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1.
Science ; 373(6561): 1304-1306, 2021 Sep 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1741512
2.
BMJ ; 375: e066588, 2021 12 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1560914

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of remote proactive management of toxicities during chemotherapy for early stage breast cancer. DESIGN: Pragmatic, cluster randomised trial. SETTING: 20 cancer centres in Ontario, Canada, allocated by covariate constrained randomisation to remote management of toxicities or routine care. PARTICIPANTS: All patients starting adjuvant or neoadjuvant chemotherapy for early stage breast cancer at each centre. 25 patients from each centre completed patient reported outcome questionnaires. INTERVENTIONS: Proactive, standardised, nurse led telephone management of common toxicities at two time points after each chemotherapy cycle. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome, cluster level mean number of visits to the emergency department or admissions to hospital per patient during the whole course of chemotherapy treatment, was evaluated with routinely available administrative healthcare data. Secondary patient reported outcomes included toxicity, self-efficacy, and quality of life. RESULTS: Baseline characteristics of participants were similar in the intervention (n=944) and control arms (n=1214); 22% were older than 65 years. Penetration (that is, the percentage of patients who received the intervention at each centre) was 50-86%. Mean number of visits to the emergency department or admissions to hospital per patient was 0.91 (standard deviation 0.28) in the intervention arm and 0.94 (0.40) in the control arm (P=0.94); 47% (1014 of 2158 patients) had at least one visit to the emergency department or a hospital admission during chemotherapy. Among 580 participants who completed the patient reported outcome questionnaires, at least one grade 3 toxicity was reported by 48% (134 of 278 patients) in the intervention arm and by 58% (163 of 283) in the control arm. No differences in self-efficacy, anxiety, or depression were found. Compared with baseline, the functional assessment of cancer therapy trial outcome index decreased by 6.1 and 9.0 points in the intervention and control participants, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Proactive, telephone based management of toxicities during chemotherapy did not result in fewer visits to the emergency department or hospital admissions. With the rapid rise in remote care because of the covid-19 pandemic, identifying scalable strategies for remote management of patients during cancer treatment is particularly relevant. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02485678.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/administration & dosage , Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy , Monitoring, Ambulatory/methods , Outpatients , Telemedicine , Telephone , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/adverse effects , Breast Neoplasms/psychology , COVID-19 , Chemotherapy, Adjuvant/adverse effects , Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Ontario , Pandemics , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Treatment Outcome
3.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(9): e2124766, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1473777

ABSTRACT

Importance: Triplet chemotherapy with fluorouracil, folinic acid, oxaliplatin, and irinotecan plus bevacizumab (FOLFOXIRI-B) is an effective first-line treatment option for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). However, the degree of implementation of FOLFOXIRI-B in daily practice is unknown. Objectives: To evaluate the current adoption rate of FOLFOXIRI-B in patients with mCRC and investigate the perspectives of medical oncologists toward this treatment option. Design, Setting, and Participants: This 1-week, multicenter, cross-sectional study in the Netherlands used a flash mob design, which facilitates ultrafast data generation (flash) through the engagement of numerous researchers (mob). During the study week (March 1-5, 2021), patient data were retrieved from electronic health records of 47 hospitals on patients with mCRC who were referred to a medical oncologist between November 1, 2020, and January 31, 2021. Interviews were simultaneously conducted with 101 medical oncologists from 52 hospitals who regularly treat patients with mCRC. Exposure: First-line systemic treatment as determined by the treating physician. Main Outcomes and Measures: The FOLFOXIRI-B prescription rate was the main outcome. Current practice was compared with prescription rates in 2015 to 2018. Eligibility for treatment with FOLFOXIRI-B was estimated. An exploratory outcome was medical oncologists' reported perspectives on FOLFOXIRI-B. Results: A total of 5948 patients in the Netherlands (median age [interquartile range], 66 [57-73] years; 3503 [59%] male; and 3712 [62%] with left-sided or rectal tumor) were treated with first-line systemic therapy for synchronous mCRC. A total of 282 patients with mCRC underwent systemic therapy during the study period (2021). Of these 282 patients, 199 (71%) were treated with intensive first-line therapy other than FOLFOXIRI-B, of whom 184 (65%) were treated with oxaliplatin doublets with or without bevacizumab; 14 (5%) with irinotecan doublets with or without bevacizumab, panitumumab, or cetuximab; and 1 (0.4%) with irinotecan with bevacizumab. Fifty-four patients (19%) were treated with fluoropyrimidine monotherapy with or without bevacizumab, 1 patient (0.4%) with panitumumab monotherapy, and 3 (1%) with immune checkpoint inhibitors. In total, 25 patients (9%; 95% CI, 6%-12%) were treated with first-line FOLFOXIRI-B compared with 142 (2%; 95% CI, 2%-3%) in 2015 to 2018. During the study period, 21 of 157 eligible patients (13.4%) in the Netherlands were treated with FOLFOXIRI-B. A total of 87 medical oncologists (86%) reported discussing FOLFOXIRI-B as a treatment option with eligible patients. A total of 47 of 85 (55%) generally communicated a preference for a chemotherapy doublet to patients. These oncologists reported a significantly lower awareness of guidelines and trial results. Toxic effects were the most reported reason to prefer an alternative regimen. Conclusions and Relevance: The findings of this study suggest that FOLFOXIRI-B prescription rates have marginally increased in the last 5 years. Considering that most medical oncologists discuss this treatment option, the prescription rate found in this study was below expectations. Awareness of guidelines and trial data seems to contribute to the discussion of available treatment options by medical oncologists, and the findings of this study suggest a need for repeated and continuing medical education.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/administration & dosage , Bevacizumab/administration & dosage , Colorectal Neoplasms/drug therapy , Drug Prescriptions/statistics & numerical data , Medical Oncology/statistics & numerical data , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Fluorouracil/administration & dosage , Humans , Leucovorin/administration & dosage , Male , Middle Aged , Netherlands , Oxaliplatin/administration & dosage , Research Design
4.
Br J Haematol ; 196(3): 548-558, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1467542

ABSTRACT

Patients affected by lymphoid malignancies (LM) are frequently immune-compromised, suffering increased mortality from COVID-19. This prospective study evaluated serological and T-cell responses after complete mRNA vaccination in 263 patients affected by chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, B- and T-cell lymphomas and multiple myeloma. Results were compared with those of 167 healthy subjects matched for age and sex. Overall, patient seroconversion rate was 64·6%: serological response was lower in those receiving anti-cancer treatments in the 12 months before vaccination: 55% vs 81·9% (P < 0·001). Anti-CD20 antibody plus chemotherapy treatment was associated with the lowest seroconversion rate: 17·6% vs. 71·2% (P < 0·001). In the multivariate analysis conducted in the subgroup of patients on active treatment, independent predictors for seroconversion were: anti-CD20 treatment (P < 0·001), aggressive B-cell lymphoma diagnosis (P = 0·002), and immunoglobulin M levels <40 mg/dl (P = 0·030). The T-cell response was evaluated in 99 patients and detected in 85 of them (86%). Of note, 74% of seronegative patients had a T-cell response, but both cellular and humoral responses were absent in 13·1% of cases. Our findings raise some concerns about the protection that patients with LM, particularly those receiving anti-CD20 antibodies, may gain from vaccination. These patients should strictly maintain all the protective measures.


Subject(s)
2019-nCoV Vaccine mRNA-1273/administration & dosage , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/administration & dosage , BNT162 Vaccine/administration & dosage , COVID-19 , Hematologic Neoplasms , Immunity, Cellular/drug effects , Lymphoproliferative Disorders , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , 2019-nCoV Vaccine mRNA-1273/immunology , Aged , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , BNT162 Vaccine/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Female , Hematologic Neoplasms/drug therapy , Hematologic Neoplasms/immunology , Humans , Immunoglobulin M/immunology , Lymphoproliferative Disorders/drug therapy , Lymphoproliferative Disorders/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Seroconversion
5.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 25(16): 5310-5317, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1395678

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has affected the treatment of cancer patients, with particular regard to the management of both chemotherapy and side effects. Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) are amongst the most troublesome side effects that impair patients' adherence to treatments and their quality of life (QoL). NEPA (Akynzeo®), is an oral fixed-dose combination of netupitant [a neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist (NK1RA), 300 mg] and palonosetron [(5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin or 5HT) type3 receptor antagonist (5HT3RA), 0.5 mg] which has been shown to be effective in preventing CINV. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This prospective study started before the outbreak of COVID-19 and was carried out during the pandemic period. The aim was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a single oral dose NEPA plus 12 mg of dexamethasone (DEX) in patients treated with Folfoxiri plus Bevacizumab and Folfirinox. The patients were diagnosed with advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) or advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). They were divided into two groups: naïve patients and patients previously treated with serotonin receptor antagonists (5HT3-RA) and neurokin-1 receptor antagonists (NK1-RA). RESULTS: During the overall phase, the complete response (CR) rate was 96.8% in naïve patients treated with Folfoxiri plus Bevacizumab, and 94.6% in patients treated with Folfirinox. During the acute and delayed phases, the CR rate was 92.8% and 94.2%, with Folfoxiri and Bevacizumab, as well as 96.2% and 94.6%, with Folfirinox. There was no adequate control of CINV events in patients on antiemetic prophylaxis with 5HT3-RA or NK1-RA associated with cortisone. During the overall phase, the CR rate was 74.6% with Folfoxiri plus Bevacizumab and 75.8% with Folfirinox. During the acute and delayed phases, the CR rate was 72.5% and 74.8% with Folfoxiri plus Bevacizumab, as well as 75.2% and 74.6% with Folfirinox. CONCLUSIONS: This study has shown the therapeutic benefits of NEPA in the management and prophylaxis of CINV events, both in naive patients and patients previously treated with 5HT3-RA and NK1-RA. In addition, NEPA has been shown to be safe, both before and during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Antiemetics/therapeutic use , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/therapeutic use , Bevacizumab/therapeutic use , Colorectal Neoplasms/drug therapy , Palonosetron/therapeutic use , Pyridines/therapeutic use , Aged , Antiemetics/administration & dosage , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/administration & dosage , Bevacizumab/administration & dosage , COVID-19 , Female , Fluorouracil/administration & dosage , Fluorouracil/therapeutic use , Humans , Irinotecan/administration & dosage , Irinotecan/therapeutic use , Leucovorin/administration & dosage , Leucovorin/therapeutic use , Male , Middle Aged , Nausea/prevention & control , Oxaliplatin/administration & dosage , Oxaliplatin/therapeutic use , Palonosetron/administration & dosage , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , Pyridines/administration & dosage , Vomiting/prevention & control
7.
Pan Afr Med J ; 39: 117, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1355245

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) represents a major challenge in the management of patients with hematologic malignancies. Individuals with plasma cell dyscrasias, including multiple myeloma, are at increased risk of developing severe disease. Furthermore, immunosuppressant agents, which represent an important component of multiple myeloma treatment, may increase the risk of serious infection; thus, treatment regimens may need to be modified in some patients. The pathogenesis of COVID-19 is incompletely understood and much remains to be established regarding cancer care in the setting of this new global health threat. We report a case of multiple myeloma remission that occurred after a single cycle of chemotherapy in a patient with COVID-19. In addition, we discuss possible mechanisms underlying this surprising observation. The findings warrant further investigation and may have important implications for the management of multiple myeloma and other plasma cell dyscrasias in the age of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/administration & dosage , COVID-19/physiopathology , Multiple Myeloma/drug therapy , Aged , Female , Humans , Multiple Myeloma/pathology , Remission Induction
8.
BMJ ; 374: n1647, 2021 07 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1320441

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate effects of remote monitoring of adjuvant chemotherapy related side effects via the Advanced Symptom Management System (ASyMS) on symptom burden, quality of life, supportive care needs, anxiety, self-efficacy, and work limitations. DESIGN: Multicentre, repeated measures, parallel group, evaluator masked, stratified randomised controlled trial. SETTING: Twelve cancer centres in Austria, Greece, Norway, Republic of Ireland, and UK. PARTICIPANTS: 829 patients with non-metastatic breast cancer, colorectal cancer, Hodgkin's disease, or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma receiving first line adjuvant chemotherapy or chemotherapy for the first time in five years. INTERVENTION: Patients were randomised to ASyMS (intervention; n=415) or standard care (control; n=414) over six cycles of chemotherapy. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome was symptom burden (Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale; MSAS). Secondary outcomes were health related quality of life (Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General; FACT-G), Supportive Care Needs Survey Short-Form (SCNS-SF34), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory-Revised (STAI-R), Communication and Attitudinal Self-Efficacy scale for cancer (CASE-Cancer), and work limitations questionnaire (WLQ). RESULTS: For the intervention group, symptom burden remained at pre-chemotherapy treatment levels, whereas controls reported an increase from cycle 1 onwards (least squares absolute mean difference -0.15, 95% confidence interval -0.19 to -0.12; P<0.001; Cohen's D effect size=0.5). Analysis of MSAS sub-domains indicated significant reductions in favour of ASyMS for global distress index (-0.21, -0.27 to -0.16; P<0.001), psychological symptoms (-0.16, -0.23 to -0.10; P<0.001), and physical symptoms (-0.21, -0.26 to -0.17; P<0.001). FACT-G scores were higher in the intervention group across all cycles (mean difference 4.06, 95% confidence interval 2.65 to 5.46; P<0.001), whereas mean scores for STAI-R trait (-1.15, -1.90 to -0.41; P=0.003) and STAI-R state anxiety (-1.13, -2.06 to -0.20; P=0.02) were lower. CASE-Cancer scores were higher in the intervention group (mean difference 0.81, 0.19 to 1.43; P=0.01), and most SCNS-SF34 domains were lower, including sexuality needs (-1.56, -3.11 to -0.01; P<0.05), patient care and support needs (-1.74, -3.31 to -0.16; P=0.03), and physical and daily living needs (-2.8, -5.0 to -0.6; P=0.01). Other SCNS-SF34 domains and WLQ were not significantly different. Safety of ASyMS was satisfactory. Neutropenic events were higher in the intervention group. CONCLUSIONS: Significant reduction in symptom burden supports the use of ASyMS for remote symptom monitoring in cancer care. A "medium" Cohen's effect size of 0.5 showed a sizable, positive clinical effect of ASyMS on patients' symptom experiences. Remote monitoring systems will be vital for future services, particularly with blended models of care delivery arising from the covid-19 pandemic. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov NCT02356081.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/administration & dosage , Cell Phone , Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions/diagnosis , Quality of Life , Telemedicine/methods , Adult , Aged , Austria , Breast Neoplasms/psychology , Breast Neoplasms/therapy , Chemotherapy, Adjuvant/adverse effects , Colorectal Neoplasms/psychology , Colorectal Neoplasms/therapy , Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions/etiology , Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions/psychology , Female , Greece , Hodgkin Disease/psychology , Hodgkin Disease/therapy , Humans , Ireland , Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin/psychology , Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin/therapy , Male , Middle Aged , Norway , Telemedicine/instrumentation , Treatment Outcome , United Kingdom
10.
Anticancer Res ; 41(4): 2193-2195, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1168334

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIM: Since January 2020, coronavirus disease (COVID-19) cases have been confirmed in Japan, and the number of patients with COVID-19 has been increasing. Two emergency declarations have been made previously and one is currently in effect. Based on our experience of a situation that could affect cancer treatment, this study retrospectively examined the correlation between perioperative anticancer therapy and COVID-19 incidence in patients with breast cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients who underwent perioperative anticancer therapy for breast cancer at our hospital from February 2020 to February 2021 were included in this study. The presence or absence of COVID-19, timing of anticancer drug initiation, and clinical data were collected. RESULTS: No cases of COVID-19 were diagnosed in patients receiving perioperative anticancer therapy at our hospital. CONCLUSION: Regimen modification, active use of supportive care, and patient lifestyle were factors reducing the incidence of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/administration & dosage , Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19/epidemiology , Perioperative Care/methods , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/adverse effects , Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , Breast Neoplasms/pathology , Breast Neoplasms/surgery , Chemotherapy, Adjuvant/statistics & numerical data , Combined Modality Therapy , Female , Humans , Immunocompromised Host , Incidence , Japan/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Neoadjuvant Therapy/statistics & numerical data , Perioperative Care/adverse effects , Perioperative Care/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
11.
Oncoimmunology ; 9(1): 1789284, 2020 07 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066080

ABSTRACT

Amid controversial reports that COVID-19 can be treated with a combination of the antimalarial drug hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) and the antibiotic azithromycin (AZI), a clinical trial (ONCOCOVID, NCT04341207) was launched at Gustave Roussy Cancer Campus to investigate the utility of this combination therapy in cancer patients. In this preclinical study, we investigated whether the combination of HCQ+AZI would be compatible with the therapeutic induction of anticancer immune responses. For this, we used doses of HCQ and AZI that affect whole-body physiology (as indicated by a partial blockade in cardiac and hepatic autophagic flux for HCQ and a reduction in body weight for AZI), showing that their combined administration did not interfere with tumor growth control induced by the immunogenic cell death inducer oxaliplatin. Moreover, the HCQ+AZI combination did not affect the capacity of a curative regimen (cisplatin + crizotinib + PD-1 blockade) to eradicate established orthotopic lung cancers in mice. In conclusion, it appears that HCQ+AZI does not interfere with the therapeutic induction of therapeutic anticancer immune responses.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/administration & dosage , Azithromycin/administration & dosage , COVID-19/drug therapy , Hydroxychloroquine/administration & dosage , Neoplasms/drug therapy , Animals , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/pharmacokinetics , Azithromycin/pharmacokinetics , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Cell Line, Tumor , Cisplatin/administration & dosage , Cisplatin/pharmacokinetics , Clinical Trials, Phase II as Topic , Crizotinib/administration & dosage , Crizotinib/pharmacokinetics , Disease Models, Animal , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical , Drug Interactions , Drug Therapy, Combination/methods , Female , France , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/pharmacokinetics , Mice , Neoplasms/immunology , Oxaliplatin/administration & dosage , Oxaliplatin/pharmacokinetics , Programmed Cell Death 1 Receptor/antagonists & inhibitors , Programmed Cell Death 1 Receptor/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
13.
Recenti Prog Med ; 111(3): 160-166, 2020 Mar.
Article in Italian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-976065

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is a rare but most aggressive form of monoclonal gammopathies, characterized by the presence of clonal cells in peripheral blood and a poor prognosis. There are two forms of PCL: primary, which arise de novo, and secondary which is a leukemic transformation in patients with previously multiple myeloma. Patients with PCL may benefit from stem cell transplantation and novel agents, but their prognosis remains inferior to that of patients who have multiple myeloma. CLINICAL CASE: We describe the case of 53 years old patient with relapsed plasma cells leukemia after unrelated bone marrow transplant, treated with a KRD chemotherapy regimen. He performed a very good response after the first 2 cycles (bone marrow malignant plasma cells reducing from 36% to 0.5%). However, according to the very poor prognosis of this disease, after the 4th cycle of chemotherapy the patient progressed and dead into few weeks. The KRD regimen was able to convert the chimerism after bone marrow transplant from partial to complete after the first 2 cycles of treatment, showing some activity in this disease. CONCLUSIONS: KRD regimen, in our clinical case, showed some activity being well tolerated in a very poor prognosis disease such as PCL. Probably, right use and maybe sooner use of new drugs such as bortezomib or carfilzomib, in combination regimens, may be useful in better treating such disease.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/administration & dosage , Bone Marrow Transplantation , Leukemia, Plasma Cell/drug therapy , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/adverse effects , COVID-19/drug therapy , Dexamethasone/administration & dosage , Disease Progression , Fatal Outcome , Humans , Lenalidomide/administration & dosage , Leukemia, Plasma Cell/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Oligopeptides/administration & dosage , Plasma Cells/pathology , Recurrence
14.
Br J Cancer ; 124(5): 860-861, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-962855

ABSTRACT

Patients with cancer should benefit from COVID-19 vaccination. Some of the most advanced vaccine candidates are mRNAs encapsulated into lipid carriers, and small liposomes are expected to accumulate in tumour tissues through the enhanced and permeation retention effect. However, to what extent solid tumours could take up a significant part of the vaccine dose as well remains unknown. This calls for a careful evaluation of the efficacy of these promising mRNA COVID-19 vaccines administered as lipid carriers for patients with solid tumours, including a possible re-appraisal of the dosing for optimal protection of this specific and frail population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/prevention & control , Drug Carriers , Neoplasms/therapy , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Acceleration , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/administration & dosage , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/therapeutic use , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Drug Carriers/standards , Frailty/epidemiology , Frailty/therapy , Humans , Immunization Programs/standards , Liposomes/administration & dosage , Liposomes/adverse effects , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/immunology , Pandemics , RNA, Messenger/administration & dosage , RNA, Messenger/standards , Time Factors , Vaccination/methods
17.
Ann Hematol ; 99(11): 2589-2598, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-746148

ABSTRACT

The induction therapy containing ixazomib, an oral proteasome inhibitor, has shown favorable efficacy and safety in clinical trials, but its experience in real-life remains limited. In routine practice, few patients received ixazomib-based induction therapy due to reasons including (1) patients' preference on oral regimens, (2) concerns on adverse events (AEs) of other intravenous/subcutaneous regimens, (3) requirements for less center visits, and (4) fears of COVID-19 and other infectious disease exposures. With the aim of assessing the real-life effectiveness and safety of ixazomib-based induction therapy, we performed this multi-center, observational study on 85 newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (NDMM) patients from 14 medical centers. Ixazomib-based regimens included ixazomib-lenalidomide-dexamethasone (IRd) in 44.7% of patients, ixazomib-dexamethasone (Id) in 29.4%, and Id plus another agent (doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, thalidomide, or daratumumab) in 25.9%. Different ixazomib-based therapies were applied due to (1) financial burdens or limitations on local health insurance coverage, (2) concerns on treatment tolerance, and (3) drug accessibility issue. Ten patients received ixazomib maintenance. The median age was 67 years; 43.5% had ISS stage III disease; 48.2% had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance score ≥ 2; and 17.6% with high-risk cytogenetic abnormalities. Overall response rate for all 85 patients was 95.3%, including 65.9% very good partial response or better and 29.5% complete responses. The median time to response was 30 days. The response rate was similar across different ixazomib-based regimens. Median progression-free survival was not reached. Severe AEs (≥ grade 3) were reported in 29.4% of patients. No grade 3/4 peripheral neuropathy (PN) occurred. Patients received a median of 6 (range 1-20) cycles of ixazomib treatment; 56.6% remained on treatment at data cutoff; 15.3% discontinued treatment due to intolerable AEs. These results support that the ixazomib-based frontline therapy was highly effective with acceptable toxicity in routine practice and the ixazomib oral regimens could be good alternative options for NDMM patients.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/administration & dosage , Boron Compounds/administration & dosage , Glycine/analogs & derivatives , Multiple Myeloma/drug therapy , Peripheral Nervous System Diseases/chemically induced , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Antibodies, Monoclonal/administration & dosage , Antibodies, Monoclonal/adverse effects , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/adverse effects , Boron Compounds/adverse effects , Cyclophosphamide/administration & dosage , Cyclophosphamide/adverse effects , Dexamethasone/administration & dosage , Dexamethasone/adverse effects , Doxorubicin/administration & dosage , Doxorubicin/adverse effects , Drug Administration Schedule , Female , Glycine/administration & dosage , Glycine/adverse effects , Humans , Lenalidomide/administration & dosage , Lenalidomide/adverse effects , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Myeloma/mortality , Multiple Myeloma/pathology , Neoplasm Staging , Peripheral Nervous System Diseases/diagnosis , Peripheral Nervous System Diseases/physiopathology , Remission Induction , Survival Analysis , Thalidomide/administration & dosage , Thalidomide/adverse effects , Treatment Outcome
18.
Br J Haematol ; 191(3): 386-389, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-697165

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has dramatically challenged care for cancer patients, especially those with active treatment who represent a vulnerable population for SARS-CoV-2 infection. Aggressive lymphoid neoplasms, such as diffuse large B cell lymphoma and high-grade B cell lymphoma, need to be treated without delay in order to get the best disease outcome. Because of that, our clinical practice was changed to minimise the risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection while continuing haematological treatment. In this report, we analyse the management of front-line therapy in 18 patients during the COVID-19 outbreak, as well as the results of the implemented measures in their outcome.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse/drug therapy , Pandemics , Plasmablastic Lymphoma/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/administration & dosage , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/adverse effects , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Azithromycin/therapeutic use , Bacterial Infections/complications , Bacterial Infections/drug therapy , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Testing , Cyclophosphamide/administration & dosage , Cyclophosphamide/adverse effects , Doxorubicin/administration & dosage , Doxorubicin/adverse effects , Febrile Neutropenia/chemically induced , Febrile Neutropenia/prevention & control , Female , Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor/therapeutic use , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Infection Control/methods , Male , Middle Aged , Prednisone/administration & dosage , Prednisone/adverse effects , Rituximab/administration & dosage , Spain/epidemiology , Superinfection/drug therapy , Vincristine/administration & dosage , Vincristine/adverse effects
19.
Eur J Haematol ; 105(6): 751-754, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-692706

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has emerged as a global pandemic. Cancer patients have been reported to be at higher risk for adverse outcome of COVID-19. Studies are ongoing to decipher the risk factors and risk groups among cancer patients as well as strategies to refine treatment approaches. Here, we report eight patients with multiple myeloma that underwent immunomodulatory therapies with daratumumab or lenalidomide-based combination treatments and one patient with smoldering multiple myeloma, all of which presented with symptomatic COVID-19. We report that patients that succumbed to COVID-19 presented with either progressive tumor disease under daratumumab treatment or were in remission under lenalidomide-dexamethasone treatment.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal/adverse effects , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/adverse effects , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Dexamethasone/adverse effects , Lenalidomide/adverse effects , Multiple Myeloma/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Thalidomide/adverse effects , Antibodies, Monoclonal/administration & dosage , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/administration & dosage , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , Cohort Studies , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Dexamethasone/administration & dosage , Disease Progression , Female , Humans , Immunomodulation , Lenalidomide/administration & dosage , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Myeloma/drug therapy , Multiple Myeloma/immunology , Multiple Myeloma/mortality , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Prognosis , Remission Induction , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Survival Analysis , Thalidomide/administration & dosage , Treatment Outcome
20.
Cancer Treat Rev ; 89: 102066, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-626164

ABSTRACT

Metronomic chemotherapy (M-CT) is defined as dose dense administration of chemotherapy at lower doses than maximum tolerated dose but at shorter free intervals, to obtain a near continuous exposure of cancer cells to those potentially effective drugs. M-CT is a useful strategy to obtain response, overcome resistance and reduce side effects, with low costs. This review will focus on the use of M-CT in advanced breast cancer (ABC). Cytostatic and cytotoxic effect on cancer cells, the anti-angiogenic and the immunomodulatory effects are its main mechanisms of actions. Many clinical trials proved the efficacy and tolerability of different monotherapies and combinations of chemotherapeutic agents administered in metronomic doses and frequencies in ABC. M-CT is a reasonable option for second and later lines of chemotherapy in metastatic breast cancer including those with prior anthracycline or taxane exposure, older patients and patients with comorbidities, and even as first-line in certain groups of patients. The acceptable efficacy and low toxicity of oral metronomic chemotherapy makes it a reasonable option during COVID-19 pandemic as well as in the post-COVID era which is projected to last for some time.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/administration & dosage , Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy , Breast Neoplasms/virology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Administration, Metronomic , Breast Neoplasms/pathology , COVID-19 , Clinical Trials, Phase II as Topic , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Female , Humans , Neoplasm Metastasis , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
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