using starting material obtained from marine species, including griffithsin, plitidepsin and fingolimod are in clinical trials to evaluate their anti-SARS-CoV-2 and anti-HIV efficacies. The current review highlights the anti-SARS-CoV-2 potential of marine-derived phytochemicals explored using in silico, in vitro and in vivo models. The current literature suggests that these molecules have the potential to bind with various key drug targets of SARS-CoV-2. In addition, many of these agents have anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory potentials and thus could play a role in the attenuation of COVID-19 complications. Overall, these agents may play a role in the management of COVID-19, but further preclinical and clinical studies are still required to establish their role in the mitigation of the current viral pandemic.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Oceans and Seas , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Alkaloids/pharmacology , Anti-Inflammatory Agents , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Depsipeptides , Fingolimod Hydrochloride/chemistry , Fingolimod Hydrochloride/pharmacology , Humans , Lectins , Marine Biology , Molecular Docking Simulation , Peptides, Cyclic/chemistry , Peptides, Cyclic/pharmacology , Phycocyanin/pharmacology , Phytochemicals , Plant Lectins/chemistry , Plant Lectins/pharmacology , Polyphenols/pharmacology , Polysaccharides/pharmacology , Seaweed , Sesquiterpenes/pharmacology
17.
Ann Intern Med ; 174(10): 1395-1403, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1481181

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Relatively little is known about the use patterns of potential pharmacologic treatments of COVID-19 in the United States. OBJECTIVE: To use the National COVID Cohort Collaborative (N3C), a large, multicenter, longitudinal cohort, to characterize the use of hydroxychloroquine, remdesivir, and dexamethasone, overall as well as across individuals, health systems, and time. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. SETTING: 43 health systems in the United States. PARTICIPANTS: 137 870 adults hospitalized with COVID-19 between 1 February 2020 and 28 February 2021. MEASUREMENTS: Inpatient use of hydroxychloroquine, remdesivir, or dexamethasone. RESULTS: Among 137 870 persons hospitalized with confirmed or suspected COVID-19, 8754 (6.3%) received hydroxychloroquine, 29 272 (21.2%) remdesivir, and 53 909 (39.1%) dexamethasone during the study period. Since the release of results from the RECOVERY (Randomised Evaluation of COVID-19 Therapy) trial in mid-June, approximately 78% to 84% of people who have had invasive mechanical ventilation have received dexamethasone or other glucocorticoids. The use of hydroxychloroquine increased during March 2020, peaking at 42%, and started declining by April 2020. By contrast, remdesivir and dexamethasone use gradually increased over the study period. Dexamethasone and remdesivir use varied substantially across health centers (intraclass correlation coefficient, 14.2% for dexamethasone and 84.6% for remdesivir). LIMITATION: Because most N3C data contributors are academic medical centers, findings may not reflect the experience of community hospitals. CONCLUSION: Dexamethasone, an evidence-based treatment of COVID-19, may be underused among persons who are mechanically ventilated. The use of remdesivir and dexamethasone varied across health systems, suggesting variation in patient case mix, drug access, treatment protocols, and quality of care. PRIMARY FUNDING SOURCE: National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences; National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; and National Institute on Aging.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Dexamethasone/therapeutic use , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Practice Patterns, Physicians' , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Alanine/therapeutic use , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Respiration, Artificial , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , United States , Young Adult
18.
Molecules ; 26(20)2021 Oct 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1480885

ABSTRACT

In our in vitro and in vivo studies, we used Acalypha indica root methanolic extract (AIRME), and investigated their free radical scavenging/antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Primarily, phytochemical analysis showed rich content of phenols (70.92 mg of gallic acid/g) and flavonoids (16.01 mg of rutin/g) in AIRME. We then performed HR-LC-MS and GC-MS analyses, and identified 101 and 14 phytochemical compounds, respectively. Among them, ramipril glucuronide (1.563%), antimycin A (1.324%), swietenine (1.134%), quinone (1.152%), oxprenolol (1.118%), choline (0.847%), bumetanide (0.847%) and fenofibrate (0.711%) are the predominant phytomolecules. Evidence from in vitro studies revealed that AIRME scavenges DPPH and hydroxyl radicals in a concentration dependent manner (10-50 µg/mL). Similarly, hydrogen peroxide and lipid peroxidation were also remarkably inhibited by AIRME as concentration increases (20-100 µg/mL). In vitro antioxidant activity of AIRME was comparable to ascorbic acid treatment. For in vivo studies, carrageenan (1%, sub-plantar) was injected to rats to induce localized inflammation. Acute inflammation was represented by paw-edema, and significantly elevated (p < 0.05) WBC, platelets and C-reactive protein (CRP). However, AIRME pretreatment (150/300 mg/kg bodyweight) significantly (p < 0.05) decreased edema volume. This was accompanied by a significant (p < 0.05) reduction of WBC, platelets and CRP with both doses of AIRME. The decreased activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase in paw tissue were restored (p < 0.05 / p < 0.01) with AIRME in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, AIRME attenuated carrageenan-induced neutrophil infiltrations and vascular dilation in paw tissue. For the first time, our findings demonstrated the potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of AIRME, which could be considered to develop novel anti-inflammatory drugs.


Subject(s)
Acalypha/chemistry , Phytochemicals/chemistry , Phytochemicals/pharmacology , Plants, Medicinal/chemistry , Animals , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/chemistry , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Antioxidants/chemistry , Antioxidants/pharmacology , Disease Models, Animal , Edema/drug therapy , Edema/enzymology , Edema/pathology , Free Radical Scavengers/chemistry , Free Radical Scavengers/pharmacology , In Vitro Techniques , Male , Phytotherapy , Plant Extracts/chemistry , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , Plant Roots/chemistry , Rats , Rats, Wistar
19.
Front Immunol ; 12: 687397, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477818

ABSTRACT

Severe COVID-19 is characterized by acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)-like hyperinflammation and endothelial dysfunction, that can lead to respiratory and multi organ failure and death. Interstitial lung diseases (ILD) and pulmonary fibrosis confer an increased risk for severe disease, while a subset of COVID-19-related ARDS surviving patients will develop a fibroproliferative response that can persist post hospitalization. Autotaxin (ATX) is a secreted lysophospholipase D, largely responsible for the extracellular production of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a pleiotropic signaling lysophospholipid with multiple effects in pulmonary and immune cells. In this review, we discuss the similarities of COVID-19, ARDS and ILDs, and suggest ATX as a possible pathologic link and a potential common therapeutic target.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Phosphoric Diester Hydrolases/metabolism , Pulmonary Fibrosis/pathology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/pathology , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/blood , Dexamethasone/therapeutic use , Humans , Lung/pathology , Lysophospholipids/metabolism , Phosphoric Diester Hydrolases/blood , Pulmonary Fibrosis/blood , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/blood , SARS-CoV-2 , Signal Transduction/immunology
20.
Mol Biol Rep ; 48(12): 8195-8202, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1474055

ABSTRACT

AIM/PURPOSE: Niclosamide (NCL) is an anthelminthic drug, which is widely used to treat various diseases due to its pleiotropic anti-inflammatory and antiviral activities. NCL modulates of uncoupling oxidative phosphorylation and different signaling pathways in human biological processes. The wide-spectrum antiviral effect of NCL makes it a possible candidate for recent pandemic SARS-CoV-2 infection and may reduce Covid-19 severity. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to review and clarify the potential role of NCL in Covid-19. METHODS: This study reviewed and highlighted the protective role of NCL therapy in Covid-19. A related literature search in PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, Google Scholar, and Science Direct was done. RESULTS: NCL has noteworthy anti-inflammatory and antiviral effects. The primary antiviral mechanism of NCL is through neutralization of endosomal PH and inhibition of viral protein maturation. NCL acts as a proton carrier, inhibits homeostasis of endosomal PH, which limiting of viral proliferation and release. The anti-inflammatory effects of NCL are mediated by suppression of inflammatory signaling pathways and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. However, the major limitation in using NCL is low aqueous solubility, which reduces oral bioavailability and therapeutic serum concentration that reducing the in vivo effect of NCL against SARS-CoV-2. CONCLUSIONS: NCL has anti-inflammatory and immune regulatory effects by modulating the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, inhibition of NF-κB /NLRP3 inflammasome and mTOR signaling pathway. NCL has an anti-SARS-CoV-2 effect via interruption of viral life-cycle and/or induction of cytopathic effect. Prospective clinical studies and clinical trials are mandatory to confirm the potential role of NCL in patients with Covid-19 concerning the severity and clinical outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Niclosamide/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/metabolism , Humans , Niclosamide/metabolism , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Signal Transduction/drug effects
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