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1.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(11)2023 May 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20233744

ABSTRACT

Residents of Puerto Rico bear a significant burden of mental health disorders, which the COVID-19 pandemic may have exacerbated. However, age-specific data on these disorders during the pandemic in Puerto Rico are scarce. This study evaluated age-related differences in the self-reported diagnosis of depression and anxiety among adults ≥18 years residing in Puerto Rico during the pandemic. An anonymous online survey was administered from December 2020 to February 2021 via Google Forms to measure self-reported sociodemographic and behavioral characteristics and physician-diagnosed mental health disorders. Multivariable logistic regression models were conducted for each self-reported mental health diagnosis after adjusting for sex, education, income, marital status, chronic diseases, and smoking. Out of 1945 adults, 50% were aged 40 years and over. Nearly 24% of responders self-reported an anxiety diagnosis, whereas 15.9% reported depression. Compared to individuals 50 years and over, those 18-29 y, 30-39 y, and 40-49 y had significantly higher odds of an anxiety diagnosis (OR = 1.84, 95% CI = 1.34-2.55; OR = 1.50, 95% CI = 1.09-2.07; and OR = 1.37, 95% CI = 1.01-1.87, respectively). However, no association between age and depression diagnosis was found. Despite anxiety and depression being frequent disorders during the pandemic in this sample, younger adults bear a higher burden of anxiety. Further research is needed to allocate appropriate mental health resources during emergencies according to population subgroups.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Humans , Middle Aged , Adolescent , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Puerto Rico/epidemiology , Pandemics , Depression/psychology , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/diagnosis , COVID-19 Testing
2.
Lupus ; 32(8): 974-982, 2023 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20231677

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to evaluate depression and anxiety in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in the post-coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) period and their potential association with the disease activity and related organ damage. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This is a case-control study including 120 adult Egyptian patients with SLE: sixty patients with SLE who were proven previously to be positive for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and recovered during the 3 months prior to the study were included in the case group and an equal number of age- and sex-matched patients with SLE and no evidence of SARS-CoV-2 infection were included in the control group. Patients' clinical history was collected, and they underwent clinical evaluation, including SLE disease activity, damage assessment, and psychological assessment. RESULTS: The mean depression and anxiety scores were significantly higher in cases than in the control group. Both scores showed a significant positive correlation with age, disease duration, the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology (SLICC/ACR) Damage Index for SLE (SDI), and SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI) and a significant negative correlation with education years. Hierarchical multivariate regression analyses revealed that COVID-19 infection was a predictor for severe depression and moderate-to-severe anxiety. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with SLE, who are already vulnerable to physiological stressors, are especially predisposed to more risk of anxiety and depression when they are contracted with COVID-19 disease. Furthermore, anxiety and depression are associated with SLE activity and damage scores, and COVID-19 infection is a significant predictor for their severity. These results suggest that healthcare providers should give special attention to the mental health of SLE patients, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic , Adult , Humans , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/complications , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/epidemiology , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Case-Control Studies , Pandemics , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Anxiety/epidemiology , Severity of Illness Index
3.
PLoS One ; 18(5): e0285799, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20240608

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Concerns about disease and an increase in health anxiety levels are expected consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic. However, there have been few longitudinal studies of health anxiety in the general population during this time period. The aim of this study was to examine health anxiety levels before and during the COVID-19 pandemic in an adult, working population in Norway. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This study included 1012 participants aged 18-70 years with one or more measurements of health anxiety (1402 measurements total) from the pre-pandemic period (2015 to March 11, 2020) and/or during the COVID-19 pandemic (March 12, 2020 to March 31, 2022). Health anxiety was measured with the revised version of the Whiteley Index-6 scale (WI-6-R). We estimated the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on health anxiety scores with a general estimation equation analysis, and age, gender, education, and friendship were included in subgroup analyses. RESULTS: We found no significant change in health anxiety scores during the COVID-19 pandemic compared to the pre-pandemic period in our adult, working population. A sensitivity analysis restricted to participants with two or more measurements showed similar results. Moreover, the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on health anxiety scores was not significant in any subgroup analysis. CONCLUSION: Health anxiety remained stable, with no significant change observed between the pre-pandemic period and the first 2 years of the COVID-19 pandemic in an adult, working population in Norway.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adult , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety Disorders , Health Status
4.
Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg ; 117(5): 317-325, 2023 05 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20240429

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Assessing the maternal mental health status during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is necessary to prevent the occurrence of severe mental disorders. Prenatal depression, anxiety and stress disorders are prominent in pregnant women living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and highly associated with poor maternal and neonatal outcomes. Therefore this study aimed to assess the level of depression, anxiety, and stress among HIV-positive pregnant women in Ethiopia during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: An institution-based cross-sectional study was conducted in Amhara region referral hospitals from 17 October 2020 to 1 March 2021. A systematic random sampling technique was used to select 423 eligible women. A structured, pretested and interviewer-administered questionnaire was employed to collect the data. A multivariable logistic regression analysis was implemented to identify factors associated with women's depression, anxiety and stress. Statistical association was certain based on the adjusted odds ratio (AOR) with its 95% confidence interval (CI) and p-values ≤0.05. RESULTS: Prenatal depression, anxiety and stress among HIV-positive pregnant women were 37.6% (95% CI 33 to 42.3), 42.1 (95% CI 37.7 to 46.7) and 34.8% (95% CI 30.3 to 39.2), respectively. Having an HIV-negative sexual partner (AOR 1.91 [95% CI 1.16 to 3.15]) and being on antiretroviral therapy >1 year (AOR 2.18 [95% CI 1.41 to 3.36]) were found to be statistically significant with women's antenatal depression, while unplanned pregnancy (AOR 1.09 [95% CI 1.02 to 2.33]) and did not discuss with the sexual partner about HIV (AOR 3.21 [95% CI 2.12 to 7.07]) were the factors associated with prenatal anxiety. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, more than one in three HIV-positive pregnant women had depression and anxiety. Thus, implementing strategies to prevent unplanned pregnancy and advocating open discussion with sexual partners about HIV will play a large role in reducing pregnancy-related depression and anxiety.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , HIV Infections , HIV Seropositivity , Infant, Newborn , Female , Pregnancy , Humans , Pregnant Women/psychology , Ethiopia/epidemiology , Pandemics , Depression/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , HIV Seropositivity/epidemiology , Anxiety/epidemiology , HIV Infections/complications , HIV Infections/epidemiology , HIV Infections/psychology
5.
BMC Public Health ; 23(1): 996, 2023 05 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20238982

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic continues to impact global health and China requires a 14-day quarantine for individuals on flights with positive COVID-19 cases. This quarantine can impact mental well-being, including sleep. This study aims to examine the impact of psychosocial and behavioral factors on insomnia among individuals undergoing quarantine in hotels. METHODS: This study was a cross-sectional survey carried out in Guangzhou, China. The data was gathered through online questionnaires distributed to international passengers who arrived in Guangzhou on flights and were required to undergo a 14-day quarantine in hotels arranged by the local government. The questionnaires were sent to the participants through the government health hotline "12,320." RESULTS: Of the 1003 passengers who were quarantined, 6.7% reported significant anxiety and 25.0% had varying degrees of insomnia. Anxiety was positively associated with insomnia (ß = 0.92, P < 0.001), while collectivism (ß = -0.07, P = 0.036), indoor exercise (ß = -0.50, P < 0.001), and the perceived people orientation of the public health service (ß = -0.20, P = 0.001) were negatively associated with insomnia. The study also identified moderating effects, such that a higher sense of collectivism, a greater frequency of indoor exercise, and a higher perception of the people-oriented of the public health service were associated with a lower impact of anxiety on insomnia. These moderating effects were also observed in participants with varying degrees of insomnia. CONCLUSIONS: This study reveals that a proportion of people undergoing entry quarantine experience insomnia and confirms how psychosocial and behavioral factors can alleviate insomnia in this population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Quarantine/psychology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Depression/epidemiology , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology
6.
BMC Psychol ; 11(1): 174, 2023 May 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20238940

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Under the background that the concept of a community with shared future for mankind has been advocated, the doctor-patient relationship has rapidly sublimated into a community with shared future for doctor-patient. The purpose of this study was to analyze the changes and relationships of anxiety, perceived a community with shared future for doctor-patient (PCSF), health self-consciousness (HSC) and benefit finding (BF) in the outbreak stage of COVID-19 and in the stable stage of COVID-19. METHODS: The questionnaire consisted of a self-designed health self-consciousness scale, perceived a community with shared future for doctor-patient scale, revised 7-item generalized anxiety disorder scale and benefit finding scale. Questionnaires were administered in the outbreak stage of COVID-19 and in the stable stage of COVID-19 to address public anxiety, BF, and trust between medical staff and patients. RESULTS: Risk perception will increase anxiety in public, and the public who trust medical staff and the ability of the government to prevent and control the epidemic will have a higher PCSF. Compared with those in the outbreak stage of COVID-19, PCSF, HSC and BF all decreased in the stable stage of COVID-19. HSC partly plays a mediating role in the process of the influence of PCSF and BF (95% CI = [0.3785, 0.5007], [0.2357, 0.3695], P < .001). The R-value of the model in the outbreak stage of COVID-19 and in the stable stage of COVID-19 were 0.555 and 0.429, and the value of R2 was 0.308 and 0.184 respectively (P < .001). In the stable stage of COVID-19, the coefficient of anxiety ✕ PCSF is negative. The B values of anxiety and PCSF are positive, and the moderating effect is negative (P = .038). Anxiety has a negative moderating effect between PCSF and HSC, indicating that anxiety will weaken the positive impact of PCSF on HSC. It means that there exists a substitution relationship between anxiety and PCSF. CONCLUSIONS: The common goal of medical staff and patients is health, and health is the premise of the meaning of life. Vigorously advocating for PCSF can not only promote a harmonious doctor-patient relationship, but also establish a good HSC and improve the understanding of the meaning of life in the public. Furthermore, if the common concept of a community with a shared future for doctor-patient is integrated into the values of life, it may be more stable and long-term to maintain a good doctor-patient relationship. In addition, we should guard against the influence of high-level anxiety on the path of meaning perception.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Physician-Patient Relations , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety Disorders , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
BMC Public Health ; 23(1): 993, 2023 05 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20238820

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic increases the risk of psychological problems, especially for the infected population. Sleep disturbance and feelings of defeat and entrapment are well-documented risk factors of anxiety symptoms. Exploring the psychological mechanism of the development of anxiety symptoms is essential for effective prevention. This study aimed to examine the mediating effects of entrapment and defeat in the association between sleep disturbance and anxiety symptoms among asymptomatic COVID-19 carriers in Shanghai, China. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted from March to April, 2022. Participants were 1,283 asymptomatic COVID-19 carriers enrolled from the Ruijin Jiahe Fangcang Shelter Hospital, Shanghai (59.6% male; mean age = 39.6 years). Questionnaire measures of sleep disturbance, entrapment, defeat, anxiety symptoms, and background characteristics were obtained. A mediation model was constructed to test the mediating effects of entrapment and defeat in the association between sleep disturbance and anxiety symptoms. RESULTS: The prevalence rates of sleep disturbance and anxiety symptoms were 34.3% and 18.8%. Sleep disturbance was positively associated with anxiety symptoms (OR [95%CI] = 5.013 [3.721-6.753]). The relationship between sleep disturbance and anxiety symptoms (total effect: Std. Estimate = 0.509) was partially mediated by entrapment (indirect effect: Std. Estimate = 0.129) and defeat (indirect effect: Std. Estimate = 0.126). The mediating effect of entrapment and defeat accounted for 50.3% of the association between sleep disturbance and anxiety symptoms. CONCLUSION: Sleep disturbance and anxiety symptoms were prevalent among asymptomatic COVID-19 carriers. Entrapment and defeat mediate the association between sleep disturbance and anxiety symptoms. More attention is needed to monitoring sleep conditions and feelings of defeat and entrapment to reduce the risk of anxiety.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sexually Transmitted Diseases , Humans , Male , Adult , Female , Depression/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Hospitals, Special , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Mobile Health Units , Anxiety/epidemiology , Sleep , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/epidemiology
8.
Int J Soc Psychiatry ; 69(4): 916-927, 2023 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20238631

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Returning to social life after the lifting of COVID-19 lockdown may increase risk of social anxiety, which is highly co-morbid with depression. However, few studies have reported the association between them. AIMS: To explore the complex relationship between social anxiety and depression symptoms in left-behind children after the lifting of the COVID-19 lockdown. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was conducted 6 months after the lockdown removal. A total of 3,107 left-behind children completed the survey with a mean age of 13.33 and a response rate of 87.77%. Depression and social anxiety severity were assessed by the DSM-5 Patient Health Questionnaire for Adolescents and the DSM-5 Social Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire, respectively. The symptom-level association between the two disorders was examined using network analysis. RESULTS: After the lifting of COVID-19 lockdown, the prevalence of depression and social anxiety in left-behind children was 19.57% and 12.36%, respectively, with a co-morbidity rate of 8.98%. Network analysis showed that "Social tension" and "Social avoidance" had the greatest expected influence; "Humiliation" and "Motor" were bridge symptom nodes in the network. The directed acyclic graph indicated that "Social fright" was at the upstream of all symptoms. CONCLUSION: Attention should be paid to social anxiety symptoms in left-behind children after the lifting of COVID-19 lockdown. Prevention and intervention measures should be taken promptly to reduce the comorbidity of social anxiety and depression symptoms in the left-behind children after the lifting of lockdown.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , Humans , Child , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Depression/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , East Asian People , Communicable Disease Control , Anxiety/epidemiology
9.
PLoS One ; 18(5): e0283762, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20238524

ABSTRACT

The isolating nature of various COVID-19 mandates may have reduced physical activity (PA) and increased mental health symptomology among individuals with amputation. However, an investigation of mental health across PA levels before and after the onset of COVID-19 among this group has not been conducted. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate group differences in depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress symptomology among individuals with amputation who reported being physically "active," "somewhat active," or "inactivate" before and during the pandemic. Individuals with an amputation at any level (n = 91; 51% female; age = 52.5±15.5) completed an online questionnaire to assess demographic information, PA levels, and mental health throughout the pandemic. Group differences in self-reported PA before and after COVID-19 onset were assessed by the PA Guidelines for Americans recommendations. The Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD-7), and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist (PCL-5) scales were used to assess group differences in mental health status. Before and after the onset of COVID-19, 33% and 42.9% of respondents reported that they were inactive, respectively. 58.2% of respondents reported decreased PA since the pandemic's onset. Prior to the pandemic, active individuals reported lower CES-D (14.21 vs. 19.07; Cohen's d: -0.414), GAD-7 (3.82 vs. 5.47; Cohen's d: -0.359), and PCL-5 (15.92 vs. 21.03; Cohen's d: -0.319) scores compared to inactive individuals. After the onset of COVID-19, scores remained lower for active respondents CES-D (12.67 vs. 20.03; Cohen's d: 0.-669), GAD-7 (3.17 vs. 5.87; Cohen's d: -0.598), and PCL-5 (13.39 vs. 19.90; Cohen's d: -0.430). Individuals with amputation reported decreased PA after the onset of COVID-19. Individuals reporting that they were "active" exhibited improved depression and anxiety symptomology scores compared to those reporting that they were "inactive."


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Health , Humans , Female , Adult , Middle Aged , Aged , Male , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Exercise , Anxiety/epidemiology , Amputation, Surgical , Depression/epidemiology
10.
PLoS One ; 18(6): e0286636, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20238502

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and the corresponding lockdown have drastically changed our lives and led to high psychological distress and mental health problems. This study examined whether psychological factors such as loneliness, perfectionism, and health anxiety are associated with COVID-19 related anxiety and depression during the pandemic in young Korean adults, after controlling for various socio-demographic factors and early life stress. METHODS: A total of 189 participants (58.2% women) completed a cross-sectional online survey including the Fear of COVID-19 Scale, Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, 3-item Revised UCLA Loneliness Scale, Frost Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale, and Whiteley Index-6. Hierarchical linear regression analyses with three blocks were employed to identify the factors that contributed to COVID-19 related anxiety and depressive symptoms. RESULTS: Hierarchical regression analyses showed that higher health anxiety was significantly associated with more severe COVID-19 related anxiety (standardized regression coefficient, ß = 0.599, p < 0.001). Additionally, higher levels of loneliness (ß = 0.482, p < 0.001), perfectionism (ß = 0.124, p = 0.035), and health anxiety (ß = 0.228, p < 0.001) were significantly associated with higher depression scores. The three psychological factors explained 32.8% of the total variance in depressive symptom scores, after taking all covariates into account. CONCLUSION: The results showed that health anxiety was a risk factor for both COVID-19 related anxiety and depression in young adults. Loneliness was the strongest predictor of depressive symptoms during the COVID-19 pandemic. These findings highlight the importance of identifying vulnerable individuals and encouraging psychological counselling and social connections to reduce the burden of psychiatric disorders during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Female , Young Adult , Male , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Mental Health , Surveys and Questionnaires , Communicable Disease Control , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology
11.
PLoS One ; 18(6): e0286155, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20237175

ABSTRACT

The mental and physical well-being of healthcare workers is being affected by global COVID-19. The pandemic has impacted the mental health of medical staff in numerous ways. However, most studies have examined sleep disorders, depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic problems in healthcare workers during and after the outbreak. The study's objective is to evaluate COVID-19's psychological effects on healthcare professionals of Saudi Arabia. Healthcare professionals from tertiary teaching hospitals were invited to participate in the survey. Almost 610 people participated in the survey, of whom 74.3% were female, and 25.7% were male. The survey included the ratio of Saudi and non-Saudi participants. The study has utilized multiple machine learning algorithms and techniques such as Decision Tree (DT), Random Forest (RF), K Nearest Neighbor (KNN), Gradient Boosting (GB), Extreme Gradient Boosting (XGBoost), and Light Gradient Boosting Machine (LightGBM). The machine learning models offer 99% accuracy for the credentials added to the dataset. The dataset covers several aspects of medical workers, such as profession, working area, years of experience, nationalities, and sleeping patterns. The study concluded that most of the participants who belonged to the medical department faced varying degrees of anxiety and depression. The results reveal considerable rates of anxiety and depression in Saudi frontline workers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Mental Health , SARS-CoV-2 , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Medical Staff
12.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(10)2023 05 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20236880

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The current study investigated the experiences, wellbeing impacts, and coping strategies of frontline workers who participated in "Hotels for Heroes", an Australian voluntary hotel quarantine program during the COVID-19 pandemic. The program was open to those who were COVID-19 positive or exposed to COVID-19 as part of their profession. METHODS: Frontline workers who had stayed in voluntary quarantine between April 2020 and March 2021 were invited to participate in a voluntary, anonymous, cross-sectional online survey including both quantitative and qualitative responses. Complete responses were collected from 106 participants, which included data on sociodemographic and occupational characteristics, experiences of the Hotels for Heroes program, and validated mental health measures. RESULTS: Mental health problems were prevalent amongst frontline workers (e.g., moderate anxiety symptoms, severe depression symptoms, and greater than usual impact of fatigue). For some, quarantine appeared to be helpful for anxiety and burnout, but quarantine also appeared to impact anxiety, depression, and PTSD negatively, and longer stays in quarantine were associated with significantly higher coronavirus anxiety and fatigue impacts. The most widely received support in quarantine was from designated program staff; however, this was reportedly accessed by less than half of the participants. CONCLUSIONS: The current study points to specific aspects of mental health care that can be applied to participants of similar voluntary quarantine programs in the future. It seems necessary to screen for psychological needs at various stages of quarantine, and to allocate appropriate care and improve its accessibility, as many participants did not utilise the routine support offered. Support should especially target disease-related anxiety, symptoms of depression and trauma, and the impacts of fatigue. Future research is needed to clarify specific phases of need throughout quarantine programs, and the barriers for participants receiving mental health supports in these contexts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Quarantine/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Australia , Anxiety/epidemiology
13.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 23(1): 556, 2023 May 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20236438

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: In addition to the common difficulties of ongoing trials, the COVID-19 pandemic posed several challenges to scientists worldwide and created an additional burden for vulnerable patient groups. In the nFC-isPO of individualised treatment for anxiety and depression in newly diagnosed patients with cancer caregivers (e.g. psycho-oncologists) reported elevated HADS scores in newly enrolled patients after the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic. Accordingly, the question arises whether the pandemic affected HADS scores. Therefore, stratified analyses by the time of enrolment (T1) were performed for patients with 12 months of care (T3). METHODS: Patients with 12 months of care (N = 1,140) were analysed. A comparison within the regression discontinuity design according to the time points at which patients completed the baseline (T1) HADS questionnaire was conducted to examine differences between patients recruited before Q2/2020 (pre-pandemic) and after the coronavirus outbreak. Furthermore, mean HADS scores at T1 and T3 for all quarters during the study were compared. RESULTS: Mean T1 and T3 HADS scores of patients with cancer during the pandemic are only slightly higher than those of the pre-pandemic group. No significant treatment effect was observed in either the pre-pandemic (p = 0.5495, Late = 1.7711) or the post-pandemic group (p = 0.9098, LATE=-0.2933). In contrast, the average local treatment effect in the post-pandemic group suggests a minimal decrease in HADS score in the predefined range and thus a positive treatment effect for isPO. Comparison of mean HADS scores at T1 and T3 did not show a large increase by pandemic-related timepoints, however, a decrease of approximately 2-3 points over each quarter at 12 months compared to baseline is observed. CONCLUSION: The existing nFC-isPO care is resilient to crisis and may counteract external influences such as the Corona pandemic. Accordingly, the pandemic had little influence on the fears of patients with cancer in the nFC-isPO. This emphasises that psycho-oncology is vital for the reduction of stress, anxiety and depression in patients with cancer. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The study was registered in the German Clinical Trials Registry on 30 October 2018 under the ID "DRKS00015326".


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Humans , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/therapy , Neoplasms/therapy , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Pandemics , Psycho-Oncology , Clinical Trials as Topic
14.
J Bras Pneumol ; 49(3): e20230056, 2023.
Article in English, Portuguese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20235727

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: COVID-19 has been associated with a significant burden to those who survive the acute phase. We aimed to describe the quality of life and symptoms of anxiety, depression, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) at 90 days after hospital discharge of COVID-19 patients. METHODS: Patients with COVID-19 admitted to a private hospital in the city of São Paulo, Brazil, between April of 2020 and April of 2021 were interviewed by telephone at 30 and 90 days after discharge to assess the quality of life and symptoms of depression, anxiety, and PTSD. RESULTS: A total of 2,138 patients were included. The mean age was 58.6 ± 15.8 years, and the median length of hospital stay was 9.0 (5.0-15.8) days. Between the two time points, depression increased from 3.1% to 7.2% (p < 0.001), anxiety increased from 3.2% to 6.2% (p < 0.001), and PTSD increased from 2.3% to 5.0% (p < 0.001). At least one physical symptom related to COVID-19 diagnosis persisted in 32% of patients at day 90. CONCLUSIONS: Persistence of physical symptoms was high even at 90 days after discharge. Although the prevalence of symptoms of anxiety, depression, and PTSD was low, these symptoms persisted for three months, with a significant increase between the time points. This finding indicates the need to identify at-risk patients so that they can be given an appropriate referral at discharge.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Adult , Middle Aged , Aged , Cohort Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Quality of Life , Brazil/epidemiology , COVID-19 Testing , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , Depression/epidemiology
15.
Med Sci Monit Basic Res ; 29: e939514, 2023 May 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20245277

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to evaluate the psychological status of anxiety and depression of hospital staff in the designated hospital in the city of Shannan during the COVID-19 pandemic in order to provide a theoretical basis for effective psychological intervention. MATERIAL AND METHODS A cross-sectional survey was performed from September 10 to 16, 2022, by administering an online questionnaire to the hospital staff on duty in the hospital. We collected participants' demographic and general information. The Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS) and Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS) were used to investigate the anxiety and depression of hospital staff. RESULTS Among 267 hospital staff, anxiety was found in 98 individuals, with a prevalence of 36.70%. Depression was found in 170 individuals, with a prevalence of 63.67%. Anxiety combined with depression was found in 84 individuals, with a prevalence of 31.46%. The prevalence of depression was higher in women, Tibetan personnel, hospital staff with primary or lower titles, staff without career establishment, and non-aid Tibetan personnel, and the differences were all statistically significant (P.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Female , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Anxiety/epidemiology , Personnel, Hospital/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Hospitals
16.
Environ Health Prev Med ; 28: 34, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20244907

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Due to the continuous spread of the epidemic, some colleges and universities have implemented a campus lockdown management policy in China. In the context of the campus lockdown, this study aimed to explore whether anxiety mediated the association between interpersonal sensitivity and depression, and investigate whether psychological capital moderated the indirect or direct effect of mediation model. METHODS: A total of 12945 undergrad students were recruited in China from April 10 to 19, 2022. These participants were asked to complete the online questionnaires measuring interpersonal sensitivity, anxiety, psychological capital, and depression. A moderated mediation model was examined by using PROCESS macro for SPSS 25.0, in which anxiety was a mediating variable, and psychological capital was a moderating variable. RESULTS: Interpersonal sensitivity was positively associated with depression among Chinese college students (r = 0.47, P < 0.001). Anxiety partially mediated the association between interpersonal sensitivity and depression (indirect effect = 2.31, 95%CI [2.18, 2.44], accounting for 70% of the total effect). Moreover, the interaction effect of interpersonal sensitivity and psychological capital on anxiety (ß = -0.04, t = -17.36, P < 0.001) and the interaction effect of anxiety and psychological capital on depression (ß = 0.002, t = 1.99, P < 0.05) were statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: The current study explained the mediation role of anxiety and the moderation role of psychological capital in the relation between interpersonal sensitivity and depression. The findings suggested that strict monitoring anxiety and promoting psychological capital may decrease the risk of depression among Chinese college students during the campus lockdown.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Depression , Humans , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Anxiety/epidemiology , Students/psychology
17.
Disaster Med Public Health Prep ; 17: e403, 2023 06 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20244893

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study is aimed at investigating the relationships between religious practice, religious coping strategies, and mental health among Chinese Christians in the context of the COVID-19 outbreak. METHODS: A total of 915 participants from several cities in China completed online questionnaires, including sociodemographic data, mental disorder history, and years as a Christian, as well as frequency of weekly religious practice, Religious Coping Scale, the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), and the Generalized Anxiety Disorder scale (GAD-7). RESULTS: The result of multivariate analysis indicated that during the COVID-19 pandemic, among Chinese Christians without a history of mental disorder, negative religious coping were associated with depression, and anxiety symptoms. Among Chinese Christians with a history of mental disorders, comorbidity with 1 mental disorder, comorbidity with 2 or more mental disorders, negative religious coping, and positive religious coping were associated with depression symptoms. Comorbidity with 2 or more mental disorders, negative religious coping, and positive religious coping were associated with anxiety symptoms. CONCLUSION: Christians with a previous history of mental illness are more likely to experience anxiety during the epidemic. In the future, mental health services during disasters may put more attention on certain religious groups and provide more spiritual care to maintain their well-being accordingly.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , COVID-19 , Christianity , Pandemics , Humans , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Depression/psychology , East Asian People
18.
AIDS Res Ther ; 20(1): 36, 2023 Jun 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20244726

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Concerns about the interconnected relationship between HIV and mental health were heightened during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study assessed whether there were temporal changes in the mental health status of people living with HIV presenting for care in Shinyanga region, Tanzania. Specifically, we compared the prevalence of depression and anxiety before and during COVID-19, with the goal of describing the changing needs, if any, to person-centered HIV services. METHODS: We analyzed baseline data from two randomized controlled trials of adults initiating ART in Shinyanga region, Tanzania between April-December 2018 (pre-COVID-19 period, n = 530) and May 2021-March 2022 (COVID-19 period, n = 542), respectively. We compared three mental health indicators that were similarly measured in both surveys: loss of interest in things, hopelessness about the future, and uncontrolled worrying. We also examined depression and anxiety which were measured using the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25 in the pre-COVID-19 period and the Patient Health Questionnaire-4 in the COVID-19 period, respectively, and classified as binary indicators per each scale's threshold. We estimated prevalence differences (PD) in adverse mental health status before and during the COVID-19 pandemic, using stabilized inverse probability of treatment weighting to adjust for underlying differences in the two study populations. RESULTS: We found significant temporal increases in the prevalence of feeling 'a lot' and 'extreme' loss of interest in things ['a lot' PD: 38, CI 34,41; 'extreme' PD: 9, CI 8,12)], hopelessness about the future [' a lot' PD: 46, CI 43,49; 'extreme' PD: 4, CI 3,6], and uncontrolled worrying [' a lot' PD: 34, CI 31,37; 'extreme' PD: 2, CI 0,4] during the COVID-19 pandemic. We also found substantially higher prevalence of depression [PD: 38, CI 34,42] and anxiety [PD: 41, CI 37,45]. CONCLUSIONS: After applying a quasi-experimental weighting approach, the prevalence of depression and anxiety symptoms among those starting ART during COVID-19 was much higher than before the pandemic. Although depression and anxiety were measured using different, validated scales, the concurrent increases in similarly measured mental health indicators lends confidence to these findings and warrants further research to assess the possible influence of COVID-19 on mental health among adults living with HIV. Trial Registration NCT03351556, registered November 24, 2017; NCT04201353, registered December 17, 2019.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , HIV Infections , Adult , Humans , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , HIV Infections/complications , HIV Infections/drug therapy , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Pandemics , Prevalence , Tanzania/epidemiology
19.
J Med Imaging Radiat Sci ; 54(2S): S29-S37, 2023 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20244576

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic has severely impacted education and other aspects of life, causing psychological distress. The current study aims to identify anxiety, depression, and stress among radiography undergraduates during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHOD: A descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted between November and December 2021 on a sample of 140 radiography undergraduates at the Department of Radiography/Radiotherapy, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, University of Peradeniya. An online survey with two sections: demographic characteristics and a psychometric scale (DASS-42) was used for data collection. RESULTS: A total of 107 undergraduates responded to the questionnaire giving a response rate of 76.2%. The results revealed that the majority of radiography undergraduate students suffered from mild to extremely severe depression (87.85%), anxiety (92.52%), and stress (73.83%) levels. In addition, more than two-thirds of the students (>73% of participants) reported at least one symptom of depression, anxiety, or stress to varying degrees. Scores for depression, anxiety, and stress did not differ significantly across gender and academic year. However, a significant difference was observed between the two age groups, 23-26 years and > 27 years, regarding depression. The older students reported severe depression, whereas younger students reported moderate depression. CONCLUSION: A high prevalence of negative psychological impact was observed among radiography undergraduates during the COVID-19 pandemic. This necessitates taking proactive steps to address, safeguard, and nurture undergraduates' mental health and well-being during the current and future pandemic crises to mitigate the negative impacts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Young Adult , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Depression/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Anxiety/epidemiology , Radiography , Students/psychology
20.
BMC Psychiatry ; 23(1): 398, 2023 06 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20244476

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although life satisfaction is a predictor of depressive and anxiety symptoms, the mechanisms underlying this association are poorly understood. This study examined how psychological capital (PsyCap), a positive psychological state, mediated the association between life satisfaction and depressive and anxiety symptoms among Chinese medical students during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was conducted at three medical universities in China. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to 583 students. Depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms, life satisfaction, and PsyCap were measured anonymously. A hierarchical linear regression analysis was performed to explore the effects of life satisfaction on depressive and anxiety symptoms. Asymptotic and resampling strategies were used to examine how PsyCap mediates the association between life satisfaction and depressive and anxiety symptoms. RESULTS: Life satisfaction was positively associated with PsyCap and its four components. There were significant negative associations between life satisfaction, psychological capital, resilience, optimism, and depressive and anxiety symptoms among medical students. Self-efficacy was negatively associated with depressive and anxiety symptoms. Psychological capital (a×b = -0.3201, BCa 95% CI: -0.3899, -0.2446; a×b = -0.2749, BCa 95% CI: -0.3817, -0.1996), resilience (a×b = -0.2103, BCa 95% CI: -0.2727, -0.1580; a×b = -0.1871, BCa 95% CI: -0.2520, -0.1414), optimism (a×b = -0.2100, BCa 95% CI: -0.3388, -0.1150; a×b = -0.1998, BCa 95% CI: -0.3307, -0.0980), and self-efficacy (a×b = -0.0916, BCa 95% CI: 0.0048, 0.11629; a×b = 0.1352, BCa 95% CI: 0.0336, 0.2117) significantly mediated the association between life satisfaction and depressive and anxiety symptoms. LIMITATIONS: This was a cross-sectional study, and causal relationships between the variables could not be ascertained. Self-reported questionnaire instruments were used for data collection, which may have recall bias. CONCLUSIONS: Life satisfaction and PsyCap can be used as positive resources to reduce depressive and anxiety symptoms among third-year Chinese medical students during the COVID-19 pandemic. Psychological capital and its components (self-efficacy, resilience, and optimism) partially mediated the relationship between life satisfaction and depressive symptoms, and completely mediated the relationship between life satisfaction and anxiety symptoms. Therefore, improving life satisfaction and investing in psychological capital (especially self-efficacy, resilience, and optimism) should be included in the prevention and treatment of depressive and anxiety symptoms among third-year Chinese medical students. Additional attention is needed to pay for self-efficacy in such disadvantageous contexts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Personal Satisfaction , Students, Medical , Humans , Anxiety/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/psychology , East Asian People , Hope , Optimism , Pandemics , Resilience, Psychological , Students, Medical/psychology , Self Efficacy
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