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1.
Nihon Yakurigaku Zasshi ; 157(1): 27-30, 2022.
Article in Japanese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1609121

ABSTRACT

The new coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) spread throughout the world and caused a pandemic with COVID-19, an infection caused by SARS-CoV-2. Even today, an increase in the number of cases has also been observed in Japan. Since the drugs used in drug repositioning have already been tested for safety and pharmacokinetics in humans, it is possible to skip some development tests, and since the manufacturing method of the drug has already been established, it is possible to shorten the development period and reduce R&D costs. Therefore, the drug repositioning method is one of the methods that should be tried in order to achieve the initial control of a pandemic. In Japan, it has been announced that research and development using drug repositioning has been conducted to date. The following are some of the candidates that have already been identified as COVID-19 therapeutic agents in Japan and are expected to be identified in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pharmaceutical Preparations , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Drug Repositioning , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Nihon Yakurigaku Zasshi ; 157(1): 31-37, 2022.
Article in Japanese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1609118

ABSTRACT

Remdesivir is a direct-acting antiviral agent that inhibits viral RNA synthesis developed by Gilead Sciences, Inc. in the United States. It has been shown to have antiviral activity against single-stranded RNA viruses, including coronaviruses, in cell culture systems and animal models, and has been developed as a therapeutic agent for Ebola virus infection since 2015. however, to date, it has not been approved in any country. A novel coronavirus infection (COVID-19) was identified in Wuhan, Hubei Province, China in Dec, 2019, and is a respiratory disease characterized by fever, cough, and dyspnea. In severe cases, it may cause serious pneumonia, multi-organ failure and death. Gilead Sciences, Inc. U.S. embarked on the development of COVID-19 as a therapeutic drug, using remdesivir, which has shown in vitro and in vivo antiviral activities against MERS-CoV and SARS-CoV, which are single-stranded RNA coronaviruses that cause Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). The in vitro antiviral activity of remdesivir against SARS-CoV-2, which causes COVID-19, was confirmed and clinical studies were initiated in February 2020. Based on the results of clinical studies conducted by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) and Gilead Sciences, Inc. and experience of administration from a compassionate use, an exceptional approval system based on the "Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Act" was also approved in Japan as of May 7, 2020 for the indication of "infections caused by SARS-CoV-2." In this article, the background of the development and clinical results of remdesivir are described.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola , Hepatitis C, Chronic , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Animals , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola/drug therapy , Hepatitis C, Chronic/drug therapy , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Adv Exp Med Biol ; 1328: 99-121, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1607382

ABSTRACT

Common cold is known as a serious clinical problem worldwide. Coronaviruses have long been identified as respiratory pathogens causing "common cold" in healthy people. The pandemic of 2019 novel coronavirus as a serious public health problem and concern has resulted in severe illness and death especially in the elderly. COVID-19 is picking up pace around the world and has spread to more than 219 countries. Due to the very easy spread of COVID-19 and its lack of recognized appropriate treatments and vaccines as well as potential therapeutic effects of several traditional herbal remedies, we decided to gather, evaluate, and compare the potential pharmacological effects of medicinal herbs from Avicenna's perspective and modern medicine with antiviral properties which may lead to the discovery of suitable traditional treatments to prevent or reduce the adverse symptoms of common cold.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Common Cold , Aged , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Common Cold/drug therapy , Humans , Public Health , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Front Biosci (Elite Ed) ; 13(2): 272-290, 2021 12 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1591755

ABSTRACT

Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a lethal virus that was detected back on 31st December 2019 in Wuhan, Hubei province in China, and since then this virus has been spreading across the globe causing a global outbreak and has left the world fighting against the virus. The disease caused by the SARS-CoV-2 was named COVID-19 and this was declared a pandemic disease by the World Health Organization on 11th March 2020. Several nations are trying to develop a vaccine that can save millions of lives. This review outlines the morphological features of the virus describing the outer and inner structures of the virus along with the entry mechanism of the virus into the host body and the infection process. Detailed reports of global outbreak along with preventive measures have also been included, with special emphasis on China, the United States of America, India, Italy, and South Korea. Broad-spectrum antiviral drugs being used at various health care centres around the world, namely Remdesivir, Camostat & Nafamostat, Famotidine, Chloroquine & Hydroxychloroquine, Lopinavir/ritonavir, Ivermectin, and Tocilizumab & Sarilumab have also been included. World Health Organization guidelines on preventive measures and use of soaps, alcohol-based hand-rubs and wearing face masks have also been described. The vaccines that are in one of the phases of human trials, namely Oxford University's vaccine, the United States-based Moderna's vaccine, India's Covaxin and the Russian vaccine, have also been incorporated in the review article.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Animals , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects
6.
mBio ; 12(6): e0334721, 2021 12 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1599212

ABSTRACT

The world was unprepared for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and remains ill-equipped for future pandemics. While unprecedented strides have been made developing vaccines and treatments for COVID-19, there remains a need for highly effective and widely available regimens for ambulatory use for novel coronaviruses and other viral pathogens. We posit that a priority is to develop pan-family drug cocktails to enhance potency, limit toxicity, and avoid drug resistance. We urge cocktail development for all viruses with pandemic potential both in the short term (<1 to 2 years) and longer term with pairs of drugs in advanced clinical testing or repurposed agents approved for other indications. While significant efforts were launched against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), in vitro and in the clinic, many studies employed solo drugs and had disappointing results. Here, we review drug combination studies against SARS-CoV-2 and other viruses and introduce a model-driven approach to assess drug pairs with the highest likelihood of clinical efficacy. Where component agents lack sufficient potency, we advocate for synergistic combinations to achieve therapeutic levels. We also discuss issues that stymied therapeutic progress against COVID-19, including testing of agents with low likelihood of efficacy late in clinical disease and lack of focus on developing virologic surrogate endpoints. There is a need to expedite efficient clinical trials testing drug combinations that could be taken at home by recently infected individuals and exposed contacts as early as possible during the next pandemic, whether caused by a coronavirus or another viral pathogen. The approach herein represents a proactive plan for global viral pandemic preparedness.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Coronavirus/drug effects , Drug Combinations , Animals , COVID-19/drug therapy , Coronavirus/classification , Coronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Humans , Mice , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects
7.
J Am Soc Mass Spectrom ; 33(1): 181-188, 2022 Jan 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1596214

ABSTRACT

Affinity selection-mass spectrometry, which includes magnetic microbead affinity selection-screening (MagMASS), is ideal for the discovery of ligands in complex mixtures that bind to pharmacological targets. Therapeutic agents are needed to prevent or treat COVID-19, which is caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Infection of human cells by SARS-CoV-2 involves binding of the virus spike protein subunit 1 (S1) to the human cell receptor angiotensin converting enzyme-2 (ACE2). Like antibodies, small molecules have the potential to block the interaction of the viral S1 protein with human ACE2 and prevent SARS-CoV-2 infection. Therefore, a MagMASS assay was developed for the discovery of ligands to the S1 protein. Unlike previous MagMASS approaches, this new assay used robotics for 5-fold enhancement of throughput and sensitivity. The assay was validated using the SBP-1 peptide, which is identical to the ACE2 amino acid sequence recognized by the S1 protein, and then applied to the discovery of natural ligands from botanical extracts. Small molecule ligands to the S1 protein were discovered in extracts of the licorice species, Glycyrrhiza inflata. In particular, the licorice ligand licochalcone A was identified through dereplication and comparison with standards using HPLC with high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Drug Discovery/methods , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Binding Sites/drug effects , COVID-19/metabolism , Chalcones/chemistry , Chalcones/pharmacology , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical/methods , Fabaceae/chemistry , Humans , Ligands , Mass Spectrometry/methods , Molecular Docking Simulation , Protein Binding/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism
8.
PLoS Biol ; 19(12): e3001490, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1595018

ABSTRACT

Over the past 20 years, 3 highly pathogenic human coronaviruses (HCoVs) have emerged-Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV), Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV), and, most recently, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)-demonstrating that coronaviruses (CoVs) pose a serious threat to human health and highlighting the importance of developing effective therapies against them. Similar to other viruses, CoVs are dependent on host factors for their survival and replication. We hypothesized that evolutionarily distinct CoVs may exploit similar host factors and pathways to support their replication cycles. Herein, we conducted 2 independent genome-wide CRISPR/Cas-9 knockout (KO) screens to identify MERS-CoV and HCoV-229E host dependency factors (HDFs) required for HCoV replication in the human Huh7 cell line. Top scoring genes were further validated and assessed in the context of MERS-CoV and HCoV-229E infection as well as SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2 infection. Strikingly, we found that several autophagy-related genes, including TMEM41B, MINAR1, and the immunophilin FKBP8, were common host factors required for pan-CoV replication. Importantly, inhibition of the immunophilin protein family with the compounds cyclosporine A, and the nonimmunosuppressive derivative alisporivir, resulted in dose-dependent inhibition of CoV replication in primary human nasal epithelial cell cultures, which recapitulate the natural site of virus replication. Overall, we identified host factors that are crucial for CoV replication and demonstrated that these factors constitute potential targets for therapeutic intervention by clinically approved drugs.


Subject(s)
Autophagy/genetics , CRISPR-Cas Systems , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Gene Knockdown Techniques , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/drug effects , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Virus Replication
9.
J Pharm Biomed Anal ; 209: 114538, 2022 Feb 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587172

ABSTRACT

The 3C-like protease (3CLpro) of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is essential to the virus life cycle and is supposed to be a potential target for the treatment of coronaviral infection. Traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) have played an impressive role in the treatment of COVID-19 in China. The effectiveness of TCM formulations prompts scientists to take continuous effort on searching for bioactive small molecules from the ancient resources. Herein, we developed a native mass spectrometry-based affinity-selection method for rapid screening of active small molecules from crude herbal extracts applied for COVID-19 therapy. Six common herbs named Lonicera japonica, Scutellaria baicalensis, Forsythia suspensa, Glycyrrhiza uralensis, Cirsium japonicum, and Andrographis paniculata were investigated. After preliminary separation of the crude extracts, the fractions were incubated with 3CLpro. A native MS-based affinity screening assay was then conducted to search for the protein-ligand complexes. A UHPLC-Q/TOF-MS with UNIFI data acquisition and data processing software was applied to identify the hit compounds. Standard compounds were used to verify the outcomes. Among the 16 hits, three flavonoids, baicalein, scutellarein and ganhuangenin, were identified as potential noncovalent inhibitors against 3CLpro with IC50 values of 0.94, 3.02, and 0.84 µM, respectively. Their binding affinities were further characterized by native MS, with Kd values being 1.43, 3.85, and 1.09 µM, respectively. Overall, we established an efficient native MS-based strategy for discovering 3CLpro ligands from crude mixtures, which supplies a potential strategy of small molecule lead discovery from TCMs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Humans , Molecular Docking Simulation , Peptide Hydrolases , Protease Inhibitors/pharmacology
10.
Mol Med ; 27(1): 162, 2021 12 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1582120

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a novel type b coronavirus responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic. With over 224 million confirmed infections with this virus and more than 4.6 million people dead because of it, it is critically important to define the immunological processes occurring in the human response to this virus and pathogenetic mechanisms of its deadly manifestation. This perspective focuses on the contribution of the recently discovered interaction of SARS-CoV-2 Spike protein with neuropilin 1 (NRP1) receptor, NRP1 as a virus entry receptor for SARS-CoV-2, its role in different physiologic and pathologic conditions, and the potential to target the Spike-NRP1 interaction to combat virus infectivity and severe disease manifestations.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Neuropilin-1/chemistry , Neuropilin-1/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/chemistry , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/etiology , Comorbidity , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/virology , Female , Host-Pathogen Interactions/drug effects , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Infant , Molecular Targeted Therapy/methods , Neuropilin-1/immunology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/drug therapy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism
11.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(24)2021 Dec 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580690

ABSTRACT

Since the start of the COVID-19 outbreak, pharmaceutical companies and research groups have focused on the development of vaccines and antiviral drugs against SARS-CoV-2. Here, we apply a drug repurposing strategy to identify drug candidates that are able to block the entrance of the virus into human cells. By combining virtual screening with in vitro pseudovirus assays and antiviral assays in Human Lung Tissue (HLT) cells, we identify entrectinib as a potential antiviral drug.


Subject(s)
Benzamides/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Indazoles/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Animals , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Benzamides/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , Cell Line , Chlorocebus aethiops , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical , Drug Repositioning/methods , Humans , Indazoles/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Molecular Docking Simulation , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Vero Cells , Virus Attachment/drug effects
12.
Molecules ; 27(1)2021 Dec 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580564

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has caused millions of fatalities since 2019. Despite the availability of vaccines for this disease, new strains are causing rapid ailment and are a continuous threat to vaccine efficacy. Here, molecular docking and simulations identify strong inhibitors of the allosteric site of the SARS-CoV-2 virus RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp). More than one hundred different flavonoids were docked with the SARS-CoV-2 RdRp allosteric site through computational screening. The three top hits were Naringoside, Myricetin and Aureusidin 4,6-diglucoside. Simulation analyses confirmed that they are in constant contact during the simulation time course and have strong association with the enzyme's allosteric site. Absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity (ADMET) data provided medicinal information of these top three hits. They had good human intestinal absorption (HIA) concentrations and were non-toxic. Due to high mutation rates in the active sites of the viral enzyme, these new allosteric site inhibitors offer opportunities to drug SARS-CoV-2 RdRp. These results provide new information for the design of novel allosteric inhibitors against SARS-CoV-2 RdRp.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Computational Biology/methods , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/antagonists & inhibitors , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical , Flavonoids/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Allosteric Site , COVID-19/virology , Catalytic Domain , Drug Design , Humans , Intestinal Absorption , Molecular Docking Simulation
13.
Viruses ; 13(12)2021 12 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580427

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in a huge number of deaths from 2020 to 2021; however, effective antiviral drugs against SARS-CoV-2 are currently under development. Recent studies have demonstrated that green tea polyphenols, particularly EGCG, inhibit coronavirus enzymes as well as coronavirus replication in vitro. Herein, we examined the inhibitory effect of green tea polyphenols on coronavirus replication in a mouse model. We used epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and green tea polyphenols containing more than 60% catechin (GTP60) and human coronavirus OC43 (HCoV-OC43) as a surrogate for SARS-CoV-2. Scanning electron microscopy analysis results showed that HCoV-OC43 infection resulted in virion particle production in infected cells. EGCG and GTP60 treatment reduced coronavirus protein and virus production in the cells. Finally, EGCG- and GTP60-fed mice exhibited reduced levels of coronavirus RNA in mouse lungs. These results demonstrate that green tea polyphenol treatment is effective in decreasing the level of coronavirus in vivo.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Catechin/analogs & derivatives , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Polyphenols/pharmacology , Tea/chemistry , Virus Replication/drug effects , Animals , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Catechin/pharmacology , Catechin/therapeutic use , Cell Line , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Coronavirus OC43, Human/drug effects , Coronavirus OC43, Human/physiology , Disease Models, Animal , Humans , Mice , Polyphenols/chemistry , Polyphenols/therapeutic use
14.
Viruses ; 13(12)2021 12 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1576965

ABSTRACT

Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV), an enteric coronavirus, causes neonatal pig acute gastrointestinal infection with a characterization of severe diarrhea, vomiting, high morbidity, and high mortality, resulting in tremendous damages to the swine industry. Neither specific antiviral drugs nor effective vaccines are available, posing a high priority to screen antiviral drugs. The aim of this study is to investigate anti-PEDV effects of carbazole alkaloid derivatives. Eighteen carbazole derivatives (No.1 to No.18) were synthesized, and No.5, No.7, and No.18 were identified to markedly reduce the replication of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) inserted-PEDV, and the mRNA level of PEDV N. Flow cytometry assay, coupled with CCK8 assay, confirmed No.7 and No.18 carbazole derivatives displayed high inhibition effects with low cell toxicity. Furthermore, time course analysis indicated No.7 and No.18 carbazole derivatives exerted inhibition at the early stage of the viral life cycle. Collectively, the analysis underlines the benefit of carbazole derivatives as potential inhibitors of PEDV, and provides candidates for the development of novel therapeutic agents.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Carbazoles/pharmacology , Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus/drug effects , Animals , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Carbazoles/chemistry , Cell Survival/drug effects , Chlorocebus aethiops , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Molecular Structure , Vero Cells , Virus Attachment/drug effects , Virus Replication/drug effects
15.
Nutrients ; 13(2)2021 Jan 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575478

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 is a newly emerging virus that currently lacks curative treatments. Lactoferrin (LF) is a naturally occurring non-toxic glycoprotein with broad-spectrum antiviral, immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory effects. In this study, we assessed the potential of LF in the prevention of SARS-CoV-2 infection in vitro. Antiviral immune response gene expression was analyzed by qRT-PCR in uninfected Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells treated with LF. An infection assay for SARS-CoV-2 was performed in Caco-2 cells treated or not with LF. SARS-CoV-2 titer was determined by qRT-PCR, plaque assay and immunostaining. Inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokine production was determined by qRT-PCR. LF significantly induced the expression of IFNA1, IFNB1, TLR3, TLR7, IRF3, IRF7 and MAVS genes. Furthermore, LF partially inhibited SARS-CoV-2 infection and replication in Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells. Our in vitro data support LF as an immune modulator of the antiviral immune response with moderate effects against SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19 , Gene Expression Regulation , Immunity, Innate/drug effects , Lactoferrin/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Animals , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Caco-2 Cells , Chlorocebus aethiops , Gene Expression Regulation/drug effects , Gene Expression Regulation/immunology , Humans , Vero Cells
16.
J Biomol Struct Dyn ; 39(14): 5033-5047, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574027

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has ravaged the world and is the greatest of pandemics in human history, in the absence of treatment or vaccine the mortality and morbidity rates are very high. The present investigation was undertaken to screen and identify the potent leads from the Indian Ayurvedic herb, Asparagus racemosus (Willd.) against SARS-CoV-2 using molecular docking and dynamics studies. The docking analysis was performed on the Glide module of Schrödinger suite on two different proteins from SARS-CoV-2 viz. NSP15 Endoribonuclease and spike receptor-binding domain. Asparoside-C, Asparoside-D and Asparoside -F were found to be most effective against both the proteins as confirmed through their docking score and affinity. Further, the 100 ns molecular dynamics study also confirmed the potential of these compounds from reasonably lower root mean square deviations and better stabilization of Asparoside-C and Asparoside-F in spike receptor-binding domain and NSP15 Endoribonuclease respectively. MM-GBSA based binding free energy calculations also suggest the most favourable binding affinities of Asparoside-C and Asparoside-F with binding energies of -62.61 and -55.19 Kcal/mol respectively with spike receptor-binding domain and NSP15 Endoribonuclease. HighlightsAsparagus racemosus have antiviral potentialPhytochemicals of Shatavari showed promising in-silico docking and MD resultsAsparaoside-C and Asparoside-F has good binding with target proteinsAsparagus racemosus holds promise as SARS-COV-2 (S) and (N) proteins inhibitor Communicated by Ramaswamy H. Sarma.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Humans , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Phytochemicals , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Viruses ; 13(12)2021 11 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574265

ABSTRACT

Modulation of the antiviral innate immune response has been proposed as a putative cellular target for the development of novel pan-viral therapeutic strategies. The Janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK-STAT) pathway is especially relevant due to its essential role in the regulation of local and systemic inflammation in response to viral infections, being, therefore, a putative therapeutic target. Here, we review the extraordinary diversity of strategies that viruses have evolved to interfere with JAK-STAT signaling, stressing the relevance of this pathway as a putative antiviral target. Moreover, due to the recent remarkable progress on the development of novel JAK inhibitors (JAKi), the current knowledge on its efficacy against distinct viral infections is also discussed. JAKi have a proven efficacy against a broad spectrum of disorders and exhibit safety profiles comparable to biologics, therefore representing good candidates for drug repurposing strategies, including viral infections.


Subject(s)
Janus Kinases/metabolism , STAT Transcription Factors/metabolism , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Virus Diseases/metabolism , Viruses/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Inflammation , Janus Kinase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Janus Kinase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Janus Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors , Virus Diseases/drug therapy , Virus Diseases/immunology , Viruses/classification , Viruses/drug effects
18.
Viruses ; 13(12)2021 12 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1572668

ABSTRACT

Broad-spectrum antiviral therapies hold promise as a first-line defense against emerging viruses by blunting illness severity and spread until vaccines and virus-specific antivirals are developed. The nucleobase favipiravir, often discussed as a broad-spectrum inhibitor, was not effective in recent clinical trials involving patients infected with Ebola virus or SARS-CoV-2. A drawback of favipiravir use is its rapid clearance before conversion to its active nucleoside-5'-triphosphate form. In this work, we report a synergistic reduction of flavivirus (dengue, Zika), orthomyxovirus (influenza A), and coronavirus (HCoV-OC43 and SARS-CoV-2) replication when the nucleobases favipiravir or T-1105 were combined with the antimetabolite 6-methylmercaptopurine riboside (6MMPr). The 6MMPr/T-1105 combination increased the C-U and G-A mutation frequency compared to treatment with T-1105 or 6MMPr alone. A further analysis revealed that the 6MMPr/T-1105 co-treatment reduced cellular purine nucleotide triphosphate synthesis and increased conversion of the antiviral nucleobase to its nucleoside-5'-monophosphate, -diphosphate, and -triphosphate forms. The 6MMPr co-treatment specifically increased production of the active antiviral form of the nucleobases (but not corresponding nucleosides) while also reducing levels of competing cellular NTPs to produce the synergistic effect. This in-depth work establishes a foundation for development of small molecules as possible co-treatments with nucleobases like favipiravir in response to emerging RNA virus infections.


Subject(s)
Antimetabolites/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , RNA Viruses/drug effects , Adenosine Triphosphate/metabolism , Amides/pharmacology , Animals , Cell Line , Drug Synergism , Guanosine Triphosphate/metabolism , Humans , Methylthioinosine/pharmacology , Mutation/drug effects , Phosphoribosyl Pyrophosphate/metabolism , Pyrazines/pharmacology , RNA Viruses/classification , RNA Viruses/genetics , RNA, Viral/drug effects , RNA, Viral/genetics , Virus Replication/drug effects
19.
Viruses ; 13(12)2021 12 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1572663

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is an urgent need for new antivirals with powerful therapeutic potential and tolerable side effects. METHODS: Here, we tested the antiviral properties of interferons (IFNs), alone and with other drugs in vitro. RESULTS: While IFNs alone were insufficient to completely abolish replication of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), IFNα, in combination with remdesivir, EIDD-2801, camostat, cycloheximide, or convalescent serum, proved to be more effective. Transcriptome and metabolomic analyses revealed that the IFNα-remdesivir combination suppressed SARS-CoV-2-mediated changes in Calu-3 cells and lung organoids, although it altered the homeostasis of uninfected cells and organoids. We also demonstrated that IFNα combinations with sofosbuvir, telaprevir, NITD008, ribavirin, pimodivir, or lamivudine were effective against HCV, HEV, FLuAV, or HIV at lower concentrations, compared to monotherapies. CONCLUSIONS: Altogether, our results indicated that IFNα can be combined with drugs that affect viral RNA transcription, protein synthesis, and processing to make synergistic combinations that can be attractive targets for further pre-clinical and clinical development against emerging and re-emerging viral infections.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Interferon-alpha/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Cell Line , Drug Synergism , Humans , Lung/drug effects , Lung/metabolism , Lung/virology , Metabolome/drug effects , Organoids , RNA, Viral/biosynthesis , RNA, Viral/drug effects , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Transcriptome/drug effects , Virus Replication/drug effects , Viruses/classification , Viruses/drug effects
20.
Molecules ; 26(24)2021 Dec 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1572568

ABSTRACT

The encapsulation mode of dexamethasone (Dex) into the cavity of ß-cyclodextrin (ß-CD), as well as its potential as an inhibitor of the COVID-19 main protease, were investigated using density functional theory with the recent dispersion corrections D4 and molecular docking calculations. Independent gradient model and natural bond orbital approaches allowed for the characterization of the host-guest interactions in the studied systems. Structural and energetic computation results revealed that hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions played significant roles in the stabilization of the formed Dex@ß-CD complex. The complexation energy significantly decreased from -179.50 kJ/mol in the gas phase to -74.14 kJ/mol in the aqueous phase. A molecular docking study was performed to investigate the inhibitory activity of dexamethasone against the COVID-19 target protein (PDB ID: 6LU7). The dexamethasone showed potential therapeutic activity as a SARS CoV-2 main protease inhibitor due to its strong binding to the active sites of the protein target, with predicted free energy of binding values of -29.97 and -32.19 kJ/mol as calculated from AutoDock4 and AutoDock Vina, respectively. This study was intended to explore the potential use of the Dex@ß-CD complex in drug delivery to enhance dexamethasone dissolution, thus improving its bioavailability and reducing its side effects.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Dexamethasone/pharmacology , Protease Inhibitors/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , beta-Cyclodextrins/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Drug Carriers/pharmacology , Humans , Molecular Docking Simulation
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