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2.
PLoS One ; 17(2): e0262515, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1688746

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Following the full re-opening of schools in England and emergence of the SARS-CoV-2 Alpha variant, we investigated the risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection in students and staff who were contacts of a confirmed case in a school bubble (school groupings with limited interactions), along with their household members. METHODS: Primary and secondary school bubbles were recruited into sKIDsBUBBLE after being sent home to self-isolate following a confirmed case of COVID-19 in the bubble. Bubble participants and their household members were sent home-testing kits comprising nasal swabs for RT-PCR testing and whole genome sequencing, and oral fluid swabs for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies. RESULTS: During November-December 2020, 14 bubbles were recruited from 7 schools, including 269 bubble contacts (248 students, 21 staff) and 823 household contacts (524 adults, 299 children). The secondary attack rate was 10.0% (6/60) in primary and 3.9% (4/102) in secondary school students, compared to 6.3% (1/16) and 0% (0/1) among staff, respectively. The incidence rate for household contacts of primary school students was 6.6% (12/183) and 3.7% (1/27) for household contacts of primary school staff. In secondary schools, this was 3.5% (11/317) and 0% (0/1), respectively. Household contacts were more likely to test positive if their bubble contact tested positive although there were new infections among household contacts of uninfected bubble contacts. INTERPRETATION: Compared to other institutional settings, the overall risk of secondary infection in school bubbles and their household contacts was low. Our findings are important for developing evidence-based infection prevention guidelines for educational settings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Adolescent , Adult , Antibodies, Viral/analysis , COVID-19/virology , Child , Contact Tracing , England/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Incidence , Male , Nasopharynx/virology , Prospective Studies , RNA, Viral/analysis , RNA, Viral/metabolism , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Schools/statistics & numerical data , Students/statistics & numerical data
4.
Curr Protoc ; 2(10): e521, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2047527

ABSTRACT

Antibody detection assays are essential for evaluating immunity of individuals against a given virus, and this has been particularly relevant during the COVID-19 pandemic. Current serology assays either require a laboratory setting and take >1 hr (i.e., enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA]) or are rapid but only qualitative in nature and cannot accurately track antibody levels over time (i.e., lateral flow assay [LFA]). Therefore, there is a need for development of a rapid and simple but also quantitative assay that can evaluate antibody levels in patients accurately over time. We have developed an assay that uses a split nanoluciferase fused to the spike or nucleocapsid proteins of the SARS-CoV-2 virus to enable luminescent-based detection of spike- or nucleocapsid-binding antibodies in serum, plasma, and whole blood samples. The resulting approach is simple, rapid, and quantitative and is highly amenable to low-/medium-throughput scale using plate-based assays, high-throughput scale using robotics, and point-of-care applications. In this article, we describe how to perform the assay in a laboratory setting using a plate reader or liquid-handling robotics and in a point-of-care setting using a handheld, battery-powered luminometer. Together, these assays allow antibody detection to be easily performed in multiple settings by simplifying and reducing assay time in a laboratory or clinical environment and by allowing for antibody detection in point-of-care, nonlaboratory settings. © 2022 Wiley Periodicals LLC. Basic Protocol: SARS-CoV-2 antibody detection using the split-luciferase assay on a medium-throughput scale with a laboratory luminometer Alternate Protocol 1: High-throughput-based protocol for SARS-CoV-2 antibody detection using a robotic platform Alternate Protocol 2: Point-of-care-based protocol for SARS-CoV-2 antibody detection using a handheld luminometer Support Protocol: Determining positive/negative cutoffs for test samples and standardizing the assay between days.


Subject(s)
Biosensing Techniques , COVID-19 , Antibodies, Viral/analysis , COVID-19/diagnosis , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/methods , Humans , Luciferases , Nucleocapsid Proteins , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sensitivity and Specificity
5.
Transbound Emerg Dis ; 69(4): e1005-e1014, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1968197

ABSTRACT

Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) has been one of the major health-related concerns in the swine production industry. Through its rapid transmission and mutation, the simultaneous circulation of multiple PRRSV strains can be a challenge in PRRSV diagnostic, control and surveillance. The objective of this longitudinal study was to describe the temporal detection of PRRSV in swine farms with different production types and PRRS management strategies. Tonsil scraping (n = 344) samples were collected from three breeding and two growing herds for approximately one year. In addition, processing fluids (n = 216) were obtained from piglet processing batches within the three breeding farms while pen-based oral fluids (n = 125) were collected in the two growing pig farms. Viral RNA extraction and reverse-transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) were conducted for all samples. The sample positivity threshold was set at quantification cycle (Cq) of ≤ 37. Statistical analyses were performed using generalized linear modelling and post hoc pairwise comparisons with Bonferroni adjustments using R statistical software. The results suggested a higher probability of detection in processing fluids compared to tonsil scraping specimens [odds ratio (OR) = 3.86; p = .096] in breeding farms whereas oral fluids were outperformed by tonsil scrapings (OR = 0.26; p < .01) in growing pig farms. The results described herein may lead to an improvement in PRRSV diagnostic and surveillance by selecting proper specimens.


Subject(s)
Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome , Porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus , Swine Diseases , Animals , Antibodies, Viral/analysis , Demography , Longitudinal Studies , Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome/diagnosis , Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome/epidemiology , Porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus/genetics , Saliva , Swine
6.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 10366, 2022 06 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1900657

ABSTRACT

The Covid-19 pandemic, caused by SARS-CoV-2, has resulted in over 6 million reported deaths worldwide being one of the biggest challenges the world faces today. Here we present optimizations of all steps of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based test to detect IgG, IgA and IgM against the trimeric spike (S) protein, receptor binding domain (RBD), and N terminal domain of the nucleocapsid (N-NTD) protein of SARS-CoV-2. We discuss how to determine specific thresholds for antibody positivity and its limitations according to the antigen used. We applied the assay to a cohort of 126 individuals from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, consisting of 23 PCR-positive individuals and 103 individuals without a confirmed diagnosis for SARS-CoV-2 infection. To illustrate the differences in serological responses to vaccinal immunization, we applied the test in 18 individuals from our cohort before and after receiving ChAdOx-1 nCoV-19 or CoronaVac vaccines. Taken together, our results show that the test can be customized at different stages depending on its application, enabling the user to analyze different cohorts, saving time, reagents, or samples. It is also a valuable tool for elucidating the immunological consequences of new viral strains and monitoring vaccination coverage and duration of response to different immunization regimens.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Seroconversion , Antibodies, Viral/analysis , Brazil , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , ChAdOx1 nCoV-19/administration & dosage , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , Humans , Immunoglobulin A , Immunoglobulin G , Immunoglobulin M , Pandemics , Phosphoproteins/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Vaccination , Vaccines, Inactivated/administration & dosage
7.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 24448, 2021 12 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1852474

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 mRNA vaccines are highly effective at preventing COVID-19. Prior studies have found detectable SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies in oral mucosal specimens of participants with history of COVID-19. To assess the development of oral SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies among people who received either the Moderna or Pfizer/BioNTech COVID-19 vaccination series, we developed a novel SARS-CoV-2 IgG enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to quantify the concentrations of oral and nasal mucosal SARS-CoV-2 IgG levels. We enrolled 52 participants who received the Moderna vaccine and 80 participants who received the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine. Oral mucosal specimens were self-collected by participants prior to or on the day of vaccination, and on days 5, 10, 15, and 20 following each vaccination dose and 30, 60, and 90 days following the second vaccination dose. A subset of the cohort provided additional nasal mucosal specimens at every time point. All participants developed detectable oral mucosal SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies by 15 days after the first vaccination dose. There were no significant differences in oral mucosal antibody concentrations once participants were fully vaccinated in the Moderna and Pfizer/BioNTech vaccines. Oral or nasal mucosal antibody testing could be an inexpensive and less invasive alternative to serum antibody testing. Further research is needed to understand the duration of detectable oral or nasal mucosal antibodies and how antibody concentrations change with time.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/analysis , Immunoglobulin G/analysis , Mouth Mucosa/metabolism , Respiratory System/metabolism , /immunology , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , Female , Health Personnel , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Time Factors , Vaccination , Young Adult , /administration & dosage
8.
Front Immunol ; 12: 801797, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1793017

ABSTRACT

Background: Limited data are available regarding the balance of risks and benefits from human milk and/or breastfeeding during and following maternal infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Objective: To investigate whether SARS-CoV-2 can be detected in milk and on the breast after maternal coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) diagnosis; and characterize concentrations of milk immunoglobulin (Ig) A specific to the SARS-CoV-2 spike glycoprotein receptor binding domain (RBD) during the 2 months after onset of symptoms or positive diagnostic test. Methods: Using a longitudinal study design, we collected milk and breast skin swabs one to seven times from 64 lactating women with COVID-19 over a 2-month period, beginning as early as the week of diagnosis. Milk and breast swabs were analyzed for SARS-CoV-2 RNA, and milk was tested for anti-RBD IgA. Results: SARS-CoV-2 was not detected in any milk sample or on 71% of breast swabs. Twenty-seven out of 29 (93%) breast swabs collected after breast washing tested negative for SARS-CoV-2. Detection of SARS-CoV-2 on the breast was associated with maternal coughing and other household COVID-19. Most (75%; 95% CI, 70-79%; n=316) milk samples contained anti-RBD IgA, and concentrations increased (P=.02) during the first two weeks following onset of COVID-19 symptoms or positive test. Milk-borne anti-RBD IgA persisted for at least two months in 77% of women. Conclusion: Milk produced by women with COVID-19 does not contain SARS-CoV-2 and is likely a lasting source of passive immunity via anti-RBD IgA. These results support recommendations encouraging lactating women to continue breastfeeding during and after COVID-19 illness.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/analysis , Immunoglobulin A/analysis , Milk, Human/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Breast Feeding , COVID-19/immunology , Female , Humans , Immunization, Passive , Immunoglobulin A/immunology , Lactation , Longitudinal Studies , Milk, Human/virology , RNA, Viral/genetics
9.
Klin Lab Diagn ; 65(11): 688-692, 2020 Dec 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1780383

ABSTRACT

The study presents the results of the creation and evaluation of the diagnostic characteristics of the rapid immunochromatographic test for the qualitative detection and differentiation of IgM/IgG antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 in human serum, plasma, and whole blood "ИХА-COVID-19-IgM / IgG". Have been tested some samples without antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 and a samples with two and one type of specific antibodies. The coincidence of the results of immunochromatographic analysis with the results of the immunochemiluminescent method was 87.2%. Test kit can be use as the rapid diagnostic test in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic and to assess the immune status of convalescents.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/analysis , COVID-19 Serological Testing , COVID-19/diagnosis , Immunoassay , Immunoglobulin G/analysis , Immunoglobulin M/analysis , Humans
10.
Klin Lab Diagn ; 65(11): 683-687, 2020 Dec 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1780382

ABSTRACT

A new original Russian test kit for the detection of IgG-antibodies to the causative agent of COVID-19 - coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 by the method of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) on a solid-phase «ELISA-SARS-CoV-2-AT-G¼ has been developed. In comparative tests with similar test systems «Vitrotest® SARS-CoV-2 IgG¼ (Vitrotest, Ukraine) and «Anti-SARS-Cov-2 ELISA (IgG)¼ (EUROIMMUN AG, Germany) high diagnostic efficiency of the new test system was shown.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/analysis , COVID-19 Serological Testing , COVID-19/diagnosis , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Immunoglobulin G/analysis , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Humans , Plasma , Reagent Kits, Diagnostic
11.
Obstet Gynecol ; 139(2): 181-191, 2022 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1774425

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate immune responses to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) mRNA-based vaccines present in breast milk and transfer of the immune responses to breastfeeding infants. METHODS: We enrolled 30 lactating women who received mRNA-based COVID-19 vaccines from January through April 2021 in this cohort study. Women provided serial milk samples, including milk expressed before vaccination, across 2-3 weeks after the first dose, and across 3 weeks after the second dose. Women provided their blood, spotted on cards (dried blood spots), 19 days after the first dose and 21 days after the second dose. Stool samples from the breastfed infants were collected 21 days after mothers' second vaccination. Prepandemic samples of milk, dried blood spots, and infant stool were used as controls. Milk, dried blood spots, and infant stool were tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for receptor-binding domain (RBD)-specific immunoglobulin (Ig)A and IgG. Milk samples were tested for the presence of neutralizing antibodies against the spike and four variants of concern: D614G, Alpha (B.1.1.7), Beta (B.1.351), and Gamma (P.1). Levels of 10 cytokines were measured in milk samples. RESULTS: Milk from COVID-19-immunized women neutralized the spike and four variants of concern, primarily driven by anti-RBD IgG. The immune response in milk also included significant elevation of interferon-γ. The immune response to maternal vaccination was reflected in breastfed infants: anti-RBD IgG and anti-RBD IgA were detected in 33% and 30% of infant stool samples, respectively. Levels of anti-RBD antibodies in infant stool correlated with maternal vaccine side effects. Median antibody levels against RBD were below the positive cutoffs in prepandemic milk and infant stool samples. CONCLUSION: Humoral and cellular immune responses to mRNA-based COVID-19 vaccination are present in most women's breast milk. The milk anti-RBD antibodies can neutralize severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) spike and variants of concern. Anti-RBD antibodies are transferred to breastfed infants, with the potential to confer passive immunity against SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/analysis , Breast Feeding , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Cytokines/analysis , Milk, Human/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , Antibodies, Viral/analysis , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin A/analysis , Immunoglobulin G/analysis , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Middle Aged , Vaccination
12.
Virol J ; 19(1): 24, 2022 02 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1770554

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: In this work, six SARS-CoV-2-specific antibody assays were evaluated, namely, two pan-immunoglobulin (pan-Ig) assays [Roche Elecsys Anti-SARS-CoV-2 (named "Elecsys" in this study) and the PerkinElmer SuperFlex™ Anti-SARS-CoV-2 Ab Assay (SuperFlex_Ab)], two IgM assays [SuperFlex™ Anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgM Assay (SuperFlex_IgM) and YHLO iFlash-SARS-CoV-2 IgM (iFlash_IgM)], and two IgG assays [SuperFlex™ Anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG Assay (SuperFlex_IgG) and iFlash-SARS-CoV-2 IgG (iFlash_IgG)]. Combination assays of SuperFlex™ (SuperFlex_any) and iFlash (iFlash_any) were also evaluated. METHODS: A total of 438 residual serum samples from 54 COVID-19 patients in the COVID-19 group and 100 samples from individuals without evidence of SARS-CoV-2 infection in the negative control group were evaluated. RESULTS: In the early stage of COVID-19 infection, within 14 days of symptom onset, the seropositive rate was lower than that of the late stage 15 days after onset (65.4% vs 99.6%). In the total period, the pan-Ig and IgG assays had higher sensitivity (90.8-95.3%) than the IgM assays (36.5-40.7%). SuperFlex_Ab and SuperFlex_any had higher sensitivity than Elecsys and SuperFlex_IgG (p < 0.05). The specificity of all the assays was 100%, except for SuperFlex_IgM (99.0%). The concordance rate between each assay was higher (96.4-100%) in the late stage than in the early stage (77.4-98.1%). CONCLUSION: For the purpose of COVID-19 diagnosis, antibody testing should be performed 15 days after onset. For the purpose of epidemiological surveillance, highly sensitive assays should be used as much as possible, such as SuperFlex_Ab, iFlash_IgG and their combination. IgM assays were not suitable for these purposes.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/analysis , COVID-19 Serological Testing/methods , COVID-19 , COVID-19/diagnosis , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/analysis , Immunoglobulin M/analysis , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Sensitivity and Specificity
13.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0260574, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1753182

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 Community Research Partnership is a population-based longitudinal syndromic and sero-surveillance study. The study includes over 17,000 participants from six healthcare systems in North Carolina who submitted over 49,000 serology results. The purpose of this study is to use these serology data to estimate the cumulative proportion of the North Carolina population that has either been infected with SARS-CoV-2 or developed a measurable humoral response to vaccination. METHODS: Adult community residents were invited to participate in the study between April 2020 and February 2021. Demographic information was collected and daily symptom screen was completed using a secure, HIPAA-compliant, online portal. A portion of participants were mailed kits containing a lateral flow assay to be used in-home to test for presence of anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgM or IgG antibodies. The cumulative proportion of participants who tested positive at least once during the study was estimated. A standard Cox proportional hazards model was constructed to illustrate the probability of seroconversion over time up to December 20, 2020 (before vaccines available). A separate analysis was performed to describe the influence of vaccines through February 15, 2021. RESULTS: 17,688 participants contributed at least one serology result. 68.7% of the population were female, and 72.2% were between 18 and 59 years of age. The average number of serology results submitted per participant was 3.0 (±1.9). By December 20, 2020, the overall probability of seropositivity in the CCRP population was 32.6%. By February 15, 2021 the probability among healthcare workers and non-healthcare workers was 83% and 49%, respectively. An inflection upward in the probability of seropositivity was demonstrated around the end of December, suggesting an influence of vaccinations, especially for healthcare workers. Among healthcare workers, those in the oldest age category (60+ years) were 38% less likely to have seroconverted by February 15, 2021. CONCLUSIONS: Results of this study suggest more North Carolina residents may have been infected with SARS-CoV-2 than the number of documented cases as determined by positive RNA or antigen tests. The influence of vaccinations on seropositivity among North Carolina residents is also demonstrated. Additional research is needed to fully characterize the impact of seropositivity on immunity and the ultimate course of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/analysis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , Age Factors , Community Participation , Female , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , North Carolina/epidemiology , Seroconversion , Young Adult
14.
Neurol Neuroimmunol Neuroinflamm ; 9(2)2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1745397

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Information about humoral and cellular responses to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and antibody persistence in convalescent (COVID-19) patients with multiple sclerosis (PwMS) is scarce. The objectives of this study were to investigate factors influencing humoral and cellular responses to SARS-CoV-2 and its persistence in convalescent COVID-19 PwMS. METHODS: This is a retrospective study of confirmed COVID-19 convalescent PwMS identified between February 2020 and May 2021 by SARS-CoV-2 antibody testing. We examined relationships between demographics, MS characteristics, disease-modifying therapy (DMT), and humoral (immunoglobulin G against spike and nucleocapsid proteins) and cellular (interferon-gamma [IFN-γ]) responses to SARS-CoV-2. RESULTS: A total of 121 (83.45%) of 145 PwMS were seropositive, and 25/42 (59.5%) presented a cellular response up to 13.1 months after COVID-19. Anti-CD20-treated patients had lower antibody titers than those under other DMTs (p < 0.001), but severe COVID-19 and a longer time from last infusion increased the likelihood of producing a humoral response. IFN-γ levels did not differ among DMT. Five of 7 (71.4%) anti--CD20-treated seronegative patients had a cellular response. The humoral response persisted for more than 6 months in 41/56(81.13%) PwMS. In multivariate analysis, seropositivity decreased due to anti-CD20 therapy (OR 0.08 [95% CI 0.01-0.55]) and increased in males (OR 3.59 [1.02-12.68]), whereas the cellular response decreased in those with progressive disease (OR 0.04 [0.001-0.88]). No factors were associated with antibody persistence. DISCUSSION: Humoral and cellular responses to SARS-CoV-2 are present in COVID-19 convalescent PwMS up to 13.10 months after COVID-19. The humoral response decreases under anti-CD20 treatment, although the cellular response can be detected in anti-CD20-treated patients, even in the absence of antibodies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Immunity, Cellular , Immunity, Humoral , Multiple Sclerosis/immunology , Adult , Aged , Antibodies, Viral/analysis , Antigens, CD20/immunology , COVID-19/complications , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/analysis , Interferon-gamma/biosynthesis , Interferon-gamma/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Sclerosis/complications , Nucleocapsid/chemistry , Nucleocapsid/immunology , Retrospective Studies
15.
STAR Protoc ; 3(1): 101203, 2022 03 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1740310

ABSTRACT

Antibodies in milk obtained from those previously SARS-CoV-2-infected or vaccinated against COVID-19 may provide passive immunity to the breastfed infant. Few assays have been established to measure antibodies in human milk, despite the public health importance of this topic. In the present protocol, we describe an optimized indirect ELISA assay aimed to measure SARS-CoV-2-reactive antibodies in human milk, which can be used as a rapid screen on undiluted samples or to designate samples as relatively low, moderate, or high titer. For complete details on the use and execution of this protocol, please refer to Fox et al. (2020).


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/analysis , Immunoassay/methods , Milk, Human/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay/methods , Humans
16.
Cell Rep ; 38(9): 110429, 2022 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1734242

ABSTRACT

Continuous emergence of SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern (VOCs) is fueling the COVID-19 pandemic. Omicron (B.1.1.529) rapidly spread worldwide. The large number of mutations in its Spike raise concerns about a major antigenic drift that could significantly decrease vaccine efficacy and infection-induced immunity. A long interval between BNT162b2 mRNA doses elicits antibodies that efficiently recognize Spikes from different VOCs. Here, we evaluate the recognition of Omicron Spike by plasma from a cohort of SARS-CoV-2 naive and previously infected individuals who received their BNT162b2 mRNA vaccine 16 weeks apart. Omicron Spike is recognized less efficiently than D614G, Alpha, Beta, Gamma, and Delta Spikes. We compare with plasma activity from participants receiving a short (4 weeks) interval regimen. Plasma from individuals of the long-interval cohort recognize and neutralize better the Omicron Spike compared with those who received a short interval. Whether this difference confers any clinical benefit against Omicron remains unknown.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , BNT162 Vaccine/administration & dosage , Immunization Schedule , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Adult , Aged , Antibodies, Neutralizing/analysis , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/analysis , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , BNT162 Vaccine/immunology , Cohort Studies , Female , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Immunization, Secondary/methods , Male , Middle Aged , Quebec , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Time Factors , Vaccination/methods , Vaccine Potency , Vaccines, Synthetic/administration & dosage , Vaccines, Synthetic/immunology , Young Adult , mRNA Vaccines/administration & dosage , mRNA Vaccines/immunology
17.
CMAJ ; 194(9): E350-E360, 2022 03 07.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1731613

ABSTRACT

CONTEXTE: La pandémie de COVID-19 a affecté de manière disproportionnée les travailleurs de la santé. Nous avons voulu mesurer la séroprévalence du SRAS-CoV-2 chez les travailleurs de la santé dans les hôpitaux du Québec, au Canada, après la première vague de la pandémie, afin d'explorer les facteurs associés à la SRAS-CoV-2-séropositivité. MÉTHODES: Entre le 6 juillet et le 24 septembre 2020, nous avons recruté des travailleurs de la santé de 10 hôpitaux, dont 8 d'une région où l'incidence de la COVID-19 était élevée (région de Montréal) et 2 de régions du Québec où l'incidence était faible. Les travailleurs de la santé admissibles étaient des médecins, des infirmières, des préposées aux bénéficiaires et des préposés à l'entretien ménager travaillant dans 4 types d'unité de soins (urgences, soins intensifs, unité hospitalière COVID-19 et unité hospitalière non-COVID-19). Les participants ont répondu à un questionnaire et subi un dépistage sérologique du SRAS-CoV-2. Nous avons identifié les facteurs ayant un lien indépendant avec une séroprévalence plus élevée. RÉSULTATS: Parmi les 2056 travailleurs de la santé recrutés, 241 (11,7 %) se sont révélés SRAS-CoV-2-positifs. Parmi eux, 171 (71,0 %) avaient déjà reçu un diagnostic de COVID-19. La séroprévalence a varié d'un hôpital à l'autre, de 2,4 %­3,7 % dans les régions où l'incidence était faible, à 17,9 %­32,0 % dans les hôpitaux ayant connu des éclosions touchant 5 travailleurs de la santé ou plus. La séroprévalence plus élevée a été associée au fait de travailler dans un hôpital où des éclosions sont survenues (rapport de prévalence ajusté 4,16, intervalle de confiance [IC] à 95 % 2,63­6,57), au fait d'être infirmière ou auxiliaire (rapport de prévalence ajusté 1,34, IC à 95 % 1,03­1,74), préposée aux bénéficiaires (rapport de prévalence ajusté 1,49, IC à 95 % 1,12­1,97) et d'ethnicité noire ou hispanique (rapport de prévalence ajusté 1,41, IC à 95 % 1,13­1,76). La séroprévalence moindre a été associée au fait de travailler dans une unité de soins intensifs (rapport de prévalence ajusté 0,47, IC à 95 % 0,30­0,71) ou aux urgences (rapport de prévalence ajusté 0,61, IC à 95 % 0,39­0,98). INTERPRÉTATION: Les travailleurs de la santé des hôpitaux du Québec ont été exposés à un risque élevé d'infection par le SRAS-CoV-2, particulièrement lors des éclosions. Il faudra travailler à mieux comprendre la dynamique de la transmission du SRAS-CoV-2 dans les milieux de soins.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/analysis , COVID-19 Serological Testing/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Quebec/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies
19.
Front Immunol ; 12: 783975, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1699418

ABSTRACT

Background: There is limited information on the functional neutralizing capabilities of breastmilk SARS-CoV-2-specific antibodies and the potential adulteration of breastmilk with vaccine mRNA after SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccination. Methods: We conducted a prospective cohort study of lactating healthcare workers who received the BNT162b2 vaccine and their infants. The presence of SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing antibodies, antibody isotypes (IgG, IgA, IgM) and intact mRNA in serum and breastmilk was evaluated at multiple time points using a surrogate neutralizing assay, ELISA, and PCR, over a 6 week period of the two-dose vaccination given 21 days apart. Results: Thirty-five lactating mothers, median age 34 years (IQR 32-36), were included. All had detectable neutralizing antibodies in the serum immediately before dose 2, with significant increase in neutralizing antibody levels 7 days after this dose [median 168.4 IU/ml (IQR 100.7-288.5) compared to 2753.0 IU/ml (IQR 1627.0-4712.0), p <0.001]. Through the two vaccine doses, all mothers had detectable IgG1, IgA and IgM isotypes in their serum, with a notable increase in all three antibody isotypes after dose 2, especially IgG1 levels. Neutralizing antibodies were detected in majority of breastmilk samples a week after dose 2 [median 13.4 IU/ml (IQR 7.0-28.7)], with persistence of these antibodies up to 3 weeks after. Post the second vaccine dose, all (35/35, 100%) mothers had detectable breastmilk SARS-CoV-2 spike RBD-specific IgG1 and IgA antibody and 32/35 (88.6%) mothers with IgM. Transient, low intact vaccine mRNA levels was detected in 20/74 (27%) serum samples from 21 mothers, and 5/309 (2%) breastmilk samples from 4 mothers within 1 weeks of vaccine dose. Five infants, median age 8 months (IQR 7-16), were also recruited - none had detectable neutralizing antibodies or vaccine mRNA in their serum. Conclusion: Majority of lactating mothers had detectable SARS-CoV-2 antibody isotypes and neutralizing antibodies in serum and breastmilk, especially after dose 2 of BNT162b2 vaccination. Transient, low levels of vaccine mRNA were detected in the serum of vaccinated mothers with occasional transfer to their breastmilk, but we did not detect evidence of infant sensitization. Importantly, the presence of breastmilk neutralising antibodies likely provides a foundation for passive immunisation of the breastmilk-fed infant.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/analysis , Antibodies, Viral/analysis , Milk, Human/immunology , Adult , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , /blood , Cohort Studies , Female , Health Personnel , Humans , Immunoglobulin Isotypes/analysis , Immunoglobulin Isotypes/blood , Infant , Lactation , Milk, Human/chemistry , Prospective Studies
20.
Viral Immunol ; 35(1): 5-14, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1692265

ABSTRACT

On March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization declared the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak a global pandemic. Although molecular testing remains the gold standard for COVID-19 diagnosis, serological testing enables the evaluation of the immune response to severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection and vaccination, and can be used to assess community viral spread. This review summarizes and analyzes the current landscape of SARS-CoV-2 testing in the United States and includes guidance on both when and why it is important to use direct pathogen detection and/or serological testing. The usefulness of monitoring humoral and cellular immune responses in infected and vaccinated patients is also addressed. Finally, this review considers current challenges, future perspectives for SARS-CoV-2 testing, and how diagnostics are being adapted as the virus evolves.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/analysis , COVID-19 Testing , COVID-19 , Vaccination , COVID-19/diagnosis , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
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