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1.
Pediatr Neonatol ; 63(6): 565-566, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2150407
2.
JMIR Public Health Surveill ; 7(9): e31052, 2021 09 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2141346

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic has caused great panic among the public, with many people suffering from adverse stress reactions. To control the spread of the pandemic, governments in many countries have imposed lockdown policies. In this unique pandemic context, people can obtain information about pandemic dynamics on the internet. However, searching for health-related information on the internet frequently increases the possibility of individuals being troubled by the information that they find, and consequently, experiencing symptoms of cyberchondria. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to examine the relationships between people's perceived severity of the COVID-19 pandemic and their depression, anxiety, and stress to explore the role of cyberchondria, which, in these relationship mechanisms, is closely related to using the internet. In addition, we also examined the moderating role of lockdown experiences. METHODS: In February 2020, a total of 486 participants were recruited through a web-based platform from areas in China with a large number of infections. We used questionnaires to measure participants' perceived severity of the COVID-19 pandemic, to measure the severity of their cyberchondria, depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms, and to assess their lockdown experiences. Confirmatory factor analysis, exploratory factor analysis, common method bias, descriptive statistical analysis, and correlation analysis were performed, and moderated mediation models were examined. RESULTS: There was a positive association between perceived severity of the COVID-19 pandemic and depression (ß=0.36, t=8.51, P<.001), anxiety (ß=0.41, t=9.84, P<.001), and stress (ß=0.46, t=11.45, P<.001), which were mediated by cyberchondria (ß=0.36, t=8.59, P<.001). The direct effects of perceived severity of the COVID-19 pandemic on anxiety (ß=0.07, t=2.01, P=.045) and stress (ß=0.09, t=2.75, P=.006) and the indirect effects of cyberchondria on depression (ß=0.10, t=2.59, P=.009) and anxiety (ß=0.10, t=2.50, P=.01) were moderated by lockdown experience. CONCLUSIONS: The higher the perceived severity of the COVID-19 pandemic, the more serious individuals' symptoms of depression, anxiety, and stress. In addition, the associations were partially mediated by cyberchondria. Individuals with higher perceived severity of the COVID-19 pandemic were more likely to develop cyberchondria, which aggravated individuals' depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms. Negative lockdown experiences exacerbated the COVID-19 pandemic's impact on mental health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Perception , Quarantine/psychology , Stress, Psychological/complications , Adolescent , Adult , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/etiology , Depression/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Quarantine/standards , Social Media/standards , Social Media/statistics & numerical data , Stress, Psychological/psychology
3.
BMC Psychol ; 10(1): 265, 2022 Nov 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2115819

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 remains a public health burden that has caused global economic crises, jeopardizing health, jobs, and livelihoods of millions of people around the globe. Several efforts have been made by several countries by implementing several health strategies to attenuate the spread of the pandemic. Although several studies indicated effects of COVID-19 on mental health and its associated factors, very little is known about the underlying mechanism of job insecurity, depression, anxiety, and stress in Bangladesh. Therefore, this study determined the prevalence of job insecurity and depression, anxiety, stress as well as the association between job insecurity, mental health outcomes also contributing determinants amongst humanitarian workers during the COVID-19 pandemic in Bangladesh. METHODS: We conducted a web-based cross-sectional study among 445 humanitarian workers during the COVID-19 pandemic in six sub-districts of Cox's bazar district of Bangladesh between April and May 2021. The questionnaire was composed of socio-demographic, lifestyle and work related factors. Psychometric instruments like job insecurity scale and depression, anxiety also stress scale (DASS-21) were employed to assess the level of job insecurity and mental health outcomes (depression, anxiety and stress). STATA software version 14 was employed to perform statistical analyses. RESULTS: The prevalence of job insecurity was 42%. The odds of job insecurity was higher in Kutubdia and Pekua (AOR = 3.1, 95% CI 1.36, 7.22) Teknaf (AOR = 2.9, 95% CI 1.33, 6.41), the impact of dissatisfaction on salary (AOR = 2.3, 95% CI 1.49, 3.58) was evident with job insecurity. The prevalence of moderate to severe depression, anxiety and stress among humanitarian worker were (26%, 7%), (25%, 10%) and (15%, 7%) respectively. Further, the region of work, being female, marital status, work environment, and salary dissatisfaction were contributing factors for poor mental health outcomes. Those with job insecurity were almost 3 times more likely to experience depression (AOR = 2.7, 95% CI 1.85, 4.04), anxiety (AOR = 2.6, 95% CI 1.76, 3.71) and stress (AOR: 2.8; 95% CI 1.89, 4.26), respectively. CONCLUSION: Our findings highlight that job security remains essential to help tackle the severity of depression, anxiety and stress in humanitarian workers. The results reflected the critical importance of local and international NGOs addressing poor mental health conditions of their employees to prevent mental health outbreaks.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Male , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Mental Health , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , Workplace
4.
J Neurol ; 269(12): 6202-6210, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2094608

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: An earlier follow-up study from the CogEx rehabilitation trial showed little change in symptoms of depression, anxiety and psychological distress during the first COVID-19 lockdown compared to pre-pandemic measurements. Here, we provide a second follow-up set of behavioral data on the CogEx sample. METHODS: This was an ancillary, longitudinal follow-up study in CogEx, a randomized controlled trial of exercise and cognitive rehabilitation in people with progressive MS involving 11 centres in North America and Europe. Only individuals impaired on the Symbol Digit Modalities Test (SDMT) were included. Participants repeated the COVID Impact survey administered approximately a year later and completed self-report measures of depression, anxiety and MS symptoms that had been obtained at the trial baseline and during the first COVID Impact survey. Participants who completed the second COVID Impact follow-up were included. To identify predictors of the participants' ratings of their mental and physical well-being, step-wise linear regression was conducted. RESULTS: Of the 131 participants who completed the first COVID impact survey, 74 participants completed the second follow-up survey (mean age 52 (SD = 6.4) years, 62.2% female, mean disease duration 16.4 (SD = 9.0) years, median EDSS 6.0). Pandemic restrictions prevented data collection from sites in Denmark and England (n = 57). The average time between measurements was 11.4 (SD = 5.56) months. There were no significant differences in age, sex, EDSS, disease course and duration between those who participated in the current follow-up study (n = 74) and the group that could not (n = 57). One participant had COVID in the time between assessments. Participants now took a more negative view of their mental/psychological well-being (p = 0.0001), physical well-being (p = 0.0009) and disease course (p = 0.005) compared to their last assessment. Depression scores increased on the HADS-depression scale (p = 0.01) and now exceeded the clinically significant threshold of ≥ 8.0 for the first time. Anxiety scores on the HADS remained unchanged. Poorer mental well-being was predicted by HADS depression scores (p = 0.012) and a secondary-progressive disease course (p = 0.0004). CONCLUSIONS: A longer follow-up period revealed the later onset of clinically significant depressive symptoms on the HADS and a decline in self-perceptions of mental and physical well-being associated with the COVID-19 pandemic relative to the first follow-up data point. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The trial was registered on September 20th 2018 at www. CLINICALTRIALS: gov having identifier NCT03679468. Registration was performed before recruitment was initiated.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Multiple Sclerosis, Chronic Progressive , Multiple Sclerosis , Psychological Distress , Humans , Female , Middle Aged , Male , Pandemics , Multiple Sclerosis/complications , Follow-Up Studies , Communicable Disease Control , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Depression/diagnosis
5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(20)2022 Oct 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2071412

ABSTRACT

In light of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and the enormous amount of uncertainty caused by it, mental health issues have become a great concern. Evidence regarding the effects of psychological resilience on the Thai population is scarce. We evaluated psychological resilience during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic and its association with the risk of mental health outcomes, such as depression, anxiety, stress, and health-related well-being. This cross-sectional study was a part of the HOME-COVID-19 project, which conducted an online survey of 4004 members of the general population in Thailand using the Brief Resilience Coping Scale. Logistic regression was performed to identify the association between psychological resilience and mental health issues and well-being. Groups with prevalence rates of 43.9%, 39.2%, and 16.9% were classified as low, moderate, and high resilient copers, respectively. Using high resilient copers as a reference group, the low resilient copers had a higher chance of having mental health adversities. The adjusted odds ratio (OR) was 1.89 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.39-2.56; p < 0.001) for depression, 2.13 (95% CI, 1.45-3.14; p < 0.001) for anxiety, 4.61 (95% CI, 3.30-6.45; p < 0.001) for perceived stress, and 3.18 (95% CI, 2.31-4.38; p < 0.001) for low well-being. For the medium resilient copers, only low well-being was found to be statistically significant (OR, 1.60; 95% CI, 1.16-2.20; p = 0.004). It is important that resilience be considered in the development of strategies for managing the COVID-19 pandemic to prevent or reduce adverse mental health outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Resilience, Psychological , Humans , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Thailand/epidemiology , Mental Health , Cross-Sectional Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology
6.
J Clin Psychiatry ; 82(4)2021 07 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2066794

ABSTRACT

Objective: The conditions created by the COVID-19 pandemic could negatively affect maternal mental health and the mother-infant relationship. The aim of this study is to determine the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on depression, anxiety, and mother-infant bonding among women seeking treatment for postpartum depression (PPD).Methods: Baseline data collected in two separate randomized controlled trials of a psychoeducational intervention for PPD in the same geographic region, one prior to COVID-19 (March 2019-March 2020) and one during the COVID-19 pandemic (April-October 2020), were compared. Eligible participants had an Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) score of ≥ 10, were ≥ 18 years of age, had an infant < 12 months old, and were fluent in English. Outcomes included PPD (EPDS), anxiety (Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 [GAD-7]), and mother-infant relationship (Postpartum Bonding Questionnaire [PBQ]). All were measured continuously and dichotomized at accepted clinical cutoffs.Results: Of the 603 participants (305 pre-COVID-19; 298 during COVID-19), mothers enrolled during the COVID-19 pandemic reported higher levels of symptoms of PPD (B = 1.35; 95% CI, 0.64 to 2.06; Cohen d = 0.31) and anxiety (B = 1.52; 95% CI, 0.72 to 2.32; Cohen d = 0.30). During COVID-19, women had 65% higher odds of clinically significant levels of depression symptoms (OR = 1.65; 95% CI, 1.13 to 2.31) and 46% higher odds of clinically relevant anxiety symptoms (OR = 1.46; 95% CI, 1.05 to 2.05). However, there were no statistically significant differences in mother-infant bonding.Conclusions: The findings of this study suggest that rates and severity of PPD and anxiety symptoms among women seeking treatment for PPD have worsened in Canada during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, treatment-seeking mothers have consistently maintained good relationships with their infants. Considering the difficulties women with PPD face when accessing treatment, it is important that strategies are developed and disseminated to safely identify and manage PPD to mitigate potential long-term adverse consequences for mothers and their families.Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov identifiers: NCT03654261 and NCT04485000.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/psychology , Depression, Postpartum/etiology , Mother-Child Relations/psychology , Mothers/psychology , Object Attachment , Pandemics , Adolescent , Adult , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression, Postpartum/epidemiology , Depression, Postpartum/psychology , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Ontario/epidemiology , Risk Factors , Self Report , Severity of Illness Index , Young Adult
7.
Ideggyogy Sz ; 75(9-10): 307-315, 2022 Sep 30.
Article in Hungarian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2067419

ABSTRACT

Background and purpose: The problems caused by the COVID-19 epidemic have the worst impact on chronic patient populations. People with chronic pain are one of the most vulnerable groups due to stress, disruption of daily routine, family problems, illness and difficulty in hospital care. It is therefore essential to assess the situation and mental well-being of this group. The aim of this survey was to assess chronic pain patients during the COVID-19 pandemic, addressing psychological background factors that might affect pain symptoms, such as depression, emotion regulation, alexithymia, well-being, health literacy and social support. Methods: 158 people participated in the survey, reporting pain for at least 3 months but had not received medical treatment. Data was collected at two dates: February and December 2021. Participants completed an online questionnaire due to the pandemic situation. The following six psychological questionnaires were used in the survey: Toronto Alexithymia Scale, Beck Depression Inventory 9-item version, Difficulty in Emotion Regulation Scale, Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, Chew-questions measuring health literacy, WHO Well-being Index. Results: The participants ranged from 20 to 80 years in age, of whom 140 (88%) were female. 42 participants (27%) achieved severe alexithymia. 118 people (75%) had depression, of which 72 people (46%) had mild depression, 26 (16%) had moderate depression, and 20 (13%) had severe depression. The degree of pain and alexithy-mia (r(158) = 0.16, p = 0.004), depression (r(158) = 0.41, p < 0.001), difficulties in emotion regulation (r(158) = 0.26, p = 0.004), and health literacy, and difficulties in emotion regulation (r(158) = 0.25, p = 0.001) were positively and significantly related. Conclusion: In addition to the characteristic comorbidities of people living with pain (e.g. anxiety, emotion disorder, sleep disorder), the epidemic-induced prolonged social isolation, stress and fear of illness may explain the proportion of high depression, emotion regulation difficulties or health literacy problems in the study sample which exacerbate alexithymia and the degree of pain. Based on these results it is important to draw the attention of professionals to the appropriate health care and educational needs of those affected.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chronic Pain , Affective Symptoms/diagnosis , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Chronic Pain/epidemiology , Chronic Pain/etiology , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Depression/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
8.
Niger J Clin Pract ; 25(9): 1571-1579, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2055767

ABSTRACT

Background: The physical activity of university students is restricted during the pandemic, changes in education and training, and uncertainties during the pandemic caused their social lives to change completely. Aim: This study aims to determine the relationship between the depression, anxiety, and stress, and positivity attitudes of university students during the Covid-19 (coronavirus disease-2019) outbreak and their attitudes and behaviors toward the pandemic. Subjects and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted online among university students, n = 2153 from April 30, 2020 to May 10, 2020. Data were collected with the Positivity Scale and the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale. Results: The proportion of those with moderate and above depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms in the study group, respectively, were 40.6%, 24.6%, and 22.5%. The risk ratio of these symptoms is higher among those with lower positive attitudes (OR [odds ratio] = 0.804, 0.897, 0.895, respectively), being women (OR = 1.446, 1.666, 1.471), who are concerned with the transmission of the Covid-19 (OR = 1.144, 1.374, 1.201), who believe their intra-family relations (OR = 1.886, 1.728, 2.083) and education (OR = 1.680, 1.682, 2.132) are negatively affected, and those who are more worried about life after the pandemic. Conclusion: Compared with the pre-pandemic period, the frequency of university students showing symptoms of depression increased, and there was no significant change in anxiety and stress levels.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Health , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Students , Universities
9.
Eur J Cancer Care (Engl) ; 31(6): e13715, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2052400

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This research has been conducted to determine the effect of music on pain and anxiety levels of patients receiving chemotherapy during COVID-19. METHODS: The research has been carried out in a real trial model with 92 adult patients (45 in the experimental group who received chemotherapy and 47 in the control group). The data have been collected by the researcher with Google Forms (using State and Trait Anxiety Inventory [STAI] and visual analogue scale [VAS]) through the links sent to the phones of participants on the day they received chemotherapy, between March 2020 and July 2020. RESULTS: The mean scores obtained from the post-test STAI (53.11 ± 4.77) and VAS (3.44 ± 2.53) in the experimental group have been determined to statistically significantly decrease when compared to the pre-test measurement data (STAI: 54.26 ± 4.26; VAS: 4.22 ± 2.41) (p < 0.05). No statistically significant difference has been determined between pre-test and post-test mean scores of the patients in the control group. CONCLUSION: It has been observed that music applications reduce the pain and anxiety levels of patients receiving chemotherapy during the COVID-19 process. It can be recommended to use music applications in the management of pain and anxiety symptoms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Music Therapy , Music , Adult , Humans , Pain , Anxiety/etiology , Pain Measurement
10.
Psychiatr Danub ; 34(Suppl 8): 90-95, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2046790

ABSTRACT

The current world scenario of apprehension and suffering for the physical and economic health of people, has generated a situation of anxiety accompanied by an emotional overload of stress, often difficult to manage. The emerging Long-Covid syndrome has placed the emphasis on the persistence of clinical factors in some individuals, beyond the time which is normally considered acceptable for healing. This article aims to provide a contribution in the research of the possible causes related to the onset of Long-Covid syndrome, as well as in the understanding of the peculiar type of link between the various psycho-physical aspects and the health condition, while focusing attention on new ways of coping and treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adaptation, Psychological , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety Disorders , COVID-19/complications , Humans
11.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Sep 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2043746

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Birth and pregnancy complications increased by 10.2% during the 2019 coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. Pregnant women are at high risk for anxiety, which might trigger physio-logical stress, leading to pregnancy complications. AIM: This study aimed to investigate factors leading to antenatal anxiety during the COVID-19 pandemic. We also aimed to discuss our find-ings with regard to the current literature about pregnancy complications. METHODS: This cross-sectional study interviewed 377 pregnant women and assessed anxiety using a validated 7-item general anxiety disorder (GAD-7) scale. Anxiety was related to physiological and demo-graphic parameters. Anxiety was subdivided into pandemic- and pregnancy-related anxiety to minimize results bias. RESULTS: Our results showed that 75.3% of pregnant women were anxious. The mean GAD-7 score was 8.28 ± 5. Linear regression analysis showed that for every increase in the number of previous pregnancies, there was a 1.3 increase in anxiety level (p < 0.001). Women with no previous miscarriages were more anxious (p < 0.001). Surprisingly, pregnant women who were previously infected with COVID-19 were 6% less stressed. Pregnant women with comorbid-ities were more stressed (p < 0.001). Low income (p < 0.001) and age (p < 0.05) were the demo-graphic factors most significantly related to increased anxiety. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of pregnancy-related anxiety increased threefold in Saudi Arabia due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Healthcare support should be available remotely during pandemics; pregnant women (especially those with comorbidities) should be educated about the risks of infection and complications to prevent anxiety-related complications during pregnancy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pregnancy Complications , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications/epidemiology , Pregnant Women , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology
12.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 101(38): e30629, 2022 Sep 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2042655

ABSTRACT

Prevalence of depression is high among medical students and several mental problems are identified as risk factors. Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic causes difficulties that could adversely affect mental health. However, data concerning prevalence of mental problems, and whether or not these problems remain risk factors for depression during the COVID-19 pandemic in medical students are scarce. To investigate the prevalence of depression, social media addiction, game addiction, sleep quality, eating disorder risk, and perceived stress among Thai medical students, risk factors for depression were investigated. Online surveys via our faculty's learning portals were advertized to medical students who engaged online learning and 224 respondents provided complete data. Study-related medical students' data were collected using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 for depression, the Social-Media Addiction Screening Scale for social media addiction, the Game Addiction Screening Test for game addiction, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index for sleep quality, the Eating Attitudes Test for eating disorder risk, and the Perceived Stress Scale for perceived stress. Depression was reported in 35.7% of medical students, social-media addiction in 22.3%, game addiction in 4.5%, eating disorder risk in 4.9%, poor sleep quality in 80.8%, and moderate-to-high perceived stress in 71.4%. The independent predictors of depression were lower grade point average, social media addiction, and moderate-to-high perceived stress. A high prevalence of depression, stress, and poor sleep was found among medical students during the COVID-19 pandemic. Medical students who are stressed, have lower grades, and/or who are addicted to social media warrant depression screening.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Students, Medical , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Humans , Pandemics , Risk Factors , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology
13.
Semergen ; 48(7): 101813, 2022 Oct.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2036514

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The current health situation is causing a detriment to mental health, where primary care physicians is a very affected group. OBJECTIVE: The objective is to discover whether the resilience variable is a predictor of the negative impact generated by COVID-19, understood in the variables of depression, anxiety and stress; and analyze, in turn, which resilient factors help to explain the variances of the variables and which control variables are also predictors. METHOD: A quantitative research has been carried out, specifically a single group non-experimental ex post facto design. The selected sample consisted of 268 primary care physicians, a group highly affected by the pandemic, who were administered a sociodemographic questionnaire, the SV-RES Resilience Scale, in its reduced version of 36 items, and the Depression, Anxiety and Depression Scale, DAS-21 stress. RESULTS: The results of the linear regressions showed how resilience, with a negative relationship, predicts depression (22.2%), anxiety (8.3%) and stress (12.3%), being the goals and identity factors that contribute significantly to explain the different variances. In turn, within the control variables, taking drugs, gender (except for the depression variable) and the decision to go to the psychologist were predictors of the various variables. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this research intensify the necessity of promoting resilience among primary care physicians, with the intention of reducing their levels of depression, anxiety, and stress.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physicians, Primary Care , Resilience, Psychological , Humans , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology
14.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(18)2022 Sep 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2032956

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic induced long-term damages that weigh on the national health systems of various countries in terms of support and care. This review aimed to highlight the mental health impact of the COVID-19 pandemic in pregnant women. We first report data on the immune system physiopathology and the main viral infections in pregnancy, including COVID-19. Then, the attention is focused on the main factors that affect the mental health of pregnant women during the COVID-19 pandemic, such as (1) the fear of being infected and transmitting the infection to the fetus, (2) the cancellation of checkups and pre-child courses, and (3) confinement and the inability to have close friends or a partner at the time of delivery or in the first days after delivery, as well as family tensions. Because of all this, pregnant women find themselves in a stressful condition independent of the pregnancy, and thus experience anxiety, depression, insomnia, hostility, delirium, and an alteration of the mother-baby relationship. Several studies have shown an involvement of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis in response to the pandemic. We propose a possible involvement of the neuroendocrine system as a mediator of the psychological symptoms of pregnant women induced by COVID-19-related stress.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Female , Humans , Hypothalamo-Hypophyseal System , Pandemics , Pituitary-Adrenal System , Pregnancy , Pregnant Women/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/etiology
15.
J Transcult Nurs ; 33(6): 742-751, 2022 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2020944

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Even under normal circumstances, anxiety is quite common among nursing students. Therefore, this study compared nursing students' health and coronavirus anxiety in two European countries. METHOD: The sample of the descriptive, cross-sectional study consisted of 685 undergraduate students studying at two different nursing schools in Turkey and Portugal. The study data were collected with the Personnel Data Collection Form, Coronavirus Anxiety Scale, and Short Health Anxiety Inventory. RESULTS: While there was no difference between the Coronavirus Anxiety Scale scores of Turkish and Portuguese nursing students (p > .05), a statistically significant difference was found between the Short Health Anxiety Inventory total scores and negative consequences scores (p < .05). DISCUSSION: Against the pandemic that the whole world is experiencing, it is recommended to compare nursing students in a cultural context and take precautions.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus , Students, Nursing , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Data Collection , Humans , Turkey/epidemiology
16.
Ann Clin Transl Neurol ; 9(10): 1504-1513, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2013308

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The clinical, neuropsychological, and socioeconomic factors affecting Parkinson's disease (PD) during COVID-19 pandemic across different populations have not been systematically studied. To address this, we conducted a meta-analysis of factors that impact the well-being of PD patients during the pandemic. METHODS: Medline and Embase were searched for articles published between 2020 and 2022. We conducted random-effects pooling of estimates and meta-regression. RESULTS: Twenty-seven studies involving 13,878 patients from America, Europe, Asia, and Africa were included. There is a high prevalence of decreased physical activity and exercise, and worsening motor and neuropsychiatric symptoms (17-56%). Patients in lower-income countries more frequently reported worsening anxiety (adjusted OR [aOR] 8.94, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.62-49.28, p = 0.012), sleep (aOR 5.16, 95% CI 1.15-23.17, p = 0.032), and PD symptoms (aOR 3.57, 95% CI 0.96-13.34, p = 0.058). Lockdown was associated with decreased exercise levels (aOR 0.13, 95% CI 0.02-0.78, p = 0.025) and worsening mood (aOR 0.48, 95% CI 0.24-0.95, p = 0.035). Younger age correlated with decreased physical activity (ß -0.30, 95% CI -0.53 to -0.07, p = 0.012), exercise (ß -0.11, 95% CI -0.15 to -0.07, p < 0.001), worsening PD symptoms (ß -0.08, 95% CI -0.15 to -0.01, p = 0.018), and sleep (ß -0.14, 95% CI -0.27 to 0, p = 0.044). Female PD patients reported a greater decrease in physical activity (ß 11.94, 95% CI 2.17-21.71, p = 0.017) and worse sleep (ß 10.76, 95% CI 2.81-18.70, p = 0.008). CONCLUSION: This large meta-analysis of PD patients in diverse populations identified a high prevalence of physical and mental worsening during the COVID-19 pandemic, with patients in lower-income countries being exceptionally vulnerable.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Parkinson Disease , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , Communicable Disease Control , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Parkinson Disease/complications , Parkinson Disease/epidemiology , Parkinson Disease/psychology
17.
Int J Ment Health Nurs ; 31(6): 1492-1502, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2001654

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 pandemic has had a great impact worldwide, specially affecting mental health and has undoubtedly taken part in human behaviour modification, increasing global health burden and with stress, anxiety and depression being the main contributors to this load. Because of the importance of this issue, the objective of this study was the creation of an explanatory model for the causal relationship of the main psychological variables: stress, anxiety and depression in the COVID-19 pandemic context. A cross-sectional study was carried out with a sample of 709 volunteers, sociodemographic variables and psychological symptoms were measured through a virtual DASS-21 questionnaire, during the COVID-19 pandemic, dated from November 2 to 6, 2020. A structural equation model using the weighted least squares means and the adjusted variance was employed for the creation and adjustment of the explanatory relational model. The results showed the presence of stress, anxiety and depression symptoms among the general population. The model showed an adequate fit (CFI = 0.94; TLI = 0.94; RMSEA = 0.06; P = 0.000) and was able to explain more than 80% of depressive symptoms (R2 = 0.86) and more than 70% of anxiety symptoms (R2 = 0.72), in addition to showing a unidirectional causal relationship of long-term stress on anxiety, and anxiety on depressive symptoms, showing a linked behaviour of the same, in the adjusted model. It was also outlined that this model was characterized by being expressed mainly in women, with lower quality of sleep and at a younger age.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Female , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Depression/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/psychology
18.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(16)2022 08 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1997583

ABSTRACT

Welfare recipients were often considered the least deserving of COVID-related support. Despite the recent attention paid to the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on mental health, few studies have explored the mental distress experienced by welfare recipients. This cross-sectional study on female Comprehensive Social Security Allowance recipients in Hong Kong aimed to explore their level of mental distress and its association with a range of risk factors specific to welfare recipients. Hence, 316 valid cases from a local community center responded to our online survey. We found that 52.3%, 23.4%, and 78% of the participants showed moderate to extremely severe depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms, respectively. A higher level of mental distress was associated with having a psychiatric diagnosis, poorer social, and greater concerns over disciplining children, the living environment, daily expenses and being infected by COVID-19. Unexpectedly, being married, having a permanent residence, and having a job were not significant protective factors for this group. The models explained 45.5%, 44.6%, and 52.5% of the overall variance in the level of depression, anxiety, and stress (p < 0.01), respectively. Our findings have important implications for supporting female welfare recipients during a public health crisis and may help frontline staff and professionals provide prompt assistance to this group in need.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Disorders , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Female , Hong Kong/epidemiology , Humans , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Security
19.
Iran J Med Sci ; 47(2): 131-138, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1994899

ABSTRACT

Background: During community-wide outbreaks, patients and their families may suffer from anxiety after making behavioral changes. This study aimed to investigate the anxiety, knowledge, and lived experiences of families with COVID-19 patients admitted to medical centers. Methods: The present multi-center study was conducted by a mixed method using convenient sampling in hospitalized COVID-19 patients in Firoozgar and Rajaie Hospitals between May and July 2020. Anxiety was measured using a short form of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. The participants' level of knowledge was assessed by an online questionnaire. The lived experiences of the families were explained through semi-structured interviews. Data were analyzed by Chi square, ANOVA, independent-samples t test, Kruskal Wallis, and Mann-Whitney tests in SPSS 16. P values≤0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: The mean age of the 324 family members, who participated in the study was 45.1±13.3 years. The mean anxiety score of the subjects was 13.5±4.1, and 63.6% of the participants had moderate to severe anxiety. The subjects' mean score for knowledge on COVID-19 was 7.15±1.32. The highest mean percentage of data received by the subjects on COVID-19 (42.7%) was obtained through radio and television broadcasting. A total of 251 important phrases were obtained from interview analysis and code extraction, out of which five main themes and 17 sub-themes were extracted. Conclusion: Our findings showed that anxiety was relatively high in families with COVID patients during the pandemic, and it was associated with age, sex, income, and familial relationships. The level of knowledge on the COVID-19 disease in families was moderate. Therefore, relevant interventions and raising people's awareness are recommended.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety Disorders , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Iran/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Research Design
20.
PLoS One ; 17(8): e0273176, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1993516

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Vulnerability for depression, anxiety and posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms due to perceived traumatic birth increase during the postpartum period. Traumatic birth has been defined as an event occurring during labour and birth that may be a serious threat to the life and safety of the mother and/or child. However, the comorbidity and multimorbidity of depression, anxiety and PTSD with their direct and indirect predictors is not well investigated in the postpartum period. In addition, the longitudinal directional association of depression, anxiety and PTSD with their comorbidities is not studied in Ethiopia. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess prevalence of postnatal comorbid and multimorbid anxiety, depression and PTSD. It also aimed to determine the directional association of postnatal anxiety, depression and PTSD with the comorbidity and multimorbidity of these mental health problems over time and to explore the factors that are directly or indirectly associated with comorbidity and multimorbidity of anxiety, depression and PTSD. METHODS: A total of 775 women were included at the first, second and third follow-up of the study (6th, 12th and 18th week of postpartum period) during October, 2020 -March, 2021. A cross-lagged autoregressive path analysis was carried out using Stata 16.0 software in order to determine the autoregressive and cross-lagged effects of depression, anxiety and PTSD with their comorbidities. In addition, a linear structural equation modelling was also carried out to determine the direct and indirect effects of independent variables on the comorbidities of depression, anxiety and PTSD. RESULTS: Comorbidity of anxiety with depression was the most common (14.5%, 12.1% and 8.1%) at the 6th, 12th and 18th week of postnatal period respectively. With regard to the direction of association, comorbidity of PTSD (due to perceived traumatic birth) with depression, PTSD with anxiety, depression with anxiety and triple comorbidity predicted depression and anxiety in subsequent waves of measurement. Direct and indirect maternal morbidity, fear of childbirth and perceived traumatic childbirth were found to have a direct and indirect positive association with comorbidities of depression, anxiety and PTSD. In contrast, higher parity, higher family size and higher social support had a direct and indirect negative association with these mental health disorders. CONCLUSION: Postnatal mental health screening, early diagnosis and treatment of maternal morbidities, developing encouraging strategies for social support and providing adequate information about birth procedures and response to mothers' needs during childbirth are essential to avert comorbidity of anxiety, depression and PTSD in the postpartum period.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , Depression, Postpartum/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/psychology , Comorbidity , Depression, Postpartum/etiology , Depression, Postpartum/psychology , Ethiopia/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Longitudinal Studies , Parturition/psychology , Postpartum Period/psychology , Pregnancy , Prevalence , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology
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