Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 22
Filter
1.
J Relig Health ; 61(1): 79-92, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1607603

ABSTRACT

Religiously integrated interventions for treating mental illnesses have proved effective. However, many studies have yet to adequately address the effects of Islamic religious-based rituals on mental health among Muslims. The present study investigated the impact of a purposefully designed Islamic religion-based intervention on reducing depression and anxiety disorders among Muslim patients using a randomised controlled trial design. A total of 62 Muslim patients (30 women and 32 men) were divided by gender into two groups, with each group assigned randomly to either treatment or control groups. The participants who received the Islamic-based intervention were compared to participants who received the control intervention. Taylor's (cite date) manifest anxiety scale and Steer and Beck's (cite the date) depression scale were used to examine the effects on depression and anxiety levels. ANCOVA results revealed that the Islamic intervention significantly reduced anxiety levels in women (d = 0.75) and depression levels in men (d = 0.80) compared to the typical care control groups.


Subject(s)
Depression , Islam , Anxiety/therapy , Anxiety Disorders/therapy , Depression/therapy , Female , Humans , Malaysia , Male
2.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(12): e26987, 2021 12 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1597573

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Current treatments for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) often yield suboptimal outcomes, partly because of insufficient targeting of underlying psychological mechanisms (eg, avoidance reinforcement learning). Mindfulness training (MT) has shown efficacy for anxiety; yet, widespread adoption has been limited, partly because of the difficulty in scaling in-person-based delivery. Digital therapeutics are emerging as potentially viable treatments; however, very few have been empirically validated. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to test the efficacy and mechanism of an app-delivered MT that was designed to target a potential mechanism of anxiety (reinforcement learning), based on which previous studies have shown concern regarding feedback and the perpetuation of anxiety through negative reinforcement. METHODS: Individuals with GAD were recruited using social media advertisements and randomized during an in-person visit to receive treatment as usual (n=33) or treatment as usual+app-delivered MT (Unwinding Anxiety; n=32). The latter was composed of 30 modules to be completed over a 2-month period. Associated changes in outcomes were assessed using self-report questionnaires 1 and 2 months after treatment initiation. RESULTS: We randomized 65 participants in this study, and a modified intent-to-treat approach was used for analysis. The median number of modules completed by the MT group was 25.5 (IQR 17) out of 30; 46% (13/28) of the participants completed the program. In addition, the MT group demonstrated a significant reduction in anxiety (GAD-7) compared with the control group at 2 months (67% vs 14%; median change in GAD-7: -8.5 [IQR 6.5] vs -1.0 [IQR 5.0]; P<.001; 95% CI 6-10). Increases in mindfulness at 1 month (nonreactivity subscale) mediated decreases in worry at 2 months (Penn State Worry Questionnaire; P=.02) and decreases in worry at 1 month mediated reductions in anxiety at 2 months (P=.03). CONCLUSIONS: To our knowledge, this is the first report on the efficacy and mechanism of an app-delivered MT for GAD. These findings demonstrate the clinical efficacy of MT as a digital therapeutic for individuals with anxiety (number needed to treat=1.6). These results also link recent advances in our mechanistic understanding of anxiety with treatment development, showing that app-delivered MT targets key reinforcement learning pathways, resulting in tangible, clinically meaningful reductions in worry and anxiety. Evidence-based, mechanistically targeted digital therapeutics have the potential to improve health at a population level at a low cost. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT03683472; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03683472.


Subject(s)
Mobile Applications , Anxiety Disorders/therapy , Humans , Treatment Outcome
3.
Nutrients ; 14(1)2021 Dec 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580544

ABSTRACT

There are many ways to regulate emotions. People use both adaptive (e.g., regulation by music) and maladaptive (e.g., regulation by food) strategies to do this. We hypothesized that participants with a high level of food-based regulatory strategies and a low level of music-based regulatory strategies (a group with the least adaptive form of emotion regulation) would have significantly greater levels of unhealthy eating behaviours, depression, anxiety and stress, as well as a significantly lower level of healthy eating behaviours than those with a low level of food-based regulatory strategies and a high level of music-based regulatory strategies (a group with the greatest adaptive form of emotion regulation). Participants (N = 410; Mage = 31.77, SD = 13.53) completed: the Brief Music in Mood Regulation Scale, the Emotional Overeating Questionnaire, the Healthy and Unhealthy Eating Behavior Scale, the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale and a socio-demographic survey. The four clusters were identified: (a) Cluster 1 (N = 148): low food-based regulatory strategies and high music-based regulatory strategies; (b) Cluster 2 (N = 42): high food-based regulatory strategies and high music-based regulatory strategies; (c) Cluster 3 (N = 70): high food-based regulatory strategies and low music-based regulatory strategies; (d) Cluster 4 (N = 150): low food-based regulatory strategies and low music-based regulatory strategies. Overall, our outcomes partially support our hypothesis, as higher levels of unhealthy eating behaviours, depression, anxiety and stress were observed in participants with high food-based and low music-based regulatory strategies as compared with adults with low food-based and high music-based regulatory strategies. To sum up, the results obtained indicate that during the COVID-19 pandemic the group of people regulating their emotional state and unhealthy eating predominantly with food is potentially characterized by worse functioning than the group of people regulating with music. Therefore, it can be concluded that people who regulate their functioning using food should be included in preventive measures by specialists. During the visit, psychologists and primary care physicians can ask patients about their daily strategies and based on this information specialists can estimate the potential risk of developing high levels of stress and anxiety, depressive disorders and unhealthy eating habits and provide specific (match) intervention.


Subject(s)
Anxiety Disorders/therapy , COVID-19/psychology , Depressive Disorder/therapy , Diet, Healthy/statistics & numerical data , Feeding and Eating Disorders/therapy , Music/psychology , Stress, Psychological/therapy , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Anxiety Disorders/complications , Anxiety Disorders/psychology , Cluster Analysis , Depressive Disorder/complications , Depressive Disorder/psychology , Emotional Regulation , Feeding and Eating Disorders/complications , Feeding and Eating Disorders/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Acuity , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/complications , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
5.
Pediatr Ann ; 50(11): e446-e448, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1512790

ABSTRACT

Anxiety is incredibly common and even normal as a waxing and waning dominant emotion for children. However, attention to disruptive symptoms that prevent daily functioning or prevent a child from thriving is within the purview of the general pediatric medical home. We review diagnosis, current tools readily accessible to every pediatrician, and treatment approaches, with special sensitivity to pandemic-related barriers and outcomes related to pediatric anxiety disorders. More than ever, the general pediatrician should be prepared to co-manage anxiety disorders with an interprofessional mental health team. [Pediatr Ann. 2021;50(11):e446-e448.].


Subject(s)
Anxiety Disorders/diagnosis , Anxiety Disorders/therapy , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Anxiety Disorders/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Emotions , Humans , Pandemics
6.
Curr Psychiatry Rep ; 23(11): 77, 2021 10 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1453882

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Anxiety disorders are highly prevalent conditions that have a detrimental impact on quality of life (QOL), particularly when left untreated. In the present review, we summarize recent literature, published within the last 3 years, on QOL in anxiety disorders, with a focus on factors that may play a role in the relationship between anxiety and QOL. RECENT FINDINGS: We organize our findings into four categories: (1) subjective distress, (2) behavioral responses, (3) functional impairment, and (4) clinical factors. Results indicate that greater anxiety symptom severity is linked with poorer QOL, and cognitive behavioral therapies for anxiety yield positive effects on QOL. Additional transdiagnostic mechanisms are highlighted, including anxiety sensitivity, distress tolerance, emotion regulation, and avoidant coping. We examine the role of functional impairment, and we discuss factors related to treatment, including comorbidity and longitudinal effects. We also consider early research from the COVID-19 pandemic. Understanding the underlying factors that contribute to QOL detriments provides important insight into the impact of anxiety disorders and identifies targets for enhancing QOL through treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quality of Life , Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , Anxiety Disorders/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
7.
JAMA Psychiatry ; 78(11): 1200-1207, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1396818

ABSTRACT

Importance: Postpartum depression (PPD) affects as many as 20% of mothers, yet just 1 in 10 of these women receives evidence-based treatment. The COVID-19 pandemic has increased PPD risk, reduced treatment access, and shifted preferences toward virtual care. Objective: To determine whether an online 1-day cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT)-based workshop added to treatment as usual improves PPD, anxiety, social support, mother-infant relationship quality, and infant temperament more than treatment as usual alone. Design, Setting, and Participants: This randomized clinical trial included 403 women with PPD who were recruited across Ontario, Canada, during the COVID-19 pandemic (April 20 to October 4, 2020). Women with Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) scores of at least 10 who were 18 years or older and had an infant younger than 12 months were eligible. Interventions: Women were randomly assigned to receive a live, interactive online 1-day CBT-based workshop delivered by a registered psychotherapist, psychiatrist, or clinical psychology graduate student in addition to treatment as usual (n = 202) or to receive treatment as usual and wait-listed to receive the workshop 12 weeks later (n = 201). Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary outcome was change in PPD (EPDS scores) in experimental and wait list control groups 12 weeks after baseline. Secondary outcomes included maternal anxiety (7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire [GAD-7]), social support (Social Provisions Scale), quality of the mother-infant relationship (Postpartum Bonding Questionnaire), and infant temperament (Infant Behavior Questionnaire-Revised Very Short Form). Results: Participants all identified as women with a mean (SD) age of 31.8 (4.4) years. The workshop led to significant mean (SD) reductions in EPDS scores (from 16.47 [4.41] to 11.65 [4.83]; B = -4.82; P < .001) and was associated with a higher odds of exhibiting a clinically significant decrease in EPDS scores (odds ratio, 4.15; 95% CI, 2.66-6.46). The mean (SD) GAD-7 scores decreased from 12.41 (5.12) to 7.97 (5.54) after the workshop (B = -4.44; 95% CI, -5.47 to -3.38; P < .001) and participants were more likely to experience a clinically significant change (odds ratio, 3.09; 95% CI, 1.99-4.81). Mothers also reported improvements in bonding (B = -3.22; 95% CI, -4.72 to -1.71; P < .001), infant-focused anxiety (B = -1.64; 95% CI, -2.25 to 1.00; P < .001), social support (B = 3.31; 95% CI, 1.04 to 5.57; P < .001), and positive affectivity/surgency in infants (B = 0.31; 95% CI, 0.05 to 0.56; P < .001). Conclusions and Relevance: In this randomized clinical trial, an online 1-day CBT-based workshop for PPD provides an effective, brief option for mothers, reducing PPD and anxiety as well as improving social support, the mother-infant relationship, and positive affectivity/surgency in offspring. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04485000.


Subject(s)
Anxiety Disorders/therapy , COVID-19 , Cognitive Behavioral Therapy , Depression, Postpartum/therapy , Internet-Based Intervention , Mother-Child Relations , Psychotherapy, Brief , Social Support , Adult , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant Behavior/physiology , Object Attachment , Ontario , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Psychiatric Status Rating Scales , Temperament/physiology
8.
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry ; 60(11): 1334-1336, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1300825

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a significant impact on youth, including through increased isolation, the transition to online schooling, decreased access to arts and sports programming, exposure to illness, and anxiety. The pandemic has also affected the delivery of therapeutic services at a time when youth have needed more help building coping skills and reducing stress. Creative arts and movement therapies promote creativity and adaptability to better develop cognitive flexibility1 while enhancing self-regulation and self-direction, adaptive skills that are protective in the face of stress.2 Creative arts and movement-based group therapies delivered through community settings-such as resettlement agencies, schools, and community recreation centers-are feasible, cost-effective, and increase accessibility, especially for populations often underrepresented in the therapeutic space.3 Offering such interventions at the group level benefits both those who are experiencing significant stress and anxiety4,5 and those who are not experiencing such symptoms, as they still reap the long-term benefits of building stress-relaxation and emotion regulation skills. Having previously demonstrated the efficacy of art therapy (AT) and dance/movement therapy (DMT) in improving posttraumatic stress and anxiety symptoms for youth,4,5 our laboratory-the Stress, Trauma, and Anxiety Research Clinic-shifted programming to virtual formats, in partnerships with local resettlement agencies and schools.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , Anxiety Disorders/therapy , Creativity , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(4): e24447, 2021 Jan 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1299015

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The present study aimed to systematically analyze the effects of mind-body exercise on PTSD symptom, depression and anxiety among patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and to provide a scientific evidence-based exercise prescription. Meanwhile, it will also help reduce the global mental health burden of COVID-19. METHODS: Both Chinese and English databases (PubMed, Web of Science, the Cochrane Library, EMBASE, VIP Database for Chinese Technical Periodicals, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, and Wanfang) were used as sources of data to search for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published between January 1980 to September 2020 relating to the effects of mind-body exercise on PTSD symptom, depression and anxiety in PTSD patients. CONCLUSION: This systematic review and meta-analysis will provide stronger evidence on the effectiveness and safety of mind-body exercise for PTSD symptoms in PTSD patients. SYSTEMATIC REVIEW REGISTRATION: INPLASY2020120072.


Subject(s)
Anxiety Disorders/therapy , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/therapy , Mind-Body Therapies , Research Design , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/therapy , Humans , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Systematic Reviews as Topic
10.
Int J Ment Health Nurs ; 30 Suppl 1: 1437-1444, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1273105

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 significantly affects patients' mental health, triggering a wide range of psychological disorders, including anxiety. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of mandala colouring on the anxiety of hospitalized COVID-19 patients. In this randomized controlled clinical trial, 70 hospitalized patients with COVID-19 were randomly divided between the intervention and control groups. Standard care was provided for both groups. The intervention group spent 30 min/day for six consecutive days performing mandala colouring. Patient anxiety was measured prior and subsequent to the intervention in both groups using the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Data were analysed using SPSS software version 25. The mean anxiety score was not significantly different between the two groups before the intervention (P = 0.08). Subsequent to the intervention, the mean anxiety score in the intervention and control groups was 44.05 ± 4.67 and 67.85 ± 6.25, respectively, indicating a statistically significant (P = 0.0001) decrease in the anxiety measured among the intervention group as compared with that of the control group. The results of this study show that 30 min of mandala colouring daily is an effective strategy for reducing anxiety in hospitalized COVID-19 patients. Mandala colouring can complement routine treatment and provides a non-pharmaceutical option for decreasing patient anxiety.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/therapy , Anxiety Disorders/therapy , Humans , Patients , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Psychiatr Q ; 92(4): 1439-1457, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1202805

ABSTRACT

The study was designed to investigate the impact of the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on mental health and perceived psychosocial support for elderly psychiatric patients in a longitudinal design. n = 32 patients with affective or anxiety disorders aged ≥60 years were included. Telephone interviews were conducted in April/May 2020 (T1) and August 2020 (T2). The psychosocial impact (PSI) of the pandemic and psychopathology were measured. Changes between T1 and T2 were examined. Patients' psychosocial support system six months before the pandemic and at T1/T2 was assessed. We found a significant positive correlation between general PSI and depression as well as severity of illness. General PSI differed significantly depending on social contact. Neither general PSI nor psychopathology changed significantly between T1 and T2. At T1, patients' psychosocial support systems were reduced as compared to six months before. Patients reported an increase in psychosocial support between T1 and T2 and high demand for additional support (sports, arts/occupational therapy, physiotherapy, psychotherapy). Elderly psychiatric patients show a negative PSI of the pandemic. They are likely to suffer from an impaired psychosocial situation, emphasizing the importance of developing concepts for sufficient psychosocial support during a pandemic.


Subject(s)
Anxiety Disorders , COVID-19 , Mood Disorders , Pandemics , Patients , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anxiety Disorders/psychology , Anxiety Disorders/therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Female , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Mood Disorders/psychology , Mood Disorders/therapy , Patients/psychology , Patients/statistics & numerical data
13.
Am J Emerg Med ; 47: 164-168, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1163279

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The outbreak of COVID-19 disrupted lives across the United States. Evidence shows that such a climate is deleterious to mental health and may increase demand for mental health services in emergency departments. The purpose of this study was to determine the difference in emergency department utilization for mental health diagnoses before and after the COVID-19 surge. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study between January-August 2019 and January-August 2020 with emergency department encounter as the sampling unit. The primary outcome was the proportion of all emergency department encounters attributed to mental health. We performed chi-square analyses to evaluate the differences between 2019 and 2020. RESULTS: We found that overall emergency department volume declined between 2019 and 2020, while the proportion attributable to mental health conditions increased (p < 0.01). Substance abuse, anxiety, and mood disorders accounted for nearly 90% of mental health diagnoses during both periods. When stratified by sex, substance abuse was the leading mental health diagnosis for males and anxiety and substance abuse disorders combined accounted for the largest proportion for females. DISCUSSION: The emergency department is an important community resource for the identification and triage of mental health emergencies. This role is even more important during disasters and extended crises, making it imperative that emergency departments employ experienced mental health staff. This study provides a comparison of emergency department utilization for mental health diagnoses before the pandemic and during the spring 2020 surge and may serve as a useful guide for hospitals, health systems and communities in future planning.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Mental Disorders/therapy , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , Anxiety Disorders/therapy , Chi-Square Distribution , Connecticut/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Sex Factors , Substance-Related Disorders/epidemiology , Substance-Related Disorders/therapy
14.
Ortop Traumatol Rehabil ; 22(5): 303-309, 2020 Oct 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1079801

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Working during the coronavirus pandemic has had a significant impact on health care workers. A group of orthopaedic trainees at Royal Gwent Hospital, UK, were redeployed to intensive therapy unit for four weeks during COVID-19 pandemic. This study reviews our experience; focusing on causes of stress and anxiety, and how they were managed. The lessons learnt could be used as a framework for pre-emptive me-asures during future challenges. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Orthopaedic registrars were divided into two groups. Seven trainees (Redeployed group) moved to ITU for four weeks to support the critical care team. The other group (Retained group) of eight registrars continued to cover orthopaedic rota. A survey was done for anxiety levels comparing the two groups at three time points during these four weeks. RESULTS: Anxiety and stress in the ITU-redeployed group was comparatively less than the continuing group as time progressed during the redeployment. CONCLUSIONS: 1. The disruptive impact of the COVID-19 pandemic has been a source of massive stress and an-xiety for health care workers. 2. Our experience shows that stress is controllable with the correct strategies. 3. The main points are early identification of vulnerable groups, proper induction, active involvement, adequate explanation, appreciation, good communication, and available psychological support whenever needed. 4. These are essential to maintain a resilient workforce against upcoming waves of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Anxiety Disorders/therapy , COVID-19/psychology , Critical Care/psychology , Depressive Disorder/therapy , Health Personnel/psychology , Orthopedic Nursing/organization & administration , Adult , Anxiety Disorders/etiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Depressive Disorder/etiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , United Kingdom , Young Adult
15.
J Alzheimers Dis ; 80(2): 533-537, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1073321

ABSTRACT

We explored the experience from caregivers of people with dementia (PwD) during mandatory confinement due to the COVID-19 pandemic in Spain. An online survey, which studied the perceptions of the main problems and consequences experienced during confinement, was answered by 106 family caregivers of PwD. Results showed that family caregivers of PwD experienced psychological problems, like anxiety, mood, sleep, or eating disorders during confinement and felt less supported when they had to handle challenging behaviors or offer meaningful activities. An innovative multi-tiered supportive approach is needed which considers a post-pandemic reality and ensures the continuity of quality care for PwD and their family careers.


Subject(s)
Alzheimer Disease/psychology , Alzheimer Disease/therapy , COVID-19/psychology , Caregivers/psychology , Needs Assessment , Adaptation, Psychological , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anxiety Disorders/psychology , Anxiety Disorders/therapy , COVID-19/prevention & control , Feeding and Eating Disorders/psychology , Feeding and Eating Disorders/therapy , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Mood Disorders/psychology , Mood Disorders/therapy , Sleep Wake Disorders/psychology , Sleep Wake Disorders/therapy , Social Isolation , Social Support , Spain
16.
JCO Oncol Pract ; 17(1): e26-e35, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1024379

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Approximately 20% of caregivers (CGs) live > 1 hour away from the patient and are considered distance caregivers (DCGs) who often report higher distress and anxiety than local CGs. The purpose of this study was to test the effectiveness of an intervention aimed at reducing anxiety and distress in DCGs of patients with cancer. METHODS: This randomized controlled trial enrolled DCGs of patients with all cancer types who were being seen monthly by oncologists in outpatient clinics. There were three arms of the intervention delivered over a 4-month period: arm 1 (a) received 4 monthly videoconference-tailored coaching sessions with an advanced practice nurse or social worker focused on information and support, (b) participated in patient's appointments with the oncologist via videoconference over the 4-month study period, and (c) had access to a website designed for DCGs. Arm 2 did not receive the coaching sessions but received the other two components, and arm 3 received access to the DCG website only. RESULTS: There were 302 DCGs who provided pre- and postintervention data. There were significant anxiety by group (P = .028 and r = 0.16) and distress by group interactions (P = .014 and r = 0.17). Arm 1 had the greatest percentage of DCGs who demonstrated improvement in anxiety (18.6%) and distress (25.2%). CONCLUSION: Coaching and use of videoconference technology (to join the DCG into the patient-oncologist office visit) were effective in reducing both anxiety and distress for DCGs. These components could be considered for local CGs who-with COVID-19-are unable to accompany the patient to oncologist visits.


Subject(s)
Anxiety Disorders/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Caregivers/psychology , Neoplasms/psychology , Adult , Anxiety Disorders/complications , Anxiety Disorders/pathology , Anxiety Disorders/therapy , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/therapy , Cost-Benefit Analysis , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/complications , Neoplasms/pathology , Neoplasms/therapy , Oncologists , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Surveys and Questionnaires , Videoconferencing/standards
17.
J Addict Med ; 14(6): e293-e296, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1020286

ABSTRACT

: The COVID-19 pandemic is likely to exacerbate existing anxiety and substance use disorders (SUDs) and increase vulnerability among individuals previously free of these conditions. Numerous pandemic-related stressors-coronavirus infection fears, social distancing and isolation, activity restrictions, financial insecurity and unemployment, caregiving or childcare responsibilities-place a substantial burden both on the general population and on many health care providers. Anxiety symptoms such as worry, tension, irritability, difficulty concentrating, and sleep disruption are increasingly prevalent. For individuals in SUD treatment, anxiety can complicate efforts to achieve treatment goals. In this commentary, we outline the potential impact of anxiety on substance use problems during the COVID-19 crisis and describe key behavioral, pharmacological, and digital health treatment considerations. We highlight populations of special concern due to heightened vulnerability and challenges accessing services, strategies to support health care providers, and directions for future research.


Subject(s)
Anxiety Disorders/therapy , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Substance-Related Disorders/therapy , Anxiety Disorders/etiology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Infection Control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Substance-Related Disorders/etiology , Vulnerable Populations
18.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(47): e23185, 2020 Nov 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1006268

ABSTRACT

This study investigates the effect of progressive muscle relaxation training on negative mood and sleep quality in Coronavirus Pneumonia (COVID-19) patients.COVID-19 is an emerging infectious disease, and there is still uncertainty about when the outbreak will be contained and the effectiveness of treatments. Considering that this disease is highly contagious, patients need to be treated in isolation. This may lead to psychological symptoms such as anxiety and depression, and even sleep problems.This study is a clinical observation study.Participants included 79 COVID-19 patients admitted to a designated hospital for COVID-19 patients in Wuhan from February to March, 2020. Patients were selected and assigned to the control group and the observation group according to their wishes, with 40 and 39 cases in each group, respectively. The control group received routine treatment and nursing, and the observation group received progressive muscle relaxation training, in addition to the routine treatment and nursing. We compared scores of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index Scale (PSQI), the Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD-7), and the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) before and after the intervention.There was no significant difference in PSQI, GAD-7, and PHQ-9 scores between the control group and the observation group before the intervention (P > .05). After the intervention, the difference in scores of PSQI, GAD-7, and PHQ-9 in the 2 groups were statistically significant (P < .05).Progressive muscle relaxation training can significantly reduce anxiety and depression and improve sleep quality in COVID-19 patients during isolation treatment.Progressive muscle relaxation training was shown to improve the treatment effect of patients and is worthy of clinical promotion.


Subject(s)
Anxiety Disorders/therapy , Autogenic Training/methods , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Sleep Wake Disorders/therapy , Sleep/physiology , Adult , Anxiety Disorders/virology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Depression/therapy , Depression/virology , Emotions/physiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Patient Health Questionnaire , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Wake Disorders/virology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Treatment Outcome
19.
Ir J Psychol Med ; 37(3): 212-213, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-851101

ABSTRACT

New York City is in the grip of the COVID-19 pandemic. Health care centers are stretched beyond capacity. Daily death rates are staggering. The city's population is hunkered down in fear. Our anxiety treatment center is treating patients via video appointments. We are helping anxious individuals adapt to tumultuous changes that we ourselves are experiencing. Our work in this time has reinforced our core beliefs about managing one's emotions; that difficult times require more active coping and that we all draw heavily from social support and familiarity to create a feeling of well-being. These principles and the experiences of our patients are discussed.


Subject(s)
Anxiety Disorders/therapy , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Counseling/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Quarantine/psychology , Telemedicine/methods , COVID-19 , Emotions , Humans , New York City , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(38): e22177, 2020 Sep 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-787423

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Anxiety disorder places a heavy burden in the clinical treatment of patients of COVID-19. Acupuncture is a recommended treatment of COVID-19 in China, and clinical researches showed the effectiveness of acupuncture. We will conduct this systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture for COVID-19. METHODS: Electronic databases of Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), Chinese Biomedical literature Database (CBM), Chinese Scientific and Journal Database (VIP), and Wan Fang database (Wanfang) will be searched for randomized controlled trials of acupuncture for anxiety disorder of COVID-19 from inception of the database to August 10, 2020. Two reviewers will screen studies, collect information independently. We will utilize RevMan 5.3 for meta-analysis. RESULTS: We will publish the study result to a peer-reviewed journal. CONCLUSION: This study will contribute to provide high-quality evidence of acupuncture for anxiety disorder of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Acupuncture Therapy/methods , Anxiety Disorders/therapy , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Anxiety Disorders/virology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Research Design , SARS-CoV-2 , Systematic Reviews as Topic , Treatment Outcome
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL