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1.
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova ; 123(4. Vyp. 2): 44-51, 2023.
Article in Russian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20234209

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To analyze neurological, psychological and psychiatric aspects of COVID-19, as well as to study the current state of the problem. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study included 103 patients with COVID-19. The main research method was clinical/psychopathological. To study the impact of activities related to the care of patients with COVID-19 in a hospital setting, the medical and psychological state of 197 hospital workers involved in the treatment of patients with COVID-19 was assessed. The level of anxiety distress was assessed with the Psychological Stress Scale (PSM-25), distress indicators corresponded to values of more than 100 points. The severity of anxiety and depressive symptoms was assessed using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). RESULTS: When considering psychopathological disorders in the context of COVID-19, it is necessary to distinguish between two main groups of disorders: mental disorders during the pandemic, and mental disorders directly caused by the causative agent SARS-CoV-2. The analysis of psychological and psychiatric aspects in various periods of the initial stage of COVID-19 showed that each of them was characterized by specific features depending on the nature of the influence of different pathogenic factors. In the structure of nosogenic mental disorders in patients with COVID-19 (103 patients), the following clinical forms were identified: acute reaction to stress (9.7%), anxiety-phobic disorders (41.7%), depressive symptoms (28.1%), hyponosognosic nosogenic reactions (20.5%). At the same time, the majority of the patients had manifestations of somatogenic asthenia (93.2%). A comparative analysis of neurological and psychological/psychiatric aspects of COVID-19 showed that the main mechanisms of the impact of highly contagious coronaviruses, including the SARS-CoV-2, on the central nervous system are: cerebral thrombosis and cerebral thromboembolism, damage to the neurovascular unit, neurodegeneration, including that induced by cytokines, and immune-mediated demyelinating nerve damage. CONCLUSION: Neurological and psychological/psychiatric aspects of COVID-19 should be taken into account both at the stage of disease treatment and in the post-infection period due to the pronounced neurotropism of SARS-CoV-2 and its effect on the neurovascular unit. Along with helping patients, an important aspect is the preservation of the mental health of medical personnel working in hospitals for infectious diseases, due to special working conditions and a high level of professional stress.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety Disorders , Mental Health , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Depression/psychology
2.
J Bras Pneumol ; 49(3): e20230056, 2023.
Article in English, Portuguese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20235727

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: COVID-19 has been associated with a significant burden to those who survive the acute phase. We aimed to describe the quality of life and symptoms of anxiety, depression, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) at 90 days after hospital discharge of COVID-19 patients. METHODS: Patients with COVID-19 admitted to a private hospital in the city of São Paulo, Brazil, between April of 2020 and April of 2021 were interviewed by telephone at 30 and 90 days after discharge to assess the quality of life and symptoms of depression, anxiety, and PTSD. RESULTS: A total of 2,138 patients were included. The mean age was 58.6 ± 15.8 years, and the median length of hospital stay was 9.0 (5.0-15.8) days. Between the two time points, depression increased from 3.1% to 7.2% (p < 0.001), anxiety increased from 3.2% to 6.2% (p < 0.001), and PTSD increased from 2.3% to 5.0% (p < 0.001). At least one physical symptom related to COVID-19 diagnosis persisted in 32% of patients at day 90. CONCLUSIONS: Persistence of physical symptoms was high even at 90 days after discharge. Although the prevalence of symptoms of anxiety, depression, and PTSD was low, these symptoms persisted for three months, with a significant increase between the time points. This finding indicates the need to identify at-risk patients so that they can be given an appropriate referral at discharge.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Adult , Middle Aged , Aged , Cohort Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Quality of Life , Brazil/epidemiology , COVID-19 Testing , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , Depression/epidemiology
3.
Disaster Med Public Health Prep ; 17: e403, 2023 06 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20244893

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study is aimed at investigating the relationships between religious practice, religious coping strategies, and mental health among Chinese Christians in the context of the COVID-19 outbreak. METHODS: A total of 915 participants from several cities in China completed online questionnaires, including sociodemographic data, mental disorder history, and years as a Christian, as well as frequency of weekly religious practice, Religious Coping Scale, the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), and the Generalized Anxiety Disorder scale (GAD-7). RESULTS: The result of multivariate analysis indicated that during the COVID-19 pandemic, among Chinese Christians without a history of mental disorder, negative religious coping were associated with depression, and anxiety symptoms. Among Chinese Christians with a history of mental disorders, comorbidity with 1 mental disorder, comorbidity with 2 or more mental disorders, negative religious coping, and positive religious coping were associated with depression symptoms. Comorbidity with 2 or more mental disorders, negative religious coping, and positive religious coping were associated with anxiety symptoms. CONCLUSION: Christians with a previous history of mental illness are more likely to experience anxiety during the epidemic. In the future, mental health services during disasters may put more attention on certain religious groups and provide more spiritual care to maintain their well-being accordingly.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , COVID-19 , Christianity , Pandemics , Humans , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Depression/psychology , East Asian People
4.
J Assoc Physicians India ; 71(3): 11-12, 2023 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2326841

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Prolonged use of N95 masks by healthcare workers might affect physical health due to mask-related hypoxia in addition to the psychological effects of N95 masks. We tried to explore the association of N95 mask-related hypoxia and headache with stress, quality of sleep, and anxiety in the current study. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The sample (N = 78) consisted of 41 doctors and 37 nurses involved in COVID-19 patient care and using N95 masks with or without PPE for at least 4 hours. Perceived stress scale (PSS), Coronavirus anxiety scale (CAS), and Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI) were administered, and physical parameters like heart rate and oxygen saturation (SpO2) were measured. RESULTS: Around 42% of the study participants experienced headaches after wearing an N95 mask and had a higher increase in heart rate (mean percent:10.5% vs 6.3%) and decline in SpO2 (mean percent: 2.6% vs 1.5%) compared to those who didn't develop a headache after N95 mask use. Independent samples t-test showed a mean difference for PSS and CAS between those who experienced headaches and those who didn't. The mean PSQI scores among the study participants were 8.91 ± 5.78; the score among those participants with and without headache was 10.57 ± 3.11 and 7.68 ± 2.53, respectively. CONCLUSION: Perceived corona anxiety, poor sleep quality, and corona anxiety are associated with N95-related headaches and SpO2 drop among health professionals who wear N95 masks for at least 4 hours.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Tension-Type Headache , Humans , N95 Respirators , Sleep Quality , Masks/adverse effects , Headache/etiology , Hypoxia/etiology , Patient Care , Health Personnel , Anxiety/etiology
5.
PLoS One ; 18(5): e0280338, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2320247

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Despite the known link between poor living conditions and mental health, there has been little research on the mental health of slum dwellers worldwide. Although the Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has led to an increase in mental health issues, little focus has been given to the impact on slum dwellers. The study aimed to investigate the association between recent COVID-19 diagnosis and the risk of depression and anxiety symptoms among people living in an urban slum in Uganda. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 284 adults (at least 18 years of age) in a slum settlement in Kampala, Uganda between April and May 2022. We assessed depression symptoms and anxiety using validated Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and Generalized Anxiety Disorder assessment tool (GAD-7) questionnaires respectively. We collected data on sociodemographic characteristics, and self-reported recent COVID-19 diagnosis (in the previous 30 days). Using a modified Poisson regression, adjusted for age, sex, gender and household income, we separately provided prevalence ratios and 95% confidence intervals for the associations between recent COVID-19 diagnosis and depressive and anxiety symptoms. RESULTS: Overall, 33.8% and 13.4% of the participants met the depression and generalized anxiety screening criteria respectively and 11.3% were reportedly diagnosed with COVID-19 in the previous 30 days. People with recent COVID-19 diagnosis were more likely to be depressed (53.1%) than those with no recent diagnosis (31.4%) (p<0.001). Participants who were recently diagnosed with COVID-19 reported higher prevalence of anxiety (34.4%) compared to those with no recent diagnosis of COVID-19 (10.7%) (p = 0.014). After adjusting for confounding, recent diagnosis with COVID-19 was associated with depression (PR = 1.60, 95% CI 1.09-2.34) and anxiety (PR = 2.83, 95% CI 1.50-5.31). CONCLUSION: This study suggests an increased risk of depressive symptoms and GAD in adults following a COVID-19 diagnosis. We recommend additional mental health support for recently diagnosed persons. The long-term of COVID-19 on mental health effects also need to be investigated.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Humans , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/diagnosis , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Poverty Areas , Cross-Sectional Studies , Uganda/epidemiology , COVID-19 Testing , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology
6.
JAMA Netw Open ; 6(5): e2312892, 2023 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2318716

ABSTRACT

Importance: The long-term consequences of COVID-19 on mental health are a critical issue given the number of people infected with SARS-CoV-2 worldwide since the beginning of the pandemic. Objective: To investigate the associations between self-reported COVID-19-like symptoms or SARS-CoV-2 seropositivity and subsequent depression or anxiety. Design, Setting, and Participants: This propensity score-matched cohort study began in May 2020, with follow-ups in November 2020 and July 2021. The study used data from a large, randomly selected, national population-based cohort from France, the EpiCoV (Epidémiologie et Conditions de Vie) study. Of 85 074 individuals 15 years or older who completed the questionnaires at the 3 collection times, 28 568 were excluded because they did not return a blood sample for serologic testing, 1994 because of missing data on outcomes or exposures, and 9252 to respect the temporal sequence (exposure must precede the outcome). Exposures: Propensity scores based on various socioeconomic, lifestyle, and health variables were computed to match participants who experienced COVID-19-like symptoms between February and November 2020 or showed SARS-CoV-2 seropositivity in November 2020. Main Outcomes and Measures: Logistic regression models were used to estimate associations between these occurrences and depression or anxiety assessed in July 2021 using the Patient Health Questionnaire 9-item and Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7-item scales, respectively. Results: Among the 45 260 included participants (mean [SD] age, 51.1 [18.9] years; 52.4% women; 8.0% with depression and 5.3% with anxiety in July 2021), COVID-19-like symptoms were associated with subsequent depression (adjusted odds ratio, 1.70; 95% CI, 1.45-1.99) and anxiety (adjusted OR, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.29-1.92), whereas SARS-CoV-2 seropositivity was not. Furthermore, COVID-19-like symptoms, but not anosmia or dysgeusia alone, were associated with subsequent depression and anxiety in both the seropositive and seronegative subgroups. Conclusions and Relevance: In this cohort study of more than 45 000 individuals drawn from the French general population, SARS-CoV-2 infection was not found as a risk factor of subsequent depression or anxiety. Moreover, self-reported COVID-19-like symptoms were associated with depression and anxiety assessed at least 8 months later in both seropositive and seronegative subgroups, suggesting that factors other than SARS-CoV-2 infection are implied in this association.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Female , Middle Aged , Male , COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Self Report , Cohort Studies , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology
7.
Disaster Med Public Health Prep ; 17: e410, 2023 05 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2316717

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Frontline healthcare workers (FHCWs) exposed to COVID-19 patients are at an increased risk of developing psychological burden. This study aims to determine the prevalence of mental health symptoms and associated factors among Mexican FHCWs attending COVID-19 patients. METHODS: FHCWs, including attending physicians, residents/fellows, and nurses providing care to COVID-19 patients at a private hospital in Monterrey, Mexico, were invited to answer an online survey between August 28, and November 30, 2020. Symptoms of depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress, and insomnia were evaluated with the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ)-9, Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD)-7, Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R), and Insomnia Severity Index (ISI). Multivariate analysis was performed to identify variables associated with each outcome. RESULTS: 131 FHCWs, 43.5% attending physicians, 19.8% residents/fellows, and 36.6% nurses were included. The overall prevalence of depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress, and insomnia was 36%, 21%, 23%, and 24% respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that residents/fellows and nurses reported more depression and insomnia than attending physicians. Although not significant, residents/fellows were more likely to experience all symptoms than nurses. CONCLUSIONS: Mexican FHCWs, especially nurses and residents/fellows, experienced a significant psychological burden while attending to COVID-19 patients. Tailored interventions providing support to FHCWs during future outbreaks are required.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/etiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Depression/psychology , Prevalence , Mexico/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/psychology , Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , Health Personnel/psychology , Hospitals
8.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 102(19): e33716, 2023 May 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2313152

ABSTRACT

It has been reported that during the coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, bronchiectasis patients were adversely affected due to their limited respiratory functions and acute exacerbations which were triggered by viral infections. The increased concern in the population during the pandemic has affected the attitudes of people toward avoiding disease and patients' treatment compliance. It is unclear whether treatment adherence and anxiety levels of bronchiectasis patients have changed during the pandemic. We aimed to evaluate treatment adherence and anxiety levels in patients with bronchiectasis. A cross-sectional survey was conducted between May and November 2021. A total of 123 patients with bronchiectasis and 110 adults without chronic diseases were included in the control group. Patient demographic information, bronchiectasis follow-up data, and COVID-19 history were recorded. Then, patients filled out "MARS-5 Index" (Medical Adherence Report Scale-5), Beck Anxiety Scale and the Effect of Events Scale (IES-R). Responses of questionnaires were statistically analyzed. Our results showed that the majority of patients with bronchiectasis had high Medical Adherence Report Scale-5 index total scores during the COVID-19 pandemic (86.2%). The total scores on the Beck Anxiety Scale of bronchiectasis patients who did not have COVID-19 were significantly higher than those who had COVID-19 (P = .04). The total scores on the IES-R were found to be significantly higher in the control group (P < .001). No significant difference was found in the total scores on the Beck Anxiety Scale between the patients and the control group. The bronchiectasis patients had high adherence to their current treatment during the COVID-19 period and were less affected by the pandemic and its psychological effects compared to the healthy population. Furthermore, individuals diagnosed with bronchiectasis who were not infected with COVID-19 demonstrated increased levels of anxiety compared to those who were infected with COVID-19 which may be due to their concern about contracting the disease.


Subject(s)
Bronchiectasis , COVID-19 , Adult , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Cross-Sectional Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/psychology , Patient Compliance , Bronchiectasis/complications , Bronchiectasis/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology
9.
Midwifery ; 123: 103727, 2023 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2312807

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Social capital means having resources and support in relationships and social ties. It can affect the individual's quality of life and mental health. The present study investigated the association between social capital with psychological status and quality of life among low-risk and high-risk pregnant women. METHODS: The present cross-sectional study was conducted with the participation of 394 pregnant women receiving prenatal care in urban comprehensive health centers in Qazvin, Iran. Two-stage sampling was used to select comprehensive health centers by random cluster sampling and then pregnant women randomly. Social capital, quality of life (QoL), psychological status, and demographic and obstetric characteristics were assessed. Uni-variable and multivariable linear regression models were used to analyze the data. RESULTS: Among the participants, 267 had low-risk pregnancies (67.77%) and the remainder were high-risk. The mean age of participants was 27.94 years (SD=5.86), the mean gestational age was 23.63 weeks (SD=7.71). The mean overall quality of life score among low-risk pregnant women was 32.00 (SD=5.27) and among high-risk pregnant women was 29.70 (SD=3.65). High-risk pregnant women experienced significantly higher anxiety and depression and fear of COVID-19. Social capital had a significant and weak relationship with anxiety among low-risk pregnant women (r = 0.22, p < 0.001). Also, a weak and significant relationship between social capital and anxiety (r = 0.24, p = 0.007), depression (r = 0.24, p = 0.007) and fear of COVID-19 (r = 0.27, p = 0.002) was found among high-risk pregnant women. CONCLUSION: Women with high-risk pregnancies experienced lower quality of life, higher anxiety and depression, and greater fear of COVID-19. There was also a weak relationship between social capital and the aforementioned variables among high-risk pregnant women. Designing and implementing interventions to increase quality of life and reduce anxiety and stress among high-risk pregnant women appears to be warranted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Social Capital , Female , Pregnancy , Humans , Adult , Infant , Pregnant Women/psychology , Quality of Life/psychology , Mental Health , Cross-Sectional Studies , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/psychology , Pregnancy, High-Risk , Depression/epidemiology
10.
Pediatr Pulmonol ; 58(7): 2025-2034, 2023 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2300991

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has spread across the world, leading to government measures associated with a negative impact on mental health. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of the pandemic on depression, anxiety and resilience in Dutch people with cystic fibrosis (PwCF) or primary ciliary dyskinesia (PwPCD) and their caregivers. METHODS: Adolescents (12-17 years) and caregivers of children (0-17 years) with CF, and adolescents, adults and caregivers of children with PCD completed questionnaires on depression, anxiety and resilience between September 2020 and February 2021. The psychosocial impact of COVID-19 was measured by the Exposure and Family Impact Survey (CEFIS) Part 2. Mixed model analyses compared depression and anxiety results to participants' prepandemic scores. RESULTS: One hundred ten participants (10 PwCF, 31 PwPCD, 52 CF caregivers, 17 PCD caregivers) completed questionnaires during the pandemic. Prepandemic outcomes were available for 87 participants. The prevalence of symptoms of depression and anxiety (PHQ-9 or GAD-7 scores ≥5) in PwCF and PwPCD and their caregivers before and during the pandemic was high, with an increase in depression in PwCF (2.75; 95% confidence interval: 0.82-4.68) and increase in anxiety in CF caregivers (1.03; 0.09-1.96) during the pandemic. Resilience was within the normal range for all groups, CEFIS scores corresponded to a low to normal impact. CONCLUSION: PwCF and PwPCD and their caregivers were at risk of elevated depression and anxiety symptoms both before and during the pandemic, which emphasizes the importance of mental health screening and psychological care in CF and PCD.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ciliary Motility Disorders , Cystic Fibrosis , Adult , Child , Adolescent , Humans , Caregivers/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Cystic Fibrosis/epidemiology , Pandemics , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/psychology , Ciliary Motility Disorders/complications
11.
Support Care Cancer ; 31(4): 213, 2023 Mar 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2298359

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To determine how participation in daily life is impacted during the first six months following a new cancer diagnosis and to identify risk factors for participation restrictions. Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) were used to suggest referrals to rehabilitation services. METHODS: Participants (n = 123) were adults (> 18 years) with the newly diagnosed primary brain, breast, colorectal, or lung cancer. PROs were collected at baseline (within 30 days of diagnosis/treatment initiation), two and five months post baseline. Daily life participation was assessed through the community participation indicators (CPI) (score range: 0-1) and patient-reported outcome measurement information system (PROMIS) ability to participate, (score range: 20-80; mean: 50, SD: 10). PROMIS-43 profile was also completed. Linear mixed-effect models with random intercept evaluated change in participation over time. RESULTS: The baseline total sample mean CPI score was 0.56; patients reported mildly impaired participation based on PROMIS scores (baseline: 46.19, 2-month follow-up: 44.81, 5 months: 44.84). However, no statistically significant changes in participation were observed over the study period. Risk factors for lower participation included receiving chemotherapy, lower physical function, higher anxiety and fatigue, and reduction in employment, p < 0.05. PROs indicated that roughly half of the participants may benefit from physical or occupational therapy or mental health support, but only 20-36% were referred by their medical team. CONCLUSION: People newly diagnosed with cancer experience impaired participation, but they are infrequently referred to supportive services such as rehabilitation. The use of PROs to assess participation, physical function, and mental health can promote access to supportive care services by identifying patients who may benefit from rehabilitation beyond those identified through routine clinical care.


Subject(s)
Neoplasms , Quality of Life , Adult , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Mental Health , Neoplasms/therapy , Anxiety/etiology
12.
Cir Cir ; 91(2): 247-252, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2297950

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID- 19 disease causes serious anxiety in healthcare workers. OBJECTIVE: This study was carried out to determine the relationship between the anxiety level of epidemic diseases and occupational satisfaction. METHOD: The "Disease Anxiety Scale," which consists of four subgroups and a total of 18 questions, and the "Vocational Satisfaction Scale," which consists of two subgroups and 20 questions, were utilized to investigate the relationship between epidemic disease anxiety and occupational satisfaction. The statistical analysis was performed using the SPSS 26.0 program. RESULTS: A total of 395 nurses were included in the study. The mean age of the participants was 33, and 63% were women. About 35.4% of the participants had deaths due to the COVID-19 pandemic in their family or close environment. It was determined that 83% of the nurses have a pandemic disease anxiety. Occupational satisfaction and epidemic anxiety level (p = 0.005, r = 0.560), pandemic (p = 0.01, r = 0.525), economic (p = 0.001, r = -0.473), quarantine (p = 0.003, r = -0.503), and social life (p = 0.003, r = -0.507) were found to be negatively correlated. There was no significant difference between job satisfaction (t = 0.286, p = 0.08) and epidemic anxiety (t = 1.312, p = 0.06) in terms of gender. CONCLUSION: Most health-care professionals experience serious anxiety, especially during the pandemic period.


ANTECEDENTES: La enfermedad de COVID- 19 causa ansiedad grave en los trabajadores de la salud. OBJETIVO: Determinar la relación entre el nivel de ansiedad de las enfermedades durante ña epidemia de COVID-19 y la satisfacción laboral. MÉTODO: Se utilizaron la Escala de Ansiedad por Enfermedad, que consta de cuatro subgrupos y un total de 18 preguntas, y la Escala de Satisfacción Vocacional, que consta de dos subgrupos y 20 preguntas, para investigar la relación entre la ansiedad por enfermedad epidémica y la satisfacción laboral. El análisis estadístico se realizó mediante el programa SPSS 26.0. RESULTADOS: La edad media de los participantes fue de 33 años y el 63% eran mujeres. El 35.4% de los participantes tuvieron muertes a causa de la pandemia de COVID-19 en su familia o entorno cercano. Se determinó que el 83% de los profesionales de enfermería tienen ansiedad por enfermedad pandémica. se Se encontraron correlacionados negativamente nivel de satisfacción laboral y ansiedad epidémica (p = 0.005, r = 0.560), pandemia (p = 0.01, r = 0.525), económica (p = 0.001, r = −0.473), cuarentena (p = 0.003, r = −0.503) y vida social (p = 0.003, r = −0.507). No hubo diferencia significativa entre la satisfacción laboral (t = 0.286, p = 0.08) y la ansiedad epidémica (t = 1.312, p = 0.06) en cuanto al sexo. CONCLUSIONES: La mayoría de los profesionales de la salud experimentan una ansiedad grave, en especial durante el período de pandemia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Female , Male , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Health Personnel , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology
13.
BMC Cancer ; 23(1): 262, 2023 Mar 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2297896

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Primary brain tumor (PBT) patients experience higher levels of distress and anxiety than other solid tumor patients, particularly at the time of clinical evaluation when uncertainty about disease status is high ("scanxiety"). There is promising evidence supporting use of virtual reality (VR) to target psychological symptoms in other solid tumor patients, though PBT patients have not been studied extensively in this context. The primary aim of this phase 2 clinical trial is to establish the feasibility of a remote VR-based relaxation intervention for a PBT population, with secondary aims designed to determine preliminary efficacy of improving distress and anxiety symptoms. METHODS: PBT patients (N = 120) with upcoming MRI scans and clinical appointments who meet eligibility will be recruited to participate in a single arm trial conducted remotely through the NIH. Following completion of baseline assessments, participants will complete a 5-min VR intervention via telehealth using a head-mounted immersive device while under supervision of the research team. Following the intervention, over the course of 1 month patients can use VR at their discretion with follow-up assessments done immediately post-VR intervention, as well as 1 week and 4 weeks later. Additionally, a qualitative phone interview will be conducted to assess patient satisfaction with the intervention. DISCUSSION: Use of immersive VR is an innovative interventional approach to target distress and scanxiety symptoms in PBT patients who are at high risk for experiencing these symptoms leading into their clinical appointments. Findings from this study may inform design of a future multicenter randomized VR trial for PBT patients and may aid in development of similar interventions for other oncology populations. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov (NCT04301089), registered 9 March 2020.


Subject(s)
Brain Neoplasms , Virtual Reality Exposure Therapy , Humans , Virtual Reality Exposure Therapy/methods , Feasibility Studies , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/therapy , Anxiety Disorders , Brain Neoplasms/therapy , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Multicenter Studies as Topic , Clinical Trials, Phase II as Topic
14.
Midwifery ; 122: 103700, 2023 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2296785

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this phenomenological study is to understand mothers' lived pregnancy experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic. DESIGN: A qualitative, phenomenological study SETTING: Participants completed the demographic survey online and semi-structured interviews, via video conferencing between November and December 2021 PARTICIPANTS: A sample of 28 mothers who were pregnant during the COVID-19 pandemic participated in the study. METHODS AND RESULTS: An inductive, thematic approach was used to analyze the data. Two central themes and eight subthemes emerged from the six-phase thematic analysis. The first central theme, Depth of Knowledge About COVID-19, included the following subthemes: 1) Vaccines and 2) Uncertainty for Exposure. The second central theme, Impacts of COVID-19, had six subthemes: 1) Types of Support Received, 2) COVID-19 Restrictions, 3) Childcare, 4) Mental Health, 5) Spending More Time at Home, and 6) Isolation. CONCLUSIONS: Findings of this study revealed mothers experienced a significant amount of stress and anxiety related to the coronavirus pandemic during their pregnancy. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Our findings highlight the need to provide pregnant mothers comprehensive care, including mental health services, adequate access to social support, and providing clear information regarding COVID-19 vaccination and its impacts on pregnancy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mothers , Female , Pregnancy , Humans , United States , Mothers/psychology , Pandemics , COVID-19 Vaccines , Anxiety/etiology , Fear , Qualitative Research
15.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 102(14): e33487, 2023 Apr 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2294805

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic is a major health care catastrophe that affects people's physical and mental well-being worldwide. Medical students are at an increased risk of mental health hazards during the COVID-19 pandemic. Sulaiman Al Rajhi University (SRU), the site of our study, is located in Qassim province in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. We conducted this study to assess the prevalence of depression, stress and anxiety symptoms among SRU medical students during the quarantine and while learning online shortly after the announcement of documented COVID-19 cases in Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. In this cross-sectional study, an online questionnaire was sent to all medical students of SRU; 278 students responded (71%). We collected participants' demographic, socioeconomic, and academic data. The Depression, Anxiety, and Stress scale and the Fear of COVID-19 Scale were used as the validated mental health assessment tools. Depression, anxiety and stress symptoms were found in 23%, 11%, and 6% of students, respectively. Females were more likely to have anxiety (P = .03) than males. Students who had close contact with COVID-19 cases, those whose lives were affected by COVID-19, and those with poor socioeconomic status had significantly higher levels of stress, anxiety, and depression compared to their counterparts (P = .004, .01, .01, respectively). Students from high-viral-load areas, unmarried students, and those who did not live with their families were more stressed (P = .06, .01, .01, respectively). The Fear of COVID-19 Scale was positively correlated with all Depression, Anxiety, and Stress components (depression: r = 0.36, anxiety: r = 0.45, and stress: r = 0.39, P < .001 for all). Medical students, especially female students, are at an increased risk of developing depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms with increased COVID-19 fear during the pandemic. The study highlights the importance of mental health screening for female students, students of low socioeconomic status, and relatives of COVID-19 cases. Our findings could help institutions adjust mental health services in the future amid such pandemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Medical , Male , Humans , Female , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Depression/etiology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Anxiety/etiology
16.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 102(14): e33464, 2023 Apr 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2303353

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients with COVID-19 will experience high levels of anxiety and depression and poor levels of sleep and quality of life (QoL) due to isolation treatment and uncertain outcomes. Progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) exercises show promising treatment effects on mental health and sleep problems and overall QoL in COVID-19 patients. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of PMR exercises in patients with COVID-19. METHODS: Both experimental and non-experimental studies related to PMR and COVID-19 were systematically searched in the PubMed, Cochrane Library, PEDro and HINARI databases for studies published from the occurrence of the pandemic to December 2022. Study selection, methodological quality assessment and data extraction were carried out by 2 independent authors. Efficacy outcomes were evaluated for sleep quality, anxiety, depression, and QoL. The safety outcomes were evaluated based on adverse events reported. Review manager (RevMan 5.4, Cochrane collaboration) was used for the data analysis. RESULTS: Four studies with 227 subjects were included in this systematic review. The pooled results indicated that PMR interventions improved the sleep quality score standardized mean difference (SMD): -0.23; 95% confidence interval (CI): -0.54, 0.07; P = .13, level of anxiety SMD: -1.35; 95% CI -2.38, -0.32; P = .01 compared to the usual care. Depression level, disease severity and QoL were also improved following PMR interventions. Only 1 study reported worsening of 1 patient clinical status while all other studies did not report any adverse events during the interventions. CONCLUSIONS: PMR interventions can improve the sleep quality, anxiety, depression, disease severity and QoL in patients with mild to moderate COVID-19 in a short-term period compared to the usual care. However, there was indecision about the safety and long-term effects of PMR.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quality of Life , Humans , Autogenic Training , Depression/therapy , Depression/psychology , COVID-19/therapy , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/therapy , Anxiety/psychology
17.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(8)2023 04 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2302910

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has caused unprecedented stress on healthcare professionals worldwide. Since resilience and mentalizing capacity play very important preventive roles when it comes to mental health, the main goal of this study was to determine whether the capacity for mentalizing and resilience could explain the levels of depression, anxiety, and stress among healthcare workers during the COVID-19 pandemic. The study was conducted in Serbia on a sample of 406 healthcare workers (141 doctors and 265 nurses) aged 19 to 65 (M = 40.11, SD = 9.41). The participants' mental health status was evaluated using the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale-DASS-42. The Reflective Functioning Questionnaire was used to evaluate the capacity for mentalizing. Resilience was assessed using the Brief Resilience Scale. The results of the correlation analysis showed that there were negative correlations between resilience and all three dimensions of mental health status: depression, anxiety, and stress. Hypermentalizing was negatively correlated with depression, anxiety, and stress, while hypomentalizing was positively correlated. Hierarchical linear regression analysis showed that both resilience and hypermentalizing were significant negative predictors of depression, anxiety, and stress, and that hypomentalizing was a significant positive predictor of depression, anxiety, and stress. Furthermore, socioeconomic status was a significant negative predictor of depression, anxiety, and stress. Marital status, number of children, and work environment were not statistically significant predictors of any of the three dimensions of mental health status among the healthcare workers in this study. There is an urgent need to establish and implement strategies to foster resilience and enhance the capacity for mentalizing among healthcare workers in order to minimize the devastating effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on mental health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mentalization , Child , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Health Personnel/psychology , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , Health Status
18.
Rev Colomb Psiquiatr (Engl Ed) ; 52(1): 51-57, 2023.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2302477

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic has represented an extraordinary challenge for health workers as they care for others while exposing themselves to contagion. Doctors, nurses, therapists and other non-care staff in clinics and hospitals are asked to be prepared to work in particularly complex and stressful situations, which makes them vulnerable to mental health problems. OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence and clinical characteristics of anxiety and depression symptoms in staff working at a health institution in Medellin, Colombia. METHODS: Observational, descriptive and cross-sectional study, based on a survey designed for the investigation, which included two scales to screen depression and anxiety symptoms, as well as sociodemographic variables. RESULTS: A total of 1,247 workers from the health institution were included. Of these, 14.6% reported symptoms of depression and 18.5% of clinically significant anxiety. A higher proportion of moderate to severe depression and anxiety symptoms was found in those working face to face. CONCLUSIONS: Anxiety and depression symptoms are highly prevalent among staff at a health institution in Medellin, Colombia, during the COVID-19 pandemic. Given the vital role of the health sector in times of pandemic, the development of mental health programmes that address the problems of this population should be considered a priority.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/psychology , Pandemics , Depression/diagnosis , Depression/epidemiology , Prevalence , Cross-Sectional Studies , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology
19.
Pediatr Int ; 64(1): e15009, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2287466

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a chronic disease causing recurrent respiratory tract infections. Viral respiratory tract infections are more severe in CF. The first case of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was seen in Turkey on March 11, 2020, and nationwide school closure and lockdown were implemented. School closure and home confinement might have adverse effects on children's physical and mental health. In this study, we aimed to compare the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on psychological reactions of CF patients and healthy controls. METHODS: This is a controlled cross-sectional study including 7-18-year-old children with CF. The survey included questions regarding family environment and peer relations, self-care, and psychological reactions to the COVID-19 pandemic. The questionnaire was administered to children via telephone calls under parental supervision. RESULTS: We evaluated 132 CF patients and 135 of their healthy peers. Mean age was 11.5 ± 2.9 years in the CF group and 11.8 ± 3.2 years in the control group (P = 0.98). There were 55 girls (41.7%) in the CF group and 81 girls (60%) in the control group (P = 0.027). The socioeconomic status of their families was similar. The CF patients were found to be less anxious for family members at risk of COVID-19, less upset about school closure, and less anxious about the COVID-19 pandemic (P < 0.001, 0.02, 0.01, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Cystic fibrosis patients seem to show more resilience in coping with the pandemic. Appropriate psychological support should be provided to them and resilience strategies in coping with the pandemic should be nurtured.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cystic Fibrosis , Adolescent , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Cystic Fibrosis/complications , Cystic Fibrosis/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics
20.
Encephale ; 48(6): 668-673, 2022 Dec.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2251928

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has caused a major health crisis and the quarantine of most of the planet's population. During confinement, anxiety symptoms may appear. The pandemic dramatically changes the lives of individuals by becoming a concrete manifestation of the threat. Constant exposure to information about the virus can increase anxiety, especially since the information may be erroneous or contradictory. This article examines the factors that predict student anxiety in the context of a pandemic. METHOD: The quantitative study involves a sample of 445 students from the University of Quebec in Abitibi-Témiscamingue. Anxiety was measured using the Beck Anxiety Inventory, and several sociodemographic variables were tested. RESULTS: The results demonstrated the effects of certain variables on anxiety, especially for women and non-binary people, were more marked than for men. Having dependent children has proven to be a protective factor. CONCLUSION: The study suggests that this variability is now considered when proposing intervention measures in a containment context. The limitations and perspectives of the study are presented and analyzed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Child , Male , Female , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Anxiety/etiology , Students
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