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1.
Neurol India ; 69(Supplement): S51-S58, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1771349

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Migraine is a common primary headache disorder and Episodic migraine is characterized by the occurrence of up to 14 headache days in a month. The preventive treatment of migraine is useful in patients with frequent migraine attacks, impaired activities of daily living, failure of acute pain management, disabling aura and limitations in the use of acute treatment. It is aimed at reducing headache frequency and intensity, improve response to acute treatment of migraine and improve the quality of life. AIM: To analyze the evidence for the efficacy and tolerability of preventive oral drugs used in the management of episodic migraine. METHODS: A narrative review of the references were reviewed by searching the literature for the articles published in PubMed in English language using all the following MeSH keywords "preventive treatment", "preventive oral treatment", AND "episodic migraine", "migraine". RESULTS: Out of articles identified in the search, 38 articles were reviewed for evidence and summarized. The various oral drugs used in the prevention of episodic migraine are antihypertensives (beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers and Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/Angiotensin receptor blockers), antidepressants (tricyclic antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors), antiepileptic drugs (valproic acid, topiramate, lamotrigine) and other miscellaneous agents. HURT questionnaire and HALT 30 index are useful in assessing response to treatment in the follow up of migraine patients. CONCLUSION: An appropriately chosen oral drug is useful in the preventive treatment of episodic migraine. In patients, who fail to respond to the preventive treatment, it is essential to review the diagnosis of migraine, titrate the dosage and duration of preventive treatment and ensure patient compliance. In those patients who fail to respond to monotherapy, polytherapy is a useful option to be considered.


Subject(s)
Migraine Disorders , Quality of Life , Activities of Daily Living , Anticonvulsants/therapeutic use , Humans , Migraine Disorders/drug therapy , Migraine Disorders/prevention & control , Topiramate/therapeutic use
2.
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova ; 122(2): 101-106, 2022.
Article in Russian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1737453

ABSTRACT

To compare an impact of coronavirus disease and Sputnik V COVID-19 vaccine on the dynamics of epilepsy. The study is part of the ongoing «Epilepsy and COVID-19¼ independent research which recruited patients with epilepsy into two groups: group 1 - COVID-19 survivors and group 2 - patients vaccinated with a COVID-19 vaccine. The study compares two clinical cases: seizure recurrence with COVID-19 disease in a young patient and good tolerability of vaccination in a female elderly patient following surgical management of pharmacoresistant epilepsy with concomitant pathology. In group 1, a 32-year-old patient with idiopathic generalized epilepsy and 3-year seizure remission had generalized seizure recurrence with electroencephalographic deterioration against the backdrop of mild COVID-19. In group 2, a 59-year-old patient, with focal pharmacoresistant epilepsy, and 3-year seizure remission after surgical management, and comorbid endocrine dysfunction showed no side-effects with Sputnik V COVID-19 vaccination and maintained clinical and electroencephalographic remission. The study revealed that the Sputnik V vaccine was well tolerated, and that seizure remission was maintained after epilepsy surgery in an elderly patient with comorbidity, as well as there was the possibility of seizure recurrence in younger patients with mild COVID-19. The findings will aid practitioners in making decisions on how to manage epilepsy patients. More study into the impact of the disease and COVID-19 vaccination on epilepsy dynamics in a larger sample is required.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Epilepsy , Adult , Aged , Anticonvulsants/therapeutic use , COVID-19 Vaccines , Epilepsy/complications , Epilepsy/drug therapy , Epilepsy/surgery , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccines, Synthetic
3.
BMJ Case Rep ; 15(3)2022 Mar 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736043

ABSTRACT

Haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is one of the rare haematological syndromes more commonly reported in infants/children than adults. This disease is known for its aggressive dysregulated immune response affecting the host rapidly, causing multiorgan dysfunction and thus carries a high mortality. The disease still remains cryptic in this current decade despite all the developments in the ever-evolving field of haematology. Due to its rare occurrence and being more frequent in infants and the paediatric population, the literature lacks enough data to standardise therapies. Such events in adults and the elderly are invariably related to an underlying insult such as infections, other autoimmune or rheumatological diseases or drugs. We describe an interesting case of a middle-aged Caucasian woman who presented with fever, pancytopenia and hepatitis, who was eventually diagnosed with HLH just in time to receive the life-saving specific treatment as per available guidelines.


Subject(s)
Arthritis, Rheumatoid , Lymphohistiocytosis, Hemophagocytic , Adult , Aged , Anticonvulsants/therapeutic use , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/complications , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/drug therapy , Child , Female , Fever/complications , Humans , Lamotrigine/therapeutic use , Lymphohistiocytosis, Hemophagocytic/diagnosis , Lymphohistiocytosis, Hemophagocytic/drug therapy , Lymphohistiocytosis, Hemophagocytic/etiology , Middle Aged
4.
Am J Nurs ; 121(8): 23, 2021 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1546038

ABSTRACT

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is advising health care practitioners that lamotrigine (Lamictal), used in managing seizures and bipolar disorder, may increase the risk of serious and potentially lethal arrythmias.The risk is greater if the patient has underlying cardiac disease or is taking medications that affect heart conduction.The FDA is requiring in vitro studies of other sodium channel blockers to determine if this risk is a class effect or unique to lamotrigine.


Subject(s)
Arrhythmias, Cardiac/etiology , Lamotrigine/adverse effects , Anticonvulsants/adverse effects , Anticonvulsants/therapeutic use , Bipolar Disorder/drug therapy , Epilepsy/drug therapy , Humans , Lamotrigine/therapeutic use , Treatment Outcome
5.
Rev Neurol ; 73(11): 390-393, 2021 12 01.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1539089

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Countries worldwide are having to cope with the COVID-19 pandemic caused by SARS-CoV-2. The burden on their national health systems is currently at unprecedented levels. Telemedicine care was initiated at an early stage in our centre. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We conducted a descriptive and retrospective study to evaluate the usefulness of telemedicine during lockdown in our centre. Patients included in the study had a clinical diagnosis of epilepsy, with two visits via telemedicine, who had been followed up for at least six months during the normal situation prior to the COVID-19 pandemic and two face-to-face consultations during the same period. RESULTS: A total of 115 patients were included. The average age was 29 years, 53% were males, 52.2% had focal epilepsy, 58.3% with a structural causation and 57.4% had difficult-to-treat epilepsy. The mean number of seizures prior to lockdown was 9.73/month and 6.54/month during lockdown. The number of patients who were seizure-free when lockdown ended was higher than that observed in the phase before it began: 54 versus 45 out of 115. CONCLUSIONS: Telemedicine is a very useful strategy for monitoring the course, progress and therapeutic changes in epileptic patients in the short and medium term. The reduction in the seizure frequency can be sustained in the medium term, not only in the short term as corroborated in previous studies. Telemedicine allows access to virtually all patients and closer monitoring.


TITLE: Telemedicina y epilepsia: experiencia asistencial de un centro de referencia nacional durante la pandemia de COVID-19.Introducción. El mundo entero está afrontando la pandemia por COVID-19 causada por el SARS-CoV-2. Los sistemas de salud nacionales están sometidos a niveles de sobrecarga sin precedentes. En nuestro centro se inició de forma temprana la asistencia a través de telemedicina. Pacientes y métodos. Es un estudio descriptivo y retrospectivo para evaluar la utilidad de la telemedicina durante el confinamiento en nuestro centro. Se incluyó a los pacientes con diagnóstico clínico de epilepsia, con dos asistencias a través de telemedicina, que tuvieran seguimiento durante al menos seis meses durante la situación de normalidad previa a la pandemia por COVID-19 y dos consultas presenciales durante ese mismo período. Resultados. Se incluyó a 115 pacientes. La media de edad fue de 29 años, el 53% fueron varones, el 52,2% con epilepsia focal, el 58,3% de etiología estructural y el 57,4% presentaba epilepsia de difícil control. La media de crisis preconfinamiento fue de 9,73/mes y de 6,54/mes durante el confinamiento. El número de pacientes libres de crisis fue mayor al final del confinamiento respecto a la fase preconfinamiento, 54 frente a 45/115. Conclusiones. La telemedicina es una estrategia de mucha utilidad en la monitorización de la evolución, el control evolutivo y los cambios terapéuticos en pacientes epilépticos a corto y medio plazo. La reducción de la frecuencia de crisis puede mantenerse a medio plazo, no sólo a corto plazo como se corroboró en estudios previos. La telemedicina permite acceder a prácticamente la totalidad de los pacientes y realizar un seguimiento más cercano.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Epilepsy/drug therapy , Pandemics , Remote Consultation/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Tertiary Care Centers/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Anticonvulsants/therapeutic use , Child , Child, Preschool , Disease Management , Drug Resistant Epilepsy/drug therapy , Drug Resistant Epilepsy/epidemiology , Epilepsies, Partial/drug therapy , Epilepsies, Partial/epidemiology , Epilepsy/epidemiology , Female , Guatemala/epidemiology , Health Facility Closure , Humans , Infant , Male , Middle Aged , Mobile Applications , Office Visits/statistics & numerical data , Procedures and Techniques Utilization/statistics & numerical data , Remote Consultation/trends , Retrospective Studies , Seizures/epidemiology , Seizures/prevention & control , Telephone , Tertiary Care Centers/organization & administration , Treatment Outcome , Videoconferencing , Young Adult
6.
Am J Emerg Med ; 54: 328.e1-328.e2, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1514111

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Status Epilepticus is the most common non-traumatic neurologic emergency in childhood. Current algorithms prioritize the use of benzodiazepines as first line treatment followed by Levetiracetam or Valproic Acid, possibly Fosphenytoin and eventually high dose Propofol and intubation. CASE REPORT: A 9-month old girl was brought to the emergency department with a continuous seizure involving the right upper and lower extremity for 45 min prior to arrival. Patient received a dose of rectal Diazepam, intramuscular Midazolam, 2 doses of Lorazepam, Levetiracetam, Fosphenytoin and 2 additional doses of Lorazepam. The seizure remained refractory and generalized. In anticipation of intubation, and because of its action on the NMDA receptor, Ketamine (1 mg/kg IV) was administered. The clonic movements and eye deviations stopped. Patient was intubated for airway protection, sedated with Propofol, then admitted to the PICU. EEG showed no evidence of a seizure pattern. Labs (CBC, CMP, COVID) were unremarkable except for WBC 24.5, blood glucose of 346 and CO2 of 17 with normal anion gap. Urinalysis showed a urinary tract infection. Patient was at her baseline on 1 week post-discharge re-evaluation. Ketamine theoretically may abort seizures through blockade of NMDA receptors which are unregulated in status epilepticus. To date, no randomized controlled trials have been reported. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Ketamine may have a role in treating status epilepticus. It may be considered for induction for rapid sequence intubation and possibly as a third or fourth line agent in refractory cases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ketamine , Propofol , Status Epilepticus , Aftercare , Anticonvulsants/therapeutic use , Female , Humans , Infant , Ketamine/adverse effects , Levetiracetam , Lorazepam/therapeutic use , Patient Discharge , Propofol/therapeutic use , Seizures/drug therapy , Status Epilepticus/drug therapy
8.
Pediatr Infect Dis J ; 40(12): e493-e496, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1416156

ABSTRACT

We present a case of a 14-year-old, previously healthy female, admitted with acute coronavirus disease 2019 infection and new-onset seizures secondary to virus-associated necrotizing disseminated acute leukoencephalopathy. Her symptoms resolved completely with intravenous immunoglobulin and steroids. Pathophysiology and prognosis of neurologic manifestations of coronavirus disease 2019 remain unclear.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Intracranial Hemorrhages/etiology , Leukoencephalopathies/etiology , Leukoencephalopathies/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Adolescent , Anticonvulsants/administration & dosage , Anticonvulsants/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/therapeutic use , Intracranial Hemorrhages/pathology , Leukoencephalopathies/pathology , Levetiracetam/administration & dosage , Levetiracetam/therapeutic use , Lorazepam/administration & dosage , Lorazepam/therapeutic use , Seizures/drug therapy
9.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(17)2021 Sep 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1390658

ABSTRACT

Anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) are an important group of drugs of several generations, ranging from the oldest phenobarbital (1912) to the most recent cenobamate (2019). Cannabidiol (CBD) is increasingly used to treat epilepsy. The outbreak of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic in 2019 created new challenges in the effective treatment of epilepsy in COVID-19 patients. The purpose of this review is to present data from the last few years on drug-drug interactions among of AEDs, as well as AEDs with other drugs, nutrients and food. Literature data was collected mainly in PubMed, as well as google base. The most important pharmacokinetic parameters of the chosen 29 AEDs, mechanism of action and clinical application, as well as their biotransformation, are presented. We pay a special attention to the new potential interactions of the applied first-generation AEDs (carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, phenytoin, phenobarbital and primidone), on decreased concentration of some medications (atazanavir and remdesivir), or their compositions (darunavir/cobicistat and lopinavir/ritonavir) used in the treatment of COVID-19 patients. CBD interactions with AEDs are clearly defined. In addition, nutrients, as well as diet, cause changes in pharmacokinetics of some AEDs. The understanding of the pharmacokinetic interactions of the AEDs seems to be important in effective management of epilepsy.


Subject(s)
Anticonvulsants/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Cannabidiol/therapeutic use , Drug Interactions , Nutrients/metabolism , Anticonvulsants/chemistry , Anticonvulsants/pharmacokinetics , COVID-19/virology , Cannabidiol/chemistry , Cannabidiol/pharmacokinetics , Carbamazepine/chemistry , Carbamazepine/pharmacokinetics , Carbamazepine/therapeutic use , Clobazam/chemistry , Clobazam/pharmacokinetics , Clobazam/therapeutic use , Epilepsy/drug therapy , Epilepsy/pathology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
10.
Acta Neurol Scand ; 143(2): 206-209, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388169

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Lockdown due to the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic became a challenge to maintain care for patients with epilepsy; we aimed to find out how the pandemic affected them. METHODS: We sent an online 22-item questionnaire to patients from our outpatient clinic, a reference centre in Spain for drug-resistant epilepsy, inquiring about the effects of lockdown, from March to May 2020. RESULTS: We sent the survey to 627 patients; 312 (58% women) sent a complete response and were included. Of all respondents, 57% took >2 antiseizure medications. One-third of respondents (29%) declared an associated cognitive or motor disability. A minority had confirmed infection with SARS-CoV-2 (1.92%). Seizure frequency remained like usual in 56% of patients, while 31.2% reported an increase. Less than 10% needed emergent assistance. Almost half reported anxiety or depression, and 25% increased behavioural disorders. Mood (F: 5.40; p: 0.002) and sleep disorders (F = 2.67; p: 0.05) were associated with increase in seizure frequency. Patients were able to contact their physicians when needed and were open to a future telematic approach to follow-up visits. CONCLUSIONS: Seizure frequency and severity remained unchanged in most patients during the lockdown. Mood and sleep disorders were common and associated with seizure worsening. Patients were open to telematic care in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Epilepsy/therapy , Pandemics , Quarantine/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Anticonvulsants/therapeutic use , Anxiety/complications , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cognition Disorders/complications , Communicable Disease Control , Depression/complications , Disabled Persons , Epilepsy/complications , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Disorders/complications , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Motor Disorders/complications , Outpatients , Seizures/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/classification , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Spain/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine
12.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(8): e2118441, 2021 08 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1335942

ABSTRACT

Importance: COVID-19 has had devastating effects on the health and well-being of older adult residents and health care professionals in nursing homes. Uncertainty about the associated consequences of these adverse effects on the use of medications common to this care setting remains. Objective: To examine the association between the COVID-19 pandemic and prescription medication changes among nursing home residents. Design, Setting, and Participants: This population-based cohort study with an interrupted time-series analysis used linked health administrative data bases for residents of all nursing homes (N = 630) in Ontario, Canada. During the observation period, residents were divided into consecutive weekly cohorts. The first observation week was March 5 to 11, 2017; the last observation week was September 20 to 26, 2020. Exposures: Onset of the COVID-19 pandemic on March 1, 2020. Main Outcomes and Measures: Weekly proportion of residents dispensed antipsychotics, benzodiazepines, antidepressants, anticonvulsants, opioids, antibiotics, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors. Autoregressive integrated moving average models with step and ramp intervention functions tested for level and slope changes in weekly medication use after the onset of the pandemic and were fit on prepandemic data for projected trends. Results: Across study years, the annual cohort size ranged from 75 850 to 76 549 residents (mean [SD] age, 83.4 [10.8] years; mean proportion of women, 68.9%). A significant increased slope change in the weekly proportion of residents who were dispensed antipsychotics (parameter estimate [ß] = 0.051; standard error [SE] = 0.010; P < .001), benzodiazepines (ß = 0.026; SE = 0.003; P < .001), antidepressants (ß = 0.046; SE = 0.013; P < .001), trazodone hydrochloride (ß = 0.033; SE = 0.010; P < .001), anticonvulsants (ß = 0.014; SE = 0.006; P = .03), and opioids (ß = 0.038; SE = 0.007; P < .001) was observed. The absolute difference in observed vs estimated use in the last week of the pandemic period ranged from 0.48% (for anticonvulsants) to 1.52% (for antipsychotics). No significant level or slope changes were found for antibiotics, ARBs, or ACE inhibitors. Conclusions and Relevance: In this population-based cohort study, statistically significant increases in the use of antipsychotics, benzodiazepines, antidepressants, anticonvulsants, and opioids followed the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, although absolute differences were small. There were no significant changes for antibiotics, ARBs, or ACE inhibitors. Studies are needed to monitor whether changes in pharmacotherapy persist, regress, or accelerate during the course of the pandemic and how these changes affect resident-level outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Drug Prescriptions/statistics & numerical data , Homes for the Aged/statistics & numerical data , Nursing Homes/statistics & numerical data , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Analgesics, Opioid/therapeutic use , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/therapeutic use , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Anticonvulsants/therapeutic use , Antidepressive Agents/therapeutic use , Antipsychotic Agents/therapeutic use , Benzodiazepines/therapeutic use , Cohort Studies , Databases, Factual , Female , Humans , Interrupted Time Series Analysis , Male , Ontario , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Epilepsy Behav ; 122: 108207, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1294313

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We performed a follow-up study of patients with COVID-19 presenting with seizures. METHODS: All consecutive patients with seizures, who were referred to Namazee Hospital, Shiraz, Iran, with a diagnosis of COVID-19, from 10 August 2020 until 20 October 2020 were included in this longitudinal study. The clinical data were collected by the admitting physician. In a follow-up phone call to the discharged patients (after eight weeks or more), we inquired their seizure outcome. RESULTS: In total, 32 patients were studied; 28 patients were followed. Twelve patients (37.5%) presented with a single tonic-clonic seizure and nine (28.1%) had convulsive status epilepticus; one patient had functional (psychogenic) seizures. Ten patients (31.3%) had pre-existing epilepsy, eight others (25%) had pre-existing CNS problems (without epilepsy), one person (3.1%) had pre-existing functional seizures, and 13 individuals (40.1%) neither had epilepsy nor had other CNS problems. Eight patients (28.6%) reported experiencing seizure(s) after being discharged from the hospital; six of these had pre-existing epilepsy and one had pre-existing functional seizures. One patient, who had a newly developed ischemic brain infarction, reported experiencing recurrent seizures. CONCLUSION: Seizures in patients with COVID-19 are either acute symptomatic (in about two-thirds) or an exacerbation of a pre-existing epilepsy/functional seizures (in about one-third). A thorough investigation of the underlying etiology of seizures in patients with COVID-19 is necessary. Seizure outcome in patients, who are hospitalized with COVID-19 and seizures, is generally good.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Anticonvulsants/therapeutic use , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Seizures/complications , Seizures/drug therapy
14.
Epilepsia ; 62(7): 1617-1628, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1262319

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Improvement in epilepsy care requires standardized methods to assess disease severity. We report the results of implementing common data elements (CDEs) to document epilepsy history data in the electronic medical record (EMR) after 12 months of clinical use in outpatient encounters. METHODS: Data regarding seizure frequency were collected during routine clinical encounters using a CDE-based form within our EMR. We extracted CDE data from the EMR and developed measurements for seizure severity and seizure improvement scores. Seizure burden and improvement was evaluated by patient demographic and encounter variables for in-person and telemedicine encounters. RESULTS: We assessed a total of 1696 encounters in 1038 individuals with childhood epilepsies between September 6, 2019 and September 11, 2020 contributed by 32 distinct providers. Childhood absence epilepsy (n = 121), Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (n = 86), and Dravet syndrome (n = 42) were the most common epilepsy syndromes. Overall, 43% (737/1696) of individuals had at least monthly seizures, 17% (296/1696) had a least daily seizures, and 18% (311/1696) were seizure-free for >12 months. Quantification of absolute seizure burden and changes in seizure burden over time differed between epilepsy syndromes, including high and persistent seizure burden in patients with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. Individuals seen via telemedicine or in-person encounters had comparable seizure frequencies. Individuals identifying as Hispanic/Latino, particularly from postal codes with lower median household incomes, were more likely to have ongoing seizures that worsened over time. SIGNIFICANCE: Standardized documentation of clinical data in childhood epilepsies through CDE can be implemented in routine clinical care at scale and enables assessment of disease burden, including characterization of seizure burden over time. Our data provide insights into heterogeneous patterns of seizure control in common pediatric epilepsy syndromes and will inform future initiatives focusing on patient-centered outcomes in childhood epilepsies, including the impact of telemedicine and health care disparities.


Subject(s)
Cost of Illness , Electronic Health Records , Epilepsy/economics , Adolescent , Anticonvulsants/therapeutic use , Child , Child, Preschool , Common Data Elements , Epilepsies, Myoclonic/epidemiology , Epilepsy, Absence/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Lennox Gastaut Syndrome/epidemiology , Male , Seizures/epidemiology , Socioeconomic Factors , Telemedicine , Treatment Outcome
15.
J Enzyme Inhib Med Chem ; 36(1): 1230-1235, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1254219

ABSTRACT

The ongoing Covid-19 is a contagious disease, and it is characterised by different symptoms such as fever, cough, and shortness of breath. Rising concerns about Covid-19 have severely affected the healthcare system in all countries as the Covid-19 outbreak has developed at a rapid rate all around the globe. Intriguing, a clinically used drug, acetazolamide (a specific inhibitor of carbonic anhydrase, CA, EC 4.2.1.1), is used to treat high-altitude pulmonary oedema (HAPE), showing a high degree of clinical similarities with the pulmonary disease caused by Covid-19. In this context, this preliminary study aims to provide insights into some factors affecting the Covid-19 patients, such as hypoxaemia, hypoxia as well as the blood CA activity. We hypothesise that patients with Covid-19 problems could show a dysregulated acid-base status influenced by CA activity. These preliminary results suggest that the use of CA inhibitors as a pharmacological treatment for Covid-19 may be beneficial.


Subject(s)
Acetazolamide/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Carbonic Anhydrases/blood , Acid-Base Equilibrium/drug effects , Altitude Sickness/blood , Altitude Sickness/drug therapy , Anticonvulsants/therapeutic use , Bicarbonates/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/virology , Carbon Dioxide/blood , Cough/blood , Cough/drug therapy , Cough/pathology , Cough/virology , Drug Repositioning , Dyspnea/blood , Dyspnea/drug therapy , Dyspnea/pathology , Dyspnea/virology , Fever/blood , Fever/drug therapy , Fever/pathology , Fever/virology , Humans , Hydrogen-Ion Concentration , Hypertension, Pulmonary/blood , Hypertension, Pulmonary/drug therapy , Hypoxia/blood , Hypoxia/drug therapy , Hypoxia/pathology , Hypoxia/virology , Oximetry , Research Design , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Severity of Illness Index , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
16.
Epilepsy Res ; 174: 106650, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1213222

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Post COVID-19 seizures are relatively rare. The aim of the present study was to estimate the frequency of acute symptomatic seizures among patients with COVID-19 and to discuss possible pathophysiological mechanisms. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Out of 439 cases with COVID-19 that were admitted to Assiut and Aswan University hospitals during the period from 1 June to 10 August 2020, 19 patients (4.3 %) presented with acute symptomatic seizures. Each patient underwent computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain and conventional electroencephalography (EEG). Laboratory investigations included: blood gases, complete blood picture, serum D-Dimer, Ferritin, C-reactive protein, renal and liver functions, and coagulation profile. RESULTS: Of the 19 patients, 3 had new onset seizures without underlying pathology (0.68 % out of the total 439 patients); 2 others (0.46 %) had previously diagnosed controlled epilepsy with breakthrough seizures. The majority of cases (14 patients, 3.19 %) had primary pathology that could explain the occurrence of seizures: 5 suffered a post COVID-19 stroke (3 ischemic and 2 hemorrhagic stroke); 6 patients had COVID-related encephalitis; 2 patients were old ischemic stroke patients; 1 patient had a brain tumor and developed seizures post COVID-19. CONCLUSION: acute symptomatic seizure is not a rare complication of post COVID-19 infection. Both new onset seizures and seizures secondary to primary brain insult (post COVID encephalitis or recent stroke) were observed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Encephalitis, Viral/epidemiology , Epilepsy/epidemiology , Seizures/epidemiology , Stroke/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , Anticonvulsants/therapeutic use , Brain/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/physiopathology , Egypt/epidemiology , Electroencephalography , Epilepsy/drug therapy , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Seizures/physiopathology , Stroke/diagnostic imaging , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
19.
Epileptic Disord ; 23(2): 268-273, 2021 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1177866

ABSTRACT

The current study screened major depression in people with epilepsy (PWE) during the epidemic of the novel coronavirus-related disease COVID-19, in order to identify whether the outbreak generated negative psychological impact on PWE. A Chinese version of the Neurological Disorders Depression Inventory for Epilepsy (C-NDDI-E), a self-reporting depression inventory, was applied for rapid detection of major depression. Assessment was carried out online during three different periods (prior to, during, and after the outbreak of COVID-19), with the aim of identifying changes in prevalence of depression and associated risk factors. A total of 158 PWE were recruited into the study (48.7% female). The questionnaire completion rates were 94.3% and 70.9% during and after the outbreak, respectively. The prevalence of depression prior to the epidemic, as the baseline, was 34.8% and increased to 42.3% during the period of the epidemic. Towards the end of the outbreak, the prevalence declined towards the baseline (36.6%). Factors such as living alone (OR = 4.022, 95% CI: 1.158-13.971, P = 0.028) and active seizures before the epidemic (OR = 2.993, 95% CI: 1.197-7.486, P = 0.019) were associated with depression during the epidemic. Monotherapy appeared to be protective against depression (OR = 0. 105, 95% CI: 0.047-0.235, P <0.001). Our results suggest that the pandemic exerts negative influence on PWE's mental health. Depression is one of the common psychological disorders that needs greater attention during this extraordinary period.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Depression/complications , Depression/epidemiology , Epilepsy/complications , Epilepsy/epidemiology , Pandemics , Adult , Anticonvulsants/therapeutic use , China/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Prevalence , Risk Factors , Seizures/drug therapy , Seizures/epidemiology , Self Report , Socioeconomic Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
20.
Epilepsy Res ; 173: 106625, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1157287

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: No data exist regarding the impact of the lockdown due to the COVID-19 pandemic on the risk factors of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). This study aimed to stratify risk factors of SUDEP in relation to COVID-19 lockdown, among patients with epilepsy (PWE) in Cairo University epilepsy unit (CUEU). Therefore, we can detect risk factors and mitigate such factors in the second wave of the virus. METHODS: an observational, cross-sectional study carried on 340 Egyptian patients with active epilepsy. Individual risk identification and stratification was done by using The SUDEP and seizure Safety Checklist, after which sharing risk knowledge to PWE and their caregivers was undertaken. RESULTS: The mean age of patients was 29.72 ± 12.12. The median of the static factors was 4 (IQR 3-5) whereas, the median of the modifiable factors was 2 (IQR 1-3). Epilepsy emergencies (serial seizures or status epilepticus) were reported in 24.1 % of patients, for which non-compliance was the commonest cause, followed by deferral of epilepsy surgery for patients with drug resistant epilepsy (DRE). Stepwise logistic regression analysis showed that use of anxiolytic medications, non-compliance, keeping patients with DRE on dual anti-seizure medications (ASMs), or adding third medication increased the odds of increased seizure frequency by 2.7, 3.5, 16.6 and 6.1 times, respectively. CONCLUSION: Some COVID-19 related issues had influenced the risk of seizure worsening including postponing epilepsy surgery for patients with DRE, non-compliance, and psychiatric comorbidities. Special attention should be paid to these issues to mitigate the risk of SUDEP.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Anti-Anxiety Agents/therapeutic use , Anticonvulsants/therapeutic use , Appointments and Schedules , COVID-19/psychology , Checklist , Cross-Sectional Studies , Egypt/epidemiology , Elective Surgical Procedures , Epilepsy/drug therapy , Epilepsy/psychology , Epilepsy/surgery , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Compliance , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy/prevention & control , Tertiary Care Centers/statistics & numerical data , Time-to-Treatment , Young Adult
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