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1.
Blood Purif ; 50(3): 290-297, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1533118

ABSTRACT

The principles and use of plasmapheresis are often little understood by intensivists. We propose to review the principles, the main indications, and the methods of using this technique.


Subject(s)
Critical Care/methods , Plasma Exchange/methods , Animals , Anti-Neutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-Associated Vasculitis/therapy , COVID-19/therapy , Equipment Design , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/therapy , Humans , Liver Failure, Acute/therapy , Membranes, Artificial , Plasma Exchange/instrumentation , Purpura, Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic/therapy
2.
Curr Opin Rheumatol ; 34(1): 33-38, 2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1503782

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review paper evaluates the use of patient reported outcome (PROs) in systemic vasculitis and the increasing incorporation of these measures in the evaluation of clinical outcomes and healthcare provision. RECENT FINDINGS: Generic PROs such as the SF-12, SF-36, EQ-5D have been used to evaluate health-related quality of life (HRQOL) across the spectrum of vasculitis; including giant cell arteritis, antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-related vasculitis and immunoglobulin A vasculitis (IgA) vasculitis. More recently disease-specific PROs have been developed including the associated vasculitis (AAV)-PRO and GCA-PRO, whilst further work is ongoing including a Steroid-PRO. SUMMARY: Generic and disease-specific PROs are complimentary in nature, but the advent of disease-specific PROs allows evaluation of the impact of specific symptoms and intervention on patient HRQOL. Following the COVID-19 pandemic, the advent of increasing virtual work has brought the potential for electronic-PRO measures to the forefront and is a current area of interest.


Subject(s)
Anti-Neutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-Associated Vasculitis , COVID-19 , Anti-Neutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-Associated Vasculitis/therapy , Antibodies, Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic , Humans , Pandemics , Patient Reported Outcome Measures , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Rheumatol Int ; 41(8): 1523-1529, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1260588

ABSTRACT

Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) are systemic autoimmune diseases that may lead to renal failure due to the infiltration of mononuclear cells and the destruction of small- and medium-sized blood vessels. It has been shown that severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) may trigger the presentation or exacerbation of autoimmune diseases. Crescentic glomerulonephritis (GN) has rarely been reported in patients with Coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19). We present rare two cases with AAV after a recent diagnosis of COVID-19. The first case was 26-year-old male patient, who was presented with acute kidney injury after COVID-19. Serum creatinine increased and active urine sediment was seen. Serological evaluation showed anti-myeloperoxidase antibody was at a level of 80.6 U/mL. Kidney biopsy showed necrotizing GN with cellular crescents. Methylprednisolone, cyclophosphamide and plasma exchange were administered. He was discharged with hemodialysis. Second case was a 36-year-old female who was hospitalized because of fever, cough and dyspnea. After she was diagnosed with COVID-19, she had total hearing loss, with cavitary lesions on bilateral lung parenchyma and an acute kidney injury. Serological evaluation showed an elevated anti-proteinase-3 with a level of 1:32. Kidney biopsy showed necrotizing GN with cellular crescents. Renal function improved after methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide treatment. With a systematic review of the literature, we found four cases of new-onset AAV due to COVID-19. Herein, we discuss two cases and provide a literature review on cases of new-onset pauci-immune GN after COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
Anti-Neutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-Associated Vasculitis/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , Anti-Neutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-Associated Vasculitis/diagnosis , Anti-Neutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-Associated Vasculitis/therapy , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Female , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Male , Middle Aged , Plasma Exchange , Renal Dialysis , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Treatment Outcome
4.
J Nephrol ; 34(1): 185-190, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-841482

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has brought on challenges not only to acute care, but also chronic care of patients. Individuals maintained on immunosuppression appear to be especially susceptible to COVID-19 infection. Patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) frequently require immunosuppression and may be at increased risk for developing COVID-19. The incidence and impact of COVID-19 on patients with AAV is currently not known. We aimed to investigate this impact via a telephone questionnaire-based patient survey and chart review. METHODS: A cross-sectional study of AAV patients followed at two centers was conducted. Data regarding demographics, disease characteristics and therapy were confirmed by chart review. A telephone survey was conducted to ascertain symptoms and contact exposure related to COVID-19, as well as changes in health care delivery during the pandemic period between January and July, 2020. RESULTS: Of the 206 patients surveyed, the median age was 64 years, 51% were female and mean (SD) disease duration was 7 (5) years. The majority had kidney (n = 160) and lung (n = 108) involvement. Seventy-five percent (n = 155) were receiving immunosuppression, with 77 patients (50%) receiving rituximab during the pandemic period. Of the 10 patients tested for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS CoV-2) by PCR, three were positive. Patients had a significant disruption in care; none had an in-person visit and 69% had a telemedicine consultation. Rituximab maintenance was postponed in 21 patients. Twelve patients experienced disease relapse. CONCLUSION: The incidence of COVID-19 in patients with AAV appears to be similar to that of the general population. For a patient population that requires active clinical surveillance, there is significant disruption in care as a result of the pandemic. Reduction of immunosuppression may not be indicated, and the risk of relapse likely far outweighs the risk of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Anti-Neutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-Associated Vasculitis/therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Aged , Anti-Neutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-Associated Vasculitis/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Cross-Sectional Studies , Cyclophosphamide/therapeutic use , Female , Humans , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Rituximab/therapeutic use , Surveys and Questionnaires
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