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1.
Mol Med Rep ; 24(6)2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1504040

ABSTRACT

The spread of the novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS­CoV­2) emerged suddenly at the end of 2019 and the disease came to be known as coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID­19). To date, there is no specific therapy established to treat COVID­19. Identifying effective treatments is urgently required to treat patients and stop the transmission of SARS­CoV­2 in humans. For the present review, >100 publications on therapeutic agents for COVID­19, including in vitro and in vivo animal studies, case reports, retrospective analyses and meta­analyses were retrieved from PubMed and analyzed, and promising therapeutic agents that may be used to combat SARS­CoV­2 infection were highlighted. Since the outbreak of COVID­19, different drugs have been repurposed for its treatment. Existing drugs, including chloroquine (CQ), its derivative hydroxychloroquine (HCQ), remdesivir and nucleoside analogues, monoclonal antibodies, convalescent plasma, Chinese herbal medicine and natural compounds for treating COVID­19 evaluated in experimental and clinical studies were discussed. Although early clinical studies suggested that CQ/HCQ produces antiviral action, later research indicated certain controversy regarding their use for treating COVID­19. The molecular mechanisms of these therapeutic agents against SARS­CoV2 have been investigated, including inhibition of viral interactions with angiotensin­converting enzyme 2 receptors in human cells, viral RNA­dependent RNA polymerase, RNA replication and the packaging of viral particles. Potent therapeutic options were reviewed and future challenges to accelerate the development of novel therapeutic agents to treat and prevent COVID­19 were acknowledged.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/therapeutic use , Animals , Antimalarials/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/diagnosis , Chloroquine/therapeutic use , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/therapeutic use , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Immunization, Passive , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
2.
BMC Infect Dis ; 21(1): 326, 2021 Apr 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455923

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Malaria is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in pediatrics in malaria endemic areas. Artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) are the drugs of choice for malaria management particularly across malaria-endemic countries. This systematic review and meta-analysis was performed to assess efficacy and safety of ACTs for uncomplicated malaria in pediatric populations. METHODS: A body of evidence was searched for published ACT trials until March 06, 2020. The search was focused on efficacy and safety studies of ACTs for uncomplicated malaria in pediatrics. PubMed library was searched using best adapted search terms after multiple trials. References were exported to the endnote library and then to Covidence for screening. Data was extracted using the Covidence platform. The per-protocol analysis report for the efficacy and the intention-to-treat analysis for the safety were synthesized. Met-analysis was carried using Open Meta-Analyst software. Random effects model was applied and the heterogeneity of studies was evaluated using I2 statistic. RESULTS: Nineteen studies were included in the final analysis. Overall, crude, PCR-corrected P. falciparum malaria treatment success rate was 96.3 and 93.9% for day 28 and 42, respectively. In the subgroup analysis, PCR-corrected adequate clinical and parasitological response (ACPR) of dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DP) was 99.6% (95% CI: 99.1 to 100%, I2 = 0%; 4 studies) at day 28 and 99.6% (95% CI of 99 to 100%, I2 = 0%; 3 studies) at day 42. Nine studies reported ACT related adverse drug reactions (ADR) (8.3%, 356/4304). The reported drug related adverse reactions ranged from 1.8% in DP (two studies) to 23.3% in artesunate-pyronaridine (AP). Gastrointestinal symptoms were the most common ACT related adverse effects, and all ADRs were reported to resolve spontaneously. CONCLUSION: ACTs demonstrated a high crude efficacy and tolerability against P. falciparum. The high treatment success and tolerability with low heterogeneity conferred by DP has implication for policy makers who plan the use of ACTs for uncomplicated falciparum malaria treatment in pediatrics.


Subject(s)
Antimalarials/therapeutic use , Artemisinins/therapeutic use , Malaria, Falciparum/drug therapy , Antimalarials/adverse effects , Artemisinins/adverse effects , Child , Drug Therapy, Combination , Humans , Treatment Outcome
5.
J Med Virol ; 93(2): 755-759, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1384219

ABSTRACT

Hydroxychloroquine sulfate (HCQ) is being scrutinized for repositioning in the treatment and prevention of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. This antimalarial drug is also chronically used to treat patients with autoimmune diseases. By analyzing the Portuguese anonymized data on private and public based medical prescriptions we have identified all cases chronically receiving HCQ for the management of diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and other autoimmune diseases. Additionally, we have detected all laboratory confirmed cases of SARS-CoV-2 infection and all laboratory confirmed negative cases in the Portuguese population (mandatorily registered in a centrally managed database). Cross linking the two sets of data has allowed us to compare the proportion of HCQ chronic treatment (at least 2 grams per month) in laboratory confirmed cases of SARS-CoV-2 infection with laboratory confirmed negative cases. Out of 26 815 SARS-CoV-2 positive patients, 77 (0.29%) were chronically treated with HCQ, while 1215 (0.36%) out of 333 489 negative patients were receiving it chronically (P = .04). After adjustment for age, sex, and chronic treatment with corticosteroids and/or immunosuppressants, the odds ratio of SARS-CoV-2 infection for chronic treatment with HCQ has been 0.51 (0.37-0.70). Our data suggest that chronic treatment with HCQ confer protection against SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/drug therapy , COVID-19/prevention & control , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/drug therapy , Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis , Adult , Aged , Antimalarials/therapeutic use , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/immunology , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/pathology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Drug Administration Schedule , Drug Repositioning , Female , Humans , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/immunology , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Odds Ratio , Portugal , Registries , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/immunology
6.
N Engl J Med ; 385(9): 803-814, 2021 08 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1373469

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Additional interventions are needed to reduce the morbidity and mortality caused by malaria. METHODS: We conducted a two-part, phase 1 clinical trial to assess the safety and pharmacokinetics of CIS43LS, an antimalarial monoclonal antibody with an extended half-life, and its efficacy against infection with Plasmodium falciparum. Part A of the trial assessed the safety, initial side-effect profile, and pharmacokinetics of CIS43LS in healthy adults who had never had malaria. Participants received CIS43LS subcutaneously or intravenously at one of three escalating dose levels. A subgroup of participants from Part A continued to Part B, and some received a second CIS43LS infusion. Additional participants were enrolled in Part B and received CIS43LS intravenously. To assess the protective efficacy of CIS43LS, some participants underwent controlled human malaria infection in which they were exposed to mosquitoes carrying P. falciparum sporozoites 4 to 36 weeks after administration of CIS43LS. RESULTS: A total of 25 participants received CIS43LS at a dose of 5 mg per kilogram of body weight, 20 mg per kilogram, or 40 mg per kilogram, and 4 of the 25 participants received a second dose (20 mg per kilogram regardless of initial dose). No safety concerns were identified. We observed dose-dependent increases in CIS43LS serum concentrations, with a half-life of 56 days. None of the 9 participants who received CIS43LS, as compared with 5 of 6 control participants who did not receive CIS43LS, had parasitemia according to polymerase-chain-reaction testing through 21 days after controlled human malaria infection. Two participants who received 40 mg per kilogram of CIS43LS and underwent controlled human malaria infection approximately 36 weeks later had no parasitemia, with serum concentrations of CIS43LS of 46 and 57 µg per milliliter at the time of controlled human malaria infection. CONCLUSIONS: Among adults who had never had malaria infection or vaccination, administration of the long-acting monoclonal antibody CIS43LS prevented malaria after controlled infection. (Funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; VRC 612 ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT04206332.).


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal/therapeutic use , Antimalarials/therapeutic use , Malaria, Falciparum/prevention & control , Adult , Antibodies, Monoclonal/administration & dosage , Antibodies, Monoclonal/adverse effects , Antibodies, Monoclonal/pharmacokinetics , Antibodies, Protozoan/blood , Antimalarials/administration & dosage , Antimalarials/adverse effects , Antimalarials/pharmacokinetics , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Healthy Volunteers , Humans , Infusions, Intravenous/adverse effects , Injections, Subcutaneous/adverse effects , Middle Aged , Plasmodium falciparum/immunology , Plasmodium falciparum/isolation & purification
7.
J Midwifery Womens Health ; 66(3): 343-350, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1325030

ABSTRACT

Malaria is a common infection world-wide, which carries significant risk of morbidity and mortality. Health care providers in the United States may lack experience in recognizing and treating this disease. The pathophysiology of malaria differs during pregnancy, resulting in increased risk for serious morbidity and mortality for the woman and her fetus. Screening for risk factors, especially immigration from and travel to endemic countries, is critical. Symptoms of malaria can mimic influenza-type illnesses, causing delay in diagnosis. Consultation with an infectious disease specialist and hospitalization may be required for appropriate testing and treatment. Chemoprophylaxis and counseling regarding methods to reduce risk are important components of prevention. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the World Health Organization have established protocols for treatment and are helpful resources for clinicians. A team approach to care based on the woman's stage of illness and recovery, can involve midwives, physicians, specialists and others.


Subject(s)
Antimalarials , Malaria , Plasmodium , Antimalarials/therapeutic use , Female , Health Personnel , Humans , Malaria/diagnosis , Malaria/drug therapy , Malaria/prevention & control , Population Surveillance , Pregnancy , Severity of Illness Index , United States
8.
J Reprod Immunol ; 146: 103344, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1315509

ABSTRACT

The pandemic COVID-19 presents a major challenge to identify effective drugs for treatment. Clinicians need evidence based on randomized trials regarding effective medical treatments for this infection. Currently no effective therapies exist for the progression of the mild forms to severe disease. Knowledge however is rapidly expanding. Remdesivir, an anti- retroviral agent has in vitro activity against this virus and has shown to decrease the duration of ICU care in patients with severe disease, while low dose dexamethasone also showed a decrease in the duration of stay in cases of severe disease requiring assisted ventilation. At the time of writing this article, two mRNA-based vaccines have shown an approximate 95 % efficacy in preventing infection in large clinical trials. At least one of these drugs has regulatory permission for vaccination in high-income countries. Low and middle-income countries may have difficulties in initiating vaccine programs on large scales because of availability, costs, refrigeration and dissemination. Adequately powered randomized trials are required for drugs with in vitro activity against the virus. Supportive care should be provided for stable, hypoxia and pneumonia free patients on imaging. Vaccines are of obvious benefit and given the preliminary evidence of the efficacy of over 95 %, Low and middle-income countries must develop links with the WHO COVAX program to ensure global distribution of vaccines.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/therapy , Evidence-Based Medicine/methods , Pandemics/prevention & control , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/pharmacology , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/therapeutic use , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/antagonists & inhibitors , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Antimalarials/pharmacology , Antimalarials/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Clinical Trials as Topic , Evidence-Based Medicine/trends , Global Health , Humans , International Cooperation , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Severity of Illness Index , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Treatment Outcome , Virus Internalization/drug effects
9.
J Healthc Eng ; 2021: 5556207, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1314165

ABSTRACT

The efficacy of hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) in treating SARS-CoV-2 infection is harshly debated, with observational and experimental studies reporting contrasting results. To clarify the role of HCQ in Covid-19 patients, we carried out a retrospective observational study of 4,396 unselected patients hospitalized for Covid-19 in Italy (February-May 2020). Patients' characteristics were collected at entry, including age, sex, obesity, smoking status, blood parameters, history of diabetes, cancer, cardiovascular and chronic pulmonary diseases, and medications in use. These were used to identify subtypes of patients with similar characteristics through hierarchical clustering based on Gower distance. Using multivariable Cox regressions, these clusters were then tested for association with mortality and modification of effect by treatment with HCQ. We identified two clusters, one of 3,913 younger patients with lower circulating inflammation levels and better renal function, and one of 483 generally older and more comorbid subjects, more prevalently men and smokers. The latter group was at increased death risk adjusted by HCQ (HR[CI95%] = 3.80[3.08-4.67]), while HCQ showed an independent inverse association (0.51[0.43-0.61]), as well as a significant influence of cluster∗HCQ interaction (p < 0.001). This was driven by a differential association of HCQ with mortality between the high (0.89[0.65-1.22]) and the low risk cluster (0.46[0.39-0.54]). These effects survived adjustments for additional medications in use and were concordant with associations with disease severity and outcome. These findings suggest a particularly beneficial effect of HCQ within low risk Covid-19 patients and may contribute to clarifying the current controversy on HCQ efficacy in Covid-19 treatment.


Subject(s)
Antimalarials/adverse effects , Antimalarials/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/mortality , Hospital Mortality , Hydroxychloroquine/adverse effects , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cluster Analysis , Female , Humans , Italy , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Severity of Illness Index , Treatment Outcome
11.
Molecules ; 26(8)2021 Apr 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1302425

ABSTRACT

Malaria is one of the most life-threatening infectious diseases and constitutes a major health problem, especially in Africa. Although artemisinin combination therapies remain efficacious to treat malaria, the emergence of resistant parasites emphasizes the urgent need of new alternative chemotherapies. One strategy is the repurposing of existing drugs. Herein, we reviewed the antimalarial effects of marketed antibiotics, and described in detail the fast-acting antibiotics that showed activity in nanomolar concentrations. Antibiotics have been used for prophylaxis and treatment of malaria for many years and are of particular interest because they might exert a different mode of action than current antimalarials, and can be used simultaneously to treat concomitant bacterial infections.


Subject(s)
Antimalarials/therapeutic use , Drug Repositioning/methods , Animals , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Drug Resistance/genetics , Humans , Malaria/physiopathology , Plasmodium falciparum/genetics , Plasmodium falciparum/pathogenicity
12.
Clin Dermatol ; 39(1): 107-117, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1300698

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic has had a profound effect on our lives and careers; this presentation explores some of the lessons we have learned from it and others that it may yet teach us. Socioeconomic effects have been profound, not all of them favorable. Travel and meeting activities, as well as many other activities, have been severely restricted. Social unrest has become intense, and it may have questionable political consequences, as the United States is undergoing a contested election result.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/therapy , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/therapeutic use , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Antimalarials/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Azithromycin/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Drug Therapy, Combination , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Statistics as Topic , Zinc/therapeutic use
13.
Clin Dermatol ; 39(1): 76-83, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1300693

ABSTRACT

As of July 9, 2020, there were more than 12 million confirmed cases of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) across the globe, with more than 550,000 deaths. Many European countries, including Belgium, the United Kingdom, Italy, and Spain, have had the highest numbers of fatalities per capita. This indicates the potential for the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) virus to overwhelm even the most advanced health care systems despite extreme societal interventions. Since its emergence, SARS-CoV-2 has disseminated across the globe, affecting the structure of global societies, infrastructure, and economies. Patients with alopecia are a diverse group who, for various indications, are prescribed a number of antimicrobials and antiandrogen treatments in addition to immunomodulatory therapies such as hydroxychloroquine, oral corticosteroids, and a range of broad immunosuppressants. These drugs are being scrutinized for their capacity to potentially affect SARS-CoV-2 outcomes. We examine these treatments and highlight the critical role that patient registries will play in generating real-world evidence to assess their impact on COVID-19 outcomes.


Subject(s)
Alopecia/drug therapy , COVID-19/drug therapy , Alopecia/classification , Androgen Antagonists/therapeutic use , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Antimalarials/therapeutic use , Cyclosporine/therapeutic use , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Janus Kinase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Methotrexate/therapeutic use , Prognosis , Registries , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Clin Dermatol ; 39(1): 56-63, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1300691

ABSTRACT

Autoimmune connective tissue diseases are a heterogeneous group of clinical entities sharing a common feature-an impairment of structural components like collagen and elastin, arising by autoimmune mechanisms. Because most patients are on a long-term immunosuppressive therapy, which renders them vulnerable to infections, a new challenge appears in front of physicians in the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) era. Immune mechanisms are substantial for the control and ceasing of viral infections, and their impairment may cause serious complications; however, data from immunosuppressed transplant patients do not reveal a higher frequency or diseases' severity in those infected by COVID-19. Several immunotherapies used to treat autoimmune connective tissue diseases favorably modulate the immune response of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2)-infected patients. The present review highlights the problems of susceptibility, severity, and therapeutic options in patients with autoimmune connective tissue diseases during the COVID-19 pandemic. The relationship between autoimmune connective tissue diseases and COVID-19 infection is explained with antiviral protection genes expression, hypercytokinemia, and lymphohistiocytosis/macrophage activation mechanisms. Recommendations concerning therapy for prevention during the pandemic period or in case of concomitant COVID-19 infection are also presented. Clinical trials are ongoing regarding COVID-19 therapy blocking the cytokine response. © 2021 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Dermatomyositis , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic , Scleroderma, Systemic , Vasculitis , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Antimalarials/therapeutic use , COVID-19/epidemiology , Dermatomyositis/complications , Dermatomyositis/drug therapy , Dermatomyositis/immunology , Disease Susceptibility , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Janus Kinase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/complications , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/drug therapy , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/immunology , Patient Acuity , SARS-CoV-2 , Scleroderma, Systemic/drug therapy , Scleroderma, Systemic/immunology , Thromboembolism/etiology , Vasculitis/drug therapy
15.
Biomolecules ; 11(7)2021 07 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1295755

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the etiological agent of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, which has been a topic of major concern for global human health. The challenge to restrain the COVID-19 pandemic is further compounded by the emergence of several SARS-CoV-2 variants viz. B.1.1.7 (Alpha), B.1.351 (Beta), P1 (Gamma) and B.1.617.2 (Delta), which show increased transmissibility and resistance towards vaccines and therapies. Importantly, there is convincing evidence of increased susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2 infection among individuals with dysregulated immune response and comorbidities. Herein, we provide a comprehensive perspective regarding vulnerability of SARS-CoV-2 infection in patients with underlying medical comorbidities. We discuss ongoing vaccine (mRNA, protein-based, viral vector-based, etc.) and therapeutic (monoclonal antibodies, small molecules, plasma therapy, etc.) modalities designed to curb the COVID-19 pandemic. We also discuss in detail, the challenges posed by different SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern (VOC) identified across the globe and their effects on therapeutic and prophylactic interventions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Animals , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Antimalarials/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Chloroquine/therapeutic use , Dexamethasone/therapeutic use , Disease Management , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Humans , Immunization, Passive , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/immunology
16.
J Infect Public Health ; 14(8): 1089-1094, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1293980

ABSTRACT

COVID 19 has hardly left any part of the world untouched. Two hundred thirteen countries have been affected by this disease, with 17,208,324 cases and 670,626 deaths as of July 30, 2020. If we look at the death toll caused by Malaria, this year, it is closely nearing COVID 19 deaths, 5, 68,700 deaths. Malaria mostly occurs in poor, tropical, and subtropical regions across the globe. In 2018, Malaria was most rampant in Africa, followed by Southeast Asian Regions (SEAR). SEAR is at the greatest risk of both COVID 19 and malaria. Strategies for essential commodities and antimalarial activities are affected by COVID 19 when the rainy season registers the maximum malaria load. We searched the literature to explore the evidence regarding efficacious antimalarial activities and the gap created by the COVID 19 pandemic, responsible barriers, and challenges, with the possible approaches towards accomplishing a target for malaria control.


Subject(s)
Antimalarials , COVID-19 , Africa , Antimalarials/therapeutic use , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Malar J ; 20(1): 272, 2021 Jun 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1277944

ABSTRACT

Malaria is one of the leading causes of mortality and morbidity in Guinea. The entire country is considered at risk of the disease. Transmission occurs all year round with peaks occurring from July through October with Plasmodium falciparum as the primary parasite species. Chloroquine (CQ) was the first-line drug against uncomplicated P. falciparum in Guinea until 2005, prior to the adoption of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT). In this review, data on therapeutic efficacy of CQ and artemisinin-based combinations reported in published literature is summarized. Against CQ, a failure rate of 27% (12/44) was reported in a study in 1992; a median failure rate of 15.6% [range: 7.7-28.3; 8 studies] was observed during 1996-2001, and 81% (17/21) of the patients failed to clear parasitaemia in a study conducted in 2007. For artemisinin-based combinations, three published studies were identified (1495 patients; 2004-2016); all three studies demonstrated day 28 polymerase chain reaction corrected efficacy > 95%. One study characterized kelch-13 mutations (389 tested; samples collected in 2016) with no evidence of mutations currently known to be associated with artemisinin resistance. The impact of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and widespread usage of counterfeit medicines are immediate challenges to malaria control activities in Guinea.


Subject(s)
Antimalarials/therapeutic use , Malaria, Falciparum/drug therapy , Malaria, Falciparum/epidemiology , Antimalarials/administration & dosage , COVID-19/complications , Guinea/epidemiology , Humans , Malaria, Falciparum/complications , SARS-CoV-2
18.
PLoS One ; 16(6): e0252388, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1262547

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Hydroxychloroquine combined with azithromycin (HCQ/AZI) has initially been used against coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19). In this retrospective study, we assessed the clinical effects of HCQ/AZI, with a 28-days follow-up. METHODS: In a registry-study which included patients hospitalized for COVID-19 between March 15 and April 2, 2020, we compared patients who received HCQ/AZI to those who did not, regarding a composite outcome of mortality and mechanical ventilation with a 28-days follow-up. QT was monitored for patients treated with HCQ/AZI. Were excluded patients in intensive care units, palliative care and ventilated within 24 hours of admission. Three analyses were performed to adjust for selection bias: propensity score matching, multivariable survival, and inverse probability score weighting (IPSW) analyses. RESULTS: Overall, 203 patients were included: 60 patients treated by HCQ/AZI and 143 control patients. During the 28-days follow-up, 32 (16.3%) patients presented the primary outcome and 23 (12.3%) patients died. Propensity-score matching identified 52 unique pairs of patients with similar characteristics. In the matched cohort (n = 104), HCQ/AZI was not associated with the primary composite outcome (log-rank p-value = 0.16). In the overall cohort (n = 203), survival and IPSW analyses also found no benefit from HCQ/AZI. In the HCQ/AZI group, 11 (18.3%) patients prolonged QT interval duration, requiring treatment cessation. CONCLUSIONS: HCQ/AZI combination therapy was not associated with lower in-hospital mortality and mechanical ventilation rate, with a 28-days follow-up. In the HCQ/AZI group, 18.3% of patients presented a prolonged QT interval requiring treatment cessation, however, control group was not monitored for this adverse event, making comparison impossible.


Subject(s)
Azithromycin/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Antimalarials/therapeutic use , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Respiration, Artificial , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Survival Rate , Treatment Outcome
20.
J Am Heart Assoc ; 9(12): e017144, 2020 06 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1255736

ABSTRACT

Background Despite a lack of clinical evidence, hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin are being administered widely to patients with verified or suspected coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Both drugs may increase risk of lethal arrhythmias associated with QT interval prolongation. Methods and Results We analyzed a case series of COVID-19-positive/suspected patients admitted between February 1, 2020, and April 4, 2020, who were treated with azithromycin, hydroxychloroquine, or a combination of both drugs. We evaluated baseline and postmedication QT interval (corrected QT interval [QTc]; Bazett) using 12-lead ECGs. Critical QTc prolongation was defined as follows: (1) maximum QTc ≥500 ms (if QRS <120 ms) or QTc ≥550 ms (if QRS ≥120 ms) and (2) QTc increase of ≥60 ms. Tisdale score and Elixhauser comorbidity index were calculated. Of 490 COVID-19-positive/suspected patients, 314 (64%) received either/both drugs and 98 (73 COVID-19 positive and 25 suspected) met study criteria (age, 62±17 years; 61% men). Azithromycin was prescribed in 28%, hydroxychloroquine in 10%, and both in 62%. Baseline mean QTc was 448±29 ms and increased to 459±36 ms (P=0.005) with medications. Significant prolongation was observed only in men (18±43 ms versus -0.2±28 ms in women; P=0.02). A total of 12% of patients reached critical QTc prolongation. Changes in QTc were highest with the combination compared with either drug, with much greater prolongation with combination versus azithromycin (17±39 ms versus 0.5±40 ms; P=0.07). No patients manifested torsades de pointes. Conclusions Overall, 12% of patients manifested critical QTc prolongation, and the combination caused greater prolongation than either drug alone. The balance between uncertain benefit and potential risk when treating COVID-19 patients should be carefully assessed.


Subject(s)
Azithromycin/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Electrocardiography/drug effects , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Long QT Syndrome/chemically induced , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Antimalarials/therapeutic use , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Drug Therapy, Combination , Female , Humans , Long QT Syndrome/physiopathology , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Prognosis , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
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