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1.
Trials ; 23(1): 427, 2022 May 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1849770

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Inappropriate antibiotic use can cause harm and promote antimicrobial resistance, which has been declared a major health challenge by the World Health Organization. In Australian residential aged care facilities (RACFs), the most common indications for antibiotic prescribing are for infections of the urinary tract, respiratory tract and skin and soft tissue. Studies indicate that a high proportion of these prescriptions are non-compliant with best prescribing guidelines. To date, a variety of interventions have been reported to address inappropriate prescribing and overuse of antibiotics but with mixed outcomes. This study aims to identify the impact of a set of sustainable, multimodal interventions in residential aged care targeting three common infection types. METHODS: This protocol details a 20-month stepped-wedge cluster-randomised trial conducted across 18 RACFs (as 18 clusters). A multimodal multi-disciplinary set of interventions, the 'AMS ENGAGEMENT bundle', will be tailored to meet the identified needs of participating RACFs. The key elements of the intervention bundle include education for nurses and general practitioners, telehealth support and formation of an antimicrobial stewardship team in each facility. Prior to the randomised sequential introduction of the intervention, each site will act as its own control in relation to usual care processes for antibiotic use and stewardship. The primary outcome for this study will be antibiotic consumption measured using defined daily doses (DDDs). Cluster-level rates will be calculated using total occupied bed numbers within each RACF during the observation period as the denominator. Results will be expressed as rates per 1000 occupied bed days. An economic analysis will be conducted to compare the costs associated with the intervention to that of usual care. A comprehensive process evaluation will be conducted using the REAIM Framework, to enable learnings from the trial to inform sustainable improvements in this field. DISCUSSION: A structured AMS model of care, incorporating targeted interventions to optimise antimicrobial use in the RACF setting, is urgently needed and will be delivered by our trial. The trial will aim to empower clinicians, residents and families by providing a robust AMS programme to improve antibiotic-related health outcomes. TRIAL REGISTRATION: US National Library of Medicine Clinical Trials.gov ( NCT04705259 ). Prospectively registered in 12th of January 2021.


Subject(s)
Anti-Infective Agents , Antimicrobial Stewardship , Aged , Anti-Bacterial Agents/adverse effects , Anti-Infective Agents/adverse effects , Antimicrobial Stewardship/methods , Australia , Humans , Inappropriate Prescribing/prevention & control , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
2.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0265493, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1759955

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The use of broad-spectrum antibiotics is widespread in patients with COVID-19 despite a low prevalence of bacterial co-infection, raising concerns for the accelerated development of antimicrobial resistance. Antimicrobial stewardship (AMS) is vital but there are limited randomized clinical trial data supporting AMS interventions such as prospective audit and feedback (PAF). High quality data to demonstrate safety and efficacy of AMS PAF in hospitalized COVID-19 patients are needed. METHODS AND DESIGN: This is a prospective, multi-center, non-inferiority, pragmatic randomized clinical trial evaluating AMS PAF intervention plus standard of care (SOC) versus SOC alone. We include patients with microbiologically confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection requiring hospital admission for severe COVID-19 pneumonia. Eligible ward beds and critical care unit beds will be randomized prior to study commencement at each participating site by computer-generated allocation sequence stratified by intensive care unit versus conventional ward in a 1:1 fashion. PAF intervention consists of real time review of antibacterial prescriptions and immediate written and verbal feedback to attending teams, performed by site-based AMS teams comprised of an AMS pharmacist and physician. The primary outcome is clinical status at post-admission day 15 measured using a 7-point ordinal scale. Patients will be followed for secondary outcomes out to 30 days. A total of 530 patients are needed to show a statistically significant non-inferiority, with 80% power and 2.5% one-sided alpha assuming standard deviation of 2 and the non-inferiority margin of 0.5. DISCUSSION: This study protocol presents a pragmatic clinical trial design with small unit cluster randomization for AMS intervention in hospitalized COVID-19 that will provide high-level evidence and may be adopted in other clinical situations. TRIAL REGISTRATION: This study is being performed at the University of Alberta and is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT04896866) on May 17, 2021.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Antimicrobial Stewardship , COVID-19/drug therapy , Antimicrobial Stewardship/methods , Clinical Protocols , Formative Feedback , Hospitalization , Humans , Medical Audit
3.
BMJ Open ; 12(2): e049867, 2022 Feb 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1714406

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is one of the critical medical issues of the 21st century. Medical professionals are the primary prescribers of antimicrobials; their undergraduate education of antimicrobial stewardship (AMS) is considered one of the fundamental approaches in combating the issue of AMR. This education level provides a platform to bridge any gaps in their knowledge and competency in AMS. This study aims to develop an educational resource on microbes, hygiene and prudent antimicrobial use for the undergraduate medical programme. The guideline produced will then be assimilated into the existing curriculum which will help to improve the quality of education which in turn will improve rationale as the use of antimicrobials in the future. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: A three-step approach consensus approach will be adopted for this study for the development of a validated medical curriculum guideline on AMR. A preliminary curriculum for the programme will be drafted from reviews of published literature including syllabi as well as national and international guidelines. A total of 26 potential sources were found to be relevant, and selected for this study. Subsequently, the drafted curriculum will be subjected for validation via online surveys by various infectious disease experts. Finally, a Delphi technique will be employed to obtain consensus on heterogeneous findings to the revised curriculum. The quantitative and qualitative responses will be analysed and discussed among the panel of researchers. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This study protocol has been approved by the Institute of Health Sciences Research Ethics Committee of Universiti Brunei Darussalam (Reference: UBD/PAPRSBIHSREC/2020/124). Informed consent declaration will be collected prior to data collections as indication of agreement of participation in the study. Results will be made available to medical educators and also researchers on AMR and stewardship. The results also will be disseminated at feedback sessions to officers at Ministry of Health and Ministry of Education, Brunei Darussalam.


Subject(s)
Anti-Infective Agents , Antimicrobial Stewardship , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Anti-Infective Agents/therapeutic use , Antimicrobial Stewardship/methods , Drug Resistance, Bacterial , Humans , Prospective Studies
4.
J Antimicrob Chemother ; 77(5): 1213-1215, 2022 04 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1621630

ABSTRACT

In delivering global healthcare, and in the context of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and antimicrobial stewardship (AMS) where information and knowledge is rapidly evolving, it is universally accepted that education and training of the healthcare workforce underpins the implementation of AMS and the effective use of existing and new health care technologies, therapies and informatics. Despite this, resourcing healthcare workforce education and training is often seen as a low priority, particularly in the resource-limited settings where the burden of AMR is greatest and healthcare resources are the most stretched. Therefore, it is disappointing to observe that, when funding the multi-dimensional AMR and AMS response, specific funding earmarked to support the development and implementation of both traditional and, increasingly, innovative education (particularly in the form of digital learning) is insufficient or lacking. In this article, I propose several novel strategies for addressing this deficit and to steer us to learn from the significant developments and support for education during the COVID-19 pandemic. If we do not invest in both traditional and innovative forms of education, our ability to create a well-trained healthcare workforce to deliver high-quality care and treatment, with better patient outcomes against AMR, will evaporate-and we will likely pay a far higher price as a consequence.


Subject(s)
Antimicrobial Stewardship , COVID-19 , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Antimicrobial Stewardship/methods , COVID-19/drug therapy , Health Personnel/education , Humans , Pandemics
5.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0261368, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1571994

ABSTRACT

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a global public health crisis that is now impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. Little is known how COVID-19 risks influence people to consume antibiotics, particularly in contexts like Bangladesh where these pharmaceuticals can be purchased without a prescription. This paper identifies the social drivers of antibiotics use among home-based patients who have tested positive with SARS-CoV-2 or have COVID-19-like symptoms. Using qualitative telephone interviews, the research was conducted in two Bangladesh cities with 40 participants who reported that they had tested positive for coronavirus (n = 20) or had COVID-19-like symptoms (n = 20). Our analysis identified five themes in antibiotic use narratives: antibiotics as 'big' medicine; managing anxiety; dealing with social repercussions of COVID-19 infection; lack of access to COVID-19 testing and healthcare services; and informal sources of treatment advice. Antibiotics were seen to solve physical and social aspects of COVID-19 infection, with urgent ramifications for AMR in Bangladesh and more general implications for global efforts to mitigate AMR.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Antimicrobial Stewardship/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , Drug Resistance, Bacterial , Adult , Bangladesh , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Qualitative Research , Social Factors
6.
J Clin Pharm Ther ; 47(2): 243-247, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1511340

ABSTRACT

WHAT IS KNOWN AND OBJECTIVE: Procalcitonin (PCT) levels rise in systemic inflammation, especially if bacterial in origin. COVID-19, caused by the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, presents with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Elevated procalcitonin in COVID-19 is considered as a marker for severity of disease. There is no study available that indicates whether elevated PCT in COVID-19 is associated with inflammation or superimposed bacterial infection. The objective of this study is to evaluate the association between PCT levels and superadded bacterial infection, and the effect of discontinuation of antibiotic in the low PCT (<0.25 ng/ml) group on patients' outcomes. METHODS: A retrospective chart review of patients admitted with COVID-19 pneumonia at a single tertiary care centre. We collected information on demographics, co-morbidities, PCT level, antibiotic use, culture results for bacterial infection, hospital length of stay (LOS) and mortality. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Continuous variables were summarized with the sample median, interquartile range, mean and range. Categorical variables were summarized with number and percentage of patients. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: We studied a total of 147 patients with COVID-19 pneumonia. 101 (69%) patients had a low PCT level (< 0.25 ng/ml). Bacterial culture results were negative for all patients, except 1 who had a markedly elevated PCT level (141.ng/ml). In patients with low PCT, 42% received no antibiotics, 59% received antibiotics initially, 32 (57%) patients antibiotic discontinued early (within 24 hours) and their culture remained negative for bacterial infections during hospitalizations. LOS was shorter (6 days in low PCT group compared to 9 days) in high PCT group. LOS was 1 day shorter (5 days vs 6 days) in no antibiotic group compared to antibiotic group. Our study examines the association between PCT level and superadded bacterial infection in COVID-19 pneumonia. Our results demonstrate that most patients admitted with COVID-19 have a low PCT (<0.25 ng/ml), which suggests no superadded bacterial infection and supports the previously published literature regarding low PCT in viral pneumonia. WHAT IS NEW AND CONCLUSION: Procalcitonin level remains low in the absence of bacterial infection. Early de-escalation/discontinuation of antibiotics is safe without adverse outcomes in COVID-19 pneumonia. Early de-escalation/discontinuation of antibiotics is associated with lower LOS.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Antimicrobial Stewardship/methods , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/drug therapy , Procalcitonin/blood , Withholding Treatment , Aged , Biomarkers/blood , Female , Humans , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Int J Antimicrob Agents ; 58(4): 106409, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1330851

ABSTRACT

Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, there has been concern about the concomitant rise of antimicrobial resistance. While bacterial co-infections seem rare in COVID-19 patients admitted to hospital wards and intensive care units (ICUs), an increase in empirical antibiotic use has been described. In the ICU setting, where antibiotics are already abundantly-and often inappropriately-prescribed, the need for an ICU-specific antimicrobial stewardship programme is widely advocated. Apart from essentially warning against the use of antibacterial drugs for the treatment of a viral infection, other aspects of ICU antimicrobial stewardship need to be considered in view of the clinical course and characteristics of COVID-19. First, the distinction between infectious and non-infectious (inflammatory) causes of respiratory deterioration during an ICU stay is difficult, and the much-debated relevance of fungal and viral co-infections adds to the complexity of empirical antimicrobial prescribing. Biomarkers such as procalcitonin for the decision to start antibacterial therapy for ICU nosocomial infections seem to be more promising in COVID-19 than non-COVID-19 patients. In COVID-19 patients, cytomegalovirus reactivation is an important factor to consider when assessing patients infected with SARS-CoV-2 as it may have a role in modulating the patient immune response. The diagnosis of COVID-19-associated invasive aspergillosis is challenging because of the lack of sensitivity and specificity of the available tests. Furthermore, altered pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic properties need to be taken into account when prescribing antimicrobial therapy. Future research should now further explore the 'known unknowns', ideally with robust prospective study designs.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Antimicrobial Stewardship/methods , COVID-19 , Cross Infection/diagnosis , Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacokinetics , Antimicrobial Stewardship/organization & administration , Biomarkers/analysis , COVID-19/drug therapy , Coinfection/drug therapy , Coinfection/microbiology , Cross Infection/drug therapy , Cytomegalovirus Infections/drug therapy , Cytomegalovirus Infections/virology , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis/diagnosis , Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis/drug therapy , Virus Activation/drug effects
9.
Future Microbiol ; 16: 919-925, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1329168

ABSTRACT

In the absence of potent antimicrobial agents, it is estimated that bacterial infections could cause millions of deaths. The emergence of COVID-19, its complex pathophysiology and the high propensity of patients to coinfections has resulted in therapeutic regimes that use a cocktail of antibiotics for disease management. Suboptimal antimicrobial stewardship in this era and the slow pace of drug discovery could result in large-scale drug resistance, narrowing future antimicrobial therapeutics. Thus, judicious use of current antimicrobials is imperative to keep up with existing and emerging infectious pathogens. Here, we provide insights into the potential implications of suboptimal antimicrobial stewardship, resulting from the emergence of COVID-19, on the spread of antimicrobial resistance.


Subject(s)
Antimicrobial Stewardship/methods , Bacterial Infections , COVID-19/epidemiology , Coinfection , Mycoses , Anti-Infective Agents/therapeutic use , Bacterial Infections/drug therapy , Bacterial Infections/epidemiology , Coinfection/drug therapy , Coinfection/epidemiology , Hand Disinfection , Humans , Mycoses/drug therapy , Mycoses/epidemiology
10.
mBio ; 12(4): e0047321, 2021 08 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1318003

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is a challenge for ongoing efforts to combat antimicrobial-resistant (AMR) bacterial infections. As we learn more about COVID-19 disease and drug stewardship evolves, there is likely to be a lasting impact of increased use of antimicrobial agents and antibiotics, as well as a lack of consistent access to health care across many populations. Sexually transmitted infections have been underreported during the pandemic and are often caused by some of the most drug-resistant pathogens. In their recent article in mBio, Parzych et al. (E. M. Parzych, S. Gulati, B. Zheng, M. A. Bah, et al., mBio 12:e00242-21, 2021, https://doi.org/10.1128/mBio.00242-21) focus on protection against Neisseria gonorrhoeae infection via in vivo delivery of an antigonococcal DNA-encoded antibody that has been modified for increased complement activation. Nucleic acid approaches are highly adaptable and could be tremendously beneficial for personalized strategies to combat AMR pathogens.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Antimicrobial Stewardship/methods , COVID-19/pathology , Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial/genetics , Coinfection/drug therapy , Coinfection/microbiology , Gonorrhea/drug therapy , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Neisseria gonorrhoeae/drug effects , Neisseria gonorrhoeae/genetics , Precision Medicine , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis ; 101(2): 115344, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1303485

ABSTRACT

Ventilator associated pneumonia(VAP) is a severe complication that can lead to high mortality when not early identified or when therapy is delayed. The aim of this study was to evaluate procalcitonin(PCT) as a biomarker for VAP development. In total, 73 hospitalized patients with COVID-19 were analyzed. PCT levels greater than 0.975ng/mL were more related to VAP. No association was found for C-reactive protein (CRP). The results show that procalcitonin may be a pertinent biomarker for VAP diagnosis and can be a helpful tool for antibiotic withdrawal.


Subject(s)
Antimicrobial Stewardship/methods , COVID-19/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Ventilator-Associated/diagnosis , Procalcitonin/blood , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Ventilator-Associated/complications , Pneumonia, Ventilator-Associated/drug therapy , ROC Curve , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Balkan Med J ; 38(3): 150-155, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1268391

ABSTRACT

Antibiotic consumption rates were quite high in number, although the bacterial coinfection rates were low in coronavirus disease 2019 pneumonia. Generally, empirical antibiotic treatment is not recommended for uncomplicated coronavirus disease 2019 mild to moderate pneumonia cases. On the other hand, antibiotic treatment and de-escalation are recommended for intubated intensive care unit patients or critical patients with sepsis, septic shock, or acute respiratory distress syndrome. The presentation of patients with severe coronavirus disease 2019 pneumonia can direct the clinicians to use antibiotics. We believe that wait and watch strategy can be preferred in such cases without sepsis, secondary bacterial infection findings, or procalcitonin < 0.5 ng/ mL. We think that a new wave of resistance will occur inevitably if we cannot perform the antibiotic stewardship properly.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Antimicrobial Stewardship , COVID-19 , Patient Selection , Antimicrobial Stewardship/methods , Antimicrobial Stewardship/standards , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/drug therapy , Humans , Medical Overuse/prevention & control , Severity of Illness Index
14.
J Hosp Infect ; 110: 103-107, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1198887

ABSTRACT

It can be a diagnostic challenge to identify patients with coronavirus disease 2019 in whom antibiotics can be safely withheld. This study evaluated the effectiveness of a guideline implemented at Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust that recommends withholding antibiotics in patients with low serum procalcitonin (PCT), defined as ≤0.25 ng/mL. Results showed reduced antibiotic consumption in patients with PCT ≤0.25 ng/mL with no increase in mortality, alongside a reduction in subsequent carbapenem prescriptions during admission. The results support the effectiveness of this guideline, and further research is recommended to identify the optimal cut-off value for PCT in this setting.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents/standards , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/standards , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Bacterial Infections/drug therapy , COVID-19/drug therapy , Procalcitonin/blood , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antimicrobial Stewardship/methods , Bacterial Infections/blood , Biomarkers/blood , Cohort Studies , Coinfection/blood , Coinfection/drug therapy , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Retrospective Studies , Young Adult
15.
J Wound Care ; 30(4): 284-296, 2021 Apr 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1187161

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Traditionally, infections are treated with antimicrobials (for example, antibiotics, antiseptics, etc), but antimicrobial resistance (AMR) has become one of the most serious health threats of the 21st century (before the emergence of COVID-19). Wounds can be a source of infection by allowing unconstrained entry of microorganisms into the body, including antimicrobial-resistant bacteria. The development of new antimicrobials (particularly antibiotics) is not keeping pace with the evolution of resistant microorganisms and novel ways of addressing this problem are urgently required. One such initiative has been the development of antimicrobial stewardship (AMS) programmes, which educate healthcare workers, and control the prescribing and targeting of antimicrobials to reduce the likelihood of AMR. Of great importance has been the European Wound Management Association (EWMA) in supporting AMS by providing practical recommendations for optimising antimicrobial therapy for the treatment of wound infection. The use of wound dressings that use a physical sequestration and retention approach rather than antimicrobial agents to reduce bacterial burden offers a novel approach that supports AMS. Bacterial-binding by dressings and their physical removal, rather than active killing, minimises their damage and hence prevents the release of damaging endotoxins. AIM: Our objective is to highlight AMS for the promotion of the judicious use of antimicrobials and to investigate how dialkylcarbamoyl chloride (DACC)-coated dressings can support AMS goals. METHOD: MEDLINE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and Google Scholar were searched to identify published articles describing data relating to AMS, and the use of a variety of wound dressings in the prevention and/or treatment of wound infections. The evidence supporting alternative wound dressings that can reduce bioburden and prevent and/or treat wound infection in a manner that does not kill or damage the microorganisms (for example, by actively binding and removing intact microorganisms from wounds) were then narratively reviewed. RESULTS: The evidence reviewed here demonstrates that using bacterial-binding wound dressings that act in a physical manner (for example, DACC-coated dressings) as an alternative approach to preventing and/or treating infection in both acute and hard-to-heal wounds does not exacerbate AMR and supports AMS. CONCLUSION: Some wound dressings work via a mechanism that promotes the binding and physical uptake, sequestration and removal of intact microorganisms from the wound bed (for example, a wound dressing that uses DACC technology to successfully prevent/reduce infection). They provide a valuable tool that aligns with the requirements of AMS (for example, reducing the use of antimicrobials in wound treatment regimens) by effectively reducing wound bioburden without inducing/selecting for resistant bacteria.


Subject(s)
Anti-Infective Agents/administration & dosage , Antimicrobial Stewardship/methods , Bandages , COVID-19 , Chlorides/administration & dosage , Surgical Wound Infection/prevention & control , Wounds and Injuries/drug therapy , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Drug Resistance, Microbial , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Br J Hosp Med (Lond) ; 82(3): 1-6, 2021 Mar 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1168179

ABSTRACT

Antibiotics are one of the most widely used classes of drugs within hospitals in the UK. They have a wide range of uses within all surgical specialties, both as preoperative prophylaxis and for treatment of acute surgical conditions. Antimicrobial resistance has increasingly been seen as a major issue, as the production of new antibiotics has decreased and overall use worldwide has increased. With the COVID-19 pandemic increasing concerns about antimicrobial resistance, there is an ever-increasing need for action. This article examines the particular challenges of antibiotic stewardship in surgical departments within the UK, and outlines possible solutions for improving adherence and reducing the risk of antimicrobial resistance in the future.


Subject(s)
Antibiotic Prophylaxis/methods , Antimicrobial Stewardship/methods , Surgery Department, Hospital , Surgical Wound Infection/prevention & control , Appendicitis/therapy , Cholecystitis/therapy , Diverticulitis/therapy , Humans , Preoperative Care , Surgical Wound Infection/drug therapy , United Kingdom
19.
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol ; 41(11): 1335-1337, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-899783

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, the antimicrobial stewardship module in our electronic medical record was reconfigured for the management of COVID-19 patients. This change allowed our subspecialist providers to review charts quickly to optimize potential therapy and management during the patient surge.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Electronic Health Records , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Antimicrobial Stewardship/methods , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Software
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