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1.
Psychiatr Danub ; 32(3-4): 563-569, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2100779

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Healthcare professionals are one of the groups most affected by a pandemic that affects the whole world. This study aimed to determine the anxiety level of emergency medical services professionals in Ankara, Turkey after the emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: In the first part of the survey, the participants of the study were asked about their socio-demographic characteristics and their contact with the COVID-19 patients. In the second part, a survey with 20 questions that determined the state anxiety level derived from the State Anxiety Inventory was performed after obtaining verbal consent. RESULTS: The mean age of the participants was 33.1±6.9, while 52.7% of all participants were males. In this study, the mean STAI Anxiety Score was 50.7±11.6. Anxiety scores were higher in females and those who had family members at risk of COVID-19 infection (p<0.05). The majority of those who had family members at risk of the infection started to stay in guesthouses instead of going home. Participants were worried about transmitting the infection to their family members (p<0.05). They felt more anxious when treating COVID-19 diagnosed or other patients (p<0.05). In addition, they thought that their anxiety level increased in general (p<0.05). CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic caused an anxiety increase in EMS workers in Turkey. Protecting the physical and mental health of the EMS employees who work at the front line against the COVID-19 pandemic and who have a high risk of infection, and ensuring their efficient work should be the main priority.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emergency Medical Services , Anxiety/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Turkey/epidemiology
2.
Psychiatr Danub ; 32(3-4): 549-556, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2100777

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Mental health of medical workers treating patients with COVID-19 is an issue of increasing concern worldwide. The available data on stress and anxiety symptoms among healthcare workers during the COVID-19 are relatively limited and have not been evaluated in Russia yet. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: The cross-sectional anonymous survey included 1,090 healthcare workers. Stress and anxiety symptoms were assessed using Stress and Anxiety to Viral Epidemics - 9 (SAVE-9) and Generalized Anxiety Disorder - 7 (GAD-7) scales. Logistic regression, Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin two component factor model, Cronbach's alpha and ROC-analysis were performed to determine the influence of different variables, internal structure and consistency, sensitivity and specificity of SAVE-9 compared with GAD-7. RESULTS: The median scores on the GAD-7 and SAVE-9 were 5 and 14, respectively. 535 (49.1%) respondents had moderate and 239 (21.9%) had severe anxiety according to SAVE-9. 134 participants (12.3%) had severe anxiety, 144 (13.2%) had moderate according to GAD-7. The component model revealed two-factor structure of SAVE-9: "anxiety and somatic concern" and "social stress". Female gender (OR - 0.98, p=0.04) and younger age (OR - 0.65, p=0.04) were associated with higher level of anxiety according to regression model. The total score of SAVE-9 with a high degree of confidence predicted the GAD-7 value in comparative ROC analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Healthcare workers in Russia reported high rates of stress and anxiety. The Russian version of the SAVE-9 displayed a good ratio of sensitivity to specificity compared with GAD-7 and can be recommended as a screening instrument for detection of stress and anxiety in healthcare workers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Personnel , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Russia/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Psychiatr Danub ; 32(3-4): 527-535, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2100775

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Adolescents' anxiety and depression during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic outbreak cannot be ignored. In public health crisis events, adolescents are prone to negative psychological problems, such as anxiety and depression. Hence, this research focuses on the use of reasonable and efficient methods to intervene in adolescents' psychological problems during the COVID-19 pandemic. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: From February to April 2020, we conducted an anonymous online survey on a total of 1,200 adolescents in the provinces of Hunan and Guangxi in China. Moreover, we randomly divided a total of 150 middle school students with anxiety scores greater than 50 and volunteered to participate in the intervention experiment into control and intervention groups, with 75 members in each group. On the basis of the proposed routine treatment, we conducted 8 weeks of model 328-based peer education intervention in the intervention group. RESULTS: After the intervention, the self-rating anxiety scale scores (SAS) of the intervention group are better than those of the control group (P<0.001). Moreover, the self-rating depression scale (SDS) scores of both groups are reduced, but the effect is more significant on the intervention group (P<0.001) than on the control group. Finally, the total Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI) scores of both groups are reduced, but the effect is more significant on the intervention group than on the control group (P=0.001 and <0.001, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Model 328-based peer education intervention can significantly reduce the level of anxiety and depression in adolescents and improve their sleep quality.


Subject(s)
Anxiety , COVID-19 , Depression , Sleep Wake Disorders , Adolescent , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/therapy , China , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/therapy
4.
Psychiatr Danub ; 32(3-4): 521-526, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2100774

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic emerged in Wuhan, China and has spread all over the world and affected global mental health. Pregnant women may be particularly vulnerable and experience high levels of distress during an infectious disease outbreak. The aim of this study was to determine anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in pregnant women during the COVID-19 pandemic. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: This cross-sectional study surveyed a total of 283 pregnant women within the period of May 11 to May 28,2020. During their regular antenatal visit, pregnant women were invited to participate in the study. The self-created personal information form was used to assess the main characteristics of the participants. Anxiety and PTSD symptoms of the pregnant women were measured by the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and Impact of Events Scale-Revised (IES-R), respectively. RESULTS: The mean age of the pregnant women was 29.20±5.55 years. Regarding gestational age, 72 (25.4%), 86 (30.4) and 125 (44.2) were in the first, second and third trimesters, respectively. The mean gestational age was 23.82±11.05 weeks. The mean STAI-S and STAI-T scores were 39.52±10.56 within the cut-off value (39-40) of the instrument and 42.74±8.33, respectively. Furthermore, the mean total IES-R score was 36.60±15.65 within the cut-off value (24) of the instrument. Multiple regression analysis revealed that pregnancy complication (p=0.01) and employment status of husband (p=0.04) were the best predictors of state anxiety. Additionally, the presence of COVID-19-related symptoms (p=0.01) and educational level (p=0.01) were found to predict PTSD symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Pregnant women would be likely to experience high levels of anxiety and PTSD symptoms during the COVID-19 pandemic's delay phase. The results should sensitize the medical team to increased anxiety and PTDS symptoms of the pregnant women in order to prevent negative outcomes for women and their fetuses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , China , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Pregnancy , Pregnant Women , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/diagnosis , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological , Young Adult
5.
Psychiatr Danub ; 32(2): 266-272, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2100757

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Occurrence of symptoms of fear and depression among general population during the outbreak of COVID-19 seems to present an emerging problem worldwide. The aim of this study was to examine levels of fear and depressive symptoms in association with COVID-19 outbreak and to assess other contributing factors in the population of Bosnia and Herzegovina. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Link to an anonymous questionnaire, mainly based on The Fear of COVID-19 Scale (Ahorsu et al. 2020) and two-item and nine-item Patient Health Questionnaires (PHQs) (Maurer et al. 2018) (background information, fear assessment and information regarding depression) was distributed online to general population of Bosnia and Herzegovina. RESULTS: Out of 1201 respondents, 217 (18.0%) reported experiencing fear and 341 (28.4%) reported having symptoms of depression during COVID-19 outbreak. The mean age of the subjects was 30.57±11.26. Being older (OR=1.044; 95% CI 1.031-1.057; p<0.001) and having moderate to severe depressive symptoms (OR=1.093; 95% CI 1.067-1.120; p<0.001) were independent significant predictors for developing fear; living in rural environment (OR=0.551; 95% Cl 0.325-0.935; p=0.0027) significantly decreased the risk of developing fear; being female (OR=1.750; 95% CI 1.242-2.466; p=0.001), unemployed (OR=1.557; 95% CI 1.040-2.330; p=0.032) or student (OR=1.943; 95% CI 1.450-2.604; p<0.001) were independent significant predictors for developing moderate to severe depressive symptoms in association with COVID-19. Mann Whitney U-test showed that being older was statistically associated with fear (p<0.001) and being younger was statistically associated with depressive symptoms (p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, based on our findings, fear and depressive symptoms in general population of Bosnia and Herzegovina during the outbreak of COVID-19 were present in 18.06% (fear) and 28.39% (depression) of subjects and it was statistically associated with age, gender, occupation, living environment and may present a secondary uprising problem connected to outbreak of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Fear , Health Surveys , Internet , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Bosnia and Herzegovina/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics
6.
Psychiatr Danub ; 33(4): 651-655, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2100822

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To investigate the current situation of anxiety and coping style of college students during COVID-19 epidemic. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: In February, 2021, 620 college students studying at home were investigated by online questionnaire, and the data were collected by self-rating anxiety scale and simple coping style questionnaire. RESULTS: Some students had behavioral reactions and somatization symptoms such as panic, anxiety, depression, boredom and depression. There are differences in coping styles among college students of different genders and grades, and some coping styles are related to anxiety. The better the knowledge of epidemic prevention or the more active the coping style, the lower the anxiety level. The more negative the coping style, the higher the anxiety. CONCLUSIONS: During COVID-19 epidemic, there are differences in coping styles among college students of different genders and grades, and some coping styles are related to anxiety. Schools and society should pay attention to the coping style and mental health counseling of candidates while preventing and controlling the epidemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adaptation, Psychological , Anxiety/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Students
7.
Psychiatr Danub ; 33(4): 646-650, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2100821

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To explore the mental health problems and countermeasures of college students under the background of epidemic prevention and control. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A total of 286 students in school were investigated with self-designed social demographic questionnaire, epidemic cognitive behavior, epidemic panic and anxiety questionnaire, depression symptom group scale, heart-filling scale and emotion regulation self-efficacy scale. RESULTS: College students have a certain understanding of COVID-19 transmission routes, preventive measures, etc., and can actively cooperate and understand the country's epidemic prevention measures. The average score of the College Student Anxiety Self-Rating Scale is (55.37±6.13) points. The total score of students' emotional regulation self-efficacy is 64.32±10.61, the total score of expressing positive emotions is 24.17±3.55, and the total score of managing negative emotions is 39.69±7.71. Under the epidemic situation, the degree of bad emotions such as panic, anxiety and depression is lower. CONCLUSIONS: The mental health status of college students is on the decline. According to the demographic characteristics and anxiety sources of different students, more social support and targeted and personalized intervention measures should be given to promote their positive mental state.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Health , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/prevention & control , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Students
8.
Psychiatr Danub ; 33(4): 634-638, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2100819

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To explore the effect of social work intervention on psychological intervention of medical workers after the epidemic under the mode of "internet plus Music Therapy". SUBJECTS AND METHODS: The observation objects in this study were all medical workers in fever clinic under the epidemic situation in COVID-19. A total of 60 cases were selected, and the proportion of anxiety and depression of medical workers in fever clinic was investigated by electronic questionnaire. After completing the investigation, social work intervention measures under the mode of "internet plus Music Therapy" were implemented. RESULTS: After implementation, the proportion of anxiety and depression of medical workers were significantly lower than those before intervention (P<0.05). The development of music therapy activities has alleviated the job anxiety of medical workers to a great extent, and the job anxiety test, total score and scores of various factors have all decreased. CONCLUSIONS: Social work intervention under the mode of "internet plus Music Therapy" can relieve anxiety and depression, and ensure the mental health of frontline medical staff during the epidemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Music Therapy , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/therapy , Humans , Internet , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Work
9.
Rev Esc Enferm USP ; 56: e20210421, 2022.
Article in English, Portuguese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2098904

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To characterize and identify depressive symptoms, anxiety, and stress associated with the COVID-19 Infodemic in the elderly from São Paulo. METHOD: Exploratory and cross-sectional study with the elderly in the capital of São Paulo who had internet access. The sociodemographic profile, the COVID-19 infodemic, depressive symptoms, stress, and anxiety were analyzed. RESULTS: A total of 411 older people participated in the study. There was a predominance of women (76.4%), with higher education (57.9%), using private health services, and with little income variation. Older people were more exposed to news or information about COVID-19 on the internet (45.3%), followed by television (34.5%), and radio (11.4%). The average stress was 19.96 points; 33.1% had anxiety, and 39.7% had depressive symptoms. The greater the number of people living with the elderly, the greater the stress (p = 0.001) and anxiety (p = 0.02). The hours of exposure to information on the internet led to stress (p = 0.001), depressive symptoms (p = 0.02), and anxiety (p = 0.02) in the elderly. CONCLUSION: During the pandemic, exposure to information on the internet triggered anxiety, stress, and depressive symptoms in the elderly. The findings highlight the need for multi and interdisciplinary interventions to mitigate such repercussions on the elderly's health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Aged , Anxiety/epidemiology , Brazil/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Infodemic , Male , Mental Health
10.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 751, 2022 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2098333

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUNDS: A physical therapist may become infected while treating a patient since they are in direct contact with them or within a two-meter radius. In addition, physical therapists may feel that they are more susceptible to COVID-19 infection when applying rehabilitation practices, which often involve direct contact with patients. The physical therapist were surveyed on their level of anxiety and depression due to the Coronavirus disease pandemic (COVID-19). METHODS: The physical therapists were asked to complete two reliable and validated scales, the Generalized Anxiety Disorder scale (GAD-7) and the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), to identify the presence of anxiety and depression in the participants. In addition, logistic regression models were used to determine the general characteristics of anxiety or depression. RESULTS: Among the 117 physical therapists who completed and participated in the study, 74 (63%) and 65 (55.5%) physical therapists reported having symptoms of anxiety and depression, respectively. The prevalence of overall anxiety levels was higher; mild (OR = 2.09; P = 0.08), moderate (OR = 2.26; P = 0.15), and severe levels six times as high (OR = 6.28; P = 0.1) in females compared to male physical therapists. Females, younger age, unmarried individuals, not having children, and not living with family showed a higher prevalence of anxiety and depression. Binary logistic regression analysis also revealed that the female gender, a single individual, and having no children were associated with anxiety and depression. CONCLUSIONS: A significant percentage of physical therapists reported symptoms of anxiety and depression, especially among females, younger age, single individuals, not having children, and not living with family. Thus, the mental health of physical therapists is suggested to be constantly and cautiously monitored, especially for those at high risk of developing psychological symptoms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physical Therapists , Humans , Male , Female , Pandemics , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Anxiety/epidemiology
11.
Ir J Psychol Med ; 38(2): 123-131, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2096533

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To examine the psychological and social impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on patients with established anxiety disorders during a period of stringent mandated social restrictions. METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 30 individuals attending the Galway-Roscommon Mental Health Services with an International Classification of Diseases diagnosis of an anxiety disorder to determine the impact of the COVID-19 restrictions on anxiety and mood symptoms, social and occupational functioning and quality of life. RESULTS: Twelve (40.0%) participants described COVID-19 restrictions as having a deleterious impact on their anxiety symptoms. Likert scale measurements noted that the greatest impact of COVID-19 related to social functioning (mean = 4.5, SD = 2.9), with a modest deleterious effect on anxiety symptoms noted (mean = 3.8, SD = 2.9). Clinician rated data noted that 8 (26.7%) participants had disimproved and 14 (46.7%) participants had improved since their previous clinical review, prior to commencement of COVID-19 restrictions. Conditions associated with no 'trigger', such as generalised anxiety disorder, demonstrated a non-significant increase in anxiety symptoms compared to conditions with a 'trigger', such as obsessive compulsive disorder. Psychiatric or physical comorbidity did not substantially impact on symptomatology secondary to COVID-19 mandated restrictions. CONCLUSIONS: The psychological and social impact of COVID-19 restrictions on individuals with pre-existing anxiety disorders has been modest with only minimal increases in symptomatology or social impairment noted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , Humans , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Secondary Care
12.
Int J Public Health ; 67: 1604717, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2089973

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To describe COVID-19 information-seeking behavior (CISB) during the first stage of the pandemic in Switzerland and identify its determinants. Methods: We conducted an online cross-sectional survey (4 May to 6 July 2020). Participants self-reported their CISB (information sources and frequency), personal COVID-19 situation (e.g., perception about having had COVID-19), sociodemographic information, and completed validated measures of health literacy, and worry and anxiety. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and logistic regressions. Results: We included 1,505 participants (24.7% male; mean age = 43.0 years, SD = 13.9). Most participants reported searching for information daily (n = 1,023, 68.0%) and referring to multiple information sources (mean 3.7, SD = 1.5). Commonly used sources were official websites (n = 1,129, 75.0%) and newspapers (n = 997, 66.2%). Participants with higher health literacy were more likely to seek information daily and use online resources, but less likely to use personal networks than those with lower health literacy. We did not find any association between CISB and worry and anxiety. Conclusion: More opportunities for personal dialogue and education about reliable online information resources should be encouraged to optimize the CISB of groups with lower health literacy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Literacy , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Information Seeking Behavior , Male , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires , Switzerland/epidemiology
13.
Int J Public Health ; 67: 1604553, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2089970

ABSTRACT

Objective: To characterize the evolution of healthcare workers' mental health status over the 1-year period following the initial COVID-19 pandemic outbreak and to examine baseline characteristics associated with resolution or persistence of mental health problems over time. Methods: We conducted an 8-month follow-up cohort study. Eligible participants were healthcare workers working in Spain. Baseline data were collected during the initial pandemic outbreak. Survey-based self-reported measures included COVID-19-related exposures, sociodemographic characteristics, and three mental health outcomes (psychological distress, depression symptoms, and posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms). We examined three longitudinal trajectories in mental health outcomes between baseline and follow-up assessments (namely asymptomatic/stable, recovering, and persistently symptomatic/worsening). Results: We recruited 1,807 participants. Between baseline and follow-up assessments, the proportion of respondents screening positive for psychological distress and probable depression decreased, respectively, from 74% to 56% and from 28% to 21%. Two-thirds remained asymptomatic/stable in terms of depression symptoms and 56% remained symptomatic or worsened over time in terms of psychological distress. Conclusion: Poor mental health outcomes among healthcare workers persisted over time. Occupational programs and mental health strategies should be put in place.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Follow-Up Studies , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Public Health ; 212: 89-94, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2083041

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to clarify the level and the correlates of climate anxiety in Germany. STUDY DESIGN: This was a quota-based online survey. METHODS: We used data collected in mid-March 2022 from a sample of the general adult population (n = 3091 individuals aged 18-74 years; March 2022). Climate anxiety was quantified using the Climate Anxiety Scale (ranging from 1 to 7, with higher scores corresponding to higher levels of climate anxiety). RESULTS: The average level of climate anxiety in Germany was 2.0 (standard deviation [SD]: 1.2). It differed between subgroups (e.g. individuals aged 18-29 years: 2.4, SD: 1.3; individuals aged 65-74 years: 1.8, SD: 1.0). Log-linear regressions showed that climate anxiety was higher among younger individuals (ß = -0.005, P < .001), full-time employed individuals (compared with retired individuals, ß = 0.07, P < .01), individuals without chronic conditions (compared with individuals with at least one chronic conditions, ß = -0.08, P < .001), individuals already vaccinated against COVID-19 (compared with individuals not vaccinated against COVID-19, ß = 0.10, P < .001), individuals with higher levels of coronavirus anxiety (ß = 0.06, P < .001), and individuals with greater fear of a conventional war (ß = 0.09, P < .001). CONCLUSIONS: Our study showed a rather low level of climate anxiety. It also revealed some correlates of greater climate anxiety such as higher levels of coronavirus anxiety or greater fear of war. Knowledge about the correlates may assist in addressing individuals at risk for high levels of climate anxiety.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety Disorders , Germany/epidemiology , Chronic Disease
15.
Psychiatr Danub ; 34(3): 602-605, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2081409

ABSTRACT

An increase of psychopathology such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is described in patients affected with COVID-19 that stayed at an intensive care unit (ICU). However, data on follow-up and on impact of contextual factors are limited. In a single-center, observational study, PTSD symptomatology was prevalent among 38% of participants (n=8), persisting in clinical PTSD in 2 participants after one year. In patients with initial PTSD symptoms, scores on depression, anxiety and insomnia scales were significantly higher. A higher mental burden due to avoidance of contact and a reduced quality of life was also retained in patients with PTSD symptoms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Humans , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/therapy , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/diagnosis , Quality of Life , Critical Care , Anxiety/epidemiology , Intensive Care Units , Depression
16.
Psychiatr Danub ; 34(3): 572-577, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2081405

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic is an extraordinary challenge for all countries and affects the psychological wellbeing of healthcare professionals working with people suffering from COVID-19 and puts them at a high risk of mental health problems. The aim of the study was to identify stress-related factors that affect the mental health of healthcare workers during the COVID-19 pandemic in Ukraine. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A total of 1098 Ukrainian healthcare workers were surveyed using an online questionnaire consisting of questions relating to a) socio-demographic characteristics; b) perceptions of the COVID-19 related situation; and c) stress and protective factors. Respondents were divided into two groups, depending on whether they provided care to the patients with COVID-19 or not. RESULTS: Of the 1087 healthcare workers, 863 (79.4%) were found to have anxiety / fear caused by the COVID-19. No significant difference was detected between professionals who did and did not provide personal assistance to patients with COVID-19 concerning anxiety / fear related to COVID-19 (p=0.0776). Based on logistic regression model (χ2(6)=263.70, p=0.000) the most significant predictive factors for anxiety / fear caused by the COVID-19 were factors related to safety and risk perception (the risk of getting infected, dying, infecting loved ones, perception of the threat of the epidemic spread), information factors (constant news about COVID-19), as well as factors related to the organisation of care (lack of staff in health care facilities). CONCLUSIONS: Negative risk perception, high consumption of COVID-19 news, and shortage of staff in health care facilities were significant predictors of anxiety / fear caused by the COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Personnel , Humans , Anxiety/epidemiology , Health Personnel/psychology , Pandemics , Prognosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Psychological Distress , Fear
17.
Psychiatr Danub ; 34(3): 564-571, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2081404

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has put enormous stress on the health care workers, threatening not only their physical health but also their mental well-being. No mental health support program (MHSP) addressing depression and anxiety in healthcare workers (HCWs), has been shown to be effective in Turkey previously. We aimed to measure the effect of our MHSP among healthcare workers who applied for psychological help associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: An MHSP has been created for healthcare professionals working in a pandemic hospital during the COVID-19 period. Health workers were recruited between July and September 2020. Anxiety, depression, and insomnia levels were evaluated with HAM-A (Hamilton Anxiety Scale), HDRS (Hamilton Depression Scale), and Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) before and after the intervention. Sexual complaints were questioned by a consultant psychiatrist. MHSP (n=31), and treatment as usual (TAU, n=27) groups were compared using repeated-measures ANOVA. RESULTS: Sociodemographic data, medical history of COVID-19, and psychiatric diagnoses were similar between the groups. There was no difference in baseline HAM-A, HDRS, and ISI scores (p>0.05). At the end of the study, there was a significant difference between study groups regarding anxiety scores (For post-treatment, MHSP=8.0±2.6 vs. TAU=17.9±3.1, p<0.001) and depression symptoms (For post-treatment, MHSP=8.8±2.7 vs. TAU=20.0±2.4, p<0.001) but not in insomnia levels (For post-treatment, MHSP=6.5±2.4 vs. TAU=7.3±2.4, p=0.499). Likewise, both groups reported similar levels of improvement in reduced sexual drive. CONCLUSIONS: Our study results suggest that the MHSP effectively alleviates the psychiatric complaints of healthcare professionals. It is recommended to have mental support teams for healthcare professionals in hospitals.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Humans , Pandemics , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/therapy , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/therapy , Depression/psychology , Turkey/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/therapy , Anxiety/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Hospitals , Delivery of Health Care
18.
Arch Prev Riesgos Labor ; 25(3): 271-284, 2022 07 15.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2080979

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To describe the sociodemographic characteristics and determine the factors associated with psychological manifestations of depression, anxiety, and stress in healthcare workers in the context of COVID-19 pandemic in health facilities in Peru during the month of May 2020. METHODS: An analytical cross-sectional study was conducted out in healthcare workers of hospital establishments in Peru. To evaluate the outcome of interest, we administered a structured questionnaire that asked about type of healthcare personnel; sociodemographic characteristics; Generalized Anxiety Disorder scale (GAD-7); Patient Health Questionnaire scale (PHQ-9); and the Revised Stressor Impact scale (IES-R). We used generalized linear Poisson models, with a logarithmic link function and robust variance. RESULTS: Out of 258 respondents, 254 completed the survey; 61.8% were women; the most common work area was emergency department or hospitalization (inpatient) services (62.2%). The median PHQ-9 score was 4 points (IQR: 2-7); for the GAD-7, it was 6 points (IQR: 4-8), and for the IES-R, 16 points (IQR: 8-24). The multivariate analysis showed that being a physician was associated with less anxiety (PR: 0.77; 95% CI: 0.62-0.94), whereas living alone was associated with a greater risk of depression (PR: 1.46; 95% CI: 1.11-1.92). CONCLUSIONS: Healthcare personnel are at risk of manifesting psychological alterations, mainly associated with the female gender, non-medical personnel and living alone.


OBJETIVO: Describir las características sociodemográficas y determinar los factores asociados a manifestaciones psicológicas de depresión, ansiedad y estrés en trabajadores sanitarios en el contexto de la pandemia por COVID-19 en los establecimientos de salud del Perú durante mayo de 2020. Métodos: Se realizó un estudio transversal en trabajadores sanitarios de establecimientos hospitalarios del Perú. Se elaboró un cuestionario estructurado que incluía las características sociodemográficas, la profesión, área y lugar de trabajo, y cuestionarios validados para trastorno de ansiedad generalizada (GAD-7), Salud del paciente (PHQ-9) y la Escala de impacto del estresor revisada (IES-R). Para el análisis se utilizó modelos lineales generalizados de Poisson, función de enlace logarítmico y varianzas robustas. Se calculó el rango intercuartílico (RIC) y la razón de prevalencia ajustada (RPa) y su intervalo de confianza del 95% (IC95%). RESULTADOS: De un total de 258 encuestados, 254 (98%) completaron al cuestionario, siendo el 61,8% mujeres y el área de trabajo más común emergencia u hospitalización (62,2%). La puntuación mediana del PHQ-9 fue 4 (RIC:2-7), del GAD-7 fue 6 (RIC:4-8) y para el IES-R fue 16 (RIC:8-24). El análisis multivariado mostró que ser médico se asocia con una menor prevalencia de ansiedad (RPa: 0,77; IC 95%: 0,62-0,94), mientras que vivir solo se asoció con una mayor prevalencia de depresión (RPa: 1,46; IC 95%: 1,11-1,92). Conclusión: El personal sanitario manifestó alteraciones psicológicas, asociado principalmente al personal no médico y vivir solo.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Female , Male , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Peru/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , Health Facilities , Delivery of Health Care
19.
Ann Intern Med ; 175(11): 1560-1571, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2080841

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To what extent the COVID-19 pandemic and its containment measures influenced mental health in the general population is still unclear. PURPOSE: To assess the trajectory of mental health symptoms during the first year of the pandemic and examine dose-response relations with characteristics of the pandemic and its containment. DATA SOURCES: Relevant articles were identified from the living evidence database of the COVID-19 Open Access Project, which indexes COVID-19-related publications from MEDLINE via PubMed, Embase via Ovid, and PsycInfo. Preprint publications were not considered. STUDY SELECTION: Longitudinal studies that reported data on the general population's mental health using validated scales and that were published before 31 March 2021 were eligible. DATA EXTRACTION: An international crowd of 109 trained reviewers screened references and extracted study characteristics, participant characteristics, and symptom scores at each timepoint. Data were also included for the following country-specific variables: days since the first case of SARS-CoV-2 infection, the stringency of governmental containment measures, and the cumulative numbers of cases and deaths. DATA SYNTHESIS: In a total of 43 studies (331 628 participants), changes in symptoms of psychological distress, sleep disturbances, and mental well-being varied substantially across studies. On average, depression and anxiety symptoms worsened in the first 2 months of the pandemic (standardized mean difference at 60 days, -0.39 [95% credible interval, -0.76 to -0.03]); thereafter, the trajectories were heterogeneous. There was a linear association of worsening depression and anxiety with increasing numbers of reported cases of SARS-CoV-2 infection and increasing stringency in governmental measures. Gender, age, country, deprivation, inequalities, risk of bias, and study design did not modify these associations. LIMITATIONS: The certainty of the evidence was low because of the high risk of bias in included studies and the large amount of heterogeneity. Stringency measures and surges in cases were strongly correlated and changed over time. The observed associations should not be interpreted as causal relationships. CONCLUSION: Although an initial increase in average symptoms of depression and anxiety and an association between higher numbers of reported cases and more stringent measures were found, changes in mental health symptoms varied substantially across studies after the first 2 months of the pandemic. This suggests that different populations responded differently to the psychological stress generated by the pandemic and its containment measures. PRIMARY FUNDING SOURCE: Swiss National Science Foundation. (PROSPERO: CRD42020180049).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Mental Health , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Bratisl Lek Listy ; 123(11): 833-839, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2080684

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Numerous studies have been conducted on the psychological effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. However, how the mental health of health workers will be affected among the number of peaks during the pandemic has not been evaluated yet. The study aims to investigate the effects of the first, second, and third peaks of COVID-19 on anxiety, depression, and stress symptoms in healthcare workers. METHODS: The current study included 4031 healthcare workers, 1051 during the first peak period, 1409 during the second peak period, and 1571 during the third peak period. The Depression-anxiety-stress scale-21(DASS-21) was used to assess the participants' levels of anxiety, depression, and stress symptoms. RESULTS: The mean age of the participants was 33.74 ± 7.95, and 2634 (66.3 %) were female. 36.9 %(n = 1486) of the participants were physicians, 41.1 % (n = 1655) were nurses and 22.1 % (n = 890) were other healthcare workers. A statistically significant difference was documented in the DASS-21 anxiety (F(2:4028) = 502.893, p 2. Peak > 1. Peak), DASS-21 depression (F(2:4028) = 46.034, p 2. Peak > 1. Peak), DASS-21 stress (F(2:4028) = 65.548, p 1. Peak), and DASS-21 total scores (F(2:4028) = 156.860, p 2. Peak > 1. Peak) of healthcare workers during all three peak periods. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings show that as the peak number rises, so do the levels of anxiety and depression among healthcare workers. As a result, it is possible to assert that prolongation of the COVID-19 pandemic worsens mental problems (Tab. 2, Fig. 3, Ref. 35).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology
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