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1.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(24)2021 Dec 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1599176

ABSTRACT

To determine whether mitigating the harmful effects of circulating microvesicle-associated inducible nitric oxide (MV-A iNOS) in vivo increases the survival of challenged mice in three different mouse models of sepsis, the ability of anti-MV-A iNOS monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to rescue challenged mice was assessed using three different mouse models of sepsis. The vivarium of a research laboratory Balb/c mice were challenged with an LD80 dose of either lipopolysaccharide (LPS/endotoxin), TNFα, or MV-A iNOS and then treated at various times after the challenge with saline as control or with an anti-MV-A iNOS mAb as a potential immunotherapeutic to treat sepsis. Each group of mice was checked daily for survivors, and Kaplan-Meier survival curves were constructed. Five different murine anti-MV-A iNOS mAbs from our panel of 24 murine anti-MV-A iNOS mAbs were found to rescue some of the challenged mice. All five murine mAbs were used to genetically engineer humanized anti-MV-A iNOS mAbs by inserting the murine complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) into a human IgG1,kappa scaffold and expressing the humanized mAbs in CHO cells. Three humanized anti-MV-A iNOS mAbs were effective at rescuing mice from sepsis in three different animal models of sepsis. The effectiveness of the treatment was both time- and dose-dependent. Humanized anti-MV-A iNOS rHJ mAb could rescue up to 80% of the challenged animals if administered early and at a high dose. Our conclusions are that MV-A iNOS is a novel therapeutic target to treat sepsis; anti-MV-A iNOS mAbs can mitigate the harmful effects of MV-A iNOS; the neutralizing mAb's efficacy is both time- and dose-dependent; and a specifically targeted immunotherapeutic for MV-A iNOS could potentially save tens of thousands of lives annually and could result in improved antibiotic stewardship.


Subject(s)
Cell-Derived Microparticles/metabolism , Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II/metabolism , Sepsis/therapy , Animals , Antibodies, Monoclonal/immunology , Antibodies, Monoclonal/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/immunology , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/pharmacology , Cell-Derived Microparticles/immunology , Disease Models, Animal , Humans , Lipopolysaccharides/pharmacology , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Nitric Oxide/metabolism , Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II/antagonists & inhibitors , Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II/immunology , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/pharmacology
2.
Int J Immunopathol Pharmacol ; 35: 20587384211059675, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1582485

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The fully-human monoclonal anti-interleukin (IL)-1ß antibody canakinumab may inhibit the production of inflammatory mediators in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and the hyperinflammatory response potentially leading to acute respiratory distress syndrome. OBJECTIVES: The goal of our retrospective, observational analysis was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of subcutaneous (s.c.) canakinumab in combination with our standard of care (SOC) treatment of selected patients with COVID-19 with respiratory failure and elevated reactive pro-inflammatory markers. METHODS: Eight participants received two doses of s.c. canakinumab 150 mg (or 2 mg/kg for participants weighing ≤40 kg) in addition to SOC. 12 patients received only SOC treatment. RESULTS: Canakinumab treatment reduced the need for mechanical ventilation and reduced proinflammatory markers, resulting in an amelioration of the final outcome, with respect to the control group who received SOC alone. The treatment was safe and well tolerated; no adverse events were reported. CONCLUSION: The use of canakinumab (300 mg, s.c.) in the early stage of COVID-19 with mild-to-moderate respiratory failure was superior to SOC at preventing clinical deterioration and may warrant further investigation as a treatment option for patients with COVID-19 who experience a hyperinflammatory response in the early stage of the disease.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized , COVID-19 , Interleukin-1beta , Respiration, Artificial , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/administration & dosage , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/adverse effects , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/immunology , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/therapy , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Female , Humans , Inflammation Mediators/blood , Interleukin-1beta/antagonists & inhibitors , Interleukin-1beta/immunology , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Monitoring, Immunologic/methods , Outcome and Process Assessment, Health Care , Patient Selection , Respiration, Artificial/methods , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Time-to-Treatment
3.
Viruses ; 13(12)2021 12 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1555015

ABSTRACT

We have developed a monoclonal antibody (mAb) cocktail (ZRC-3308) comprising of ZRC3308-A7 and ZRC3308-B10 in the ratio 1:1 for COVID-19 treatment. The mAbs were designed to have reduced immune effector functions and increased circulation half-life. mAbs showed good binding affinities to non-competing epitopes on RBD of SARS-CoV-2 spike protein and were found neutralizing SARS-CoV-2 variants B.1, B.1.1.7, B.1.351, B.1.617.2, and B.1.617.2 AY.1 in vitro. The mAb cocktail demonstrated effective prophylactic and therapeutic activity against SARS-CoV-2 infection in Syrian hamsters. The antibody cocktail appears to be a promising candidate for prophylactic use and for therapy in early COVID-19 cases that have not progressed to severe disease.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/immunology , COVID-19/therapy , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/therapeutic use , Antibody Affinity , Binding Sites , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cricetinae , Disease Models, Animal , Epitopes , Humans , Immunization, Passive , Mesocricetus , Mutation , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
4.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 25(21): 6797-6812, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1524867

ABSTRACT

Cytokines in cardiac tissue plays a key role in progression of cardiometabolic diseases and cardiotoxicity induced by several anticancer drugs. Interleukin-1ß is one on the most studied regulator of cancer progression, survival and resistance to anticancer treatments. Recent findings indicate that interleukin1-ß exacerbates myocardial damages in cancer patients treated with chemotherapies and immune check-point inhibitors. Interleukin1-ß blocking agent canakinumab reduces major adverse cardiovascular events and cardiovascular death in recent cardiovascular trials. We focalized on the main biological functions of interleukin1-ß in cancer and cardiovascular diseases, summarizing the main clinical evidence available to date in literature. Especially in the era of SARS-CoV-2 infection, associated to coagulopathies, myocarditis and heart failure, cancer patients have an increased risk of cardiovascular complications compared to general population, therefore, the pharmacological inhibition of interleukin1-ß should be discussed and considered.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Antineoplastic Agents/adverse effects , COVID-19/complications , Cardiotoxicity/prevention & control , Interleukin-1beta/metabolism , Neoplasms/drug therapy , Anthracyclines/adverse effects , Anthracyclines/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/immunology , Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/virology , Cardiotoxicity/etiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/prevention & control , Humans , Interleukin-1beta/immunology , Neoplasms/complications , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
5.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 21522, 2021 11 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1500507

ABSTRACT

There is controversy whether IL-6 (receptor) antagonists are beneficial in treating COVID-19 patients. We therefore update our systematic review to answer the following research questions: (1) Do patients hospitalized for COVID-19 treated with IL-6 (receptor) antagonists have lower mortality compared to standard of care? (2) Do patients hospitalized for COVID-19 treated with IL-6 (receptor) antagonists have more side effects compared to standard of care? The following databases were search up to December 1st 2020: PubMed, PMC PubMed Central, MEDLINE, WHO COVID-19 Database, Embase, Web-of-Science, COCHRANE LIBRARY, Emcare and Academic Search Premier. In order to pool the risk ratio (RR) and risk difference of individual studies we used random effects meta-analysis. The search strategy retrieved 2975 unique titles of which 71 studies (9 RCTs and 62 observational) studies comprising 29,495 patients were included. Mortality (RR 0.75) and mechanical ventilation (RR 0.78) were lower and the risk of neutropenia (RR 7.3), impaired liver function (RR 1.67) and secondary infections (RR 1.26) were higher for patients treated with IL-6 (receptor) antagonists compared to patients not treated with treated with IL-6 (receptor) antagonists. Our results showed that IL-6 (receptor) antagonists are effective in reducing mortality in COVID-19 patients, while the risk of side effects was higher. The baseline risk of mortality was an important effect modifier: IL-6 (receptor) antagonists were effective when the baseline mortality risk was high (e.g. ICU setting), while they could be harmful when the baseline mortality risk was low.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Receptors, Interleukin-6/antagonists & inhibitors , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/adverse effects , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/immunology , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Odds Ratio , Respiration, Artificial , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Survival Rate
6.
J Infect Dis ; 224(7): 1109-1114, 2021 10 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470152

ABSTRACT

Whether monoclonal antibodies are able to neutralize severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) variants of concern has been investigated using pseudoviruses. In this study we show that bamlanivimab, casirivimab, and imdevimab efficiently neutralize authentic SARS-CoV-2, including variant B.1.1.7 (alpha), but variants B.1.351 (beta) and P.2 (zeta) were resistant against bamlanivimab and partially resistant to casirivimab. Whether antibodies are able to neutralize severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) variantshas been investigated using pseudoviruses. We show that authentic SARS-CoV-2 carrying E484K were resistant against bamlanivimab and less susceptible to casirivimab, convalescent and vaccine-elicited sera.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Amino Acid Substitution , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Humans , Mutation, Missense , Neutralization Tests
7.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 20274, 2021 10 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1467137

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this work is to provide an in silico molecular rationale of the role eventually played by currently circulating mutations in the receptor binding domain of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein (S-RBDCoV­2) in evading the immune surveillance effects elicited by the two Eli Lilly LY-CoV555/bamlanivimab and LY-CoV016/etesevimab monoclonal antibodies. The main findings from this study show that, compared to the wild-type SARS-CoV-2 spike protein, mutations E484A/G/K/Q/R/V, Q493K/L/R, S494A/P/R, L452R and F490S are predicted to be markedly resistant to neutralization by LY-CoV555, while mutations K417E/N/T, D420A/G/N, N460I/K/S/T, T415P, and Y489C/S are predicted to confer LY-CoV016 escaping advantage to the viral protein. A challenge of our global in silico results against relevant experimental data resulted in an overall 90% agreement. Thus, the results presented provide a molecular-based rationale for all relative experimental findings, constitute a fast and reliable tool for identifying and prioritizing all present and newly reported circulating spike SARS-CoV-2 variants with respect to antibody neutralization, and yield substantial structural information for the development of next-generation vaccines and monoclonal antibodies more resilient to viral evolution.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/immunology , Antiviral Agents/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Humans , Protein Binding
8.
MAbs ; 13(1): 1953683, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1327301

ABSTRACT

The global pandemic of COVID-19 caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has resulted in widespread social and economic disruption. Effective interventions are urgently needed for the prevention and treatment of COVID-19. Neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have demonstrated their prophylactic and therapeutic efficacy against SARS-CoV-2, and several have been granted authorization for emergency use. Here, we discover and characterize a fully human cross-reactive mAb, MW06, which binds to both SARS-CoV-2 and SARS-CoV spike receptor-binding domain (RBD) and disrupts their interaction with angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptors. Potential neutralization activity of MW06 was observed against both SARS-CoV-2 and SARS-CoV in different assays. The complex structure determination and epitope alignment of SARS-CoV-2 RBD/MW06 revealed that the epitope recognized by MW06 is highly conserved among SARS-related coronavirus strains, indicating the potential broad neutralization activity of MW06. In in vitro assays, no antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of SARS-CoV-2 infection was observed for MW06. In addition, MW06 recognizes a different epitope from MW05, which shows high neutralization activity and has been in a Phase 2 clinical trial, supporting the development of the cocktail of MW05 and MW06 to prevent against future escaping variants. MW06 alone and the cocktail show good effects in preventing escape mutations, including a series of variants of concern, B.1.1.7, P.1, B.1.351, and B.1.617.1. These findings suggest that MW06 recognizes a conserved epitope on SARS-CoV-2, which provides insights for the development of a universal antibody-based therapy against SARS-related coronavirus and emerging variant strains, and may be an effective anti-SARS-CoV-2 agent.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/immunology , Antibodies, Monoclonal/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , SARS Virus/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Amino Acid Sequence , Antibodies, Monoclonal/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Neutralizing/chemistry , Antibodies, Neutralizing/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Viral/chemistry , Antibodies, Viral/therapeutic use , Antibody-Dependent Enhancement , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/therapy , Conserved Sequence , Cross Reactions , Epitopes/chemistry , Epitopes/genetics , Epitopes/immunology , Humans , Models, Molecular , Neutralization Tests , Pandemics , Protein Domains , Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs , SARS Virus/chemistry , SARS Virus/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
10.
Exp Mol Med ; 53(7): 1116-1123, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1307318

ABSTRACT

Interleukin-6 (IL-6) plays a crucial role in host defense against infection and tissue injuries and is a bioindicator of multiple distinct types of cytokine storms. In this review, we present the current understanding of the diverse roles of IL-6, its receptors, and its signaling during acute severe systemic inflammation. IL-6 directly affects vascular endothelial cells, which produce several types of cytokines and chemokines and activate the coagulation cascade. Endothelial cell dysregulation, characterized by abnormal coagulation and vascular leakage, is a common complication in cytokine storms. Emerging evidence indicates that a humanized anti-IL-6 receptor antibody, tocilizumab, can effectively block IL-6 signaling and has beneficial effects in rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile systemic idiopathic arthritis, and Castleman's disease. Recent work has also demonstrated the beneficial effect of tocilizumab in chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy-induced cytokine storms as well as coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Here, we highlight the distinct contributions of IL-6 signaling to the pathogenesis of several types of cytokine storms and discuss potential therapeutic strategies for the management of cytokine storms, including those associated with sepsis and COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , Interleukin-6/genetics , Receptors, Interleukin-6/genetics , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/immunology , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/genetics , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokines/genetics , Cytokines/metabolism , Endothelium, Vascular/immunology , Humans , Interleukin-6/antagonists & inhibitors , Interleukin-6/immunology , Receptors, Interleukin-6/antagonists & inhibitors , Receptors, Interleukin-6/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Sepsis/genetics , Sepsis/immunology , Sepsis/pathology , Sepsis/prevention & control
11.
Nature ; 596(7871): 276-280, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1301174

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 B.1.617 lineage was identified in October 2020 in India1-5. Since then, it has become dominant in some regions of India and in the UK, and has spread to many other countries6. The lineage includes three main subtypes (B1.617.1, B.1.617.2 and B.1.617.3), which contain diverse mutations in the N-terminal domain (NTD) and the receptor-binding domain (RBD) of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein that may increase the immune evasion potential of these variants. B.1.617.2-also termed the Delta variant-is believed to spread faster than other variants. Here we isolated an infectious strain of the Delta variant from an individual with COVID-19 who had returned to France from India. We examined the sensitivity of this strain to monoclonal antibodies and to antibodies present in sera from individuals who had recovered from COVID-19 (hereafter referred to as convalescent individuals) or who had received a COVID-19 vaccine, and then compared this strain with other strains of SARS-CoV-2. The Delta variant was resistant to neutralization by some anti-NTD and anti-RBD monoclonal antibodies, including bamlanivimab, and these antibodies showed impaired binding to the spike protein. Sera collected from convalescent individuals up to 12 months after the onset of symptoms were fourfold less potent against the Delta variant relative to the Alpha variant (B.1.1.7). Sera from individuals who had received one dose of the Pfizer or the AstraZeneca vaccine had a barely discernible inhibitory effect on the Delta variant. Administration of two doses of the vaccine generated a neutralizing response in 95% of individuals, with titres three- to fivefold lower against the Delta variant than against the Alpha variant. Thus, the spread of the Delta variant is associated with an escape from antibodies that target non-RBD and RBD epitopes of the spike protein.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Convalescence , Immune Evasion/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Epitopes/chemistry , Epitopes/genetics , Epitopes/immunology , France , Humans , India/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Neutralization Tests , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics
12.
Lancet Respir Med ; 9(6): 643-654, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1291133

ABSTRACT

Circulating concentrations of the pleiotropic cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) are known to be increased in pro-inflammatory critical care syndromes, such as sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Elevations in serum IL-6 concentrations in patients with severe COVID-19 have led to renewed interest in the cytokine as a therapeutic target. However, although the pro-inflammatory properties of IL-6 are widely known, the cytokine also has a series of important physiological and anti-inflammatory functions. An adequate understanding of the complex processes by which IL-6 signalling occurs is crucial for the correct interpretation of IL-6 concentrations in the blood or lung, the use of IL-6 as a critical care biomarker, or the design of effective anti-IL-6 strategies. Here, we outline the role of IL-6 in health and disease, explain the different types of IL-6 signalling and their contribution to the net biological effect of the cytokine, describe the approaches to IL-6 inhibition that are currently available, and discuss implications for the future use of treatments such as tocilizumab in the critical care setting.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized , COVID-19 , Interleukin-6 , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/immunology , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/pharmacology , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/therapy , Critical Illness , Humans , Immunologic Factors/immunology , Immunologic Factors/pharmacology , Interleukin-6/antagonists & inhibitors , Interleukin-6/blood , Interleukin-6/immunology , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Viruses ; 13(7)2021 06 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1289016

ABSTRACT

We summarize here in vitro evidences of efficacy for convalescent plasma, currently approved vaccines and monoclonal antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern (VOC: B.1.1.7, B.1.351, P.1, and B.1.617.2), variants of interest (VOI: B.1.427/B.1.429, P.2, B.1.525, P.3, B.1.526, and B.1.671.1), and other strains (B.1.1.298 and B.1.258delta). While waiting from real world clinical efficacy, these data provide guidance for the treating physician.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Plasma/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Viral Vaccines/immunology , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , COVID-19/therapy , Humans , Immunization, Passive/standards , In Vitro Techniques , Neutralization Tests , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
14.
Cell Rep ; 36(3): 109415, 2021 07 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1283976

ABSTRACT

The emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) variants threatens efforts to contain the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. The number of COVID-19 cases and deaths in India has risen steeply, and a SARS-CoV-2 variant, B.1.617, is believed to be responsible for many of these cases. The spike protein of B.1.617 harbors two mutations in the receptor binding domain, which interacts with the angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptor and constitutes the main target of neutralizing antibodies. Therefore, we analyze whether B.1.617 is more adept in entering cells and/or evades antibody responses. B.1.617 enters two of eight cell lines tested with roughly 50% increased efficiency and is equally inhibited by two entry inhibitors. In contrast, B.1.617 is resistant against bamlanivimab, an antibody used for COVID-19 treatment. B.1.617 evades antibodies induced by infection or vaccination, although less so than the B.1.351 variant. Collectively, our study reveals that antibody evasion of B.1.617 may contribute to the rapid spread of this variant.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/pharmacology , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/pharmacology , Antibodies, Viral/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Esters/pharmacology , Guanidines/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Cell Line , Humans , Protease Inhibitors/pharmacology , Protein Binding , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Vaccination
15.
Biochem Biophys Res Commun ; 566: 135-140, 2021 08 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1260666

ABSTRACT

The global circulation of newly emerging variants of SARS-CoV-2 is a new threat to public health due to their increased transmissibility and immune evasion. Moreover, currently available vaccines and therapeutic antibodies were shown to be less effective against new variants, in particular, the South African (SA) variant, termed 501Y.V2 or B.1.351. To assess the efficacy of the CT-P59 monoclonal antibody against the SA variant, we sought to perform as in vitro binding and neutralization assays, and in vivo animal studies. CT-P59 neutralized B.1.1.7 variant to a similar extent as to wild type virus. CT-P59 showed reduced binding affinity against a RBD (receptor binding domain) triple mutant containing mutations defining B.1.351 (K417N/E484K/N501Y) also showed reduced potency against the SA variant in live virus and pseudovirus neutralization assay systems. However, in vivo ferret challenge studies demonstrated that a therapeutic dosage of CT-P59 was able to decrease B.1.351 viral load in the upper and lower respiratory tracts, comparable to that observed for the wild type virus. Overall, although CT-P59 showed reduced in vitro neutralizing activity against the SA variant, sufficient antiviral effect in B.1.351-infected animals was confirmed with a clinical dosage of CT-P59, suggesting that CT-P59 has therapeutic potential for COVID-19 patients infected with SA variant.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Neutralizing/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Viral/therapeutic use , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/virology , Immunoglobulin G/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Animals , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Disease Models, Animal , Female , Ferrets , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , In Vitro Techniques , Neutralization Tests , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , South Africa , Viral Load/immunology
16.
JAMA ; 326(1): 46-55, 2021 07 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1251867

ABSTRACT

Importance: Preventive interventions are needed to protect residents and staff of skilled nursing and assisted living facilities from COVID-19 during outbreaks in their facilities. Bamlanivimab, a neutralizing monoclonal antibody against SARS-CoV-2, may confer rapid protection from SARS-CoV-2 infection and COVID-19. Objective: To determine the effect of bamlanivimab on the incidence of COVID-19 among residents and staff of skilled nursing and assisted living facilities. Design, Setting, and Participants: Randomized, double-blind, single-dose, phase 3 trial that enrolled residents and staff of 74 skilled nursing and assisted living facilities in the United States with at least 1 confirmed SARS-CoV-2 index case. A total of 1175 participants enrolled in the study from August 2 to November 20, 2020. Database lock was triggered on January 13, 2021, when all participants reached study day 57. Interventions: Participants were randomized to receive a single intravenous infusion of bamlanivimab, 4200 mg (n = 588), or placebo (n = 587). Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary outcome was incidence of COVID-19, defined as the detection of SARS-CoV-2 by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and mild or worse disease severity within 21 days of detection, within 8 weeks of randomization. Key secondary outcomes included incidence of moderate or worse COVID-19 severity and incidence of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Results: The prevention population comprised a total of 966 participants (666 staff and 300 residents) who were negative at baseline for SARS-CoV-2 infection and serology (mean age, 53.0 [range, 18-104] years; 722 [74.7%] women). Bamlanivimab significantly reduced the incidence of COVID-19 in the prevention population compared with placebo (8.5% vs 15.2%; odds ratio, 0.43 [95% CI, 0.28-0.68]; P < .001; absolute risk difference, -6.6 [95% CI, -10.7 to -2.6] percentage points). Five deaths attributed to COVID-19 were reported by day 57; all occurred in the placebo group. Among 1175 participants who received study product (safety population), the rate of participants with adverse events was 20.1% in the bamlanivimab group and 18.9% in the placebo group. The most common adverse events were urinary tract infection (reported by 12 participants [2%] who received bamlanivimab and 14 [2.4%] who received placebo) and hypertension (reported by 7 participants [1.2%] who received bamlanivimab and 10 [1.7%] who received placebo). Conclusions and Relevance: Among residents and staff in skilled nursing and assisted living facilities, treatment during August-November 2020 with bamlanivimab monotherapy reduced the incidence of COVID-19 infection. Further research is needed to assess preventive efficacy with current patterns of viral strains with combination monoclonal antibody therapy. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04497987.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Neutralizing/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/adverse effects , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/immunology , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , Antiviral Agents/immunology , Assisted Living Facilities , COVID-19/epidemiology , Double-Blind Method , Drug Approval , Female , Health Personnel , Humans , Immunization, Passive , Incidence , Infusions, Intravenous , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index , Skilled Nursing Facilities , Young Adult
17.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 10220, 2021 05 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1228272

ABSTRACT

The urgent need for a treatment of COVID-19 has left researchers with limited choice of either developing an effective vaccine or identifying approved/investigational drugs developed for other medical conditions for potential repurposing, thus bypassing long clinical trials. In this work, we compared the sequences of experimentally verified SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing antibodies and sequentially/structurally similar commercialized therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. We have identified three therapeutic antibodies, Tremelimumab, Ipilimumab and Afasevikumab. Interestingly, these antibodies target CTLA4 and IL17A, levels of which have been shown to be elevated during severe SARS-CoV-2 infection. The candidate antibodies were evaluated further for epitope restriction, interaction energy and interaction surface to gauge their repurposability to tackle SARS-CoV-2 infection. Our work provides candidate antibody scaffolds with dual activities of plausible viral neutralization and immunosuppression. Further, these candidate antibodies can also be explored in diagnostic test kits for SARS-CoV-2 infection. We opine that this in silico workflow to screen and analyze antibodies for repurposing would have widespread applications.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal/pharmacology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Drug Repositioning , Antibodies, Monoclonal/immunology , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/immunology , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/pharmacology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Drug Repositioning/methods , Epitopes/immunology , Humans , Ipilimumab/immunology , Ipilimumab/pharmacology , Molecular Docking Simulation , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
18.
Lancet Respir Med ; 9(6): 655-664, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1209411

ABSTRACT

The pleiotropic cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of COVID-19, but uncertainty remains about the potential benefits and harms of targeting IL-6 signalling in patients with the disease. The efficacy and safety of tocilizumab and sarilumab, which block the binding of IL-6 to its receptor, have been tested in adults with COVID-19-related acute respiratory illness in randomised trials, with important differences in trial design, characteristics of included patients, use of co-interventions, and outcome measurement scales. In this Series paper, we review the clinical and methodological heterogeneity of studies of IL-6 receptor antagonists, and consider how this heterogeneity might have influenced reported treatment effects. Timing from clinical presentation to treatment, severity of illness, and concomitant use of corticosteroids are among the factors that might have contributed to apparently inconsistent results. With an understanding of the sources of variability in these trials, available evidence could be applied to guide clinical decision making and to inform the enrichment of future studies.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/pharmacology , COVID-19 , Clinical Trials as Topic , Receptors, Interleukin-6/antagonists & inhibitors , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/therapy , Clinical Trials as Topic/methods , Clinical Trials as Topic/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Patient Selection , Receptors, Interleukin-6/immunology , SARS-CoV-2
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