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1.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0258893, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1700707

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Explore how previous work during the 2003 Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) outbreak affects the psychological response of clinical and non-clinical healthcare workers (HCWs) to the current COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A cross-sectional, multi-centered hospital online survey of HCWs in the Greater Toronto Area, Canada. Mental health outcomes of HCWs who worked during the COVID-19 pandemic and the SARS outbreak were assessed using Impact of Events-Revised scale (IES-R), Generalized Anxiety Disorder scale (GAD-7), and Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). RESULTS: Among 3852 participants, moderate/severe scores for symptoms of post- traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (50.2%), anxiety (24.6%), and depression (31.5%) were observed among HCWs. Work during the 2003 SARS outbreak was reported by 1116 respondents (29.1%), who had lower scores for symptoms of PTSD (P = .002), anxiety (P < .001), and depression (P < .001) compared to those who had not worked during the SARS outbreak. Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed non-clinical HCWs during this pandemic were at higher risk of anxiety (OR, 1.68; 95% CI, 1.19-2.15, P = .01) and depressive symptoms (OR, 2.03; 95% CI, 1.34-3.07, P < .001). HCWs using sedatives (OR, 2.55; 95% CI, 1.61-4.03, P < .001), those who cared for only 2-5 patients with COVID-19 (OR, 1.59; 95% CI, 1.06-2.38, P = .01), and those who had been in isolation for COVID-19 (OR, 1.36; 95% CI, 0.96-1.93, P = .05), were at higher risk of moderate/severe symptoms of PTSD. In addition, deterioration in sleep was associated with symptoms of PTSD (OR, 4.68, 95% CI, 3.74-6.30, P < .001), anxiety (OR, 3.09, 95% CI, 2.11-4.53, P < .001), and depression (OR 5.07, 95% CI, 3.48-7.39, P < .001). CONCLUSION: Psychological distress was observed in both clinical and non-clinical HCWs, with no impact from previous SARS work experience. As the pandemic continues, increasing psychological and team support may decrease the mental health impacts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/epidemiology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/psychology , Adaptation, Psychological/physiology , Adolescent , Adult , Allied Health Personnel , Anxiety/psychology , Anxiety/virology , Anxiety Disorders/psychology , Anxiety Disorders/virology , COVID-19/virology , Canada , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/psychology , Depression/virology , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Health , Middle Aged , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Patient Health Questionnaire , Psychological Distress , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/virology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/virology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
2.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0258893, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1511820

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Explore how previous work during the 2003 Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) outbreak affects the psychological response of clinical and non-clinical healthcare workers (HCWs) to the current COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A cross-sectional, multi-centered hospital online survey of HCWs in the Greater Toronto Area, Canada. Mental health outcomes of HCWs who worked during the COVID-19 pandemic and the SARS outbreak were assessed using Impact of Events-Revised scale (IES-R), Generalized Anxiety Disorder scale (GAD-7), and Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). RESULTS: Among 3852 participants, moderate/severe scores for symptoms of post- traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (50.2%), anxiety (24.6%), and depression (31.5%) were observed among HCWs. Work during the 2003 SARS outbreak was reported by 1116 respondents (29.1%), who had lower scores for symptoms of PTSD (P = .002), anxiety (P < .001), and depression (P < .001) compared to those who had not worked during the SARS outbreak. Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed non-clinical HCWs during this pandemic were at higher risk of anxiety (OR, 1.68; 95% CI, 1.19-2.15, P = .01) and depressive symptoms (OR, 2.03; 95% CI, 1.34-3.07, P < .001). HCWs using sedatives (OR, 2.55; 95% CI, 1.61-4.03, P < .001), those who cared for only 2-5 patients with COVID-19 (OR, 1.59; 95% CI, 1.06-2.38, P = .01), and those who had been in isolation for COVID-19 (OR, 1.36; 95% CI, 0.96-1.93, P = .05), were at higher risk of moderate/severe symptoms of PTSD. In addition, deterioration in sleep was associated with symptoms of PTSD (OR, 4.68, 95% CI, 3.74-6.30, P < .001), anxiety (OR, 3.09, 95% CI, 2.11-4.53, P < .001), and depression (OR 5.07, 95% CI, 3.48-7.39, P < .001). CONCLUSION: Psychological distress was observed in both clinical and non-clinical HCWs, with no impact from previous SARS work experience. As the pandemic continues, increasing psychological and team support may decrease the mental health impacts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/epidemiology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/psychology , Adaptation, Psychological/physiology , Adolescent , Adult , Allied Health Personnel , Anxiety/psychology , Anxiety/virology , Anxiety Disorders/psychology , Anxiety Disorders/virology , COVID-19/virology , Canada , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/psychology , Depression/virology , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Health , Middle Aged , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Patient Health Questionnaire , Psychological Distress , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/virology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/virology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
3.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(47): e23185, 2020 Nov 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1006268

ABSTRACT

This study investigates the effect of progressive muscle relaxation training on negative mood and sleep quality in Coronavirus Pneumonia (COVID-19) patients.COVID-19 is an emerging infectious disease, and there is still uncertainty about when the outbreak will be contained and the effectiveness of treatments. Considering that this disease is highly contagious, patients need to be treated in isolation. This may lead to psychological symptoms such as anxiety and depression, and even sleep problems.This study is a clinical observation study.Participants included 79 COVID-19 patients admitted to a designated hospital for COVID-19 patients in Wuhan from February to March, 2020. Patients were selected and assigned to the control group and the observation group according to their wishes, with 40 and 39 cases in each group, respectively. The control group received routine treatment and nursing, and the observation group received progressive muscle relaxation training, in addition to the routine treatment and nursing. We compared scores of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index Scale (PSQI), the Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD-7), and the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) before and after the intervention.There was no significant difference in PSQI, GAD-7, and PHQ-9 scores between the control group and the observation group before the intervention (P > .05). After the intervention, the difference in scores of PSQI, GAD-7, and PHQ-9 in the 2 groups were statistically significant (P < .05).Progressive muscle relaxation training can significantly reduce anxiety and depression and improve sleep quality in COVID-19 patients during isolation treatment.Progressive muscle relaxation training was shown to improve the treatment effect of patients and is worthy of clinical promotion.


Subject(s)
Anxiety Disorders/therapy , Autogenic Training/methods , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Sleep Wake Disorders/therapy , Sleep/physiology , Adult , Anxiety Disorders/virology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Depression/therapy , Depression/virology , Emotions/physiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Patient Health Questionnaire , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Wake Disorders/virology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Treatment Outcome
4.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(38): e22177, 2020 Sep 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-787423

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Anxiety disorder places a heavy burden in the clinical treatment of patients of COVID-19. Acupuncture is a recommended treatment of COVID-19 in China, and clinical researches showed the effectiveness of acupuncture. We will conduct this systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture for COVID-19. METHODS: Electronic databases of Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), Chinese Biomedical literature Database (CBM), Chinese Scientific and Journal Database (VIP), and Wan Fang database (Wanfang) will be searched for randomized controlled trials of acupuncture for anxiety disorder of COVID-19 from inception of the database to August 10, 2020. Two reviewers will screen studies, collect information independently. We will utilize RevMan 5.3 for meta-analysis. RESULTS: We will publish the study result to a peer-reviewed journal. CONCLUSION: This study will contribute to provide high-quality evidence of acupuncture for anxiety disorder of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Acupuncture Therapy/methods , Anxiety Disorders/therapy , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Anxiety Disorders/virology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Research Design , SARS-CoV-2 , Systematic Reviews as Topic , Treatment Outcome
5.
J Affect Disord ; 275: 210-215, 2020 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-626132

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a new infectious disease with high transmissibility and morbidity. It has caused substantial mental distress to medical professionals. We aimed to compare the psychological impact of the COVID-19 outbreak between frontline and non-frontline medical workers in China. METHODS: This case-control study recruited 1173 frontline and 1173 age- and sex-matched non-frontline medical workers during the COVID-19 outbreak (February 11 to 26, 2020). A set of online questionnaires were used to measure mental problems (i.e., anxiety, insomnia, and depressive symptoms), and help-seeking behavior and treatment for these mental problems. RESULTS: Frontline medical workers had higher rates of any mental problem (52.6% vs. 34.0%, adjusted OR=1.88, 95% CI=1.57-2.25), anxiety symptoms (15.7% vs. 7.4%, adjusted OR=1.95, 95% CI=1.46-2.61), depressed mood (marginally insignificant; 14.3% vs. 10.1%, adjusted OR=1.32, 95% CI=0.99-1.76) and insomnia (47.8% vs. 29.1%, adjusted OR=1.96, 95% CI=1.63-2.36) than non-frontline medical workers. No significant difference was observed in terms of suicidal ideation (12.0% vs. 9.0%, adjusted OR=1.25, 95% CI=0.92-1.71), help-seeking (4.5% vs. 4.5%, adjusted OR=1.00, 95% CI=0.53-1.87) or treatment (3.4% vs. 2.3%, adjusted OR=1.38, 95% CI=0.54-3.52) for mental problems. LIMITATIONS: The case-control nature of the data precludes causal inferences, and there is a possibility of bias related to self-reports. CONCLUSIONS: Frontline medical workers had more mental problems but comparable help-seeking behaviors and treatment for these problems than non-frontline medical workers. These findings highlight the timely mental support and intervention for medical workers, especially for those on the frontline.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Mental Disorders/virology , Mental Health , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Adult , Anxiety/psychology , Anxiety/virology , Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , Anxiety Disorders/virology , COVID-19 , Case-Control Studies , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Depression/virology , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Disorders/psychology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/virology
6.
Psychiatry Res ; 288: 112955, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-46183

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which appeared in early December 2019, had an atypical viral pneumonia outbreak in Wuhan, Hubei, China. And there is a high risk of global proliferation and impact. The sudden increase in confirmed cases has brought tremendous stress and anxiety to frontline surgical staff. The results showed that the anxiety and depression of surgical staff during the outbreak period were significantly higher and mental health problems appeared, so psychological interventions are essential.


Subject(s)
Anxiety Disorders , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Depression , Personnel, Hospital , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Anxiety , Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , Anxiety Disorders/virology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/virology , Disease Outbreaks , General Surgery , Humans , Mental Health Services , Pandemics , Personnel, Hospital/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological
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