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3.
Cardiovasc Hematol Disord Drug Targets ; 20(3): 181-184, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1435708

ABSTRACT

Nowadays Coronavirus Disease 2019 (Covid-19) is increasing mortality all over the world mercilessly. We are learning almost every day about its new symptoms and that it mutates quickly. This disease has tied us up and made us desperate. The death rate from this disease has increased in patients who had pre-existing medical conditions, especially cardiovascular ones, by eliminating the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-2 receptor in the lungs. Also, ACE1 and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB) may stimulate ACE2 expression and worse the prognosis. Intravenous infusions of ACEIs and ARBs in experimental animals increase the number of ACE2 receptors. Therefore, it may be one of the reasons that COVID-19 infects the cells of patients treating hypertension. However, most of the congress of cardiology do not recommend to discontinue these anti-hypertensive drugs. Therefore, this brief report evaluates Covid-19 in the view of cardiovascular diseases taking into account current reports and suggests some possible solutions to keep the virus under control.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/pharmacology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacokinetics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Age Factors , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/therapeutic use , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Animals , Antihypertensive Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , Cardiovascular Diseases/metabolism , Humans , Hypertension/drug therapy , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Thromboembolism/etiology , Thromboembolism/physiopathology
7.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev ; 2: CD008274, 2021 02 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1375589

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: All major guidelines for antihypertensive therapy recommend weight loss. Dietary interventions that aim to reduce body weight might therefore be a useful intervention to reduce blood pressure and adverse cardiovascular events associated with hypertension. OBJECTIVES: Primary objectives To assess the long-term effects of weight-reducing diets in people with hypertension on all-cause mortality, cardiovascular morbidity, and adverse events (including total serious adverse events, withdrawal due to adverse events, and total non-serious adverse events). Secondary objectives To assess the long-term effects of weight-reducing diets in people with hypertension on change from baseline in systolic blood pressure, change from baseline in diastolic blood pressure, and body weight reduction. SEARCH METHODS: For this updated review, the Cochrane Hypertension Information Specialist searched the following databases for randomised controlled trials up to April 2020: the Cochrane Hypertension Specialised Register, CENTRAL (2020, Issue 3), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid Embase, and ClinicalTrials.gov. We also contacted authors of relevant papers about further published and unpublished work. The searches had no language restrictions. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of at least 24 weeks' duration that compared weight-reducing dietary interventions to no dietary intervention in adults with primary hypertension. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently assessed risks of bias and extracted data. Where appropriate and in the absence of significant heterogeneity between studies (P > 0.1), we pooled studies using a fixed-effect meta-analysis. In case of moderate or larger heterogeneity as measured by Higgins I2, we used a random-effects model. MAIN RESULTS: This second review update did not reveal any new trials, so the number of included trials remains the same: eight RCTs involving a total of 2100 participants with high blood pressure and a mean age of 45 to 66 years. Mean treatment duration was 6 to 36 months. We judged the risks of bias as unclear or high for all but two trials. No study included mortality as a predefined outcome. One RCT evaluated the effects of dietary weight loss on a combined endpoint consisting of the necessity of reinstating antihypertensive therapy and severe cardiovascular complications. In this RCT, weight-reducing diet lowered the endpoint compared to no diet: hazard ratio 0.70 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.57 to 0.87). None of the trials evaluated adverse events as designated in our protocol. The certainty of the evidence was low for a blood pressure reduction in participants assigned to weight-loss diets as compared to controls: systolic blood pressure: mean difference (MD) -4.5 mm Hg (95% CI -7.2 to -1.8 mm Hg) (3 studies, 731 participants), and diastolic blood pressure: MD -3.2 mm Hg (95% CI -4.8 to -1.5 mm Hg) (3 studies, 731 participants). We judged the certainty of the evidence to be high for weight reduction in dietary weight loss groups as compared to controls: MD -4.0 kg (95% CI -4.8 to -3.2) (5 trials, 880 participants). Two trials used withdrawal of antihypertensive medication as their primary outcome. Even though we did not consider this a relevant outcome for our review, the results of these RCTs strengthen the finding of a reduction of blood pressure by dietary weight-loss interventions. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: In this second update, the conclusions remain unchanged, as we found no new trials. In people with primary hypertension, weight-loss diets reduced body weight and blood pressure, but the magnitude of the effects are uncertain due to the small number of participants and studies included in the analyses. Whether weight loss reduces mortality and morbidity is unknown. No useful information on adverse effects was reported in the relevant trials.


Subject(s)
Diet, Reducing/adverse effects , Hypertension/diet therapy , Aged , Antihypertensive Agents/therapeutic use , Bias , Blood Pressure , Cardiovascular Diseases/prevention & control , Humans , Hypertension/drug therapy , Hypertension/mortality , Middle Aged , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Weight Loss
8.
Korean J Intern Med ; 36(Suppl 1): S123-S131, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1369806

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: There are concerns that the use of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) blockers may increase the risk of being infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) or progressing to a severe clinical course after infection. This this study aimed to investigate the influence of RAS blockers on the risk and severity of SARS-CoV-2 infection. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study analyzing nationwide claims data of 215,184 adults who underwent SARS-CoV-2 tests in South Korea. The SARS-CoV-2 positive rates and clinical outcomes were evaluated according to the use of RAS blockers in patients with hypertension (n = 64,243). RESULTS: In total, 38,919 patients with hypertension were on RAS blockers. The SARS-CoV-2 positive rates were significantly higher in the RAS blocker group than in the control group after adjustments (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 1.22; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10 to 1.36; p < 0.001), and matching by propensity score (adjusted OR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.32; p = 0.017). Among the 1,609 SARS-CoV-2-positive patients with hypertension, the use of RAS blockers was not associated with poor outcomes, such as mortality (adjusted OR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.56 to 1.17; p = 0.265), and a composite of admission to the intensive care unit and mortality (adjusted OR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.73 to 1.22; p = 0.669). Analysis in the propensity scorematched population showed consistent results. CONCLUSION: In this Korean nationwide claims dataset, the use of RAS blockers was associated with a higher risk to SARS-CoV-2 infection but not with higher mortality or other severe clinical courses.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/therapeutic use , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Antihypertensive Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/therapy , Hypertension/drug therapy , Renin-Angiotensin System/drug effects , Administrative Claims, Healthcare , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/adverse effects , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/adverse effects , Antihypertensive Agents/adverse effects , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , Databases, Factual , Female , Humans , Hypertension/diagnosis , Hypertension/mortality , Hypertension/physiopathology , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index , Treatment Outcome
9.
Zool Res ; 42(5): 633-636, 2021 Sep 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1369995

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the etiologic agent responsible for the global coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Numerous studies have demonstrated that cardiovascular disease may affect COVID-19 progression. In the present study, we investigated the effect of hypertension on viral replication and COVID-19 progression using a hypertensive mouse model infected with SARS-CoV-2. Results revealed that SARS-CoV-2 replication was delayed in hypertensive mouse lungs. In contrast, SARS-CoV-2 replication in hypertensive mice treated with the antihypertensive drug captopril demonstrated similar virus replication as SARS-CoV-2-infected normotensive mice. Furthermore, antihypertensive treatment alleviated lung inflammation induced by SARS-CoV-2 replication (interleukin (IL)-1ß up-regulation and increased immune cell infiltration). No differences in lung inflammation were observed between the SARS-CoV-2-infected normotensive mice and hypertensive mice. Our findings suggest that captopril treatment may alleviate COVID-19 progression but not affect viral replication.


Subject(s)
Antihypertensive Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , Captopril/therapeutic use , Hypertension/complications , Lung Diseases/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Animals , Antihypertensive Agents/pharmacology , Captopril/pharmacology , Gene Expression Regulation/drug effects , Inflammation/complications , Inflammation/drug therapy , Interleukin-1beta/genetics , Interleukin-1beta/metabolism , Lung Diseases/etiology , Lung Diseases/virology , Mice , Virus Replication/drug effects
11.
J Clin Hypertens (Greenwich) ; 23(9): 1664-1674, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1354498

ABSTRACT

This multicenter, phase 4, Prospective Randomized Open, Blinded End-point (PROBE) study aimed to evaluate safety and efficacy of telmisartan/rosuvastatin single-pill combination (SPC) therapy on lowering central blood pressure (BP) compared with telmisartan monotherapy in hypertensive patients with dyslipidemia in Korea. Study was terminated earlier than planned due to COVID-19 pandemic, thus should be considered as a pilot study. Among 125 patients who met the inclusion criteria of hypertension and dyslipidemia (defined as 10-year Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease risk score over 5%), 80 patients went through 4-week single-group run-in period with telmisartan 40-80 mg, then randomized to telmisartan 80 mg + rosuvastatin (10 or 20 mg) SPC group or telmisartan 80 mg monotherapy group. The central/brachial BP, brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV), and augmentation index (AIx) were assessed at baseline and 16 weeks later. Mean brachial SBP changed from 135.80 ± 14.22 mmHg to 130.69 ± 13.23 mmHg in telmisartan/rosuvastatin group and from 134.37 ± 12.50 mmHg to 133.75 ± 12.30 mmHg in telmisartan monotherapy group without significant difference (between-group difference p = .149). Mean central SBP were reduced significantly in the telmisartan/rosuvastatin group with change from 126.72 ± 14.44 mmHg to 121.56 ± 14.56 mmHg while telmisartan monotherapy group showed no significant change (between-group difference p = .028). BaPWV changed from 1672.57 ± 371.72 m/s to 1591.75 ± 272.16 m/s in telmisartan/rosuvastatin group and from 1542.85 ± 263.70 m/s to 1586.12 ± 297.45 m/s in telmisartan group with no significance (between-group difference p = .078). Change of AIx had no significant difference (between-group difference p = .314). Both groups showed excellent compliance rate of 96.9 ± 4.5% with no significant difference in adverse rate. Telmisartan/rosuvastatin SPC therapy was more effective in lowering central BP compared with the telmisartan monotherapy. The results of this study showed benefit of additive statin therapy in hypertensive patients combined with dyslipidemia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dyslipidemias , Hypertension , Ankle Brachial Index , Antihypertensive Agents/therapeutic use , Benzoates , Blood Pressure , Drug Combinations , Dyslipidemias/drug therapy , Humans , Hypertension/drug therapy , Pandemics , Pilot Projects , Prospective Studies , Pulse Wave Analysis , Rosuvastatin Calcium , SARS-CoV-2 , Telmisartan/pharmacology
12.
J Am Heart Assoc ; 10(15): e021154, 2021 08 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1331849

ABSTRACT

Background Considering the widespread risk of collider bias and confounding by indication in previous research, the associations between renin-angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS) inhibitor use and COVID-19 remain unknown. Accordingly, this study tested the hypothesis that RAAS inhibitors influence the summation effect of COVID-19 and its progression to severe outcomes. Methods and Results This nationwide cohort study compared all residents of Sweden, without prior cardiovascular disease, in monotherapy (as of January 1, 2020) with a RAAS inhibitor to those using a calcium channel blocker or a thiazide diuretic. Comparative cohorts were balanced using machine-learning-derived propensity score methods. Of 165 355 people in the analysis (51% women), 367 were hospitalized or died with COVID-19 (246 using a RAAS inhibitor versus 121 using a calcium channel blocker or thiazide diuretic; Cox proportional hazard ratio [HR], 0.97; 95% CI, 0.74-1.27). When each outcome was assessed separately, 335 people were hospitalized with COVID-19 (HR, 0.92; 95% CI, 0.70-1.22), and 64 died with COVID-19 (HR, 1.22; 95% CI, 0.68-2.19). The severity of COVID-19 outcomes did not differ between those using a RAAS inhibitor and those using a calcium channel blocker or thiazide diuretic (ordered logistic regression odds ratio, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.89-1.14). Conclusions Despite potential limitations, this study is among the best available evidence that RAAS inhibitor use in primary prevention does not increase the risk of severe COVID-19 outcomes; presenting strong data from which scientists and policy makers alike can base, with greater confidence, their current position on the safety of using RAAS inhibitors during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/therapeutic use , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , COVID-19 , Hypertension/drug therapy , Risk Assessment , Aged , Antihypertensive Agents/classification , Antihypertensive Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Calcium Channel Blockers/therapeutic use , Female , Humans , Hypertension/epidemiology , Hypertension/prevention & control , Male , Middle Aged , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Renin-Angiotensin System/drug effects , Risk Assessment/methods , Risk Assessment/statistics & numerical data , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Sodium Chloride Symporter Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Sweden/epidemiology
13.
J Cardiovasc Pharmacol ; 78(5): e648-e655, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1331600

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has rapidly evolved into a global pandemic. The substantial morbidity and mortality associated with the infection has prompted us to understand potential risk factors that can predict patient outcomes. Hypertension has been identified as the most prevalent cardiovascular comorbidity in patients infected with COVID-19 that demonstrably increases the risk of hospitalization and death. Initial studies implied that renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors might increase the risk of viral infection and aggravate disease severity, thereby causing panic given the high global prevalence of hypertension. Nonetheless, subsequent evidence supported the administration of antihypertensive drugs and noted that they do not increase the severity of COVID-19 infection in patients with hypertension, rather may have a beneficial effect. To date, the precise mechanism by which hypertension predisposes to unfavorable outcomes in patients infected with COVID-19 remains unknown. In this mini review, we elaborate on the pathology of SARS-CoV-2 infection coexisting with hypertension and summarize potential mechanisms, focusing on the dual roles of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 and the disorders of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system in COVID-19 and hypertension. The effects of proinflammatory factors released because of immune response and gastrointestinal dysfunction in COVID-19 are also discussed.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Hypertension/enzymology , Renin-Angiotensin System , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/antagonists & inhibitors , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Animals , Antihypertensive Agents/therapeutic use , Blood Pressure/drug effects , COVID-19/enzymology , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Comorbidity , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Hypertension/drug therapy , Hypertension/mortality , Hypertension/physiopathology , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Prognosis , Renin-Angiotensin System/drug effects , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index
14.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 57(7)2021 Jun 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1323297

ABSTRACT

Background and Objectives: Renal artery denervation (RDN) procedure is a broadly discussed method in the treatment of resistant hypertension. Many studies report short-term (3-12 months) results for blood pressure and arterial stiffness. The primary endpoints were changes in 24 h mean systolic blood pressure (BP) and office systolic BP 48 months after RDN. The secondary endpoints were changes in aortic pulse wave velocity and impact of polypharmacy on these variables. Materials and Methods: Renal artery denervation was performed in 73 patients treated for resistant hypertension; 49 patients remained in final analysis. Patient examination was carried out before the procedure, and subsequently at 3, 6, 12, 24, and 48 months later. Patients' antihypertensive and overall medication regimens were carefully analysed. Results: Mean 24 h arterial blood pressure lowered and was sustained at lower levels for up to 48 months; median (interequartile range-IQR) from 158(23.5)/100(14.2) to 140(26.5)/86(16.2) mmHg. Mean reduction in 24 h ambulatory systolic BP was -11 ± 25 mmHg (95% CI, -20 to -2; p < 0.001), while office systolic BP reduced by -7 ± 23 mmHg (95%CI, -24 to -1; p < 0.02). A significant reduction in median aortic pulse wave velocity 12 months after the procedure (drop from baseline 11.2 [3.15] m/s (95%CI 6.1 to 16.2) to 9.8 [2.1] m/s (95%CI 6.1 to 13.7; p = 0.002)). After 48 months, there was no worsening compared to the baseline level of 10.3 [4.0] m/s (95% CI 6.9 to 17.8) (p > 0.05). The total mean number of antihypertensive drugs remained unchanged: 5.97(±1.1) vs. 5.24 (±1.45). A higher number of pills after 48 months was associated with higher aortic pulse wave velocity (1-5 pill group: 8.1 ± 1.6 m/s; 6-10 pill group: 10.9 ± 1.8 m/s; >11 pill group: 15.1 ± 2.6 m/s) (p = 0.003). Conclusions: Antihypertensive effect after renal denervation lasts up to 48 months with no worsening of arterial stiffness compared to baseline. In our study, polypharmacy was associated with increased arterial stiffness 48 months after the procedure.


Subject(s)
Hypertension , Renal Artery , Antihypertensive Agents/therapeutic use , Blood Pressure , Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory , Denervation , Humans , Hypertension/drug therapy , Pulse Wave Analysis , Treatment Outcome
15.
Hipertens Riesgo Vasc ; 37(4): 169-175, 2020.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1322115

ABSTRACT

The first case of COVID-19 was reported on 31 December 2019 in Wuhan, China. Ever since there has been unprecedented and growing interest in learning about all aspects of this new disease. Debate has been generated as to the association between antihypertensive therapy with renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) inhibitors and SARS-CoV-2 infection. While many questions as yet remain unanswered, the aim of this report is to inform health professionals about the current state of knowledge. Because this is an ever-evolving topic, the recommendation is that it be updated as new evidence becomes available. Below, we provide a review of pre-clinical and clinical studies that link coronavirus to the RAAS.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Renin-Angiotensin System/physiology , ADAM17 Protein/physiology , Angiotensin II/physiology , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/adverse effects , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/pharmacology , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/therapeutic use , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/adverse effects , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Antihypertensive Agents/adverse effects , Antihypertensive Agents/pharmacology , Antihypertensive Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Vaccines , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Humans , Hypertension/complications , Hypertension/physiopathology , Lung/physiopathology , Models, Biological , Pandemics/prevention & control , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/drug effects , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/physiology , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Receptors, Virus/drug effects , Renin-Angiotensin System/drug effects , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Serine Endopeptidases/physiology , Viral Vaccines , Virus Internalization/drug effects
16.
Am Heart J ; 240: 46-57, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1316364

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB) are known to impact the functional receptor for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The association between chronic therapy with these medications and infection risk remains unclear. OBJECTIVES: The objective was to determine the association between prior ACEI or ARB therapy and SARS-CoV-2 infection among patients with hypertension in the U.S. Veteran's Affairs health system. METHODS: We compared the odds of SARS-CoV-2 infection among three groups: patients treated with ACEI, treated with ARB, or treated with alternate first-line anti-hypertensives without ACEI/ARB. We excluded patients with alternate indications for ACEI or ARB therapy. We performed an augmented inverse propensity weighted analysis with adjustment for demographics, region, comorbidities, vitals, and laboratory values. RESULTS: Among 1,724,723 patients with treated hypertension, 659,180 were treated with ACEI, 310,651 with ARB, and 754,892 with neither. Before weighting, patients treated with ACEI or ARB were more likely to be diabetic and use more anti-hypertensives. There were 13,278 SARS-CoV-2 infections (0.8%) between February 12, 2020 and August 19, 2020. Patients treated with ACEI had lower odds of SARS-CoV-2 infection (odds ratio [OR] 0.93; 95% CI: 0.89-0.97) while those treated with ARB had similar odds (OR 1.02; 95% CI: 0.96-1.07) compared with patients treated with alternate first-line anti-hypertensives without ACEI/ARB. In falsification analyses, patients on ACEI did not have a difference in their odds of unrelated outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest the safety of continuing ACEI and ARB therapy. The association between ACEI therapy and lower odds of SARS-CoV-2 infection requires further investigation.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/therapeutic use , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Antihypertensive Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hypertension/drug therapy , Renin-Angiotensin System/drug effects , Adrenergic beta-Antagonists/therapeutic use , Aged , Angiotensin II Type 2 Receptor Blockers , Calcium Channel Blockers/therapeutic use , Case-Control Studies , Comorbidity , Confidence Intervals , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Odds Ratio , Propensity Score , Receptors, Virus , SARS-CoV-2 , Sodium Chloride Symporter Inhibitors/therapeutic use , United States/epidemiology , United States Department of Veterans Affairs , Veterans/statistics & numerical data
17.
PLoS One ; 16(7): e0254635, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1311289

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Statins have anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects that may reduce the severity of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), in which organ dysfunction is mediated by severe inflammation. Large studies with diverse populations evaluating statin use and outcomes in COVID-19 are lacking. METHODS AND RESULTS: We used data from 10,541 patients hospitalized with COVID-19 through September 2020 at 104 US hospitals enrolled in the American Heart Association's COVID-19 Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) Registry to evaluate the associations between statin use and outcomes. Prior to admission, 42% of subjects (n = 4,449) used statins (7% on statins alone, 35% on statins plus anti-hypertensives). Death (or discharge to hospice) occurred in 2,212 subjects (21%). Outpatient use of statins, either alone or with anti-hypertensives, was associated with a reduced risk of death (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 0.59, 95% CI 0.50-0.69), adjusting for demographic characteristics, insurance status, hospital site, and concurrent medications by logistic regression. In propensity-matched analyses, use of statins and/or anti-hypertensives was associated with a reduced risk of death among those with a history of CVD and/or hypertension (aOR 0.68, 95% CI 0.58-0.81). An observed 16% reduction in odds of death among those without CVD and/or hypertension was not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: Patients taking statins prior to hospitalization for COVID-19 had substantially lower odds of death, primarily among individuals with a history of CVD and/or hypertension. These observations support the continuation and aggressive initiation of statin and anti-hypertensive therapies among patients at risk for COVID-19, if these treatments are indicated based upon underlying medical conditions.


Subject(s)
Antihypertensive Agents/administration & dosage , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/administration & dosage , Registries/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , American Heart Association , Antihypertensive Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/mortality , Cardiovascular Diseases/drug therapy , Drug Utilization/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Male , Middle Aged , Mortality/trends , Population Groups/statistics & numerical data , United States
18.
Curr Opin Cardiol ; 36(4): 405-412, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1301390

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: In this article, we review the most current evidence for initiation and maintenance of various antihypertension (HTN) drug classes, including other misconceptions with respect to common comorbidities in patients with HTN. RECENT FINDINGS: Although the currently available anti-HTN agents have broad applicability in treating HTN, additional agents, such as angiotensin receptor-neprilysin inhibitors and novel nonsteroidal mineralocorticoid antagonists, have recently gained clinical significance. In addition, there have been some anecdotal concerns regarding the adverse effects, indications, and risks of COVID-19 infection/mortality when using certain anti-HTN agents. SUMMARY: Current guidelines currently address the treatment of primary HTN. However, isolated HTN is uncommon and often involves comorbid diseases that require specific regimentation. Several experimental medications are currently in late-stage trials showing potential superiority over current drugs that are available in the market.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hypertension , Antihypertensive Agents/therapeutic use , Humans , Hypertension/drug therapy , Hypertension/epidemiology , Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonists , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 13588, 2021 06 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1290939

ABSTRACT

Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a severe complication of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) that negatively affects its outcome. Concern had been raised about the potential effect of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) blockades on renal outcomes in COVID-19 patients. However, the association between RAAS blockade use and incident AKI in COVID-19 patients has not been fully understood. We investigated the association between RAAS blockade exposure and COVID-19-related AKI in hospitalized patients through meta-analysis. Electronic databases were searched up to 24th December 2020. Summary estimates of pooled odds ratio (OR) of COVID-19-related AKI depending on RAAS blockade exposure were obtained through random-effects model. The random-effect meta-analysis on fourteen studies (17,876 patients) showed that RAAS blockade use was significantly associated with increased risk of incident AKI in hospitalized COVID-19 patients (OR 1.68; 95% confidence interval 1.19-2.36). Additional analysis showed that the association of RAAS blockade use on COVID-19-related AKI remains significant even after stratification by drug class and AKI severity. RAAS blockade use is significantly associated with the incident AKI in hospitalized COVID-19 patients. Therefore, careful monitoring of renal complications is recommended for COVID-19 patients with recent RAAS blockade use due to the potential risk of AKI.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/therapeutic use , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Antihypertensive Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , Renin-Angiotensin System/drug effects , Aged , Databases, Factual , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Odds Ratio , Risk Factors
20.
Yonsei Med J ; 62(7): 577-583, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1285267

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: We aimed to investigate whether the use of cardiovascular drugs in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients with hypertension as a comorbidity has a significant effect on the incidence and associated mortality rate of COVID-19. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data covering the period between January 1, 2020 and June 4, 2020 were extracted from The National Health Insurance Service-COVID-19 (NHIS-COVID-19) database in South Korea and analyzed as a population-based cohort study. RESULTS: A total of 101657 hypertensive adults aged 20 years or older were included for final analysis. Among them, 1889 patients (1.9%) were diagnosed with COVID-19 between January 1, 2020 and June 4, 2020, and hospital mortality occurred in 193 patients (10.2%). In a multivariable model, the use of beta-blockers was associated with an 18% lower incidence of COVID-19 [odds ratio (OR): 0.82, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.69-0.98; p=0.029]. Among 1889 hypertensive patients diagnosed with COVID-19, the use of a calcium channel blocker (CCB) was associated with a 42% lower hospital mortality rate (OR: 0.58, 95% CI: 0.38-0.89; p=0.012). The use of other cardiovascular drugs was not associated with the incidence of COVID-19 or hospital mortality rate among COVID-19 patients. Similar results were observed in all 328374 adults in the NHIS-COVID-19 database, irrespective of the presence of hypertension. CONCLUSION: In South Korea, beta-blockers exhibited potential benefits in lowering the incidence of COVID-19 among hypertensive patients. Furthermore, CCBs may lower the hospital mortality rate among hypertensive COVID-19 patients. These findings were also applied to the general adult population, regardless of hypertension.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hypertension , Adult , Antihypertensive Agents/therapeutic use , Calcium Channel Blockers/therapeutic use , Cohort Studies , Humans , Hypertension/complications , Hypertension/drug therapy , Hypertension/epidemiology , Incidence , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
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