Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 35
Filter
Add filters

Document Type
Year range
1.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(52): e28470, 2021 Dec 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1592821

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The outbreak of novel coronavirus (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2), which causes the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), is the most important current health problem. The number of patients is increasing worldwide. Pneumonia is the most life-threatening complication of the disease. Prolonged viral shedding in hematological patients with COVID-19 has been demonstrated; however, data on COVID-19 patients receiving anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody therapy are limited. Accordingly, focusing on humoral immunity, herein, we present 4 COVID-19 patients who were on anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody treatment and had prolonged pneumonia. PATIENT CONCERNS: Two of 4 patients were on rituximab and the other 2 were on obinutuzumab therapy. DIAGNOSIS: The polymerase chain reaction test results for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 were positive for all 4 patients and their COVID pneumonia lasted for >50 days. INTERVENTIONS: Although all patients were treated with an adequate amount of convalescent plasma, prolonged polymerase chain reaction positivity and prolonged pneumonia were possibly due to the lack of ability of the immune system to initiate its antibody response. OUTCOMES: Despite the administration of standard therapies, recurrent pneumonia observed in the present case series of non-neutropenic patients, in whom primary malignancies were under control. CONCLUSIONS: It is suggested that further investigations should be performed to understand the underlying pathophysiology.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Monoclonal/therapeutic use , Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Pneumonia/epidemiology , Rituximab/therapeutic use , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , Female , Humans , Immunization, Passive , Middle Aged , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Recurrence , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
3.
Oncology (Williston Park) ; 35(1): 26-28, 2021 Jan 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1485807

ABSTRACT

Against the difficult and trying backdrop of the pandemic, cancer investigators persisted, and for patients with lung cancer, that persistence paid off in spectacular ways. With several new FDA approved treatments, as well as 2 new targetable mutations in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), 2020 was a banner year in the overall lung cancer space. ONCOLOGY® recently sat down with Jennifer W. Carlisle, MD, of Emory University's Winship Cancer Institute, to discuss the many advances made during the last year for patients with lung cancer along with her hopes for further significant milestones in the year to come.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Lung Neoplasms/drug therapy , Medical Oncology/organization & administration , Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological/therapeutic use , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/drug therapy , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/genetics , Humans , Lung Neoplasms/genetics , Precision Medicine , SARS-CoV-2
4.
J Med Virol ; 94(1): 417-423, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1439701

ABSTRACT

A 36-year-old male with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma on maintenance rituximab therapy presented to the emergency department with high fever and fatigue. A chest X-ray showed a lobar infiltrate, 40 days before admission the patient suffered from a mild coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection and fully recovered. PCR nasopharyngeal swab was negative for COVID-19. Comprehensive biochemical, radiological, and pathological evaluation including 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography with computed tomography and transbronchial lung biopsy found no pathogen or lymphoma recurrence. Treatment for pneumonia with antibiotic and antifungal agents was nonbeneficial. A diagnosis of secondary organizing pneumonia (OP) was made after pneumonia migration and a rapid response to corticosteroids. OP secondary to a viral respiratory infection has been well described. Raising awareness for post-COVID-19 OP has therapeutic and prognostic importance because those patients benefit from steroid therapy. We believe the condition described here is underdiagnosed and undertreated by doctors worldwide. Because of the ongoing global pandemic we are now encountering a new kind of patient, patients that have recovered from COVID-19. We hope that this case may contribute to gaining more knowledge about this growing patient population.


Subject(s)
Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , COVID-19/therapy , Cryptogenic Organizing Pneumonia/diagnosis , Cryptogenic Organizing Pneumonia/drug therapy , Adult , Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological/therapeutic use , Cryptogenic Organizing Pneumonia/pathology , Humans , Immunocompromised Host/immunology , Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse/drug therapy , Male , Nasopharynx/virology , Positron-Emission Tomography , Rituximab/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2
6.
PLoS One ; 16(8): e0255501, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1362085

ABSTRACT

With more than 82 million cases worldwide and almost two million deaths, the Covid-19 global pandemic shows little sign of abating. However, its effect on quality of life (QoL) in skin cancer patients has not been systematically evaluated to date. Given that QoL impairments may be associated with increased psychological morbidity, and may interfere with engagement with cancer therapy and follow-up, we prospectively evaluated quality of life in skin cancer patients using the Covid-19 Emotional Impact Survey (C-19EIS) and the EORTC QLQ-C30 questionnaires. 101 patients (48 females and 53 males) completed both questionnaires. The mean C-19EIS score was 3.8 on a scale from 0 (no impact) to 12 (severe impact). Patients undergoing systemic therapy showed significantly impaired physical (p = 0.006) and social functioning (p = 0.003). However, when compared to the published normative EORTC QLQ-C30 data, there was no evidence that the Covid-19 pandemic had significantly impacted upon overall quality of life. Subscales of the EORTC QLQ-C30 were significantly inversely correlated with the C-19EIS, validating its use in skin cancer patients. Despite the Covid-19 pandemic, skin cancer patients in our tertiary referral center were surprisingly resilient. However, given the geographical variations in the rates of Sars-CoV-2 infection it is possible that the low incidence in Northern Germany may have resulted in a lack of general QoL impairments. Multi-center studies are required to further determine the impact of Covid-19 on psychological wellbeing in skin cancer patients in order to develop supportive interventions and to ensure that engagement with cancer care services is maintained in order to enable early detection of cancer progression and/or recurrence.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological/therapeutic use , COVID-19/epidemiology , Quality of Life/psychology , Skin Neoplasms/drug therapy , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/psychology , Female , Germany , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , Resilience, Psychological , Skin Neoplasms/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Tertiary Care Centers , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
7.
Mol Immunol ; 137: 221-227, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1313337

ABSTRACT

Natural Killer (NK) cells are considered the first line of defense against viral infections and tumors. Several factors affect NK cytotoxic activity rendering it dysfunctional and thereby impeding the ability to scavenge abnormal cells as a part of immune escaping mechanisms induced by different types of cancers. NK cells play a crucial role augmenting the activity of various types of anticancer mAb since dysfunctional NK cells are the main reason for the low response to these therapies. To this light, we examined the phenotypic characters of the circulating NK cells isolated from HCC patients compared to healthy controls. Then, dysfunctional NK cells, from HCC patients, were reactivated with cytokines cocktail and their cytotoxic activity with the anti-EGFR mAb "cetuximab" was investigated. This showed a downregulation of patients NK cells activating receptors (NKP30, NKP46, NKG2D and CD16) as well as CD56 and up-regulation of NKG2A inhibitory receptor. We also reported an increase in aberrant CD56- NK cells subset in peripheral blood of HCC patients compared to healthy controls. Thus, confirming the dysfunctionality of peripheral NK cells isolated from HCC patients. Cytokines re-activation of those NK cells lead to upregulation of NK activating receptors and downregulation of inhibitory receptor. Moreover, the percentage of aberrant CD56- NK cells subset was reduced. Here, we proved that advanced HCC patients have an increased percentage of more immature and noncytotoxic NK cell subsets in their peripheral blood, which might account for the low cytotoxicity noticed in those patients. A significant improvement in the cytotoxicity against HCC was noticed upon using reactivated NK cells combined with cetuximab. Therefore, this study highlights the potential recruitment of NK immune cells along with cetuximab to enhance cytotoxicity against HCC.


Subject(s)
Antibody-Dependent Cell Cytotoxicity/immunology , Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological/therapeutic use , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/therapy , Cetuximab/therapeutic use , Cytokines/pharmacology , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Liver Neoplasms/therapy , CD56 Antigen/metabolism , Cell Line, Tumor , Humans , Lymphocyte Activation/immunology , NK Cell Lectin-Like Receptor Subfamily C/metabolism
8.
Clin Lymphoma Myeloma Leuk ; 21(10): e810-e816, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1313014

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We previously reported elsewhere of a follicular lymphoma patient suffering from persistent COVID-19 pneumonia that was still ongoing at 2 months after onset. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We provide a follow-up report of the case along with a literature review of immunocompromised lymphoma patients experiencing prolonged COVID-19 infections. RESULTS: Although requiring a full 1 year, the presented case eventually achieved spontaneous resolution of COVID-19 pneumonia. Anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies could not be detected throughout the disease course, but COVID-19-directed T-cell response was found to be intact. The patient also developed secondary immune thrombocytopenia subsequent to COVID-19 pneumonia. We found 19 case reports of immunocompromised lymphoma patients with prolonged COVID-19 infections in the literature. All 5 patients who died did not receive convalescent plasma therapy, whereas resolution of COVID-19 infection was achieved in 8 out of 9 patients who received convalescent plasma therapy. CONCLUSIONS: We demonstrate through the presented case that while time-consuming, resolution of COVID-19 infections may be achieved without aid from humoral immunity if cellular immunity is intact. Immunocompromised lymphoma patients are at risk of a prolonged disease course of COVID-19, and convalescent plasma therapy may be a promising approach in such patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Lymphoma, Follicular/drug therapy , Pneumonia/immunology , Rituximab/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Thrombocytopenia/immunology , Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological/therapeutic use , COVID-19/virology , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Immunocompromised Host/immunology , Lymphoma, Follicular/complications , Lymphoma, Follicular/immunology , Maintenance Chemotherapy/methods , Middle Aged , Pneumonia/complications , Pneumonia/virology , Remission, Spontaneous , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/virology , Thrombocytopenia/complications
10.
Oncology (Williston Park) ; 34(9): 370-376, 2020 09 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1231670

ABSTRACT

In an asymptomatic 77-yearold woman, former 55 packyears smoker, a routine X-ray showed a 45-mm superior left lobe lesion. A chest CT scan confirmed a 36-mm superior left lobe lesion and an aortic-pulmonary lymph node enlargement measuring 42 mm, suspicious for neoplasia. A PET-CT scan showed an elevated uptake in the primary lesion, in the aortic-pulmonary lymph node, and in the left hilar lymph node with a standardized uptake value - 40 and 4.3, respectively. CT-guided lung biopsy showed a lung squamous cell carcinoma. An endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration for lymph-node staging was negative for lymph node spread. Brain MRI was negative. Final staging was determined to be a IIIA (T2bN2) squamous cell carcinoma of the lung.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal/therapeutic use , Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological/therapeutic use , Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/therapy , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Lung Neoplasms/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia/diagnosis , Aged , Antibodies, Monoclonal/adverse effects , Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological/adverse effects , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Carboplatin/administration & dosage , Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/diagnostic imaging , Chemoradiotherapy , Consolidation Chemotherapy , Diagnosis, Differential , Female , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Lung Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging , Paclitaxel/administration & dosage , Pandemics , Pneumonia/chemically induced , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Front Immunol ; 12: 613502, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1221945

ABSTRACT

In these times of COVID-19 pandemic, concern has been raised about the potential effects of SARS-CoV-2 infection on immunocompromised patients, particularly on those receiving B-cell depleting agents and having therefore a severely depressed humoral response. Convalescent plasma can be a therapeutic option for these patients. Understanding the underlying mechanisms of convalescent plasma is crucial to optimize such therapeutic approach. Here, we describe a COVID-19 patient who was deeply immunosuppressed following rituximab (anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody) and concomitant chemotherapy for chronic lymphoid leukemia. His long-term severe T and B cell lymphopenia allowed to evaluate the treatment effects of convalescent plasma. Therapeutic outcome was monitored at the clinical, biological and radiological level. Moreover, anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibody titers (IgM, IgG and IgA) and neutralizing activity were assessed over time before and after plasma transfusions, alongside to SARS-CoV-2 RNA quantification and virus isolation from the upper respiratory tract. Already after the first cycle of plasma transfusion, the patient experienced rapid improvement of pneumonia, inflammation and blood cell counts, which may be related to the immunomodulatory properties of plasma. Subsequently, the cumulative increase in anti-SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing antibodies due to the three additional plasma transfusions was associated with progressive and finally complete viral clearance, resulting in full clinical recovery. In this case-report, administration of convalescent plasma revealed a stepwise effect with an initial and rapid anti-inflammatory activity followed by the progressive SARS-CoV-2 clearance. These data have potential implications for a more extended use of convalescent plasma and future monoclonal antibodies in the treatment of immunosuppressed COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/therapy , Aged , Antibodies, Neutralizing/administration & dosage , Antibodies, Viral/administration & dosage , Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating/therapeutic use , Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological/therapeutic use , Bendamustine Hydrochloride/therapeutic use , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Humans , Immunization, Passive/methods , Immunoglobulin A/blood , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin M/blood , Leukemia, Lymphoid/complications , Leukemia, Lymphoid/drug therapy , Male , Rituximab/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Treatment Outcome
12.
J Immunother Cancer ; 9(4)2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1209683

ABSTRACT

The clinically indistinguishable overlap between pneumonitis caused due to immune checkpoint inhibition (ICI) and pneumonia associated with COVID-19 has posed considerable challenges for patients with cancer and oncologists alike. The cancer community continues to face the challenges that lay at the complex immunological intersection of immune-based cancer therapy and immune dysregulation that results from COVID-19. Is there compounded immune dysregulation that could lead to poor outcomes? Could ICIs, in fact, ameliorate SARS-CoV-2-driven T-cell exhaustion?A little more is known about the kinetics of the viral replication in immunocompromised patients now as compared with earlier during the pandemic. Working knowledge of the diagnostic and therapeutic nuances of SARS-CoV-2 infection in patients with active cancers, issues related to viability and replication potential of the virus, unclear role of corticosteroids among those with diminished or dysfunctional effector T-cell repertoire, and the type of immunotherapy with differential risk of pneumonitis will inform decision making related to immunotherapy choices and decision for ICI continuation in the era of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Immunotherapy/methods , Neoplasms/therapy , Pneumonia/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological/adverse effects , Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Diagnosis, Differential , Humans , Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors/adverse effects , Immunocompromised Host/immunology , Immunotherapy/adverse effects , Neoplasms/immunology , Pneumonia/chemically induced , Pneumonia/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , T-Lymphocytes/drug effects , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/metabolism
14.
Acta Oncol ; 60(1): 13-19, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066057

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cancer patients suffer from worse coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) outcomes. Whether active oncologic treatment is an additional risk factor in this population remains unclear. Therefore, here we have conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to summarize the existing evidence for the effect of active oncologic treatment on COVID-19 outcomes. METHODS: Systematic search of databases (PubMed, Embase) was conducted for studies published from inception to July 1, 2020, with a subsequent search update conducted on 10 October 2020. In addition, abstracts and presentations from major conference proceedings (ASCO, ESMO, AACR) as well as pre-print databases (medxriv, bioxriv) were searched. Retrospective and prospective studies reporting clinical outcomes in cancer patients with laboratory confirmation or clinical diagnosis of COVID-19 and details of active or recent oncologic treatment were selected. Random-effects model was applied throughout meta-analyses. Summary outcome measure was the pooled odds ratio (OR) of death for active cancer therapy versus no active cancer therapy for each of the following modalities: recent surgery, chemotherapy, targeted therapy, immunotherapy, or chemoimmunotherapy. RESULTS: Sixteen retrospective and prospective studies (3558 patients) were included in the meta-analysis. Active chemotherapy was associated with higher risk of death compared to no active chemotherapy (OR, 1.60, 95% CI, 1.14-2.23). No significant association with risk of death was identified for active targeted therapy, immunotherapy, chemoimmunotherapy, or recent surgery. Meta-analysis of multivariate adjusted OR of death for active chemotherapy was consistently associated with higher risk of death compared to no active chemotherapy (OR, 1.42, 95% CI, 1.01-2.01). CONCLUSIONS: Active chemotherapy appears to be associated with higher risk of death in cancer patients with COVID-19. Further research is necessary to characterize the complex interactions between active cancer treatment and COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/mortality , Immunotherapy , Neoplasms/therapy , Surgical Procedures, Operative , Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , Humans , Molecular Targeted Therapy , Neoplasms/complications , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Pharmacology ; 106(1-2): 9-19, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066969

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Extensive efforts have been made in optimizing monoclonal immunoglobulin (Ig)G antibodies for use in clinical practice. Accumulating evidence suggests that IgA or anti-FcαRI could also represent an exciting avenue toward novel therapeutic strategies. SUMMARY: Here, we underline that IgA is more effective in recruiting neutrophils for tumor cell killing and is potently active against several pathogens, including rotavirus, poliovirus, influenza virus, and SARS-CoV-2. IgA could also be used to modulate excessive immune responses in inflammatory diseases. Furthermore, secretory IgA is emerging as a major regulator of gut microbiota, which impacts intestinal homeostasis and global health as well. As such, IgA could be used to promote a healthy microbiota in a therapeutic setting. Key messages: IgA combines multifaceted functions that can be desirable for immunotherapy.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Immunoglobulin A/therapeutic use , Immunotherapy , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Animals , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Monoclonal/adverse effects , Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Immunoglobulin A/adverse effects , Immunotherapy/adverse effects , Inflammation/drug therapy , Inflammation/immunology , Mice , Neoplasms/drug therapy , Neoplasms/immunology
17.
J Immunother Cancer ; 8(2)2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-971586

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 outbreak caused by SARS-CoV-2 challenges the medical system by interfering with routine therapies for many patients with chronic diseases. In patients with cancer receiving immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs), difficulties also arise from the incomplete understanding of the intricate interplay between their routine treatment and pathogenesis of the novel virus. By referring to previous ICI-based investigations, we speculate that ICIs themselves are not linked to high-infection risks of respiratory diseases or inflammation-related adverse effects in patients with cancer. Moreover, ICI treatment may even enhance coronavirus clearance in some patients with malignant tumor by boosting antiviral T-cell responsiveness. However, the 'explosive' inflammation during COVID-19 in some ICI-treated patients with cancer was illustrated as exuberant immunopathological damage or even death. In case of the COVID-19 immunopathogenesis fueled by ICIs, we propose a regular monitor of pathogenic T-cell subsets and their exhaustion marker expression (eg, Th17 and interleukin (IL)-6-producing Th1 subsets with surface programmed death 1 expression) to guide the usage of ICI. Here we aimed to address these considerations, based on available literature and experience from our practice, that may assist with the decision-making of ICI administration during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological/pharmacology , COVID-19/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/prevention & control , Neoplasms/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Decision-Making , Cytokine Release Syndrome/blood , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Drug Monitoring , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Neoplasms/blood , Neoplasms/immunology , Pandemics , Patient Selection , Programmed Cell Death 1 Receptor/antagonists & inhibitors , Programmed Cell Death 1 Receptor/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Th1 Cells/drug effects , Th1 Cells/immunology , Th1 Cells/metabolism , Th17 Cells/drug effects , Th17 Cells/immunology , Th17 Cells/metabolism , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
18.
FEBS J ; 287(17): 3677-3680, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-960856

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), the highly contagious illness caused by a novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has spread across the globe, becoming one of the most challenging public health crisis of our times. SARS-CoV-2 can cause severe disease associated with multiple organ damage. Cancer patients have a higher risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection and death. While the virus uses angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) as the primary entry receptor, the recent experimental and clinical findings suggest that some tumor markers, including CD147 (basigin), can provide an additional entry for SARS-CoV-2 infection through binding to the viral spike (S) protein. In the absence of specific viral drugs, blocking of CD147 might be a way to prevent virus invasion. Identifying other target proteins is of high importance as targeting the alternative receptors for SARS-CoV-2 might open up a promising avenue for the treatment of COVID-19 patients, including those who have cancer.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological/therapeutic use , Basigin/antagonists & inhibitors , Biomarkers, Tumor/antagonists & inhibitors , COVID-19/drug therapy , Neoplasms/drug therapy , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/antagonists & inhibitors , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Antibodies, Monoclonal/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Basigin/genetics , Basigin/immunology , Biomarkers, Tumor/genetics , Biomarkers, Tumor/immunology , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Clinical Trials as Topic , Host-Pathogen Interactions/drug effects , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Neoplasms/genetics , Neoplasms/immunology , Neoplasms/virology , Protein Binding , Receptors, Virus/genetics , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Severity of Illness Index , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism
19.
Cancer Invest ; 39(1): 9-14, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-894477

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of COVID-19 pandemia is a major health worldwide concern. Patients with cancer might have a worse outcome, because of the immunosuppression determined by the tumor itself and anti-cancer treatments, including chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The impact and course of viral infection in patients receiving immunotherapy remains unknown. We report the case of a patient with metastatic melanoma, long responder to anti PD-1 blockade who got infected with Sars CoV-2, recovering without sequelae. A critical review of literature was performed. Limited data available in literature support the possibility to continue the immunotherapy in patients with cancer under control.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Melanoma/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological/therapeutic use , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Male , Melanoma/pathology , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Metastasis , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...