Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 156
Filter
1.
Intern Med ; 61(8): 1219-1223, 2022 Apr 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2089579

ABSTRACT

A 44-year-old man developed coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pneumonia during immunochemotherapy consisting of carboplatin, paclitaxel, and pembrolizumab for non-small cell lung cancer. Low-grade fever, followed by mild hypoxemia, and febrile neutropenia, were observed, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) was administered until the recovery of neutropenia, when he developed a high fever, severe hypoxemia, and hypotension accompanied by consolidation in the bilateral lungs. His conditions promptly improved after treatment including hydrocortisone and the primary and metastatic tumors remained regressed for 10 months without further treatment. Post-COVID-19 organizing pneumonia during cancer immunochemotherapy can be aggravated by immune-checkpoint inhibitors and G-CSF.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung , Lung Neoplasms , Adult , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/adverse effects , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/drug therapy , Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor/therapeutic use , Humans , Hypoxia/drug therapy , Lung Neoplasms/complications , Lung Neoplasms/drug therapy , Male
2.
Am J Case Rep ; 23: e937500, 2022 Sep 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2056389

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND Diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common subtype of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). While bone marrow (BM) involvement is common in lymphoma, primary bone marrow (PBM) DLBCL is extremely rare. We present a case of PBM DLBCL discovered in a patient with COVID-19. CASE REPORT An 80-year-old man presented with generalized abdominal pain, weight loss, fever, fatigue, anorexia, and watery diarrhea over a 3-month period. Physical examination was unremarkable. Laboratory workup revealed anemia, thrombocytopenia, and elevated inflammation markers. SARS-COV-2 PCR was positive, while blood cultures were negative. A rapid decline in the white blood cell count in the following days prompted a BM biopsy, confirming the diagnosis of PBM DLBCL. Computed tomography (CT) did not show thoracic or abdominal lymphadenopathy. The patient received packed red blood cell and platelet transfusions, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) for pancytopenia, and empirical antibiotics for suspected infection. Due to active COVID-19 and advanced age, cytotoxic chemotherapy was delayed. Rituximab and prednisone were initiated on day 9, followed by an infusion reaction, which led to treatment discontinuation. He died 2 days later. CONCLUSIONS Diagnosing PBM malignancy is challenging, especially with coexisting infection. It is essential to suspect underlying BM malignancy in patients with clinical deterioration and worsening pancytopenia despite adequate treatment. The diagnosis of PBM DLBCL requires the absence of lymphadenopathy, and the presence of histologically confirmed DLBCL. Prompt management with combination chemotherapy with rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (R-CHOP) with/without hematopoietic stem cell transplant can improve the prognosis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lymphadenopathy , Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse , Pancytopenia , Aged, 80 and over , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/therapeutic use , Bone Marrow/pathology , COVID-19/complications , Cyclophosphamide/therapeutic use , Doxorubicin/therapeutic use , Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor/therapeutic use , Humans , Lymphadenopathy/pathology , Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse/complications , Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse/diagnosis , Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse/therapy , Male , Pancytopenia/etiology , Prednisone/therapeutic use , Rituximab/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Vincristine/therapeutic use
3.
Ter Arkh ; 94(7): 827-835, 2022 Aug 12.
Article in Russian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2044341

ABSTRACT

AIM: The primary objective of the interim analysis of the MULTISPECT study was to evaluate the short-term efficacy of the treatment and long-term outcomes in cohorts of primary and pretreated patients with multiple myeloma (MM) receiving treatment in actual clinical practice in various regions of the Russian Federation. Secondary objectives were a description of the main characteristics of patients; analysis of the most commonly used therapy regimens of the 1st and later lines and the sequence of their changes; evaluation of the response to therapy. Additional objectives included evaluation of the effect of the new COVID-19 coronavirus infection on the course of MM in patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study is an observational retrospective-prospective multicenter cohort study. For its implementation, a structured database of patients with MM was used, provided by hematologists of the centers affiliated for the study. RESULTS: The study included 1,294 patients (cohort 1 806, cohort 2 488). In both cohorts, patients aged 6069 years were in the majority. 3 lines of therapy (L1, L2, L3) were used for cohort 1; in cohort 2, the 4th line of therapy was also used in 2 patients. The therapy regimens were analyzed for 290 (22.41%) of all patients in the study. Responses to therapy were analyzed for 214 patients of cohort 1 and 109 patients of cohort 2. Autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantations were carried out for a limited proportion of patients in both cohorts. At the end of the study and upon presentation of its results, the status of patients was the following: 96% of patients in cohort 1 and 89% in cohort 2 were alive. The therapy regimens in both cohorts were characterized by variability. The most commonly used regimens in each of the lines of therapy have been identified. The most used therapy regimen in patients with MM of both cohorts was the VCD-regime. Rd-regime in cohort 1 and RD-regime in cohort 2 were the second most frequent used regimens. In patients of both cohorts, the therapy regimens including Bortezomib were most often used. CONCLUSION: The variety of therapy regimens used to treat MM in actual clinical practice may be due to the factors of availability of new medicines and updated recommendations for the treatment of the disease. Further, in the context of this study, a more detailed analysis of the efficacy of certain therapy regimens in the 1st and later lines on progression free survival and overall survival of MM patients should be carried out.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation , Multiple Myeloma , Humans , Multiple Myeloma/diagnosis , Multiple Myeloma/epidemiology , Multiple Myeloma/therapy , Bortezomib/therapeutic use , Retrospective Studies , Cohort Studies , Prospective Studies , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/therapeutic use , COVID-19/therapy , Transplantation, Autologous/methods , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Treatment Outcome , Disease-Free Survival
4.
J Clin Oncol ; 40(25): 2946-2956, 2022 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2043160

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Combining standard of care (pertuzumab-trastuzumab [PH], chemotherapy) with cancer immunotherapy may potentiate antitumor immunity, cytotoxic activity, and patient outcomes in high-risk, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive early breast cancer. We report the phase III IMpassion050 primary analysis of neoadjuvant atezolizumab, PH, and chemotherapy in these patients. METHODS: Patients with a primary tumor of > 2 cm and histologically confirmed, positive lymph node status (T2-4, N1-3, M0) were randomly assigned 1:1 to atezolizumab/placebo with dose-dense doxorubicin/cyclophosphamide, followed by paclitaxel, and PH. After surgery, patients were to continue atezolizumab/placebo and PH (total: 1 year of HER2-targeted therapy); those with residual disease could switch to ado-trastuzumab emtansine with atezolizumab/placebo. Coprimary efficacy end points were pathologic complete response (pCR; ypT0/is ypN0) rates in intention-to-treat (ITT) and programmed cell death-ligand 1 (PD-L1)-positive populations. RESULTS: At clinical cutoff (February 5, 2021), pCR rates in the placebo and atezolizumab groups in the ITT populations were 62.7% (n = 143/228) and 62.4% (n = 141/226), respectively (difference -0.33%; 95% CI, -9.2 to 8.6; P = .9551). The pCR rates in the placebo and atezolizumab groups in patients with PD-L1-positive tumors were 72.5% (n = 79/109) and 64.2% (n = 70/109), respectively (difference -8.26%; 95% CI, -20.6 to 4.0; P = .1846). Grade 3-4 and serious adverse events were more frequent in the atezolizumab versus placebo group. Five grade 5 adverse events occurred (four neoadjuvant, one adjuvant; two assigned to study treatment), all with atezolizumab. Overall, the safety profile was consistent with that of atezolizumab in other combination studies. CONCLUSION: Atezolizumab with neoadjuvant dose-dense doxorubicin/cyclophosphamide-paclitaxel and PH for high-risk, HER2-positive early breast cancer did not increase pCR rates versus placebo in the ITT or PD-L1-positive populations. PH and chemotherapy remains standard of care; longer follow-up may help to inform the long-term impact of atezolizumab.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , Neoadjuvant Therapy , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/adverse effects , B7-H1 Antigen/therapeutic use , Breast Neoplasms/pathology , Cyclophosphamide , Doxorubicin , Female , Humans , Neoadjuvant Therapy/adverse effects , Paclitaxel , Receptor, ErbB-2/metabolism , Trastuzumab , Treatment Outcome
5.
N Engl J Med ; 387(6): 495-505, 2022 08 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2031919

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Teclistamab is a T-cell-redirecting bispecific antibody that targets both CD3 expressed on the surface of T cells and B-cell maturation antigen expressed on the surface of myeloma cells. In the phase 1 dose-defining portion of the study, teclistamab showed promising efficacy in patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma. METHODS: In this phase 1-2 study, we enrolled patients who had relapsed or refractory myeloma after at least three therapy lines, including triple-class exposure to an immunomodulatory drug, a proteasome inhibitor, and an anti-CD38 antibody. Patients received a weekly subcutaneous injection of teclistamab (at a dose of 1.5 mg per kilogram of body weight) after receiving step-up doses of 0.06 mg and 0.3 mg per kilogram. The primary end point was the overall response (partial response or better). RESULTS: Among 165 patients who received teclistamab, 77.6% had triple-class refractory disease (median, five previous therapy lines). With a median follow-up of 14.1 months, the overall response rate was 63.0%, with 65 patients (39.4%) having a complete response or better. A total of 44 patients (26.7%) were found to have no minimal residual disease (MRD); the MRD-negativity rate among the patients with a complete response or better was 46%. The median duration of response was 18.4 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 14.9 to not estimable). The median duration of progression-free survival was 11.3 months (95% CI, 8.8 to 17.1). Common adverse events included cytokine release syndrome (in 72.1% of the patients; grade 3, 0.6%; no grade 4), neutropenia (in 70.9%; grade 3 or 4, 64.2%), anemia (in 52.1%; grade 3 or 4, 37.0%), and thrombocytopenia (in 40.0%; grade 3 or 4, 21.2%). Infections were frequent (in 76.4%; grade 3 or 4, 44.8%). Neurotoxic events occurred in 24 patients (14.5%), including immune effector cell-associated neurotoxicity syndrome in 5 patients (3.0%; all grade 1 or 2). CONCLUSIONS: Teclistamab resulted in a high rate of deep and durable response in patients with triple-class-exposed relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma. Cytopenias and infections were common; toxic effects that were consistent with T-cell redirection were mostly grade 1 or 2. (Funded by Janssen Research and Development; MajesTEC-1 ClinicalTrials.gov numbers, NCT03145181 and NCT04557098.).


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Bispecific , Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological , B-Cell Maturation Antigen , CD3 Complex , Multiple Myeloma , Antibodies, Bispecific/administration & dosage , Antibodies, Bispecific/adverse effects , Antibodies, Bispecific/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/administration & dosage , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/adverse effects , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Antineoplastic Agents/administration & dosage , Antineoplastic Agents/adverse effects , Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use , Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological/administration & dosage , Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological/adverse effects , Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological/therapeutic use , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/adverse effects , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/therapeutic use , B-Cell Maturation Antigen/antagonists & inhibitors , CD3 Complex/antagonists & inhibitors , Humans , Injections, Subcutaneous , Multiple Myeloma/drug therapy , Multiple Myeloma/immunology , Multiple Myeloma/pathology , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/drug therapy , Recurrence , T-Lymphocytes/drug effects , T-Lymphocytes/immunology
7.
J Surg Oncol ; 126(8): 1375-1382, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2013659

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) is a complex treatment used in selected patients with peritoneal surface malignancies. HIPEC procedures are time and resource intensive. The primary aim of this analysis was to compare the experience of treating advanced abdominal tumors with CRS-HIPEC before and during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. METHODS: Patients included in this analysis received CRS-HIPEC at a single center during either a prepandemic (March 18, 2019-March 17, 2020) or pandemic (March 18, 2020-February 5, 2021) interval. A retrospective chart review was performed. RESULTS: Our analysis included 67 patients: 30 (45%) treated prepandemic and 37 (55%) treated during the pandemic. Median age at the time of operation was 58 years (interquartile range: [49-65]); 53% of patients were women. Patients treated during the pandemic presented with higher peritoneal cancer index (PCI) scores with 32% (n = 12) having a PCI > 20 at the time of surgery (p = 0.01). Five patients had delays in surgery due to the pandemic. Rates of overall postoperative morbidity, reoperation, and readmission were not different between the cohorts. CONCLUSIONS: Despite presenting with more extensive disease, patients treated with CRS-HIPEC during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic had comparable perioperative outcomes to patients treated prepandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hyperthermia, Induced , Peritoneal Neoplasms , Humans , Female , Middle Aged , Male , Cytoreduction Surgical Procedures/adverse effects , Peritoneal Neoplasms/pathology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy , Chemotherapy, Cancer, Regional Perfusion/methods , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Feasibility Studies , Hyperthermia, Induced/adverse effects , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/therapeutic use , Survival Rate , Combined Modality Therapy
8.
Am J Case Rep ; 23: e936536, 2022 Aug 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2010499

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND Atezolizumab is an immune checkpoint inhibitor used as first-line treatment with carboplatin and etoposide chemotherapy for advanced small cell lung cancer. Immunochemotherapy treatment decisions can be affected by patients' physical ability. Because of the exclusion of patients with an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Performance Status (ECOG PS) ≥2 from clinical trials, treatment outcome evidence in this group is limited. CASE REPORT We present the case of a 75-year-old woman with an ECOG PS of 2 admitted with respiratory symptoms and diagnosed with advanced small-cell lung cancer. After managing exacerbation of COPD and decompensated heart failure, atezolizumab with carboplatin and etoposide was administered. After 2 cycles of immunochemotherapy, deterioration of health was observed, including anemia and thrombocytopenia. Because of the good response in imaging tests and restored balance of the patient condition, immunochemotherapy was continued. After 4 cycles of combined treatment, complete regression was achieved. No another adverse effects were observed. The patient was qualified for maintenance therapy with atezolizumab. In follow-up CT scan after 2 cycles of atezolizumab, progression was observed and patient was qualified for second-line treatment. CONCLUSIONS This report presents the case of an older patient with advanced small cell lung cancer and an ECOG status of 2 who responded to combined immunochemotherapy with atezolizumab, etoposide, and carboplatin. Adverse effects observed during immunotherapy were not a reason for discontinuation of the therapy. The assessment of the effectiveness of immunotherapy in patients with ECOG PS ³2 is difficult owing to the insufficient representation of this group in clinical trials.


Subject(s)
Lung Neoplasms , Small Cell Lung Carcinoma , Aged , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/therapeutic use , Carboplatin/therapeutic use , Etoposide/therapeutic use , Female , Group Processes , Humans , Immunotherapy , Lung Neoplasms/drug therapy , Small Cell Lung Carcinoma/drug therapy , Smokers
10.
Intern Med ; 61(16): 2523-2526, 2022 Aug 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1993647

ABSTRACT

A patient with follicular lymphoma treated with obinutuzumab and bendamustine experienced prolonged coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19). One month after the symptoms transiently improved, the patient experienced exacerbated COVID-19 symptoms. The patient recovered from COVID-19 with remdesivir and dexamethasone and was discharged 77 days after the disease onset. The patient completed a primary series of SARS-CoV-2 vaccinations on day 176, but the anti-spike protein IgG was not detected later. A careful observation to detect any subsequent relapse of COVID-19 symptoms is necessary in immunocompromised patients. Chemotherapy should be based on the disease status and type of lymphoma.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lymphoma, Follicular , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/adverse effects , Bendamustine Hydrochloride/therapeutic use , Humans , Immunocompromised Host , Lymphoma, Follicular/complications , Lymphoma, Follicular/drug therapy , Rituximab/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2
11.
N Engl J Med ; 386(26): 2482-2494, 2022 06 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1984509

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Ibrutinib, a Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitor, may have clinical benefit when administered in combination with bendamustine and rituximab and followed by rituximab maintenance therapy in older patients with untreated mantle-cell lymphoma. METHODS: We randomly assigned patients 65 years of age or older to receive ibrutinib (560 mg, administered orally once daily until disease progression or unacceptable toxic effects) or placebo, plus six cycles of bendamustine (90 mg per square meter of body-surface area) and rituximab (375 mg per square meter). Patients with an objective response (complete or partial response) received rituximab maintenance therapy, administered every 8 weeks for up to 12 additional doses. The primary end point was progression-free survival as assessed by the investigators. Overall survival and safety were also assessed. RESULTS: Among 523 patients, 261 were randomly assigned to receive ibrutinib and 262 to receive placebo. At a median follow-up of 84.7 months, the median progression-free survival was 80.6 months in the ibrutinib group and 52.9 months in the placebo group (hazard ratio for disease progression or death, 0.75; 95% confidence interval, 0.59 to 0.96; P = 0.01). The percentage of patients with a complete response was 65.5% in the ibrutinib group and 57.6% in the placebo group (P = 0.06). Overall survival was similar in the two groups. The incidence of grade 3 or 4 adverse events during treatment was 81.5% in the ibrutinib group and 77.3% in the placebo group. CONCLUSIONS: Ibrutinib treatment in combination with standard chemoimmunotherapy significantly prolonged progression-free survival. The safety profile of the combined therapy was consistent with the known profiles of the individual drugs. (Funded by Janssen Research and Development and Pharmacyclics; SHINE ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01776840.).


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols , Lymphoma, Mantle-Cell , Adenine/administration & dosage , Adenine/analogs & derivatives , Aged , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/adverse effects , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/therapeutic use , Bendamustine Hydrochloride/administration & dosage , Bendamustine Hydrochloride/adverse effects , Disease Progression , Humans , Lymphoma, Mantle-Cell/drug therapy , Lymphoma, Mantle-Cell/mortality , Maintenance Chemotherapy , Piperidines/administration & dosage , Piperidines/adverse effects , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/administration & dosage , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/adverse effects , Pyrazoles/administration & dosage , Pyrazoles/adverse effects , Pyrimidines/administration & dosage , Pyrimidines/adverse effects , Remission Induction , Rituximab/administration & dosage , Rituximab/adverse effects , Survival Analysis
13.
BMJ Open ; 12(8): e051324, 2022 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1973838

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Up to one-fifth of patients with colorectal cancer will develop peritoneal metastases, frequently without other districts' involvement. Despite the recent unsuccesses of hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) for colorectal cancer peritoneal metastases treatment, the rationale in the prophylactic setting remains strong. Several clinical and pharmacokinetic data suggest that the efficacy of intraperitoneal chemotherapy is highest when the disease is microscopic. However, robust evidence demonstrating whether the addition of HIPEC for high-risk colorectal cancers offers better control of local recurrence is lacking. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This is a multicentre randomised phase 3 trial comparing prophylactic surgery plus HIPEC CO2 with mitomycin, over standard surgical excision in patients with colorectal cancer at high risk of peritoneal carcinomatosis; 388 patients will be included in this study. The primary objective is to compare the efficacy of prophylactic surgery (radical colorectal resection, omentectomy, appendectomy, round ligament of the liver resection and bilateral adnexectomy) plus HIPEC CO2 with mitomycin and standard surgery in terms of local recurrence-free survival. The main secondary endpoints are disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS) and safety. The primary endpoint will be described with a cumulative incidence function and will be analysed with Grey test to take account of the competing risks. DFS and OS will be described with the Kaplan-Meier method. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This trial has been evaluated by the Italian Medicines Agency, local ethics committees and will be submitted to the Ministry of Health to notify the start of the trial according to the regulation of trials on devices with CE mark/certification.The results will be submitted for presentation at academic meetings and for publication in a peer-reviewed journal, whatever the findings. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT03914820.


Subject(s)
Colorectal Neoplasms , Hyperthermia, Induced , Peritoneal Neoplasms , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/therapeutic use , Carbon Dioxide , Clinical Trials, Phase III as Topic , Colorectal Neoplasms/drug therapy , Combined Modality Therapy , Cytoreduction Surgical Procedures/methods , Female , Humans , Hyperthermia, Induced/methods , Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy , Mitomycins/therapeutic use , Multicenter Studies as Topic , Peritoneal Neoplasms/secondary , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
14.
Br J Haematol ; 198(2): 288-297, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1968069

ABSTRACT

Treatment of patients with resistant/refractory multiple myeloma (MM) is an unmet need. In this phase II study, we evaluated the role of bendamustine, pomalidomide and dexamethasone combination in this setting. Between February 2020 and December 2021, 28 patients were recruited. Patients received bendamustine 120 mg/m2 day 1, pomalidomide 3 mg days 1-21, and dexamethasone 40 mg days 1, 8, 11, 22, regimen given for a maximum of six cycles. The median (range) age of the patients was 54 (30-76) years and 15 (53.6%) were males. Patients had received a median (range) of three (two-six) prior lines and 85.7% were refractory to both lenalidomide and bortezomib. The primary end-point was the overall response rate (ORR) defined as ≥partial response after at least three cycles. Secondary objectives were toxicity, progression-free survival (PFS), time to progression and overall survival (OS). An intent-to-treat analysis was done. An ORR of 57.6% was achieved. Patients with extramedullary myeloma had a better response rate. At a median follow-up of 8.6 months, the median PFS and OS were 6.2 and 9.7 months respectively. Toxicity was manageable; mainly haematological (neutropenia, 46.4%; anaemia, 42.8%; and thrombocytopenia, 7.1%). Bendamustine, pomalidomide and dexamethasone could be a novel combination for the heavily pretreated, lenalidomide-refractory myeloma population.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols , Multiple Myeloma , Adult , Aged , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/toxicity , Bendamustine Hydrochloride/therapeutic use , Dexamethasone/therapeutic use , Female , Humans , Lenalidomide/therapeutic use , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Myeloma/drug therapy , Thalidomide/analogs & derivatives , Thalidomide/therapeutic use
15.
Thorac Cancer ; 13(18): 2654-2658, 2022 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1968050

ABSTRACT

Cancer patients are considered highly susceptible to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. However, it is not well known when chemotherapy can be safely restarted in cancer patients after coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Here, we describe the case of an 18-year-old man diagnosed with primary mediastinal nonseminomatous germ cell tumor (PMNSGCT) in which chemotherapy could be safely restarted after COVID-19. On day 11 of the third cycle of bleomycin, etoposide, plus cisplatin (BEP), he was diagnosed with mild COVID-19. On day 16 after the onset of COVID-19 (day 26 of third cycle of BEP), chemotherapy for his PMNSGCT was restarted. He received surgery after the fourth cycle of BEP without recurrence of COVID-19. Chemotherapy could be restarted and followed by surgery in this post-COVID-19 patient who had experienced mild illness after the discharge criteria were met and all symptoms had disappeared. We report this case with a review of the literature on restarting chemotherapy after SARS-CoV2 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/therapeutic use , Bleomycin/therapeutic use , Cisplatin/therapeutic use , Etoposide/therapeutic use , Humans , Male , Neoplasms, Germ Cell and Embryonal , RNA, Viral , SARS-CoV-2 , Testicular Neoplasms
16.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 101(30): e29281, 2022 Jul 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1967934

ABSTRACT

RATIONALE: Germ cell tumors in the head and neck are very rare. In cases of germ cell tumors, it is uncommon for lymph node metastasis to be the only and initial symptom, and this can easily lead to a misdiagnosis. Herein, we report about a 28-year-old woman with lymph node metastasis, in whom a primary tumor appeared in the nasal cavity. PATIENT CONCERNS: A 28-year-old woman presented with enlarged left submandibular lymph nodes. No other mass was found on whole-body screening using positron emission tomography-computed tomography. DIAGNOSIS: After partial submandibular lymphadenectomy was performed, histopathological and immunohistochemical examinations revealed a metastatic germ cell tumor. However, it was difficult to further classify and affirm the origin. INTERVENTIONS: As the patient was receiving four cycles of bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin chemotherapy, a primary tumor emerged in the nasal cavity, which was finally confirmed as an immature teratoma of a high World Health Organization histological grade and Norris grade 3. This tumor was found to contain similar components to lymph nodes with respect to histopathological and immunohistochemical characteristics, especially the immature neural tubes or nervous tissue in the nasal cavity. Fortunately, the patient recovered well with no signs of relapse, and the size of residual lymph nodes remained unchanged after she received another four cycles of bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin chemotherapy and two cycles of doxorubicin and ifosfamide (AI) chemotherapy. OUTCOMES: Unfortunately, 11 months later, during the coronavirus disease pandemic, the patient died owing to respiratory failure and pulmonary infection. CONCLUSIONS: In cases of malignant tumor in the submandibular lymph nodes of adults, the metastasis of a germ cell tumor should be considered an important differential diagnosis even if a primary tumor does not emerge. In this case, adequate postoperative chemotherapy is necessary.


Subject(s)
Neoplasms, Germ Cell and Embryonal , Testicular Neoplasms , Adult , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/therapeutic use , Bleomycin/therapeutic use , Cisplatin/therapeutic use , Etoposide/therapeutic use , Female , Humans , Lymph Node Excision , Lymphatic Metastasis , Male , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/drug therapy , Neoplasms, Germ Cell and Embryonal/drug therapy , Neoplasms, Germ Cell and Embryonal/therapy , Testicular Neoplasms/pathology
17.
Lancet Oncol ; 23(8): 1031-1043, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1926992

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Zanubrutinib is a next-generation, selective Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitor with efficacy in relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL). We compared zanubrutinib with bendamustine-rituximab to determine its effectiveness as frontline therapy in patients with CLL or SLL. METHODS: We conducted an open-label, multicentre, phase 3 study at 153 academic or community hospitals in 14 countries and regions. Eligible patients had untreated CLL or SLL requiring treatment as per International Workshop on CLL criteria; were aged 65 years or older, or 18 years or older and had comorbidities; and had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status score of 0-2. A central interactive web response system randomly assigned patients without del(17)(p13·1) to zanubrutinib (group A) or bendamustine-rituximab (group B) by sequential block method (permutated blocks with a random block size of four). Patients with del(17)(p13·1) were enrolled in group C and received zanubrutinib. Zanubrutinib was administered orally at 160 mg twice per day (28-day cycles); bendamustine at 90 mg/m2 of body surface area on days 1 and 2 for six cycles plus rituximab at 375 mg/m2 of body surface area the day before or on day 1 of cycle 1, and 500 mg/m2 of body surface area on day 1 of cycles 2-6, were administered intravenously. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival per independent review committee in the intention-to-treat population in groups A and B, with minimum two-sided α of 0·05 for superiority. Safety was analysed in all patients who received at least one dose of study treatment. The study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT03336333, and is closed to recruitment. FINDINGS: Between Oct 31, 2017, and July 22, 2019, 590 patients were enrolled; patients without del(17)(p13·1) were randomly assigned to zanubrutinib (group A; n=241) or bendamustine-rituximab (group B; n=238). At median follow-up of 26·2 months (IQR 23·7-29·6), median progression-free survival per independent review committee was not reached in either group (group A 95% CI not estimable [NE] to NE; group B 28·1 months to NE). Progression-free survival was significantly improved in group A versus group B (HR 0·42 [95% CI 0·28 to 0·63]; two-sided p<0·0001). The most common grade 3 or worse adverse event was neutropenia (27 [11%] of 240 patients in group A, 116 [51%] of 227 in group B, and 17 [15%] of 111 patients in group C). Serious adverse events occurred in 88 (37%) of 240 patients in group A, 113 (50%) of 227 patients in group B, and 45 (41%) of 111 patients in group C. Adverse events leading to death occurred in 11 (5%) of 240 patients in group A, 12 (5%) of 227 patients in group B, and three (3%) of 111 patients in group C, most commonly due to COVID-19 (four [2%] of 240 patients in group A), diarrhoea, and aspiration pneumonia (two each [1%] of 227 patients in group B). INTERPRETATION: Zanubrutinib significantly improved progression-free survival versus bendamustine-rituximab, with an acceptable safety profile consistent with previous studies. These data support zanubrutinib as a potential new treatment option for untreated CLL and SLL. FUNDING: BeiGene.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Chronic, B-Cell , Sequoia , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/adverse effects , Bendamustine Hydrochloride , Humans , Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Chronic, B-Cell/drug therapy , Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Chronic, B-Cell/pathology , Piperidines , Pyrazoles , Pyrimidines , Rituximab
18.
Lancet Oncol ; 23(8): 1078-1086, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1915191

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Most kidney transplant recipients with cancer stop or reduce immunosuppressive therapy before starting treatment with an immune checkpoint inhibitor, and approximately 40% of such patients will develop allograft rejection. Isolated immunosuppression reduction might be associated with organ rejection. Whether immunosuppression manipulation, immune checkpoint inhibition, or both, induce organ rejection is difficult to ascertain. The aim of this study was to examine the risk of allograft rejection with immune checkpoint inhibitor exposure when baseline immunosuppression was left unchanged. METHODS: We conducted a multicentre, single-arm, phase 1 study in three hospitals in Australia. Kidney transplant recipients aged 18 years or older with incurable, locally advanced cancer or defined metastatic solid tumours were eligible if they had a creatinine concentration of less than 180 mmol/L, no or low concentrations of donor-specific HLA antibodies, and an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group status of 0-2. Patients received standard doses of nivolumab (3 mg/kg intravenously every 14 days for five cycles, then 480 mg every 28 days for up to 2 years). The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients with irretrievable allograft rejection and no evidence of tumour response. Primary outcome analyses and safety analyses were done in the modified intention-to-treat population. This trial is registered with the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register, ANZCTR12617000741381, and is completed. FINDINGS: Between May 31, 2017, and Aug 6, 2021, 22 kidney transplant recipients with various solid tumours were screened and enrolled, four of whom chose not to proceed in the study and one of whom had unexpected disease progression. 17 patients (six [35%] women and 11 [65%] men; median age 67 years [IQR 59-71]) were allocated treatment with nivolumab and were included in the analyses. The trial was then stopped due to ongoing difficulties with running clinical trials during COVID-19 health restrictions. Patients were treated with a median of three infusions (IQR 2-10) and median follow-up was 28 months (IQR 16-34). No patients had irretrievable allograft rejection without evidence of tumour response. There were no treatment-related deaths or treatment-related serious adverse events. The most common grade 3 or grade 4 adverse events were decreased lymphocyte count in four (24%) patients, fever or infection in four (24%) patients, decreased haemoglobin in three (18%) patients, and increased creatinine in three (18%) patients. INTERPRETATION: Maintaining baseline immunosuppression before treatment with an immune checkpoint inhibitor in kidney transplant recipients might not affect expected efficacy and might reduce the risk of allograft rejection mediated by immune checkpoint inhibitors. FUNDING: Bristol Myers Squibb.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Kidney Transplantation , Aged , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/therapeutic use , Australia , Creatinine , Female , Humans , Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors/adverse effects , Kidney Transplantation/adverse effects , Male , Nivolumab
19.
Comput Math Methods Med ; 2022: 5430720, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1902135

ABSTRACT

Background: Over the last few years, the role of PDL1/PD-1 in pancreatic cancer development has received increasing attention, and this article is aimed at opening up new ideas for the medicine-based treatment of pancreatic cancer. Aims: To investigate the efficacy and safety of PDL1/PD-1 inhibitors versus FOLFIRINOX regimen in the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer and its impact on patient survival and to provide a reference basis for clinical treatment of pancreatic cancer. Materials and Methods: The 116 pancreatic cancer patients treated in our hospital from September 2019 to September 2021 were selected and divided into 58 cases each in the (instance of watching, noticing, or making a statement) group and the comparison group according to the method based on random number table. The comparison group was treated with FOLFIRINOX, and the group was treated with PDL1/PD-1 stopper. The effectiveness, safety, and hit/effect on survival of the patients in the two groups were compared. Results: The median chemotherapy cycle for all patients was 4 (1-6), and the combined objective remission rate (0RR) was 36% and the disease control rate (DCR) was 80% after no chemotherapy in 116 patients, with 37.5% 0RR and 81.3% DCR in the observation group and 33.3% 0RR and 77.8% DCR in the comparison group. The greatest number of all patients reached SD, 44%; in the observation group, 43.8%; and in the comparison group, 44.5%. The rate of adverse reactions such as hematological toxicity, neutropenia, anemia, thrombocytopenia, nonhematological toxicity, vomiting, fatigue, infection, diarrhea, intestinal obstruction, and peripheral neuropathy was lower in 10.3% of patients in the observation group than in 25.8% of patients in the comparison group, which was significantly different by χ 2 test (P < 0.05). The median progression-free survival curve of the two groups was 19 months in the comparison group and 22 months in the observation group. The progression-free survival in the observation group was significantly higher than that in the comparison group, and there was a statistically significant difference between the two groups (P < 0.05). Conclusion: PDL1/PD-1 inhibitors in combination with FOLFIRINOX regimens have shown longer survival than treatment with FOLFIRINOX regimens for pancreatic cancer patients, with reliable clinical efficacy, tolerable adverse effects, and a high safety profile for patients.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols , Pancreatic Neoplasms , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/therapeutic use , Fluorouracil , Humans , Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors , Irinotecan , Leucovorin , Oxaliplatin , Pancreatic Neoplasms/drug therapy , Programmed Cell Death 1 Receptor
20.
Cancer Sci ; 113(5): 1763-1770, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1901629

ABSTRACT

Pegfilgrastim, a pegylated form of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, has reduced the risk of developing febrile neutropenia, which is associated with an increase in severe infection and prolonged hospitalization. However, pegfilgrastim administration requires that patients visit hospital following cancer chemotherapy, thus imposing a burden on patients and those around them. An on-body injector (OBI), which automatically administers pegfilgrastim about 27 hours after chemotherapy, was used in this study. The OBI, which consists of a main pump unit and infusion set, is a drug delivery device designed to be attached to the patient's body, with a timer-controlled dosing function. This study was conducted in breast cancer patients to evaluate the safety of pegfilgrastim administered subcutaneously via the OBI. The study period consisted of screening and treatment observation periods involving four cycles of neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy with docetaxel plus cyclophosphamide. One 3.6-mg pegfilgrastim dose was administered subcutaneously via OBI during each cycle of chemotherapy. The study enrolled 35 patients, and no serious adverse events or febrile neutropenia occurred. Administration of pegfilgrastim was successfully completed at all times when the OBI was attached to the patient, and no safety concerns associated with OBI function arose. For outpatients requiring pegfilgrastim following cancer chemotherapy, the use of an OBI was considered to be a safe option to reduce the need for outpatient visits that restrict their activities of daily living.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , Febrile Neutropenia , Activities of Daily Living , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/adverse effects , Breast Neoplasms/chemically induced , Cyclophosphamide/therapeutic use , Docetaxel/therapeutic use , Febrile Neutropenia/chemically induced , Female , Filgrastim/therapeutic use , Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor , Humans , Polyethylene Glycols/therapeutic use , Recombinant Proteins/adverse effects
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL