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1.
Breast Dis ; 41(1): 1-3, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1604128

ABSTRACT

During the first hit of SARS-COVID pandemic, an important reorganization of Healthcare Services has been done, and new protocols and pathways to protect frail patients like oncological patients were designed. The second hit of pandemic had stressed these new pathways and suggests to health-workers some improvements for safer management of patents.We reported our experience in organizing the clinical pathway of neoadjuvant therapy candidate patients based on the execution of sentinel lympho-node biopsy and the placement of implantable venous access port in the same access to operating room before neoadjuvant chemotherapy suggesting a possible organizational model. In the period October-December 2020 we have included in this new type of path twelve patients and we have not registered any cases of COVID among the patients included. We think this new path, adopted amid the second hit, will be useful for all Breast Units that are facing the challenge of guaranteeing the highest standards of care in a historical moment where the health emergency occupies the efforts of health workers and the economic resources of health systems.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents/administration & dosage , Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy , COVID-19/prevention & control , Catheterization, Central Venous/methods , Infection Control/methods , Patient Safety , Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy/methods , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use , Breast Neoplasms/pathology , Breast Neoplasms/surgery , Catheterization, Central Venous/instrumentation , Catheterization, Central Venous/standards , Central Venous Catheters , Chemotherapy, Adjuvant , Critical Pathways , Female , Humans , Infection Control/standards , Mastectomy , Middle Aged , Neoadjuvant Therapy , Neoplasm Staging , Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy/standards
2.
Expert Rev Anticancer Ther ; 21(12): 1371-1383, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526146

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: For the clinical treatment of cancer patients, coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) can cause serious immune-related problems. Cancer patients, who experience immunosuppression due to the pathogenesis and severity of disease, may become more aggressive due to multiple factors such as age, comorbidities, and immunosuppression. In this pandemic era, COVID-19 causes lymphopenia, cancer cell awakening, inflammatory diseases, and a cytokine storm that worsens disease-related morbidity and prognosis. AREAS COVERED: We discuss all the risk factors of COVID-19 associated with cancer patients and propose new strategies to use antiviral and anticancer drugs for therapeutic purposes. We bring new drugs, cancers and COVID-19 treatment strategies together to address the immune system challenges faced by oncologists. EXPERT OPINION: The chronic inflammatory microenvironment caused by COVID-19 awakens dormant cancer cells through inflammation and autoimmune activation. Drug-related strategies to ensure that clinical treatment can reduce the susceptibility of cancer patients to COVID-19, and possible counter-measures to minimize the harm caused by the COVID-19 have been outlined. The response to the pandemic and recovery has been elaborated, which can provide information for long-term cancer treatment and speed up the optimization process.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Inflammation/drug therapy , Neoplasms/drug therapy , Antineoplastic Agents/administration & dosage , Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/immunology , Humans , Inflammation/immunology , Inflammation/virology , Neoplasms/immunology , Neoplasms/virology , Prognosis , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index
4.
Anticancer Res ; 41(9): 4535-4542, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1395532

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIM: Due to the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, many scientific committees proposed neoadjuvant therapy (NACT) bridging treatment as a novel strategy and indication. The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on breast cancer patients undergoing NACT. PATIENTS AND METHODS: All breast cancer patients referred to two Breast Units during COVID-19-pandemic were enrolled. RESULTS: Out of 814 patients, 43(5.3%) were enrolled in the COVID-19-group and compared with 94 (7.9%) similar Pre-COVID-19 patients. We observed a reduction in the number of patients undergoing NACT, p=0.0019. No difference was reported in terms of clinical presentation, indications, and tumor response. In contrast, a higher number of vascular adverse events was reported (6.9% vs. 0% p=0.029). Immediate breast cancer reconstructions following invasive surgery suffered a significant slowdown (5.9% vs. 47.7%, p=0.019). CONCLUSION: COVID-19 caused a reduction in the number of patients undergoing NACT, with no changes in terms of indications, clinical presentation, and tumor response. Furthermore, there was an increased incidence of vascular events.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents/administration & dosage , Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy , Breast Neoplasms/surgery , COVID-19/epidemiology , Mammaplasty/statistics & numerical data , Neoadjuvant Therapy/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Antineoplastic Agents/adverse effects , Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal/administration & dosage , Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal/adverse effects , COVID-19/complications , Drug Therapy/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Neoadjuvant Therapy/adverse effects , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome
5.
Future Oncol ; 17(33): 4447-4456, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1338142

ABSTRACT

Aim: To evaluate the immunogenicity and safety of the CoronaVac vaccine in patients with cancer receiving active systemic therapy. Methods: This multicenter, prospective, observational study was conducted with 47 patients receiving active systemic therapy for cancer. CoronaVac was administered as two doses (3 µg/day) on days 0 and 28. Antibody level higher than 1 IU/ml was defined as 'immunogenicity.' Results: The immunogenicity rate was 63.8% (30/47) in the entire patient group, 59.5% (25/42) in those receiving at least one cytotoxic drug and 100% (five of five) in those receiving monoclonal antibody or immunotherapy alone. Age was an independent predictive factor for immunogenicity (odds ratio: 0.830; p = 0.043). Conclusion: More than half of cancer patients receiving active systemic therapy developed immunogenicity.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents/adverse effects , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Neoplasms/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antineoplastic Agents/administration & dosage , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Double-Blind Method , Female , Humans , Immunogenicity, Vaccine/drug effects , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/immunology , Prospective Studies , Vaccines, Inactivated/administration & dosage , Vaccines, Inactivated/adverse effects , Vaccines, Inactivated/immunology
7.
JCO Clin Cancer Inform ; 5: 631-640, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1259226

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Oral chemotherapy challenges providers' abilities to safely monitor patients' symptoms, adherence, and financial toxicity. COVID-19 has increased the urgency of caring for patients remotely. Collection of electronic patient-reported outcomes (ePROs) has demonstrated efficacy for patients on intravenous chemotherapy, but limited data support their use in oral chemotherapy. We undertook a pilot project to assess the feasibility of implementing an ePRO system for patients starting oral chemotherapy at our cancer center, which includes both an academic site and a community site. METHODS: Patients initiating oral chemotherapy were asked to participate. A five-question tool was built in REDCap. Concerning responses triggered outreach within one business day. The primary outcome was time to first symptom assessment. For comparison, we used a historical cohort of patients who had been prescribed oral chemotherapies by providers in the same disease groups at the cancer center. RESULTS: Twenty-five of 62 (40%) patients completed ePRO assessments. Fifty historical charts were reviewed. Time to first symptom assessment was 7 days (IQR, 4-14 days) in the historical group compared with 3 days (IQR, 2-4 days) in the ePRO group. Time to clinical action was 14 days (7-35 days) in the historical group compared with 8 days (4-19 days) in the ePRO group. No statistically significant differences were detected in 30-day emergency department visit or hospitalization (12% for both groups) or 90-day emergency department visit or hospitalization rates (historical 28% and ePRO 20%). CONCLUSION: An ePRO tool monitoring patient concerns about adherence, cost, and toxicities for patients with new oral chemotherapy regimens is feasible and improves time to symptom assessment. Further investigation is needed to improve patient engagement with ePROs and evaluate the long-term impacts for patients on oral chemotherapy.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents/administration & dosage , Patient Reported Outcome Measures , Administration, Oral , Aged , Antineoplastic Agents/adverse effects , Electronic Health Records , Female , Humans , Internet , Male , Middle Aged , Pilot Projects , Surveys and Questionnaires
8.
Curr Oncol ; 28(3): 2007-2013, 2021 05 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1243960

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 situation is a worldwide health emergency with strong implications in clinical oncology. In this viewpoint, we address two crucial dilemmas from the ethical dimension: (1) Is it ethical to postpone or suspend cancer treatments which offer a statistically significant benefit in quality of life and survival in cancer patients during this time of pandemic?; (2) Should we vaccinate cancer patients against COVID-19 if scientific studies have not included this subgroup of patients? Regarding the first question, the best available evidence applied to the ethical principles of Beauchamp and Childress shows that treatments (such as chemotherapy) with clinical benefit are fair and beneficial. Indeed, the suspension or delay of such treatments should be considered malefic. Regarding the second question, applying the doctrine of double-effect, we show that the potential beneficial effect of vaccines in the population with cancer (or those one that has had cancer) is much higher than the potential adverse effects of these vaccines. In addition, there is no better and less harmful known solution.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Clinical Decision-Making/ethics , Neoplasms/drug therapy , Patient Selection/ethics , Time-to-Treatment/ethics , Antineoplastic Agents/administration & dosage , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Humans , Medical Oncology/ethics , Neoplasms/immunology , Neoplasms/mortality , Neoplasms/psychology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Quality of Life , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Time Factors , Vaccination/adverse effects , Vaccination/ethics
10.
J Oncol Pharm Pract ; 27(5): 1073-1079, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1226841

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, changes to chemotherapy services were implemented as a means of managing imposed workload strains within health services and protecting patients from contracting COVID-19. Given the rapidly evolving nature of the pandemic many changes were rapidly adopted and were not substantiated by robust evidence. This study aimed to describe the changes adopted internationally to chemotherapy services, which may be used to guide future changes to treatment delivery. METHODS: A survey was developed to understand the impact of COVID-19 on the delivery of systemic anti-cancer therapies (SACT). It comprised 22 questions and examined the strategies implemented during the pandemic to prioritise and protect patients receiving SACT and the participants' professional opinion of the strategies employed. The survey was available in English, Spanish and French and was distributed via professional bodies. RESULTS: 129 responses were obtained from healthcare professionals working across 17 different countries. 45% of institutions had to implement treatment prioritisation strategies and all hospitals implemented changes in the delivery of treatment, including: reduction in treatments (69%), using less immunosuppressive agents (50%), allowing treatment breaks (14%) and switching to oral therapies (45%). Virtual clinic visits were perceived by participants as the most effective strategy to protect patients. CONCLUSIONS: The pandemic has forced chemotherapy healthcare professionals to adopt new ways of working by reducing health interactions. Many areas of research are needed following this period, including understanding patients' perceptions of risks to treatment, utilisation of oral treatments and the impact of treatment breaks on cancer outcomes.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents/administration & dosage , COVID-19 , Health Personnel/organization & administration , Neoplasms/drug therapy , Humans , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workload
11.
J Thromb Thrombolysis ; 52(2): 504-507, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1202813

ABSTRACT

Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) which can cause significant mortality is a thrombotic microangiopathy due to deficiency of VWF cleaving protease ADAMTS13 and as per medical literature there are examples that TTP can be caused by COVID 19 infection. A 35 years old female after admission with right sided weakness and slurring of speech was found to be COVID positive and diagnosed as a case of TTP. Patient had absent ADAMTS13 level on day 1. Treatment was started with therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) later injection Vincristine and Rituximab was given after 4th TPE as it was suspected as refractory case. Finally patient received 16 TPE procedures with cryo poor plasma as exchange fluid and gradually her platelet count started to maintain normal and she was discharged. Specific management and such association of this type of cases need to be studied more judiciously.


Subject(s)
ADAMTS13 Protein , COVID-19 , Purpura, Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic , Rituximab/administration & dosage , Vincristine/administration & dosage , ADAMTS13 Protein/blood , ADAMTS13 Protein/deficiency , Adult , Antineoplastic Agents/administration & dosage , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , Female , Humans , Immunologic Factors/administration & dosage , Plasma Exchange/methods , Platelet Count/methods , Purpura, Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic/blood , Purpura, Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic/diagnosis , Purpura, Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic/etiology , Purpura, Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic/therapy , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Treatment Outcome
12.
Cancer Med ; 10(7): 2242-2249, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1118132

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 outbreak has posed considerable challenges to the health care system worldwide, especially for cancer treatment. We described the activity and the care organisation of the Hospitalisation At Home (HAH) structure during the pandemic for treating patients with anti-cancer injections. METHODS: We report the established organisation, the eligibility criteria, the patient characteristics, the treatment schemes and the stakeholders' role during two 5-week periods in 2020, before and during the French population's lockdown. RESULTS: The increase of activity during the lockdown (+32% of treated patients, +156% of new patients and +28% of delivered preparations) concerned solid tumour, mainly breast cancer, even if haematological malignancies remained the most frequent. Thirty different drugs were delivered, including three new drugs administered in HAH versus 19 during the routine period (p < 0.01). For those clinical departments accustomed to using HAH, the usual organisation was kept, but with adjustments. Five clinical departments increased the number of patients treated at home and widened the panel of drugs prescribed. Three oncology departments and one radiotherapy department for the first time solicited HAH for anti-cancer injections, mainly for immunotherapy. We adjusted the HAH organisation with additional human resources and allowed to prescribe drugs with an infusion time of <30 min only for the new prescribers. CONCLUSION: HAH allowed for the continuation of anti-cancer injections without postponement during the pandemic, and for a decrease in unnecessary patient travel to hospital with its concomitant COVID-19 transmission risk. Often left out of guidelines, the place of HAH in treating cancer patients should be reappraised, even more so during a pandemic.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents/administration & dosage , COVID-19/prevention & control , Home Care Services, Hospital-Based/statistics & numerical data , Neoplasms/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Child , Child, Preschool , Disease Outbreaks , Female , France , Home Care Services, Hospital-Based/organization & administration , Humans , Male , Medical Oncology/methods , Medical Oncology/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Public Health/methods , Public Health/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
13.
Future Oncol ; 17(13): 1593-1600, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1105970

ABSTRACT

Aims: This project aims to address the question of whether patients were satisfied with using a video visit for prechemotherapy evaluation during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods & materials: This project used a survey tool with patients undergoing prechemotherapy evaluation that was administered at the time of chemotherapy; 70 surveys were collected. Descriptive statistics of survey questions are presented. Results: 73% of patients reported satisfaction with their video visit experience. 65% of patients reported that they prefer in-person visits as their preferred choice for prechemotherapy evaluation. Conclusion: Patient satisfaction was favorable, but not consistent with results from prior published studies. Patients also mostly preferred an in-person visit for prechemotherapy evaluation. Further research is needed to determine patient attitudes to telemedicine for different types of consultations.


Lay abstract In this study, we looked at how satisfied patients were with video visits to consult with their physicians prior to receiving chemotherapy. We collected 70 surveys from June to July 2020 in the clinic's infusion center. Most patients were satisfied with using video visits, but maybe were not as satisfied with using video visits as has been reported in other studies. Most patients also still preferred an in-person visit to a video visit. Patients may have preferred in-person visits because that is what they were used to. More research is needed to find why satisfaction with video visits can be so varied.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents/administration & dosage , COVID-19/complications , Neoplasms/drug therapy , Patient Satisfaction , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Telemedicine/methods , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , Delivery of Health Care , Evaluation Studies as Topic , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/virology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
14.
Anticancer Drugs ; 32(5): 589-591, 2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1082921

ABSTRACT

Encorafenib (Braftovi) is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with unresectable or metastatic melanoma with a BRAF V600 mutation, in combination with binimetinib (Mektovi). According to the product label of encorafenib, there are no specific treatment recommendations in case of an overdose. We report on a 63-year-old man who ingested a double dose (900 mg) of encorafenib for 16 days. He developed overall minor chronic overdose symptoms such as nausea and vomiting grade 1 and muscle pain. Based on the most occurring adverse events of encorafenib, liver values, kidney function parameters and QTc interval were measured. Kidney function parameters were normal, whereas liver values were slightly increased (grade 1) and QTc slightly prolonged. The plasma concentration 3 h after the last dose was 2110 ng/mL. We describe the course of a case with a chronic overdose during 16 days of the double dose of encorafenib as well as the followed approach, which could be taken into account when observing an encorafenib overdose. Providing information in times of Covid-19 is challenging, but remains necessary for good clinical care.


Subject(s)
Carbamates , Drug Overdose , Liver Function Tests/methods , Long QT Syndrome , Medication Therapy Management/standards , Melanoma , Skin Neoplasms , Sulfonamides , Antineoplastic Agents/administration & dosage , Antineoplastic Agents/adverse effects , Antineoplastic Agents/blood , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/therapeutic use , Benzimidazoles/administration & dosage , Benzimidazoles/adverse effects , COVID-19/epidemiology , Carbamates/administration & dosage , Carbamates/adverse effects , Carbamates/blood , Communicable Disease Control , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Drug Monitoring/methods , Drug Overdose/blood , Drug Overdose/diagnosis , Drug Overdose/etiology , Drug Overdose/physiopathology , Humans , Long QT Syndrome/chemically induced , Long QT Syndrome/diagnosis , Male , Melanoma/drug therapy , Melanoma/genetics , Melanoma/pathology , Middle Aged , Mutation , Proto-Oncogene Proteins B-raf/antagonists & inhibitors , Proto-Oncogene Proteins B-raf/genetics , Skin Neoplasms/drug therapy , Skin Neoplasms/genetics , Skin Neoplasms/pathology , Sulfonamides/administration & dosage , Sulfonamides/adverse effects , Sulfonamides/blood , Vomiting/chemically induced , Vomiting/diagnosis
16.
Curr Oncol ; 27(3): e313-e317, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1024671

ABSTRACT

Background: The emergence of covid-19 has the potential to change the way in which the health care system can accommodate various patient populations and might affect patients with non-covid-19 problems. The Quebec Lung Cancer Network, which oversees thoracic oncology services in the province of Quebec under the direction of the Ministère de la Santé et des Services sociaux, convened to develop recommendations to deal with the potential disruption of services in thoracic oncology in the province of Quebec. The summary provided here has been adapted from the original document posted on the Programme québécois du cancer Web site at: https://www.msss.gouv.qc.ca/professionnels/documents/coronavirus-2019-ncov/PJ1_Recommandations_oncologie-thoracique-200415.pdf. Methods: Plans to optimize the health care system and potentially to prioritize services were discussed with respect to various levels of activity. For each level-of-activity scenario, suggestions were made for the services and treatments to prioritize and for those that might have to be postponed, as well as for potential alternatives to care. Results: The principal recommendation is that the cancer centre executive committee and the multidisciplinary tumour board always try to find a solution to maintain standard-of-care therapy for all patients with thoracic tumours, using novel approaches to treatment and the adoption of a network approach to care, as needed. Conclusions: The effect of the covid-19 pandemic on the health care system remains unpredictable and requires that cancer teams unite and offer the most efficient and innovative therapies to all patients under the various conditions that might be forced upon them.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents/administration & dosage , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/therapy , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Lung Neoplasms/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Radiotherapy , Small Cell Lung Carcinoma/therapy , Thoracic Surgical Procedures , Triage , Administration, Oral , Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/diagnosis , Disease Management , Humans , Lung Neoplasms/diagnosis , Mediastinoscopy , Medical Oncology , Molecular Diagnostic Techniques , Neoplasm Staging , Pandemics , Quebec/epidemiology , Radiosurgery , SARS-CoV-2 , Small Cell Lung Carcinoma/diagnosis , Thoracoscopy
17.
JCO Oncol Pract ; 17(3): e377-e385, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-983894

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The response to the COVID-19 pandemic has affected the management of patients with cancer. In this pooled retrospective analysis, we describe changes in management patterns for patients with cancer diagnosed with COVID-19 in two academic institutions in the San Francisco Bay Area. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Adult and pediatric patients diagnosed with COVID-19 with a current or historical diagnosis of malignancy were identified from the electronic medical record at the University of California, San Francisco, and Stanford University. The proportion of patients undergoing active cancer management whose care was affected was quantified and analyzed for significant differences with regard to management type, treatment intent, and the time of COVID-19 diagnosis. The duration and characteristics of such changes were compared across subgroups. RESULTS: A total of 131 patients were included, of whom 55 were undergoing active cancer management. Of these, 35 of 55 (64%) had significant changes in management that consisted primarily of delays. An additional three patients not undergoing active cancer management experienced a delay in management after being diagnosed with COVID-19. The decision to change management was correlated with the time of COVID-19 diagnosis, with more delays identified in patients treated with palliative intent earlier in the course of the pandemic (March/April 2020) compared with later (May/June 2020) (OR, 4.2; 95% CI, 1.03 to 17.3; P = .0497). This difference was not seen among patients treated with curative intent during the same timeframe. CONCLUSION: We found significant changes in the management of cancer patients with COVID-19 treated with curative and palliative intent that evolved over time. Future studies are needed to determine the impact of changes in management and treatment on cancer outcomes for patients with cancer and COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents/administration & dosage , COVID-19/therapy , Neoplasms/therapy , Radiotherapy/statistics & numerical data , Surgical Procedures, Operative/statistics & numerical data , Time-to-Treatment/statistics & numerical data , Administration, Oral , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , California , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Infusions, Intravenous , Injections, Intramuscular , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/complications , Neoplasms/diagnosis , Palliative Care , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Time Factors , Young Adult
18.
Br J Haematol ; 191(2): 194-206, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-966626

ABSTRACT

Haematology patients receiving chemo- or immunotherapy are considered to be at greater risk of COVID-19-related morbidity and mortality. We aimed to identify risk factors for COVID-19 severity and assess outcomes in patients where COVID-19 complicated the treatment of their haematological disorder. A retrospective cohort study was conducted in 55 patients with haematological disorders and COVID-19, including 52 with malignancy, two with bone marrow failure and one immune-mediated thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). COVID-19 diagnosis coincided with a new diagnosis of a haematological malignancy in four patients. Among patients, 82% were on systemic anti-cancer therapy (SACT) at the time of COVID-19 diagnosis. Of hospitalised patients, 37% (19/51) died while all four outpatients recovered. Risk factors for severe disease or mortality were similar to those in other published cohorts. Raised C-reactive protein at diagnosis predicted an aggressive clinical course. The majority of patients recovered from COVID-19, despite receiving recent SACT. This suggests that SACT, where urgent, should be administered despite intercurrent COVID-19 infection, which should be managed according to standard pathways. Delay or modification of therapy should be considered on an individual basis. Long-term follow-up studies in larger patient cohorts are required to assess the efficacy of treatment strategies employed during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , Hematologic Diseases/complications , Immunotherapy , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antineoplastic Agents/administration & dosage , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Comorbidity , Cross Infection/complications , Female , Hematologic Diseases/drug therapy , Hematologic Diseases/mortality , Hematologic Diseases/therapy , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation , Humans , Leukemia/complications , Leukemia/drug therapy , Leukemia/mortality , London/epidemiology , Lymphoma/complications , Lymphoma/drug therapy , Lymphoma/mortality , Male , Middle Aged , Respiration, Artificial , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombophilia/drug therapy , Thrombophilia/etiology , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
20.
Oncol Nurs Forum ; 47(6): 629-630, 2020 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-874113

ABSTRACT

Infusion of antineoplastic medications in nontraditional settings, including the home, is not a new concept. However, the emergence of the novel coronavirus, COVID-19, has accelerated conversations around ensuring that patients with cancer can continue timely cancer treatment regimens while minimizing their risk of COVID-19 exposure and infection. Administration of antineoplastics through home infusion has been offered as a potential solution and continues to gain momentum among healthcare facilities and third-party payers.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents/administration & dosage , Home Infusion Therapy/nursing , Neoplasms/drug therapy , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Oncology Nursing , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Risk , Societies, Nursing , United States/epidemiology
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