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2.
J Clin Immunol ; 42(2): 232-239, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1838372

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To study the effect of interferon-α2 auto-antibodies (IFN-α2 Abs) on clinical and virological outcomes in critically ill COVID-19 patients and the risk of IFN-α2 Abs transfer during convalescent plasma treatment. METHODS: Sera from healthy controls, cases of COVID-19, and other respiratory illness were tested for IFN-α2 Abs by ELISA and a pseudo virus-based neutralization assay. The effects of disease severity, sex, and age on the risk of having neutralizing IFN-α2 Abs were determined. Longitudinal analyses were performed to determine association between IFN-α2 Abs and survival and viral load and whether serum IFN-α2 Abs appeared after convalescent plasma transfusion. RESULTS: IFN-α2 neutralizing sera were found only in COVID-19 patients, with proportions increasing with disease severity and age. In the acute stage of COVID-19, all sera from patients with ELISA-detected IFN-α2 Abs (13/164, 7.9%) neutralized levels of IFN-α2 exceeding physiological concentrations found in human plasma and this was associated with delayed viral clearance. Convalescent plasma donors that were anti-IFN-α2 ELISA positive (3/118, 2.5%) did not neutralize the same levels of IFN-α2. Neutralizing serum IFN-α2 Abs were associated with delayed viral clearance from the respiratory tract. CONCLUSIONS: IFN-α2 Abs were detected by ELISA and neutralization assay in COVID-19 patients, but not in ICU patients with other respiratory illnesses. The presence of neutralizing IFN-α2 Abs in critically ill COVID-19 is associated with delayed viral clearance. IFN-α2 Abs in COVID-19 convalescent plasma donors were not neutralizing in the conditions tested.


Subject(s)
Autoantibodies/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/therapy , Interferon alpha-2/immunology , Plasma/immunology , Adult , Aged , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antiviral Agents/immunology , Blood Component Transfusion/methods , Critical Illness , Female , Humans , Immunization, Passive/methods , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/immunology
3.
Oxid Med Cell Longev ; 2022: 5589089, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736165

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic caused relatively high mortality in patients, especially in those with concomitant diseases (i.e., diabetes, hypertension, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)). In most of aforementioned comorbidities, the oxidative stress appears to be an important player in their pathogenesis. The direct cause of death in critically ill patients with COVID-19 is still far from being elucidated. Although some preliminary data suggests that the lung vasculature injury and the loss of the functioning part of pulmonary alveolar population are crucial, the precise mechanism is still unclear. On the other hand, at least two classes of medications used with some clinical benefits in COVID-19 treatment seem to have a major influence on ROS (reactive oxygen species) and RNS (reactive nitrogen species) production. However, oxidative stress is one of the important mechanisms in the antiviral immune response and innate immunity. Therefore, it would be of interest to summarize the data regarding the oxidative stress in severe COVID-19. In this review, we discuss the role of oxidative and antioxidant mechanisms in severe COVID-19 based on available studies. We also present the role of ROS and RNS in other viral infections in humans and in animal models. Although reactive oxygen and nitrogen species play an important role in the innate antiviral immune response, in some situations, they might have a deleterious effect, e.g., in some coronaviral infections. The understanding of the redox mechanisms in severe COVID-19 disease may have an impact on its treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Oxidative Stress/immunology , Antioxidants/pharmacology , Antioxidants/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/immunology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Oxidative Stress/drug effects , Reactive Nitrogen Species/immunology , Reactive Nitrogen Species/metabolism , Reactive Oxygen Species/immunology , Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
4.
Viruses ; 14(1)2021 12 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1628815

ABSTRACT

Outbreaks of influenza, caused by the influenza A virus (IAV), occur almost every year in various regions worldwide, seriously endangering human health. Studies have shown that host non-coding RNA is an important regulator of host-virus interactions in the process of IAV infection. In this paper, we comprehensively analyzed the research progress on host non-coding RNAs with regard to the regulation of IAV replication. According to the regulation mode of host non-coding RNAs, the signal pathways involved, and the specific target genes, we found that a large number of host non-coding RNAs directly targeted the PB1 and PB2 proteins of IAV. Nonstructural protein 1 and other key genes regulate the replication of IAV and indirectly participate in the regulation of the retinoic acid-induced gene I-like receptor signaling pathway, toll-like receptor signaling pathway, Janus kinase signal transducer and activator of transcription signaling pathway, and other major intracellular viral response signaling pathways to regulate the replication of IAV. Based on the above findings, we mapped the regulatory network of host non-coding RNAs in the innate immune response to the influenza virus. These findings will provide a more comprehensive understanding of the function and mechanism of host non-coding RNAs in the cellular anti-virus response as well as clues to the mechanism of cell-virus interactions and the discovery of antiviral drug targets.


Subject(s)
Host-Pathogen Interactions , Influenza A virus/genetics , Influenza, Human/immunology , RNA, Untranslated , Virus Replication , Antiviral Agents/immunology , Cell Cycle , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Influenza, Human/virology , MicroRNAs , RNA, Circular , Signal Transduction
5.
Mol Cell Biochem ; 477(3): 711-726, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1616202

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus pandemic has emerged as one of the significant medical-health challenges of the current century. The World Health Organization has named this new virus severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Since the first detection of SARS-CoV-2 in November 2019 in Wuhan, China, physicians, researchers, and others have made it their top priority to find drugs and cures that can effectively treat patients and reduce mortality rates. The symptoms of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) include fever, dry cough, body aches, and anosmia. Various therapeutic compounds have been investigated and applied to mitigate the symptoms in COVID-19 patients and cure the disease. Degenerative virus analyses of the infection incidence and COVID-19 have demonstrated that SARS-CoV-2 penetrates the pulmonary alveoli's endothelial cells through Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptors on the membrane, stimulates various signaling pathways and causes excessive secretion of cytokines. The continuous triggering of the innate and acquired immune system, as well as the overproduction of pro-inflammatory factors, cause a severe condition in the COVID-19 patients, which is called "cytokine storm". It can lead to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in critical patients. Severe and critical COVID-19 cases demand oxygen therapy and mechanical ventilator support. Various drugs, including immunomodulatory and immunosuppressive agents (e.g., monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and interleukin antagonists) have been utilized in clinical trials. However, the studies and clinical trials have documented diverging findings, which seem to be due to the differences in these drugs' possible mechanisms of action. These drugs' mechanism of action generally includes suppressing or modulating the immune system, preventing the development of cytokine storm via various signaling pathways, and enhancing the blood vessels' diameter in the lungs. In this review article, multiple medications from different drug families are discussed, and their possible mechanisms of action are also described.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/immunology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Immunomodulating Agents/pharmacology , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/immunology , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Azetidines/immunology , Azetidines/pharmacology , COVID-19/etiology , Dexamethasone/immunology , Dexamethasone/pharmacology , Famotidine/immunology , Famotidine/pharmacology , Humans , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/immunology , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Infliximab/immunology , Infliximab/pharmacology , Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein/immunology , Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein/pharmacology , Melatonin/immunology , Melatonin/pharmacology , Purines/immunology , Purines/pharmacology , Pyrazoles/immunology , Pyrazoles/pharmacology , Sulfonamides/immunology , Sulfonamides/pharmacology
6.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 7092, 2021 12 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1561304

ABSTRACT

The nasal epithelium is a plausible entry point for SARS-CoV-2, a site of pathogenesis and transmission, and may initiate the host response to SARS-CoV-2. Antiviral interferon (IFN) responses are critical to outcome of SARS-CoV-2. Yet little is known about the interaction between SARS-CoV-2 and innate immunity in this tissue. Here we apply single-cell RNA sequencing and proteomics to a primary cell model of human nasal epithelium differentiated at air-liquid interface. SARS-CoV-2 demonstrates widespread tropism for nasal epithelial cell types. The host response is dominated by type I and III IFNs and interferon-stimulated gene products. This response is notably delayed in onset relative to viral gene expression and compared to other respiratory viruses. Nevertheless, once established, the paracrine IFN response begins to impact on SARS-CoV-2 replication. When provided prior to infection, recombinant IFNß or IFNλ1 induces an efficient antiviral state that potently restricts SARS-CoV-2 viral replication, preserving epithelial barrier integrity. These data imply that the IFN-I/III response to SARS-CoV-2 initiates in the nasal airway and suggest nasal delivery of recombinant IFNs to be a potential chemoprophylactic strategy.


Subject(s)
Epithelial Cells/virology , Interferon Type I/immunology , Interferons/immunology , Nasal Mucosa/virology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Antiviral Agents/immunology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Cells, Cultured , Epithelial Cells/cytology , Epithelial Cells/immunology , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Kinetics , Nasal Mucosa/cytology , Nasal Mucosa/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Viral Tropism , Virus Replication/drug effects
7.
Clin Immunol ; 233: 108888, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1517099

ABSTRACT

Human interferon alpha (hIFN-α) administration constitutes the current FDA approved therapy for chronic Hepatitis B and C virus infections. Additionally, hIFN-α treatment efficacy was recently demonstrated in patients with COVID-19. Thus, hIFN-α constitutes a therapeutic alternative for those countries where vaccination is inaccessible and for people who did not respond effectively to vaccination. However, hIFN-α2b exhibits a short plasma half-life resulting in the occurrence of severe side effects. To optimize the cytokine's pharmacokinetic profile, we developed a hyperglycosylated IFN, referred to as GMOP-IFN. Given the significant number of reports showing neutralizing antibodies (NAb) formation after hIFN-α administration, here we applied the DeFT (De-immunization of Functional Therapeutics) approach to develop functional, de-immunized versions of GMOP-IFN. Two GMOP-IFN variants exhibited significantly reduced ex vivo immunogenicity and null antiproliferative activity, while preserving antiviral function. The results obtained in this work indicate that the new de-immunized GMOP-IFN variants constitute promising candidates for antiviral therapy.


Subject(s)
Hepatitis B, Chronic/immunology , Hepatitis C, Chronic/immunology , Interferon-alpha/immunology , Recombinant Proteins/immunology , Adult , Amino Acid Sequence , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antiviral Agents/immunology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , CHO Cells , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Cattle , Cell Line , Cell Line, Tumor , Cell Proliferation/drug effects , Cells, Cultured , Cricetinae , Cricetulus , Drug Stability , HEK293 Cells , Hepatitis B, Chronic/drug therapy , Hepatitis B, Chronic/virology , Hepatitis C, Chronic/drug therapy , Hepatitis C, Chronic/virology , Humans , Interferon-alpha/genetics , Interferon-alpha/pharmacology , Recombinant Proteins/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
8.
Biosci Rep ; 41(10)2021 10 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1510636

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) virus has become a global health emergency. Although new vaccines have been generated and being implicated, discovery and application of novel preventive and control measures are warranted. We aimed to identify compounds that may possess the potential to either block the entry of virus to host cells or attenuate its replication upon infection. Using host cell surface receptor expression (angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and Transmembrane protease serine 2 (TMPRSS2)) analysis as an assay, we earlier screened several synthetic and natural compounds and identified candidates that showed ability to down-regulate their expression. Here, we report experimental and computational analyses of two small molecules, Mortaparib and MortaparibPlus that were initially identified as dual novel inhibitors of mortalin and PARP-1, for their activity against SARS-CoV-2. In silico analyses showed that MortaparibPlus, but not Mortaparib, stably binds into the catalytic pocket of TMPRSS2. In vitro analysis of control and treated cells revealed that MortaparibPlus caused down-regulation of ACE2 and TMPRSS2; Mortaparib did not show any effect. Furthermore, computational analysis on SARS-CoV-2 main protease (Mpro) that also predicted the inhibitory activity of MortaparibPlus. However, cell-based antiviral drug screening assay showed 30-60% viral inhibition in cells treated with non-toxic doses of either MortaparibPlus or Mortaparib. The data suggest that these two closely related compounds possess multimodal anti-COVID-19 activities. Whereas MortaparibPlus works through direct interactions/effects on the host cell surface receptors (ACE2 and TMPRSS2) and the virus protein (Mpro), Mortaparib involves independent mechanisms, elucidation of which warrants further studies.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Computational Biology/methods , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/immunology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Cell Line, Tumor , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical/methods , HSP70 Heat-Shock Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Humans , Mitochondrial Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Poly (ADP-Ribose) Polymerase-1/antagonists & inhibitors , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Serine Endopeptidases/immunology , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Virus Internalization/drug effects
9.
Eur J Immunol ; 51(7): 1641-1651, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1473829

ABSTRACT

Emerging life-threatening viruses have posed great challenges to public health. It is now increasingly clear that epigenetics plays a role in shaping host-virus interactions and there is a great need for a more thorough understanding of these intricate interactions through the epigenetic lens, which may represent potential therapeutic opportunities in the clinic. In this review, we highlight the current understanding of the roles of key epigenetic regulators - chromatin remodeling and histone modification - in modulating chromatin openness during host defense against virus. We also discuss how the RNA modification m6A (N6-methyladenosine) affects fundamental aspects of host-virus interactions. We conclude with future directions for uncovering more detailed functions that epigenetic regulation exerts on both host cells and viruses during infection.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/immunology , Epigenesis, Genetic/genetics , Epigenesis, Genetic/immunology , Immunity, Innate/genetics , Immunity, Innate/immunology , Animals , Chromatin/genetics , Chromatin/immunology , Histones/genetics , Histones/immunology , Host Microbial Interactions/genetics , Host Microbial Interactions/immunology , Humans , RNA Processing, Post-Transcriptional/genetics , RNA Processing, Post-Transcriptional/immunology
10.
Cell Chem Biol ; 29(1): 5-18.e6, 2022 01 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1471910

ABSTRACT

The global epidemic caused by the coronavirus severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) has resulted in the infection of over 200 million people. To extend the knowledge of interactions between SARS-CoV-2 and humans, we systematically investigate the interactome of 29 viral proteins in human cells by using an antibody-based TurboID assay. In total, 1,388 high-confidence human proximal proteins with biotinylated sites are identified. Notably, we find that SARS-CoV-2 manipulates the antiviral and immune responses. We validate that the membrane protein ITGB1 associates angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) to mediate SARS-CoV-2 entry. Moreover, we reveal that SARS-CoV-2 proteins inhibit activation of the interferon pathway through the mitochondrial protein mitochondrial antiviral-signaling protein (MAVS) and the methyltransferase SET domain containing 2, histone lysine methyltransferase (SETD2). We propose 111 potential drugs for the clinical treatment of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and identify three compounds that significantly inhibit the replication of SARS-CoV-2. The proximity labeling map of SARS-CoV-2 and humans provides a resource for elucidating the mechanisms of viral infection and developing drugs for COVID-19 treatment.


Subject(s)
Antibodies/immunology , Antiviral Agents/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/immunology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/immunology , Humans , Integrin beta1/immunology , Microbial Sensitivity Tests
11.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 20274, 2021 10 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1467137

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this work is to provide an in silico molecular rationale of the role eventually played by currently circulating mutations in the receptor binding domain of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein (S-RBDCoV­2) in evading the immune surveillance effects elicited by the two Eli Lilly LY-CoV555/bamlanivimab and LY-CoV016/etesevimab monoclonal antibodies. The main findings from this study show that, compared to the wild-type SARS-CoV-2 spike protein, mutations E484A/G/K/Q/R/V, Q493K/L/R, S494A/P/R, L452R and F490S are predicted to be markedly resistant to neutralization by LY-CoV555, while mutations K417E/N/T, D420A/G/N, N460I/K/S/T, T415P, and Y489C/S are predicted to confer LY-CoV016 escaping advantage to the viral protein. A challenge of our global in silico results against relevant experimental data resulted in an overall 90% agreement. Thus, the results presented provide a molecular-based rationale for all relative experimental findings, constitute a fast and reliable tool for identifying and prioritizing all present and newly reported circulating spike SARS-CoV-2 variants with respect to antibody neutralization, and yield substantial structural information for the development of next-generation vaccines and monoclonal antibodies more resilient to viral evolution.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/immunology , Antiviral Agents/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Humans , Protein Binding
12.
Biomed Pharmacother ; 144: 112247, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1446461

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is a pneumonia-like disease with highly transmittable and pathogenic properties caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which infects both animals and humans. Although many efforts are currently underway to test possible therapies, there is no specific FDA approved drug against SARS-CoV-2 yet. miRNA-directed gene regulation controls the majority of biological processes. In addition, the development and progression of several human diseases are associated with dysregulation of miRNAs. In this regard, it has been shown that changes in miRNAs are linked to severity of COVID-19 especially in patients with respiratory diseases, diabetes, heart failure or kidney problems. Therefore, targeting these small noncoding-RNAs could potentially alleviate complications from COVID-19. Here, we will review the roles and importance of host and RNA virus encoded miRNAs in COVID-19 pathogenicity and immune response. Then, we focus on potential miRNA therapeutics in the patients who are at increased risk for severe disease.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , COVID-19/therapy , Genetic Therapy/methods , MicroRNAs/administration & dosage , Animals , Antiviral Agents/immunology , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , Drug Delivery Systems/methods , Humans , MicroRNAs/genetics , MicroRNAs/immunology
13.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 6(1): 315, 2021 08 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1442755

ABSTRACT

The evolution of coronaviruses, such as SARS-CoV-2, makes broad-spectrum coronavirus preventional or therapeutical strategies highly sought after. Here we report a human angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2)-targeting monoclonal antibody, 3E8, blocked the S1-subunits and pseudo-typed virus constructs from multiple coronaviruses including SARS-CoV-2, SARS-CoV-2 mutant variants (SARS-CoV-2-D614G, B.1.1.7, B.1.351, B.1.617.1, and P.1), SARS-CoV and HCoV-NL63, without markedly affecting the physiological activities of ACE2 or causing severe toxicity in ACE2 "knock-in" mice. 3E8 also blocked live SARS-CoV-2 infection in vitro and in a prophylactic mouse model of COVID-19. Cryo-EM and "alanine walk" studies revealed the key binding residues on ACE2 interacting with the CDR3 domain of 3E8 heavy chain. Although full evaluation of safety in non-human primates is necessary before clinical development of 3E8, we provided a potentially potent and "broad-spectrum" management strategy against all coronaviruses that utilize ACE2 as entry receptors and disclosed an anti-coronavirus epitope on human ACE2.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/antagonists & inhibitors , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived/immunology , Antiviral Agents/immunology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Disease Models, Animal , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Mice, Transgenic , Vero Cells
14.
Biomed Pharmacother ; 143: 112228, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1432983

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), which is a respiratory illness associated with high mortality, has been classified as a pandemic. The major obstacles for the clinicians to contain the disease are limited information availability, difficulty in disease diagnosis, predicting disease prognosis, and lack of disease monitoring tools. Additionally, the lack of valid therapies has further contributed to the difficulties in containing the pandemic. Recent studies have reported that the dysregulation of the immune system leads to an ineffective antiviral response and promotes pathological immune response, which manifests as ARDS, myocarditis, and hepatitis. In this study, a novel platform has been described for disseminating information to physicians for the diagnosis and monitoring of patients with COVID-19. An adjuvant approach using compounds that can potentiate antiviral immune response and mitigate COVID-19-induced immune-mediated target organ damage has been presented. A prolonged beneficial effect is achieved by implementing algorithm-based individualized variability measures in the treatment regimen.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/immunology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/drug therapy , Chemotherapy, Adjuvant/methods , Medical Informatics/methods , Algorithms , COVID-19/immunology , Disease Management , Disease Progression , Gastrointestinal Tract/immunology , Humans , Immunity, Cellular , Immunity, Humoral , Severity of Illness Index
15.
Arch Immunol Ther Exp (Warsz) ; 69(1): 25, 2021 Sep 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1411512

ABSTRACT

The term host defense peptides arose at the beginning to refer to those peptides that are part of the host's immunity. Because of their broad antimicrobial capacity and immunomodulatory activity, nowadays, they emerge as a hope to combat resistant multi-drug microorganisms and emerging viruses, such as the case of coronaviruses. Since the beginning of this century, coronaviruses have been part of different outbreaks and a pandemic, and they will be surely part of the next pandemics, this review analyses whether these peptides and their derivatives are ready to be part of the treatment of the next coronavirus pandemic.


Subject(s)
Antimicrobial Cationic Peptides/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pandemics , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/chemical synthesis , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/immunology , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Antimicrobial Cationic Peptides/chemical synthesis , Antimicrobial Cationic Peptides/immunology , Antiviral Agents/chemical synthesis , Antiviral Agents/immunology , Clinical Trials as Topic , Coronavirus/drug effects , Coronavirus/physiology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Immunomodulation , Respiratory Tract Infections/drug therapy , Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/immunology , Respiratory Tract Infections/virology
17.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(9)2021 Apr 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1359279

ABSTRACT

Deeply understanding the virus-host interaction is a prerequisite for developing effective anti-viral strategies. Traditionally, the transporter associated with antigen processing type 1 (TAP1) is critical for antigen presentation to regulate adaptive immunity. However, its role in controlling viral infections through modulating innate immune signaling is not yet fully understood. In the present study, we reported that TAP1, as a product of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs), had broadly antiviral activity against various viruses such as herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), adenoviruses (AdV), vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), dengue virus (DENV), Zika virus (ZIKV), and influenza virus (PR8) etc. This antiviral activity by TAP1 was further confirmed by series of loss-of-function and gain-of-function experiments. Our further investigation revealed that TAP1 significantly promoted the interferon (IFN)-ß production through activating the TANK binding kinase-1 (TBK1) and the interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) signaling transduction. Our work highlighted the broadly anti-viral function of TAP1 by modulating innate immunity, which is independent of its well-known function of antigen presentation. This study will provide insights into developing novel vaccination and immunotherapy strategies against emerging infectious diseases.


Subject(s)
ATP Binding Cassette Transporter, Subfamily B, Member 2/immunology , Antiviral Agents/immunology , Host Microbial Interactions/immunology , Interferon Type I/biosynthesis , ATP Binding Cassette Transporter, Subfamily B, Member 2/antagonists & inhibitors , ATP Binding Cassette Transporter, Subfamily B, Member 2/deficiency , ATP Binding Cassette Transporter, Subfamily B, Member 2/genetics , Animals , Gene Knockout Techniques , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Interferon Regulatory Factor-3/immunology , Mice , Models, Immunological , RAW 264.7 Cells , Toll-Like Receptors/agonists , Virus Diseases/immunology
18.
J Exp Med ; 218(10)2021 10 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1345702

ABSTRACT

IFN-I and IFN-III immunity in the nasal mucosa is poorly characterized during SARS-CoV-2 infection. We analyze the nasal IFN-I/III signature, namely the expression of ISGF-3-dependent IFN-stimulated genes, in mildly symptomatic COVID-19 patients and show its correlation with serum IFN-α2 levels, which peak at symptom onset and return to baseline from day 10 onward. Moreover, the nasal IFN-I/III signature correlates with the nasopharyngeal viral load and is associated with the presence of infectious viruses. By contrast, we observe low nasal IFN-I/III scores despite high nasal viral loads in a subset of critically ill COVID-19 patients, which correlates with the presence of autoantibodies (auto-Abs) against IFN-I in both blood and nasopharyngeal mucosa. In addition, functional assays in a reconstituted human airway epithelium model of SARS-CoV-2 infection confirm the role of such auto-Abs in abrogating the antiviral effects of IFN-I, but not those of IFN-III. Thus, IFN-I auto-Abs may compromise not only systemic but also local antiviral IFN-I immunity at the early stages of SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Autoantibodies/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Interferon Type I/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , Aged , Animals , Antiviral Agents/immunology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Autoantibodies/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/virology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Female , Humans , Interferon Type I/pharmacology , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Nasal Cavity/immunology , Nasal Cavity/virology , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Vero Cells , Viral Load/drug effects , Viral Load/immunology , Virus Replication/drug effects , Virus Replication/immunology
19.
Viruses ; 13(7)2021 07 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1335222

ABSTRACT

Viral infections cause a variety of acute and chronic human diseases, sometimes resulting in small local outbreaks, or in some cases spreading across the globe and leading to global pandemics. Understanding and exploiting virus-host interactions is instrumental for identifying host factors involved in viral replication, developing effective antiviral agents, and mitigating the severity of virus-borne infectious diseases. The diversity of CRISPR systems and CRISPR-based tools enables the specific modulation of innate immune responses and has contributed impressively to the fields of virology and immunology in a very short time. In this review, we describe the most recent advances in the use of CRISPR systems for basic and translational studies of virus-host interactions.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/immunology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , CRISPR-Cas Systems , Virus Diseases/immunology , Animals , Exoribonucleases/metabolism , Host Microbial Interactions/immunology , Humans , Immune Evasion , Immunity, Innate , Interferons/genetics , Interferons/immunology , RNA Editing , Transcriptome , Virus Diseases/virology , Virus Internalization , Virus Replication/drug effects
20.
Cytokine ; 146: 155637, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1333350

ABSTRACT

Interferons have prominent roles in various pathophysiological conditions, mostly related to inflammation. Interferon-gamma (IFNγ) was, initially discovered as a potent antiviral agent, over 50 years ago, and has recently garnered renewed interest as a promising factor involved in both innate and adaptive immunity. When new disease epidemics appear such as SARS-CoV (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus), MERS-CoV (Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus), IAV (Influenza A virus), and in particular the current SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, it is especially timely to review the complexity of immune system responses to viral infections. Here we consider the controversial roles of effectors like IFNγ, discussing its actions in immunomodulation and immunotolerance. We explore the possibility that modulation of IFNγ could be used to influence the course of such infections. Importantly, not only could endogenous expression of IFNγ influence the outcome, there are existing IFNγ therapeutics that can readily be applied in the clinic. However, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms controlled by IFNγ suggests that the exact timing for application of IFNγ-based therapeutics could be crucial: it should be earlier to significantly reduce the viral load and thus decrease the overall severity of the disease.


Subject(s)
Adaptive Immunity/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Immune Tolerance/immunology , Immunity, Innate/immunology , Interferon-gamma/immunology , Antiviral Agents/immunology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Interferon-gamma/therapeutic use , Receptors, Interferon/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Signal Transduction/immunology
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