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1.
Pediatr Blood Cancer ; 69(5): e29595, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1712170

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To assess feasibility and safety of outpatient administration of ifosfamide and etoposide (IE) for pediatric Ewing sarcoma (EWS) patients in a resource-limited setting amid the COVID-19 pandemic. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Retrospective study of patients with EWS who received outpatient IE from January 2020 until January 2021 at our institution. Ifosfamide 1800 mg/m2 was given for 5 days with MESNA (2-mercaptoethane sulfonate sodium) infusion and additional boluses before and after 9 hours of hydration. Patients >10 years of age with the ability to drink orally at home, no pre-existing renal dysfunction or history of hematuria were included. They were monitored for hemorrhagic cystitis with a urine dipstick before, midway, and at end of infusion. A urine analysis was done 24 hours after the last dose of ifosfamide. RESULTS: Forty-seven (100%) cycles were given as outpatient during the study period. Thirty-five (74%) cycles were given on time, two (4%) cycles were delayed due to mucositis, two (4%) due to delayed count recovery, and eight (18%) due to unavailability of outpatient appointments. The median interval between these cycles was 15 days (range 14-44 days). No episode of hemorrhagic cystitis was reported. Urine analysis was not done at 24 hours for 27 (58%) cycles, so microscopic hematuria may have been missed. This outpatient protocol saved 32% (USD 299) per cycle in cost and 282 days of hospitalization. CONCLUSION: Outpatient administration of IE for pediatric patients with EWS is feasible, safe, and cost-effective during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sarcoma, Ewing , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/adverse effects , COVID-19/drug therapy , Child , Etoposide/adverse effects , Feasibility Studies , Humans , Ifosfamide/adverse effects , Outpatients , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Sarcoma, Ewing/drug therapy
2.
BMJ Case Rep ; 15(2)2022 Feb 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1673377

ABSTRACT

Oxaliplatin is a chemotherapeutic agent used in a variety of malignancies such as colorectal cancer and pancreatic cancer. It is a platinum derivative that results in direct cell cytotoxicity with resultant cell death. The most common side effects often noted are neurotoxicity, nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, hepatotoxicity and myelosuppression. Oxaliplatin induced digital ischaemia and necrosis is a rare side effect that was observed in our patient. In general, digital ischaemia is a rare vascular disorder that is often associated with autoimmune disease. A patient with digital ischaemia due to oxaliplatin will be described in this case report.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents , Colorectal Neoplasms , Antineoplastic Agents/adverse effects , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/adverse effects , Colorectal Neoplasms/drug therapy , Humans , Ischemia/chemically induced , Necrosis/chemically induced , Organoplatinum Compounds/adverse effects , Oxaliplatin/adverse effects
3.
Lancet Haematol ; 9(2): e98-e110, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1616877

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Melphalan flufenamide (melflufen), an alkylating peptide-drug conjugate, plus dexamethasone showed clinical activity and manageable safety in the phase 2 HORIZON study. We aimed to determine whether melflufen plus dexamethasone would provide a progression-free survival benefit compared with pomalidomide plus dexamethasone in patients with previously treated multiple myeloma. METHODS: In this randomised, open-label, head-to-head, phase 3 study (OCEAN), adult patients (aged ≥18 years) were recruited from 108 university hospitals, specialist hospitals, and community-based centres in 21 countries across Europe, North America, and Asia. Eligible patients had an ECOG performance status of 0-2; must have had relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma, refractory to lenalidomide (within 18 months of randomisation) and to the last line of therapy; and have received two to four previous lines of therapy (including lenalidomide and a proteasome inhibitor). Patients were randomly assigned (1:1), stratified by age, number of previous lines of therapy, and International Staging System score, to either 28-day cycles of melflufen and dexamethasone (melflufen group) or pomalidomide and dexamethasone (pomalidomide group). All patients received dexamethasone 40 mg orally on days 1, 8, 15, and 22 of each cycle. In the melflufen group, patients received melflufen 40 mg intravenously over 30 min on day 1 of each cycle and in the pomalidomide group, patients received pomalidomide 4 mg orally daily on days 1 to 21 of each cycle. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival assessed by an independent review committee in the intention-to-treat (ITT) population. Safety was assessed in patients who received at least one dose of study medication. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT03151811, and is ongoing. FINDINGS: Between June 12, 2017, and Sept 3, 2020, 246 patients were randomly assigned to the melflufen group (median age 68 years [IQR 60-72]; 107 [43%] were female) and 249 to the pomalidomide group (median age 68 years [IQR 61-72]; 109 [44%] were female). 474 patients received at least one dose of study drug (melflufen group n=228; pomalidomide group n=246; safety population). Data cutoff was Feb 3, 2021. Median progression-free survival was 6·8 months (95% CI 5·0-8·5; 165 [67%] of 246 patients had an event) in the melflufen group and 4·9 months (4·2-5·7; 190 [76%] of 249 patients had an event) in the pomalidomide group (hazard ratio [HR] 0·79, [95% CI 0·64-0·98]; p=0·032), at a median follow-up of 15·5 months (IQR 9·4-22·8) in the melflufen group and 16·3 months (10·1-23·2) in the pomalidomide group. Median overall survival was 19·8 months (95% CI 15·1-25·6) at a median follow-up of 19·8 months (IQR 12·0-25·0) in the melflufen group and 25·0 months (95% CI 18·1-31·9) in the pomalidomide group at a median follow-up of 18·6 months (IQR 11·8-23·7; HR 1·10 [95% CI 0·85-1·44]; p=0·47). The most common grade 3 or 4 treatment-emergent adverse events were thrombocytopenia (143 [63%] of 228 in the melflufen group vs 26 [11%] of 246 in the pomalidomide group), neutropenia (123 [54%] vs 102 [41%]), and anaemia (97 [43%] vs 44 [18%]). Serious treatment-emergent adverse events occurred in 95 (42%) patients in the melflufen group and 113 (46%) in the pomalidomide group, the most common of which were pneumonia (13 [6%] vs 21 [9%]), COVID-19 pneumonia (11 [5%] vs nine [4%]), and thrombocytopenia (nine [4%] vs three [1%]). 27 [12%] patients in the melflufen group and 32 [13%] in the pomalidomide group had fatal treatment-emergent adverse events. Fatal treatment-emergent adverse events were considered possibly treatment related in two patients in the melflufen group (one with acute myeloid leukaemia, one with pancytopenia and acute cardiac failure) and four patients in the pomalidomide group (two patients with pneumonia, one with myelodysplastic syndromes, one with COVID-19 pneumonia). INTERPRETATION: Melflufen plus dexamethasone showed superior progression-free survival than pomalidomide plus dexamethasone in patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma. FUNDING: Oncopeptides AB.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols , Multiple Myeloma , Aged , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/adverse effects , COVID-19/drug therapy , Dexamethasone/adverse effects , Female , Humans , Lenalidomide/adverse effects , Male , Melphalan/adverse effects , Melphalan/analogs & derivatives , Middle Aged , Multiple Myeloma/drug therapy , Phenylalanine/adverse effects , Phenylalanine/analogs & derivatives , SARS-CoV-2 , Thalidomide/adverse effects , Thalidomide/analogs & derivatives
4.
Expert Rev Hematol ; 14(12): 1129-1135, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1577548

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Multiple Myeloma (MM) accounts for 1-2% of all malignancies but is the second most common hematological malignancy. It is characterized by a proliferation of malignant plasma cells. The treatment paradigm of MM in Australia is traditionally hospital-based, complex, and costly. While MM comprises 1-2% of cancer diagnoses, it appears in the top 10 cancer diagnoses requiring hospital admission. The cumulative time spent receiving treatment is a significant burden for patients. The ability to receive treatment at home and maximize time away from hospital-based settings is a key preference for patients receiving anticancer therapies over a prolonged period of time. METHODS: The Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre and Royal Melbourne Hospital's combined Clinical Hematology Unit has collaborated with their Hospital in the Home departments to develop several innovative programs to address this. RESULTS: We describe our current active programs and potential developments in home-based MM therapy. CONCLUSION: We have enabled large numbers of patients to receive complex therapies in their own home and the COVID-19 pandemic has increased the pace of the roll out without any compromise in safety. We anticipate that the next raft of immunotherapies will be able to transition into the @Home treatment setting in the coming years.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Multiple Myeloma , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/adverse effects , Bortezomib/therapeutic use , Dexamethasone/therapeutic use , Humans , Multiple Myeloma/drug therapy , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
5.
BMJ ; 375: e066588, 2021 12 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1560914

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of remote proactive management of toxicities during chemotherapy for early stage breast cancer. DESIGN: Pragmatic, cluster randomised trial. SETTING: 20 cancer centres in Ontario, Canada, allocated by covariate constrained randomisation to remote management of toxicities or routine care. PARTICIPANTS: All patients starting adjuvant or neoadjuvant chemotherapy for early stage breast cancer at each centre. 25 patients from each centre completed patient reported outcome questionnaires. INTERVENTIONS: Proactive, standardised, nurse led telephone management of common toxicities at two time points after each chemotherapy cycle. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome, cluster level mean number of visits to the emergency department or admissions to hospital per patient during the whole course of chemotherapy treatment, was evaluated with routinely available administrative healthcare data. Secondary patient reported outcomes included toxicity, self-efficacy, and quality of life. RESULTS: Baseline characteristics of participants were similar in the intervention (n=944) and control arms (n=1214); 22% were older than 65 years. Penetration (that is, the percentage of patients who received the intervention at each centre) was 50-86%. Mean number of visits to the emergency department or admissions to hospital per patient was 0.91 (standard deviation 0.28) in the intervention arm and 0.94 (0.40) in the control arm (P=0.94); 47% (1014 of 2158 patients) had at least one visit to the emergency department or a hospital admission during chemotherapy. Among 580 participants who completed the patient reported outcome questionnaires, at least one grade 3 toxicity was reported by 48% (134 of 278 patients) in the intervention arm and by 58% (163 of 283) in the control arm. No differences in self-efficacy, anxiety, or depression were found. Compared with baseline, the functional assessment of cancer therapy trial outcome index decreased by 6.1 and 9.0 points in the intervention and control participants, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Proactive, telephone based management of toxicities during chemotherapy did not result in fewer visits to the emergency department or hospital admissions. With the rapid rise in remote care because of the covid-19 pandemic, identifying scalable strategies for remote management of patients during cancer treatment is particularly relevant. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02485678.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/administration & dosage , Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy , Monitoring, Ambulatory/methods , Outpatients , Telemedicine , Telephone , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/adverse effects , Breast Neoplasms/psychology , COVID-19 , Chemotherapy, Adjuvant/adverse effects , Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Ontario , Pandemics , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Treatment Outcome
6.
Support Care Cancer ; 30(3): 2755-2766, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1536305

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To characterize and compare both the outcome and cost of treatment of outpatient (OP) and inpatient (IP) ifosfamide therapy. METHODS: A single-center retrospective chart review of patients 18 years and older receiving ifosfamide therapy. The primary endpoint compares and evaluates the side effect profiles of ifosfamide-treated patients in the OP/IP settings. The adverse event grading system was characterized using the CTCAE Version 5.0. The highest grade was documented per cycle. The secondary endpoint of this study compares the costs of OP/IP therapy. It was assumed that the cost of medication was equivalent for IP/OP treatments. The cost saved with OP administration was determined by the average cost of hospital stay for IP admission. RESULTS: Ifosfamide therapy of 86 patients (57 OP, 29 IP) was reviewed. The predominant OP regimens were doxorobucin-ifosfamide-mesna (AIM) with 43.9% and ifosfamide-etoposide (IE) with 29.8%. Grade 4 anemia, thrombocytopenia, and neutropenia were most frequent in IP vs OP therapies (22.9% IP vs 4.3% OP, 21.6% IP vs 9.2% OP, and 22.8% IP vs 19.6% OP respectively). Neutropenic fever (NF) occurred in 20 OP patients which were predominantly treated with AIM or IE and led to average hospital stay of 6 days. Neurotoxicity, treated with methylene blue (MB) occurred in 4 OP patients. OP therapy saved a total of 783 hospital days, leading to a cost savings of $2,103,921. CONCLUSIONS: Transitioning ifosfamide to the OP setting is feasible for academic and community infusion centers with the OP administration being safe, well-tolerated, and associated with decreased total cost of care. The current processes allow for safe transition of chemotherapy of chemotherapy under times of COVID.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ifosfamide , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/adverse effects , Cost Savings , Etoposide , Humans , Ifosfamide/adverse effects , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Expert Rev Hematol ; 14(12): 1049-1058, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1429102

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Despite the development of new therapeutic agents, relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma (RRMM) is associated with poor survival outcomes. Furthermore, many patients develop resistance to immunomodulatory drugs (IMiD), creating a need for IMiD-free regimens. Areas covered: This review focuses on the combination of carfilzomib, dexamethasone, and daratumumab (KdD or DKd) which has shown promising results in patients with RRMM who have tried multiple lines of therapy, and has been approved in the U.S., EU, and Japan. The KdD triplet has two recommended dosage regimens, carfilzomib once-weekly (KdD70 QW) and carfilzomib twice-weekly (KdD56 BIW), with comparable efficacy and safety profiles. Expert opinion: These options provide flexibility to patients and healthcare providers, especially in the era of COVID-19. Carfilzomib-based regimens remain a standard of care based on multiple randomized phase 3 studies. Additional studies are currently underway investigating carfilzomib-based regimens such as KdD combined with novel agents. Nevertheless, KdD is one of the most efficacious options for patients with RRMM.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Multiple Myeloma , Adult , Antibodies, Monoclonal , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/adverse effects , COVID-19/drug therapy , Dexamethasone/therapeutic use , Humans , Multiple Myeloma/drug therapy , Oligopeptides , SARS-CoV-2
9.
J Investig Med High Impact Case Rep ; 9: 23247096211013230, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1410018

ABSTRACT

Multiple myeloma is the second most common hematological malignancy. Ixazomib is the first oral proteasome inhibitor approved in the United States for the management of multiple myeloma who have received at least one prior treatment. The availability of oral chemotherapeutic agents for the management of multiple myeloma has made it easier for patients who do not have to come to the hospital for chemotherapy infusions. However, many barriers are associated with oral chemotherapy, and one of them is a misinterpretation of instruction which can have deleterious effects. In this case report, we present a case of a 69-year-old male with multiple myeloma who accidentally took ixazomib daily for 3 days instead of the weekly regimen and thus coming into the hospital with an overdose. In this report, we focus on the adverse effects associated with ixazomib toxicity and how to manage the adverse reactions. Although there is no antidote available for ixazomib, supportive care is very essential in these patients.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents , Boron Compounds , Glycine/analogs & derivatives , Multiple Myeloma , Aged , Antineoplastic Agents/poisoning , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/adverse effects , Boron Compounds/poisoning , Boron Compounds/therapeutic use , Drug Overdose , Glycine/poisoning , Glycine/therapeutic use , Humans , Male , Multiple Myeloma/drug therapy
10.
J Pediatr Hematol Oncol ; 44(2): e543-e545, 2022 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1270767

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a contagious disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2. Patients with hematologic malignancies have been shown to have higher risk of mortality due to COVID-19 than reported in the general adult population. Reports on acute lymphoblastic leukemia and COVID in children are scarce. We present a case of an 11-year-old male patient undergoing treatment for B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia with an atypical course of COVID-19. The patient received a positive result of the syndrome coronavirus-2 polymerase chain reaction test performed due to epidemiologic reasons. The chemotherapy was continued since the patient had no clinical signs of COVID-19. The disease started with intensive gastrointestinal bleeding, followed by severe respiratory tract infection over 2 weeks later.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/adverse effects , COVID-19/complications , Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage/pathology , Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , Child , Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage/chemically induced , Humans , Male , Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma/pathology , Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma/virology , Prognosis
11.
J Cancer Res Ther ; 17(2): 547-550, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1268381

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Health emergency due to COVID-19 started in Uruguay on March 13, 2020; our mastology unit tried to ensure adequate oncological care, and protect patients from the virus infection and complications. OBJECTIVE: To assess the health care activities in the "peak" of the pandemic during 3 months. MATERIALS AND METHODS: we collected data from the electronic health record. RESULTS: There were a total of 293 medical appointments from 131 patients (221 face-to-face), that decreased by 16.7% compared to the same period in 2019 (352 appointments). The medical appointments were scheduled to evaluate the continuity of systemic treatment or modifications (95 patients; 72.5%), follow-up (17; 12.9%), first-time consultation (12; 9.1%), and assess paraclinical studies (7; 5.3%). The patients were on hormone therapy (81 patients; 74%), chemotherapy (CT) (21; 19%), and anti-HER2 therapies (9; 8%). New twenty treatments were initiated. Of the 14 patients that were on adjuvant/neoadjuvant CT, 9 (64.3%) continued with the same regimen with the addition of prophylactic granulocyte-colony-stimulating factors (G-CSF), and 5 (35.7%), who were receiving weekly paclitaxel, continued the treatment with no changes. Of the seven patients that were on palliative CT, 2 (28.5%) continued the treatment with the addition of G-CSF, 3 (42.8%) continued with weekly capecitabine or paclitaxel with no treatment changes, and 2 (28.5%) changed their treatment regimen (a less myelosuppressive regimen was selected for one and due to progression of the disease in the other patient). The ninety patients who were receiving adjuvant, neoadjuvant, or palliative criteria hormone therapy and/or anti-HER2 therapies, continued the treatment with no changes. CONCLUSIONS: The evidence suggests that, although medical appointments decreased by approximately 17%, we could maintain healthcare activities, continued most of the treatments while the most modified was CT with G-CSF to avoid myelosuppression.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Continuity of Patient Care/statistics & numerical data , Delivery of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Medical Oncology/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/adverse effects , Bone Marrow/drug effects , Breast Neoplasms/complications , Breast Neoplasms/diagnosis , Breast Neoplasms/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Continuity of Patient Care/organization & administration , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Delivery of Health Care/standards , Electronic Health Records/statistics & numerical data , Female , Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor/administration & dosage , Hematopoiesis/drug effects , Hematopoiesis/immunology , Humans , Medical Oncology/organization & administration , Medical Oncology/standards , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Referral and Consultation/standards , Referral and Consultation/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Telemedicine/standards , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Triage/organization & administration , Triage/standards , Uruguay/epidemiology
12.
Am J Hematol ; 96(8): 934-944, 2021 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1204615

ABSTRACT

Prolonged Covid-19 is an emerging issue for patients with lymphoma or immune deficiency. We aimed to examine prolonged length of in-hospital stay (LOS) due to Covid-19 among patients with lymphoma and assess its determinants and outcomes. Adult patients with lymphoma admitted for Covid-19 to 16 French hospitals in March and April, 2020 were included. Length of in-hospital stay was analyzed as a competitor vs death. The study included 111 patients. The median age was 65 years (range, 19-92). Ninety-four patients (85%) had B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Within the 12 months prior to hospitalization for Covid-19, 79 patients (71%) were treated for their lymphoma. Among them, 63 (57%) received an anti-CD20 therapy. Fourteen patients (12%) had relapsed/refractory disease. The median LOS was 14 days (range, 1-235). After a median follow-up of 191 days (3-260), the 6-month overall survival was 69%. In multivariable analyses, recent administration of anti-CD20 therapy was associated with prolonged LOS (subdistribution hazard ratio 2.26, 95% confidence interval 1.42-3.6, p < 0.001) and higher risk of death (hazard ratio 2.17, 95% confidence interval 1.04-4.52, p = 0.039). An age ≥ 70 years and relapsed/refractory lymphoma were also associated with prolonged LOS and decreased overall survival. In conclusion, an age ≥ 70 years, a relapsed/refractory lymphoma and recent administration of anti-CD20 therapy are risk factors for prolonged LOS and death for lymphoma patients hospitalized for Covid-19. These findings may contribute to guide the management of lymphoma during the pandemic, support evaluating specific therapeutic approaches, and raise questions on the efficacy and timing of vaccination of this particular population.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/adverse effects , B-Lymphocytes/drug effects , COVID-19/complications , Immunotherapy/adverse effects , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antigens, CD20/immunology , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/therapeutic use , COVID-19/mortality , Combined Modality Therapy , Comorbidity , Drug Resistance, Neoplasm , Female , Humans , Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin/mortality , Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin/therapy , Male , Middle Aged , Proportional Hazards Models , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Rituximab/administration & dosage , Rituximab/adverse effects , Survival Analysis , Young Adult
13.
Transfus Clin Biol ; 28(3): 264-270, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1201297

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The patients with hematological malignancies are a vulnerable group to COVID-19, due to the immunodeficiency resulting from the underlying disease and oncological treatment that significantly impair cellular and humoral immunity. Here we report on a beneficial impact of a passive immunotherapy with convalescent plasma to treat a prolonged, active COVID-19 infection in a patient with a history of nasopharyngeal diffuse large B-cell lymphoma treated with the therapy inducing substantial impairment of particularly humoral arm of immune system. The specific aim was to quantify SARS-CoV2 neutralizing antibodies in a patient plasma during the course of therapy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Besides the standard of care treatment and monitoring, neutralizing antibody titers in patient's serum samples, calibrated according to the First WHO International Standard for anti-SARS-CoV-2 immunoglobulin (human), were quantified in a time-dependent manner. During the immunotherapy period peripheral blood flow cytometry immunophenotyping was conducted to characterize lymphocyte subpopulations. RESULTS: The waves of clinical improvements and worsening coincided with transfused neutralizing antibodies rises and drops in the patient's systemic circulation, proving their contribution in controlling the disease progress. Besides the patient's lack of own humoral immune system, immunophenotyping analysis revealed also the reduced level of helper T-lymphocytes and immune exhaustion of monocytes. CONCLUSION: Therapeutic approach based on convalescent plasma transfusion transformed a prolonged, active COVID-19 infection into a manageable chronic disease.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/biosynthesis , COVID-19/therapy , Immunocompromised Host , Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse/complications , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Neutralizing/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antibodies, Viral/therapeutic use , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/adverse effects , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , Chlorocebus aethiops , Combined Modality Therapy , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation , Humans , Immunization, Passive , Immunophenotyping , Lymphocyte Subsets/drug effects , Lymphocyte Subsets/immunology , Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse/immunology , Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse/therapy , Lymphopenia/etiology , Lymphopenia/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Monocytes/immunology , Nasopharynx/virology , RNA, Viral/analysis , RNA, Viral/blood , Radiotherapy, Adjuvant , Rituximab/administration & dosage , Rituximab/adverse effects , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Vero Cells , Virus Cultivation
15.
Anticancer Res ; 41(4): 2193-2195, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1168334

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIM: Since January 2020, coronavirus disease (COVID-19) cases have been confirmed in Japan, and the number of patients with COVID-19 has been increasing. Two emergency declarations have been made previously and one is currently in effect. Based on our experience of a situation that could affect cancer treatment, this study retrospectively examined the correlation between perioperative anticancer therapy and COVID-19 incidence in patients with breast cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients who underwent perioperative anticancer therapy for breast cancer at our hospital from February 2020 to February 2021 were included in this study. The presence or absence of COVID-19, timing of anticancer drug initiation, and clinical data were collected. RESULTS: No cases of COVID-19 were diagnosed in patients receiving perioperative anticancer therapy at our hospital. CONCLUSION: Regimen modification, active use of supportive care, and patient lifestyle were factors reducing the incidence of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/administration & dosage , Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19/epidemiology , Perioperative Care/methods , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/adverse effects , Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , Breast Neoplasms/pathology , Breast Neoplasms/surgery , Chemotherapy, Adjuvant/statistics & numerical data , Combined Modality Therapy , Female , Humans , Immunocompromised Host , Incidence , Japan/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Neoadjuvant Therapy/statistics & numerical data , Perioperative Care/adverse effects , Perioperative Care/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
17.
Oncologist ; 26(6): 483-491, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1081640

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The National Comprehensive Cancer Network recommends either three cycles of bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin or four cycles of etoposide and cisplatin (EPx4) as initial chemotherapy for the treatment of good-risk germ cell tumors (GCTs). To assess the response, toxicity, and survival outcomes of EPx4, we analyzed our experience. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Response and survival outcomes, selected toxicities, and adherence to chemotherapy dose and schedule were assessed in patients with good-risk GCT who received EPx4 at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center between 1982 and 2016. The results were compared with our past results and published data. RESULTS: Between 1982 and 2016, 944 patients with GCT were treated with EPx4, 289 who were previously reported plus 655 treated between January 2000 and August 2016. A favorable response was achieved in 928 of 944 patients (98.3%). Five-year progression-free, disease-specific, and overall survival rates were 93.9%, 98.6%, and 97.9%, respectively. Median follow-up was 7.3 years (range, 2.8 months to 35.5 years). Viable, nonteratomatous malignant GCT was present in 3.5% of 432 postchemotherapy retroperitoneal lymph node dissection specimens from patients with nonseminomatous GCT. Febrile neutropenia and thromboembolic events occurred in 16.0% and 8.9%, respectively, with one treatment-related death. In the more recent 655-patient cohort, full-dose EPx4 was administered to 631 (96.3%), with deviations from planned treatment driven mainly by vascular (n = 13), hematologic (n = 11), renal (n = 7), or infectious (n = 5) events. CONCLUSION: EPx4 is highly effective and well tolerated in patients with good-risk GCTs and remains a standard of care. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Four cycles of etoposide and cisplatin (EPx4) is a standard-of-care regimen for all patients with good-risk germ cell tumors with a favorable response rate and disease-specific survival of 98%. Full-dose administration of etoposide and cisplatin and complete resection of residual disease lead to optimal outcomes. EPx4 should be the recommended regimen in active smokers, patients with reduced or borderline kidney function, and patients aged 50 years or older, which are patient groups at increased risk for bleomycin pulmonary toxicity. Because of a risk of acquired severe pulmonary illness, EPx4 may also be favored for patients who vape or use e-cigarettes and during ongoing transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems , Neoplasms, Germ Cell and Embryonal , Testicular Neoplasms , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/adverse effects , Bleomycin/adverse effects , Cisplatin/adverse effects , Etoposide/adverse effects , Humans , Male , Neoplasms, Germ Cell and Embryonal/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Testicular Neoplasms/drug therapy
18.
Prog Urol ; 31(5): 243-244, 2021 04.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1038161
19.
Recenti Prog Med ; 111(3): 160-166, 2020 Mar.
Article in Italian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-976065

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is a rare but most aggressive form of monoclonal gammopathies, characterized by the presence of clonal cells in peripheral blood and a poor prognosis. There are two forms of PCL: primary, which arise de novo, and secondary which is a leukemic transformation in patients with previously multiple myeloma. Patients with PCL may benefit from stem cell transplantation and novel agents, but their prognosis remains inferior to that of patients who have multiple myeloma. CLINICAL CASE: We describe the case of 53 years old patient with relapsed plasma cells leukemia after unrelated bone marrow transplant, treated with a KRD chemotherapy regimen. He performed a very good response after the first 2 cycles (bone marrow malignant plasma cells reducing from 36% to 0.5%). However, according to the very poor prognosis of this disease, after the 4th cycle of chemotherapy the patient progressed and dead into few weeks. The KRD regimen was able to convert the chimerism after bone marrow transplant from partial to complete after the first 2 cycles of treatment, showing some activity in this disease. CONCLUSIONS: KRD regimen, in our clinical case, showed some activity being well tolerated in a very poor prognosis disease such as PCL. Probably, right use and maybe sooner use of new drugs such as bortezomib or carfilzomib, in combination regimens, may be useful in better treating such disease.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/administration & dosage , Bone Marrow Transplantation , Leukemia, Plasma Cell/drug therapy , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/adverse effects , COVID-19/drug therapy , Dexamethasone/administration & dosage , Disease Progression , Fatal Outcome , Humans , Lenalidomide/administration & dosage , Leukemia, Plasma Cell/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Oligopeptides/administration & dosage , Plasma Cells/pathology , Recurrence
20.
Ann Hematol ; 99(11): 2589-2598, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-746148

ABSTRACT

The induction therapy containing ixazomib, an oral proteasome inhibitor, has shown favorable efficacy and safety in clinical trials, but its experience in real-life remains limited. In routine practice, few patients received ixazomib-based induction therapy due to reasons including (1) patients' preference on oral regimens, (2) concerns on adverse events (AEs) of other intravenous/subcutaneous regimens, (3) requirements for less center visits, and (4) fears of COVID-19 and other infectious disease exposures. With the aim of assessing the real-life effectiveness and safety of ixazomib-based induction therapy, we performed this multi-center, observational study on 85 newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (NDMM) patients from 14 medical centers. Ixazomib-based regimens included ixazomib-lenalidomide-dexamethasone (IRd) in 44.7% of patients, ixazomib-dexamethasone (Id) in 29.4%, and Id plus another agent (doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, thalidomide, or daratumumab) in 25.9%. Different ixazomib-based therapies were applied due to (1) financial burdens or limitations on local health insurance coverage, (2) concerns on treatment tolerance, and (3) drug accessibility issue. Ten patients received ixazomib maintenance. The median age was 67 years; 43.5% had ISS stage III disease; 48.2% had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance score ≥ 2; and 17.6% with high-risk cytogenetic abnormalities. Overall response rate for all 85 patients was 95.3%, including 65.9% very good partial response or better and 29.5% complete responses. The median time to response was 30 days. The response rate was similar across different ixazomib-based regimens. Median progression-free survival was not reached. Severe AEs (≥ grade 3) were reported in 29.4% of patients. No grade 3/4 peripheral neuropathy (PN) occurred. Patients received a median of 6 (range 1-20) cycles of ixazomib treatment; 56.6% remained on treatment at data cutoff; 15.3% discontinued treatment due to intolerable AEs. These results support that the ixazomib-based frontline therapy was highly effective with acceptable toxicity in routine practice and the ixazomib oral regimens could be good alternative options for NDMM patients.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/administration & dosage , Boron Compounds/administration & dosage , Glycine/analogs & derivatives , Multiple Myeloma/drug therapy , Peripheral Nervous System Diseases/chemically induced , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Antibodies, Monoclonal/administration & dosage , Antibodies, Monoclonal/adverse effects , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/adverse effects , Boron Compounds/adverse effects , Cyclophosphamide/administration & dosage , Cyclophosphamide/adverse effects , Dexamethasone/administration & dosage , Dexamethasone/adverse effects , Doxorubicin/administration & dosage , Doxorubicin/adverse effects , Drug Administration Schedule , Female , Glycine/administration & dosage , Glycine/adverse effects , Humans , Lenalidomide/administration & dosage , Lenalidomide/adverse effects , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Myeloma/mortality , Multiple Myeloma/pathology , Neoplasm Staging , Peripheral Nervous System Diseases/diagnosis , Peripheral Nervous System Diseases/physiopathology , Remission Induction , Survival Analysis , Thalidomide/administration & dosage , Thalidomide/adverse effects , Treatment Outcome
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