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1.
Front Public Health ; 10: 712657, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775961

ABSTRACT

Listeria monocytogenes is the causative agent of listeriosis, a highly lethal disease initiated after the ingestion of Listeria-contaminated food. This species comprises different serovars, from which 4b, 1/2a, and 1/2b cause most of the infections. Among the different proteins involved in pathogenesis, the internalins A (InlA) and B (InlB) are the best characterized, since they play a major role in the enterocyte entry of Listeria cells during early infection. Due to their covalent attachment to the cell wall and location on the bacterial surface, along with their exclusive presence in the pathogenic L. monocytogenes, these proteins are also used as detection targets for this species. Even though huge advancements were achieved in the enrichment steps for subsequent Listeria detection, few studies have focused on the improvement of the antibodies for immunodetection. In the present study, recombinant InlA and InlB produced in Escherichia coli were used as targets to generate antibodies via phage display using the human naïve antibody libraries HAL9 and HAL10. A set of five recombinant antibodies (four against InlA, and one against InlB) were produced in scFv-Fc format and tested in indirect ELISA against a panel of 19 Listeria strains (17 species; including the three main serovars of L. monocytogenes) and 16 non-Listeria species. All five antibodies were able to recognize L. monocytogenes with 100% sensitivity (CI 29.24-100.0) and specificity (CI 88.78-100.0) in all three analyzed antibody concentrations. These findings show that phage display-derived antibodies can improve the biological tools to develop better immunodiagnostics for L. monocytogenes.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal , Bacterial Proteins , Listeria monocytogenes , Antibodies, Monoclonal/metabolism , Bacterial Proteins/immunology , Bacteriophages , Cell Surface Display Techniques , Humans , Listeria monocytogenes/isolation & purification
2.
J Chem Inf Model ; 62(7): 1771-1782, 2022 04 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1751664

ABSTRACT

In the past 2 years, since the emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), multiple SARS-CoV-2 variants have emerged. Whenever a new variant emerges, considerable time is required to analyze the binding affinity of the viral surface proteins to human angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (hACE2) and monoclonal antibodies. To efficiently predict the binding affinities associated with hACE2 and monoclonal antibodies in a short time, herein, we propose a method applying statistical analysis to simulations performed using molecular and quantum mechanics. This method efficiently predicted the trend of binding affinity for the binding of the spike protein of each variant of SARS-CoV-2 to hACE2 and individually to eight commercial monoclonal antibodies. Additionally, this method accurately predicted interaction energy changes in the crystal structure for 10 of 13 mutated residues in the Omicron variant, showing a significant change in the interaction energy of hACE2. S375F was found to be a mutation that majorly changed the binding affinity of the spike protein to hACE2 and the eight monoclonal antibodies. Our proposed analysis method enables the prediction of the binding affinity of new variants to hACE2 or to monoclonal antibodies in a shorter time compared to that utilized by the experimental method.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Antibodies, Monoclonal/metabolism , Humans , Protein Binding , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism
3.
Science ; 375(6579): 449-454, 2022 Jan 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1723472

ABSTRACT

Understanding broadly neutralizing sarbecovirus antibody responses is key to developing countermeasures against SARS-CoV-2 variants and future zoonotic sarbecoviruses. We describe the isolation and characterization of a human monoclonal antibody, designated S2K146, that broadly neutralizes viruses belonging to SARS-CoV- and SARS-CoV-2-related sarbecovirus clades which use ACE2 as an entry receptor. Structural and functional studies show that most of the virus residues that directly bind S2K146 are also involved in binding to ACE2. This allows the antibody to potently inhibit receptor attachment. S2K146 protects against SARS-CoV-2 Beta challenge in hamsters and viral passaging experiments reveal a high barrier for emergence of escape mutants, making it a good candidate for clinical development. The conserved ACE2-binding residues present a site of vulnerability that might be leveraged for developing vaccines eliciting broad sarbecovirus immunity.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies/immunology , COVID-19/therapy , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/chemistry , Animals , Antibodies, Monoclonal/chemistry , Antibodies, Monoclonal/immunology , Antibodies, Monoclonal/metabolism , Antibodies, Monoclonal/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Viral/chemistry , Antibodies, Viral/metabolism , Antibody Affinity , Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies/chemistry , Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies/metabolism , Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies/therapeutic use , COVID-19/immunology , Cross Reactions , Cryoelectron Microscopy , Epitopes , Humans , Immune Evasion , Mesocricetus , Models, Molecular , Molecular Mimicry , Mutation , Protein Conformation , Protein Domains , Receptors, Coronavirus/chemistry , Receptors, Coronavirus/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism
4.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 2594, 2022 02 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1692553

ABSTRACT

Complex glycans decorate viral surface proteins and play a critical role in virus-host interactions. Viral surface glycans shield vulnerable protein epitopes from host immunity yet can also present distinct "glycoepitopes" that can be targeted by host antibodies such as the potent anti-HIV antibody 2G12 that binds high-mannose glycans on gp120. Two recent publications demonstrate 2G12 binding to high mannose glycans on SARS-CoV-2 and select Influenza A (Flu) H3N2 viruses. Previously, our lab observed 2G12 binding and functional inhibition of a range of Flu viruses that include H3N2 and H1N1 lineages. In this manuscript, we present these data alongside structural analyses to offer an expanded picture of 2G12-Flu interactions. Further, based on the remarkable breadth of 2G12 N-glycan recognition and the structural factors promoting glycoprotein oligomannosylation, we hypothesize that 2G12 glycoepitopes can be defined from protein structure alone according to N-glycan site topology. We develop a model describing 2G12 glycoepitopes based on N-glycan site topology, and apply the model to identify viruses within the Protein Data Bank presenting putative 2G12 glycoepitopes for 2G12 repurposing toward analytical, diagnostic, and therapeutic applications.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal/metabolism , Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies/metabolism , HIV Antibodies/metabolism , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/immunology , Influenza A Virus, H3N2 Subtype/immunology , Models, Immunological , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Animals , Dogs , Drug Repositioning , Epitopes , Hemagglutinin Glycoproteins, Influenza Virus/metabolism , Humans , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/metabolism , Influenza A Virus, H3N2 Subtype/metabolism , Madin Darby Canine Kidney Cells , Molecular Targeted Therapy , Neutralization Tests , Polysaccharides/metabolism
5.
Viruses ; 14(2)2022 01 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1667340

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), the pandemic caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), is characterized by symptoms such as fever, fatigue, a sore throat, diarrhea, and coughing. Although various new vaccines against COVID-19 have been developed, early diagnostics, isolation, and prevention remain important due to virus mutations resulting in rapid and high disease transmission. Amino acid substitutions in the major diagnostic target antigens of SARS-CoV-2 may lower the sensitivity for the detection of SARS-CoV-2. For this reason, we developed specific monoclonal antibodies that bind to epitope peptides as antigens for the rapid detection of SARS-CoV-2 NP. The binding affinity between antigenic peptides and monoclonal antibodies was investigated, and a sandwich pair for capture and detection was employed to develop a rapid biosensor for SARS-CoV-2 NP. The rapid biosensor, based on a monoclonal antibody pair binding to conserved epitopes of SARS-CoV-2 NP, detected cultured virus samples of SARS-CoV-2 (1.4 × 103 TCID50/reaction) and recombinant NP (1 ng/mL). Laboratory confirmation of the rapid biosensor was performed with clinical specimens (n = 16) from COVID-19 patients and other pathogens. The rapid biosensor consisting of a monoclonal antibody pair (75E12 for capture and the 54G6/54G10 combination for detection) binding to conserved epitopes of SARS-CoV-2 NP could assist in the detection of SARS-CoV-2 NP under the circumstance of spreading SARS-CoV-2 variants.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal/metabolism , Antibodies, Viral/metabolism , Biosensing Techniques/methods , Epitopes/metabolism , Nucleocapsid Proteins/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Viral Proteins/metabolism , Animals , Antibodies, Monoclonal/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Epitopes/genetics , Epitopes/immunology , Humans , Immunoassay , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Nucleocapsid Proteins/genetics , Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , Peptides/immunology , Peptides/metabolism , Protein Binding , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Viral Proteins/immunology
6.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 7(1): 23, 2022 01 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1655541
7.
J Virol Methods ; 302: 114486, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1654882

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Recently, the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by SARS-CoV-2 infection has spread rapidly around the world, becoming a new global pandemic disease. Nucleic acid detection is the primary method for clinical diagnosis of SARS-CoV-2 infection, with the addition of antibody and antigen detection. Nucleocapsid protein (NP) is a kind of conservative structural protein with abundant expression during SARS-CoV-2 infection, which makes it an ideal target for immunoassay. METHODS: The coding sequence for SARS-CoV-2-NP was obtained by chemical synthesis, and then inserted into pET28a(+). The soluble recombinant NP (rNP) with an estimated molecular weight of 49.4 kDa was expressed in E. coli cells after IPTG induction. Six-week-old BALB/c mice were immunized with rNP, and then their spleen cells were fused with SP2/0 cells, to develop hybridoma cell lines that stably secreted monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against NP. The mAbs were preliminarily evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and then used to develop a magnetic particle-based chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay (CLEIA) for measurement of SARS-CoV-2-NP. RESULTS: mAb 15B1 and mAb 18G10 were selected as capture and detection antibody respectively to develop CLEIA, due to the highest sensitivity for rNP detection. The proposed CLEIA presented a good linearity for rNP detection at a working range from 0.1 to 160 µg/L, with a precision coefficient of variance below 10 %. CONCLUSION: The newly developed mAbs and CLEIA can serve as potential diagnostic tools for clinical measurement of SARS-CoV-2-NP.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins , SARS-CoV-2 , Animals , Antibodies, Monoclonal/metabolism , Antibodies, Viral/metabolism , COVID-19/diagnosis , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/analysis , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/genetics , Escherichia coli/genetics , Humans , Immunoassay/methods , Luminescence , Mice , Phosphoproteins/analysis , Phosphoproteins/genetics , Sensitivity and Specificity
8.
Science ; 375(6583): 864-868, 2022 02 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1650843

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) Omicron variant of concern evades antibody-mediated immunity that comes from vaccination or infection with earlier variants due to accumulation of numerous spike mutations. To understand the Omicron antigenic shift, we determined cryo-electron microscopy and x-ray crystal structures of the spike protein and the receptor-binding domain bound to the broadly neutralizing sarbecovirus monoclonal antibody (mAb) S309 (the parent mAb of sotrovimab) and to the human ACE2 receptor. We provide a blueprint for understanding the marked reduction of binding of other therapeutic mAbs that leads to dampened neutralizing activity. Remodeling of interactions between the Omicron receptor-binding domain and human ACE2 likely explains the enhanced affinity for the host receptor relative to the ancestral virus.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/chemistry , Antibodies, Viral/chemistry , Immune Evasion , Receptors, Coronavirus/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Amino Acid Substitution , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Antibodies, Monoclonal/chemistry , Antibodies, Monoclonal/immunology , Antibodies, Monoclonal/metabolism , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/metabolism , Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies/chemistry , Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies/immunology , Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies/metabolism , Cryoelectron Microscopy , Crystallography, X-Ray , Humans , Models, Molecular , Mutation , Protein Binding , Protein Conformation , Protein Domains/genetics , Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs/genetics , Receptors, Coronavirus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism
9.
Phys Chem Chem Phys ; 24(5): 3410-3419, 2022 Feb 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1650366

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic was caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Among all the potential targets studied for developing drugs and antibodies, the spike (S) protein is the most striking one, which is on the surface of the virus. In contrast with the intensively investigated immunodominant receptor-binding domain (RBD) of the protein, little is known about the neutralizing antibody binding mechanisms of the N-terminal domain (NTD), let alone the effects of NTD mutations on antibody binding and thereby the risk of immune evasion. Based on 400 ns molecular dynamics simulation for 11 NTD-antibody complexes together with other computational approaches in this study, we investigated critical residues for NTD-antibody binding and their detailed mechanisms. The results show that 36 residues on the NTD including R246, Y144, K147, Y248, L249 and P251 are critically involved in the direct interaction of the NTD with many monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), indicating that the viruses harboring these residue mutations may have a high risk of immune evasion. Binding free energy calculations and an interaction mechanism study reveal that R246I, which is present in the Beta (B.1.351/501Y.V2) variant, may have various impacts on current NTD antibodies through abolishing the hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interaction with the antibodies or affecting other interface residues. Therefore, special attention should be paid to the mutations of these key residues in future antibody and vaccine design and development.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal/metabolism , Antibodies, Neutralizing/metabolism , Immune Evasion/genetics , Mutation , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Antibodies, Monoclonal/chemistry , Antibodies, Neutralizing/chemistry , Hydrogen Bonding , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Protein Binding , Protein Domains/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Thermodynamics
10.
Nat Commun ; 13(1): 462, 2022 01 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1650125

ABSTRACT

As a result of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic numerous scientific groups have generated antibodies against a single target: the CoV-2 spike antigen. This has provided an unprecedented opportunity to compare the efficacy of different methods and the specificities and qualities of the antibodies generated by those methods. Generally, the most potent neutralizing antibodies have been generated from convalescent patients and immunized animals, with non-immune phage libraries usually yielding significantly less potent antibodies. Here, we show that it is possible to generate ultra-potent (IC50 < 2 ng/ml) human neutralizing antibodies directly from a unique semisynthetic naïve antibody library format with affinities, developability properties and neutralization activities comparable to the best from hyperimmune sources. This demonstrates that appropriately designed and constructed naïve antibody libraries can effectively compete with immunization to directly provide therapeutic antibodies against a viral pathogen, without the need for immune sources or downstream optimization.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Monoclonal/immunology , Antibodies, Monoclonal/metabolism , Antibody Affinity/immunology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Immunoglobulin G/metabolism , Neutralization Tests/methods , Pandemics , Peptide Library , Protein Binding , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Single-Chain Antibodies/immunology , Single-Chain Antibodies/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Vero Cells
11.
Int J Biol Macromol ; 200: 438-448, 2022 Mar 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1633972

ABSTRACT

As SARS-CoV-2 (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2) continues to inflict chaos globally, a new variant officially known as B.1.1.529 was reported in South Africa and was found to harbor 30 mutations in the spike protein. It is too early to speculate on transmission and hospitalizations. Hence, more analyses are required, particularly to connect the genomic patterns to the phenotypic attributes to reveal the binding differences and antibody response for this variant, which can then be used for therapeutic interventions. Given the urgency of the required analysis and data on the B.1.1.529 variant, we have performed a detailed investigation to provide an understanding of the impact of these novel mutations on the structure, function, and binding of RBD to hACE2 and mAb to the NTD of the spike protein. The differences in the binding pattern between the wild type and B.1.1.529 variant complexes revealed that the key substitutions Asn417, Ser446, Arg493, and Arg498 in the B.1.1.529 RBD caused additional interactions with hACE2 and the loss of key residues in the B.1.1.529 NTD resulted in decreased interactions with three CDR regions (1-3) in the mAb. Further investigation revealed that B.1.1.529 displayed a stable dynamic that follows a global stability trend. In addition, the dissociation constant (KD), hydrogen bonding analysis, and binding free energy calculations further validated the findings. Hydrogen bonding analysis demonstrated that significant hydrogen bonding reprogramming took place, which revealed key differences in the binding. The total binding free energy using MM/GBSA and MM/PBSA further validated the docking results and demonstrated significant variations in the binding. This study is the first to provide a basis for the higher infectivity of the new SARS-CoV-2 variants and provides a strong impetus for the development of novel drugs against them.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/chemistry , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Antibodies/chemistry , Antibodies/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Antibodies, Monoclonal/chemistry , Antibodies, Monoclonal/metabolism , Humans , Hydrogen Bonding , Immune Evasion , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Protein Binding/immunology , Protein Domains/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism
12.
Viruses ; 14(2)2022 01 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1625933

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 epidemic is raging around the world. Neutralizing antibodies are powerful tools for the prevention and treatment of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Antibody CR3022, a SARS-CoV neutralizing antibody, was found to cross-react with SARS-CoV-2, but its affinity was lower than that of its binding with SARS-CoV, which greatly limited the further development of CR3022 against SARS-CoV-2. Therefore, it is necessary to improve its affinity to SARS-CoV-2 in vitro. In this study, the structure-based molecular simulations were utilized to virtually mutate the possible key residues in the complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) of the CR3022 antibody. According to the criteria of mutation energy, the mutation sites that have the potential to impact the antibody affinity were then selected. Then optimized CR3022 mutants with the enhanced affinity were further identified and verified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), surface plasma resonance (SPR) and autoimmune reactivity experiments. Finally, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and binding free energy calculation (MM/PBSA) were performed on the wild-type CR3022 and its two double-site mutants to understand in more detail the contribution of these sites to the higher affinity. It was found that the binding affinity of the CR3022 antibody could be significantly enhanced more than ten times after the introduction of the S103F/Y mutation in HCDR-3 and the S33R mutation in LCDR-1. The additional hydrogen-bonding, hydrophobic interactions, as well as salt-bridges formed between the modified double-site mutated antibody and SARS-CoV-2 RBD were identified. The computational and experimental results clearly demonstrated that the affinity of the modified antibody has been greatly enhanced. This study indicates that CR3022 as a neutralizing antibody recognizing the conserved region of RBD against SARS-CoV with cross-reactivity with SARS-CoV-2, a different member in a large family of coronaviruses, could be improved by the computational and experimental approaches which provided insights for developing antibody drugs against SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal/chemistry , Antibodies, Monoclonal/metabolism , Antibodies, Neutralizing/chemistry , Antibodies, Neutralizing/metabolism , Antibody Affinity , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Antibodies, Monoclonal/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Cross Reactions , Protein Binding , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
13.
Rev Med Virol ; 31(6): e2231, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574317

ABSTRACT

The Spike protein is the target of both antibody-based therapeutics (convalescent plasma, polyclonal serum, monoclonal antibodies) and vaccines. Mutations in Spike could affect efficacy of those treatments. Hence, monitoring of mutations is necessary to forecast and readapt the inventory of therapeutics. Different phylogenetic nomenclatures have been used for the currently circulating SARS-CoV-2 clades. The Spike protein has different hotspots of mutation and deletion, the most dangerous for immune escape being the ones within the receptor binding domain (RBD), such as K417N/T, N439K, L452R, Y453F, S477N, E484K, and N501Y. Convergent evolution has led to different combinations of mutations among different clades. In this review we focus on the main variants of concern, that is, the so-called UK (B.1.1.7), South African (B.1.351) and Brazilian (P.1) strains.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Neutralizing/therapeutic use , COVID-19/therapy , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Antibodies, Monoclonal/chemistry , Antibodies, Monoclonal/metabolism , Antibodies, Neutralizing/chemistry , Antibodies, Neutralizing/metabolism , Antibodies, Viral/chemistry , Antibodies, Viral/metabolism , Antibodies, Viral/therapeutic use , Brazil/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Gene Expression , Humans , Immune Evasion , Immunization, Passive/methods , Mutation , Phylogeny , Protein Binding , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2/classification , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , South Africa/epidemiology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , United Kingdom/epidemiology
14.
J Immunol Methods ; 500: 113195, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1536656

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 pandemic poses a serious threat to human health; it has completely disrupted global stability, making vaccine development an important goal to achieve. Monoclonal antibodies play an important role in subunit vaccines strategies. In this work, nine murine MAbs against the RBD of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein were obtained by hybridoma technology. Characterization of purified antibodies demonstrated that five of them have affinities in the order of 108 L/mol. Six MAbs showed specific recognition of different recombinant RBD-S antigens in solution. Studies of the additivity index of anti-RBD antibodies, by using a novel procedure to determine the additivity cut point, showed recognition of at least five different epitopes. The MAbs CBSSRBD-S.11 and CBSSRBD-S.8 revealed significant neutralizing capacity against SARS-CoV-2 in an ACE2-RBD binding inhibition assay (IC50 = 85.5pM and IC50 = 122.7pM, respectively) and in a virus neutralizing test with intact SARS-CoV-2 (VN50 = 0.552 nM and VN50 = 4.854 nM, respectively) when D614G strain was used to infect Vero cells. Also CBSSRBD-S.11 neutralized the SARS-CoV-2 strains Alpha and Beta: VN50 = 0.707 nM and VN50 = 0.132 nM, respectively. The high affinity CBSSRBD-S.8 and CBSSRBD-S.7 recognized different epitopes, so they are suitable for the development of a sandwich ELISA to quantitate RBD-S recombinant antigens in biomanufacturing processes, as well as in pharmacokinetic studies in clinical and preclinical trials.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal/metabolism , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , Antibodies, Monoclonal/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/genetics , Clinical Trials as Topic , Female , Genetic Engineering , Humans , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs/genetics , Vaccines, Subunit/genetics
15.
Elife ; 102021 11 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1534520

ABSTRACT

The alpha/B.1.1.7 SARS-CoV-2 lineage emerged in autumn 2020 in the United Kingdom and transmitted rapidly until winter 2021 when it was responsible for most new COVID-19 cases in many European countries. The incidence domination was likely due to a fitness advantage that could be driven by the receptor-binding domain (RBD) residue change (N501Y), which also emerged independently in other variants of concern such as the beta/B.1.351 and gamma/P.1 strains. Here, we present a functional characterization of the alpha/B.1.1.7 variant and show an eightfold affinity increase towards human angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE-2). In accordance with this, transgenic hACE2 mice showed a faster disease progression and severity after infection with a low dose of B.1.1.7, compared to an early 2020 SARS-CoV-2 isolate. When challenged with sera from convalescent individuals or anti-RBD monoclonal antibodies, the N501Y variant showed a minor, but significant elevated evasion potential of ACE-2/RBD antibody neutralization. The data suggest that the single asparagine to tyrosine substitution remarkable rise in affinity may be responsible for the higher transmission rate and severity of the B.1.1.7 variant.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Monoclonal/metabolism , Antibodies, Neutralizing/metabolism , Antibodies, Viral/metabolism , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/metabolism , Disease Progression , Female , Humans , Male , Mice , Mutation, Missense , Protein Binding , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Severity of Illness Index , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , United Kingdom
16.
Theranostics ; 12(1): 1-17, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1512993

ABSTRACT

Background: Administration of potent anti-receptor-binding domain (RBD) monoclonal antibodies has been shown to curtail viral shedding and reduce hospitalization in patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection. However, the structure-function analysis of potent human anti-RBD monoclonal antibodies and its links to the formulation of antibody cocktails remains largely elusive. Methods: Previously, we isolated a panel of neutralizing anti-RBD monoclonal antibodies from convalescent patients and showed their neutralization efficacy in vitro. Here, we elucidate the mechanism of action of antibodies and dissect antibodies at the epitope level, which leads to a formation of a potent antibody cocktail. Results: We found that representative antibodies which target non-overlapping epitopes are effective against wild type virus and recently emerging variants of concern, whilst being encoded by antibody genes with few somatic mutations. Neutralization is associated with the inhibition of binding of viral RBD to ACE2 and possibly of the subsequent fusion process. Structural analysis of representative antibodies, by cryo-electron microscopy and crystallography, reveals that they have some unique aspects that are of potential value while sharing some features in common with previously reported neutralizing monoclonal antibodies. For instance, one has a common VH 3-53 public variable region yet is unusually resilient to mutation at residue 501 of the RBD. We evaluate the in vivo efficacy of an antibody cocktail consisting of two potent non-competing anti-RBD antibodies in a Syrian hamster model. We demonstrate that the cocktail prevents weight loss, reduces lung viral load and attenuates pulmonary inflammation in hamsters in both prophylactic and therapeutic settings. Although neutralization of one of these antibodies is abrogated by the mutations of variant B.1.351, it is also possible to produce a bi-valent cocktail of antibodies both of which are resilient to variants B.1.1.7, B.1.351 and B.1.617.2. Conclusions: These findings support the up-to-date and rational design of an anti-RBD antibody cocktail as a therapeutic candidate against COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal/chemistry , Antibodies, Monoclonal/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , Antibodies, Monoclonal/metabolism , Antibodies, Neutralizing/chemistry , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/pharmacology , Binding Sites , Binding, Competitive , COVID-19/virology , Cricetinae , Cryoelectron Microscopy , Crystallography, X-Ray , Dogs , Epitopes , Female , Humans , Madin Darby Canine Kidney Cells , Neutralization Tests , Protein Domains , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism
17.
Nat Immunol ; 22(12): 1503-1514, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1493136

ABSTRACT

Prevention of viral escape and increased coverage against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) variants of concern require therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) targeting multiple sites of vulnerability on the coronavirus spike glycoprotein. Here we identify several potent neutralizing antibodies directed against either the N-terminal domain (NTD) or the receptor-binding domain (RBD) of the spike protein. Administered in combinations, these mAbs provided low-dose protection against SARS-CoV-2 infection in the K18-human angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 mouse model, using both neutralization and Fc effector antibody functions. The RBD mAb WRAIR-2125, which targets residue F486 through a unique heavy-chain and light-chain pairing, demonstrated potent neutralizing activity against all major SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern. In combination with NTD and other RBD mAbs, WRAIR-2125 also prevented viral escape. These data demonstrate that NTD/RBD mAb combinations confer potent protection, likely leveraging complementary mechanisms of viral inactivation and clearance.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Amino Acid Sequence , Animals , Antibodies, Monoclonal/administration & dosage , Antibodies, Monoclonal/metabolism , Antibodies, Neutralizing/chemistry , Antibodies, Neutralizing/metabolism , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/metabolism , Binding Sites/genetics , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/prevention & control , Disease Models, Animal , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Epitope Mapping , Epitopes/chemistry , Epitopes/immunology , Epitopes/metabolism , Humans , Mice, Transgenic , Neutralization Tests , Protein Binding , Protein Conformation , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Sequence Homology, Amino Acid , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Survival Analysis
18.
Front Immunol ; 12: 751584, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463475

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has caused a global pandemic of novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Though vaccines and neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been developed to fight COVID-19 in the past year, one major concern is the emergence of SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern (VOCs). Indeed, SARS-CoV-2 VOCs such as B.1.1.7 (UK), B.1.351 (South Africa), P.1 (Brazil), and B.1.617.1 (India) now dominate the pandemic. Herein, we found that binding activity and neutralizing capacity of sera collected from convalescent patients in early 2020 for SARS-CoV-2 VOCs, but not non-VOC variants, were severely blunted. Furthermore, we observed evasion of SARS-CoV-2 VOCs from a VH3-30 mAb 32D4, which was proved to exhibit highly potential neutralization against wild-type (WT) SARS-CoV-2. Thus, these results indicated that SARS-CoV-2 VOCs might be able to spread in convalescent patients and even harbor resistance to medical countermeasures. New interventions against these SARS-CoV-2 VOCs are urgently needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Mutation/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Adult , Antibodies, Monoclonal/metabolism , Antibodies, Neutralizing/metabolism , Antibodies, Viral/metabolism , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Humans , Immune Evasion , Immunization, Passive , Male , Middle Aged , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism
19.
Front Immunol ; 12: 707977, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1457901

ABSTRACT

The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic caused by SARS-CoV-2 is a huge public health crisis for the globe. The receptor-binding domain (RBD) of SARS-CoV-2 spike (S) protein plays a vital role in viral infection and serves as a major target for developing neutralizing antibodies. In this study, the antibody response to the RBD of SARS-CoV-2 S protein was analyzed by a panel of sera from animals immunized with RBD-based antigens and four linear B-cell epitope peptides (R345, R405, R450 and R465) were revealed. The immunogenicity of three immunodominant peptides (R345, R405, R465) was further accessed by peptide immunization in mice, and all of them could induced potent antibody response to SARS-CoV-2 S protein, indicating that the three determinants in the RBD were immunogenic. We further generated and characterized monoclonal antibodies (15G9, 12C10 and 10D2) binding to these epitope peptides, and finely mapped the three immunodominant epitopes using the corresponding antibodies. Neutralization assays showed that all three monoclonal antibodies had neutralization activity. Results from IFA and western blotting showed that 12C10 was a cross-reactive antibody against both of SARS-CoV-2 and SARS-CoV. Results from conservative and structural analysis showed that 350VYAWN354 was a highly conserved epitope and exposed on the surface of SARS-CoV-2 S trimer, whereas 473YQAGSTP479 located in the receptor binding motif (RBM) was variable among different SARS-CoV-2 strains. 407VRQIAP412 was a highly conserved, but cryptic epitope shared between SARS-CoV-2 and SARS-CoV. These findings provide important information for understanding the humoral antibody response to the RBD of SARS-CoV-2 S protein and may facilitate further efforts to design SARS-CoV-2 vaccines and the target of COVID-19 diagnostic.


Subject(s)
B-Lymphocytes/immunology , Epitopes, B-Lymphocyte/metabolism , Peptides/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Amino Acid Motifs/genetics , Antibodies, Monoclonal/metabolism , Antibodies, Neutralizing/metabolism , Antibodies, Viral/metabolism , COVID-19 Vaccines , Conserved Sequence/genetics , Epitope Mapping , Epitopes, B-Lymphocyte/genetics , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Immunity, Humoral , Peptides/genetics , Protein Binding , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics
20.
Immunity ; 54(9): 2159-2166.e6, 2021 09 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1454205

ABSTRACT

The emergence of SARS-CoV-2 antigenic variants with increased transmissibility is a public health threat. Some variants show substantial resistance to neutralization by SARS-CoV-2 infection- or vaccination-induced antibodies. Here, we analyzed receptor binding domain-binding monoclonal antibodies derived from SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccine-elicited germinal center B cells for neutralizing activity against the WA1/2020 D614G SARS-CoV-2 strain and variants of concern. Of five monoclonal antibodies that potently neutralized the WA1/2020 D614G strain, all retained neutralizing capacity against the B.1.617.2 variant, four also neutralized the B.1.1.7 variant, and only one, 2C08, also neutralized the B.1.351 and B.1.1.28 variants. 2C08 reduced lung viral load and morbidity in hamsters challenged with the WA1/2020 D614G, B.1.351, or B.1.617.2 strains. Clonal analysis identified 2C08-like public clonotypes among B cells responding to SARS-CoV-2 infection or vaccination in 41 out of 181 individuals. Thus, 2C08-like antibodies can be induced by SARS-CoV-2 vaccines and mitigate resistance by circulating variants of concern.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal/metabolism , Antibodies, Neutralizing/metabolism , Antibodies, Viral/metabolism , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Germinal Center/immunology , Lung/virology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Animals , Cells, Cultured , Clone Cells , Cricetinae , Disease Models, Animal , Humans , Neutralization Tests , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Vaccination , Viral Load
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